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Thread: Kendrick Green

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadman View Post
    Might need to pay more attention to guys Matt Williamson points out in the future
    i'm not sure who he was a scout for (i'm guessing steelers)

    but i'm sure he's still tight with a few of his former colleagues.


    it was the first time i tuned in for his opinions. it won't be the last, he had a great inside view of things

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iron City Inc. View Post
    In our division we face some HUGE DT's. If Green can knock these dudes on the back n open some holes I'm all in. Some of those guys are much bigger and much heavier. A tall task indeed. Browns have Billings who is 328lbs, Baltimore has Justin Ellis 350lbs, Brandon Williams 336lbs n Calais Campbell at 6 8 and over 300.
    Perhaps Green can do it. Perhaps he needs to gain some weight to do it we shall see.
    Maybe not a stellar example of a people mover but Pouncey was the same weight as Green and survived a decade in the AFCN (although maybe the last 3 or 4 weren't great).

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northern_Blitz View Post
    For another Toronto centric example: The Leafs saw something in Justin Pogge that made them want to keep him over Tuukka Rask.

    Sometimes the something you see is something you want to be there that isn't. That's why it's good to have a broad set of inputs. To cancel out your lying eyes.

    I don't know if Green is Bautista or Pogge. Probably he's somewhere in between (hopefully MUCH closer to Bautista).
    Feeling like "Lazlo Holmes" right about now:

    Last edited by Captain Lemming; 05-03-2021 at 09:11 PM.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Lemming View Post
    Feeling like "Lazlo Holmes" right about now:

    it's cold!

    that's what's up
    Steel Maniac predicted no RBs would be chosen in the 1st round, so of course we selected:

    1(24) Najee Harris RB Alabama


  5. #85
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    Interesting comment just now from Kevin Colbert to @StanLoveTheShow, saying the Steelers believed that if third-round pick Kendrick Green had played more center in college he might’ve been drafted even higher. They think he’s just scratching the surface and it’s his best spot.

    — Brian Batko (@BrianBatko) May 3, 2021
    Steel Maniac predicted no RBs would be chosen in the 1st round, so of course we selected:

    1(24) Najee Harris RB Alabama


  6. #86
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    wolfley's thoughts
    To do that, you need attitude. So when Steelers offensive line coach Adrian Klemm addressed the media and offered the buzz word “Demeanor,” while describing third-round draft pick Kendrick Gr was all ears.


    If last year showed us anything, you gotta move 'em, you can’t ask ’em “to move a man from A to B against his will,” as offered by Russ Grimm, echoing his college coach and Pitt great Joe Moore.
    It's the lost art of people-moving.
    Things have changed, my friends. I know in my heart of hearts it’s for the better, but at the same time it feels as if everything that developed you, tested you, made you tougher, has been taken away: Oklahoma drills, padded practices, two-a-days, long training camps, Highlander pass pro (one-on-one’s, there can be only one) - all of those markers along the way that let you know where you stood in the pack of alpha males.
    So, it was with great interest that I settled into some serious film study of Green. And I have to tell you that it was like watching a throwback film to the “days of yore.”


    From my notes:
    * Powerful hamhocks and core. Plays the “under and up” leverage game well. He’s obviously an adherent to the “ask no quarter, give no quarter” school of mayhem. His “demeanor,” to quote Klemm, is that of the '80s or '90s, when the emphasis was on getting movement and finishing your block. And it was more of a personal thing than anything else. This guy finishes like I do on steak night at Golden Corral.
    * Keeps his head on a swivel during twist stunts on passes. Didn’t get ear-holed the way I did when I was a young buck. We had a saying, back in the day, “Something going away; something’s coming back.” It was a reminder on twist stunts that just because your man was going away, don’t be lulled into not seeing someone coming back at you. Not to worry, Kendrick already has it figured out.
    * What I really loved was Green going out of his way to help out his wingman and drill a guy. We used to refer to it as “snipering” a guy while using the Belushi technique (reference to “Animal House” when John Belushi was scoping out Dean Wormer’s office). Literally, Green, finding no one in his “fly-zone” at LG, roared down and T-boned the man bull-rushing over the OC and dropped him like a bad habit. He’s a one-man demolition derby.
    * Shows excellent ability to “drop anchor” on a bull rush. Using natural, God-given leverage, Green seems comfortable in grinding bull-rushes to a halt. Again, going back to his 6-2 height, being a squat monster can be a huge positive when guys are trying to test your chin.
    * While playing OG, and facing a bubble, Green showed good body control and patience as he climbed to the second level. And, well, there’s really no technical term to describe this, so I’ll just say what my notes say: He physically “assaulted” the ILB playing over him, and did so while keeping his feet under him as the hamhocks engaged in four-wheel drive. Love it.


    * I don’t know Green’s athletic background, but it wouldn’t surprise me if he’s done some “wrasslin.” Watching his body mechanics and the way he moves when engaging in stand-up grappling reminded me of the late, great Carlton Haselrig. Displaying tremendous balance sensitivity, Carlton could tell when he had his opponent off-balance. And as soon as he felt his opponent get a little out of kilter, it was Slam City. I had similar thoughts as I watched Green finish off some of his opponents. Green even seemed proficient in rag-dolling (using a push-pull technique) in some of his finishing efforts.
    * I haven’t seen enough on his open-field search-and-destroy modes of destruction. Being able to assess the “lay of the land” while on the pull takes some time, but from everything I’ve seen thus far it shouldn’t take too long to get up to speed when he hoofs it.
    * Run or pass, he works his hands inside very well, and technically looks to be proficient and aware of his hand placement. He could stand to do a little violent hand work with punch pads in the offseason, which would help his passing of guys off on twist stunts. Some young guys take a couple years of learning to be aware of their hand placement. Green looks to be there already.
    * I was also impressed with his innate ability to stay on the same level as his wingman, whether he’s playing OC or OG. If you get too staggered in pass pro, guys are susceptible to getting picked on the twists.
    (I can tell you stories of our younger years, when Tunch Ilkin and I were playing side by side; and he didn’t protect my hip and I got drilled. Oh, how he laughed in the huddle. I wanted to kill him.)
    At first glance, overall, I love the pick. But as with everything else, it’s wait-and-see until he straps it up with the big boys.
    Green’s demeanor shows through in his attention to detail and dedication to dishing out dirt naps, even to “the echo of the whistle the next valley over.”
    You have to love that kind of “Demeanor.”

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ-STEELER View Post
    wolfley's thoughts
    To do that, you need attitude. So when Steelers offensive line coach Adrian Klemm addressed the media and offered the buzz word “Demeanor,” while describing third-round draft pick Kendrick Gr was all ears.


    If last year showed us anything, you gotta move 'em, you can’t ask ’em “to move a man from A to B against his will,” as offered by Russ Grimm, echoing his college coach and Pitt great Joe Moore.
    It's the lost art of people-moving.
    Things have changed, my friends. I know in my heart of hearts it’s for the better, but at the same time it feels as if everything that developed you, tested you, made you tougher, has been taken away: Oklahoma drills, padded practices, two-a-days, long training camps, Highlander pass pro (one-on-one’s, there can be only one) - all of those markers along the way that let you know where you stood in the pack of alpha males.
    So, it was with great interest that I settled into some serious film study of Green. And I have to tell you that it was like watching a throwback film to the “days of yore.”


    From my notes:
    * Powerful hamhocks and core. Plays the “under and up” leverage game well. He’s obviously an adherent to the “ask no quarter, give no quarter” school of mayhem. His “demeanor,” to quote Klemm, is that of the '80s or '90s, when the emphasis was on getting movement and finishing your block. And it was more of a personal thing than anything else. This guy finishes like I do on steak night at Golden Corral.
    * Keeps his head on a swivel during twist stunts on passes. Didn’t get ear-holed the way I did when I was a young buck. We had a saying, back in the day, “Something going away; something’s coming back.” It was a reminder on twist stunts that just because your man was going away, don’t be lulled into not seeing someone coming back at you. Not to worry, Kendrick already has it figured out.
    * What I really loved was Green going out of his way to help out his wingman and drill a guy. We used to refer to it as “snipering” a guy while using the Belushi technique (reference to “Animal House” when John Belushi was scoping out Dean Wormer’s office). Literally, Green, finding no one in his “fly-zone” at LG, roared down and T-boned the man bull-rushing over the OC and dropped him like a bad habit. He’s a one-man demolition derby.
    * Shows excellent ability to “drop anchor” on a bull rush. Using natural, God-given leverage, Green seems comfortable in grinding bull-rushes to a halt. Again, going back to his 6-2 height, being a squat monster can be a huge positive when guys are trying to test your chin.
    * While playing OG, and facing a bubble, Green showed good body control and patience as he climbed to the second level. And, well, there’s really no technical term to describe this, so I’ll just say what my notes say: He physically “assaulted” the ILB playing over him, and did so while keeping his feet under him as the hamhocks engaged in four-wheel drive. Love it.


    * I don’t know Green’s athletic background, but it wouldn’t surprise me if he’s done some “wrasslin.” Watching his body mechanics and the way he moves when engaging in stand-up grappling reminded me of the late, great Carlton Haselrig. Displaying tremendous balance sensitivity, Carlton could tell when he had his opponent off-balance. And as soon as he felt his opponent get a little out of kilter, it was Slam City. I had similar thoughts as I watched Green finish off some of his opponents. Green even seemed proficient in rag-dolling (using a push-pull technique) in some of his finishing efforts.
    * I haven’t seen enough on his open-field search-and-destroy modes of destruction. Being able to assess the “lay of the land” while on the pull takes some time, but from everything I’ve seen thus far it shouldn’t take too long to get up to speed when he hoofs it.
    * Run or pass, he works his hands inside very well, and technically looks to be proficient and aware of his hand placement. He could stand to do a little violent hand work with punch pads in the offseason, which would help his passing of guys off on twist stunts. Some young guys take a couple years of learning to be aware of their hand placement. Green looks to be there already.
    * I was also impressed with his innate ability to stay on the same level as his wingman, whether he’s playing OC or OG. If you get too staggered in pass pro, guys are susceptible to getting picked on the twists.
    (I can tell you stories of our younger years, when Tunch Ilkin and I were playing side by side; and he didn’t protect my hip and I got drilled. Oh, how he laughed in the huddle. I wanted to kill him.)
    At first glance, overall, I love the pick. But as with everything else, it’s wait-and-see until he straps it up with the big boys.
    Green’s demeanor shows through in his attention to detail and dedication to dishing out dirt naps, even to “the echo of the whistle the next valley over.”
    You have to love that kind of “Demeanor.”
    I love this analysis!! Wolf has got me jacked about this guy!!!


  8. #88
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    Not only will he play this year, he will kill someone with his bare hands while blocking them...

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ-STEELER View Post
    wolfley's thoughts
    To do that, you need attitude. So when Steelers offensive line coach Adrian Klemm addressed the media and offered the buzz word “Demeanor,” while describing third-round draft pick Kendrick Gr was all ears.


    If last year showed us anything, you gotta move 'em, you can’t ask ’em “to move a man from A to B against his will,” as offered by Russ Grimm, echoing his college coach and Pitt great Joe Moore.
    It's the lost art of people-moving.
    Things have changed, my friends. I know in my heart of hearts it’s for the better, but at the same time it feels as if everything that developed you, tested you, made you tougher, has been taken away: Oklahoma drills, padded practices, two-a-days, long training camps, Highlander pass pro (one-on-one’s, there can be only one) - all of those markers along the way that let you know where you stood in the pack of alpha males.
    So, it was with great interest that I settled into some serious film study of Green. And I have to tell you that it was like watching a throwback film to the “days of yore.”


    From my notes:
    * Powerful hamhocks and core. Plays the “under and up” leverage game well. He’s obviously an adherent to the “ask no quarter, give no quarter” school of mayhem. His “demeanor,” to quote Klemm, is that of the '80s or '90s, when the emphasis was on getting movement and finishing your block. And it was more of a personal thing than anything else. This guy finishes like I do on steak night at Golden Corral.
    * Keeps his head on a swivel during twist stunts on passes. Didn’t get ear-holed the way I did when I was a young buck. We had a saying, back in the day, “Something going away; something’s coming back.” It was a reminder on twist stunts that just because your man was going away, don’t be lulled into not seeing someone coming back at you. Not to worry, Kendrick already has it figured out.
    * What I really loved was Green going out of his way to help out his wingman and drill a guy. We used to refer to it as “snipering” a guy while using the Belushi technique (reference to “Animal House” when John Belushi was scoping out Dean Wormer’s office). Literally, Green, finding no one in his “fly-zone” at LG, roared down and T-boned the man bull-rushing over the OC and dropped him like a bad habit. He’s a one-man demolition derby.
    * Shows excellent ability to “drop anchor” on a bull rush. Using natural, God-given leverage, Green seems comfortable in grinding bull-rushes to a halt. Again, going back to his 6-2 height, being a squat monster can be a huge positive when guys are trying to test your chin.
    * While playing OG, and facing a bubble, Green showed good body control and patience as he climbed to the second level. And, well, there’s really no technical term to describe this, so I’ll just say what my notes say: He physically “assaulted” the ILB playing over him, and did so while keeping his feet under him as the hamhocks engaged in four-wheel drive. Love it.


    * I don’t know Green’s athletic background, but it wouldn’t surprise me if he’s done some “wrasslin.” Watching his body mechanics and the way he moves when engaging in stand-up grappling reminded me of the late, great Carlton Haselrig. Displaying tremendous balance sensitivity, Carlton could tell when he had his opponent off-balance. And as soon as he felt his opponent get a little out of kilter, it was Slam City. I had similar thoughts as I watched Green finish off some of his opponents. Green even seemed proficient in rag-dolling (using a push-pull technique) in some of his finishing efforts.
    * I haven’t seen enough on his open-field search-and-destroy modes of destruction. Being able to assess the “lay of the land” while on the pull takes some time, but from everything I’ve seen thus far it shouldn’t take too long to get up to speed when he hoofs it.
    * Run or pass, he works his hands inside very well, and technically looks to be proficient and aware of his hand placement. He could stand to do a little violent hand work with punch pads in the offseason, which would help his passing of guys off on twist stunts. Some young guys take a couple years of learning to be aware of their hand placement. Green looks to be there already.
    * I was also impressed with his innate ability to stay on the same level as his wingman, whether he’s playing OC or OG. If you get too staggered in pass pro, guys are susceptible to getting picked on the twists.
    (I can tell you stories of our younger years, when Tunch Ilkin and I were playing side by side; and he didn’t protect my hip and I got drilled. Oh, how he laughed in the huddle. I wanted to kill him.)
    At first glance, overall, I love the pick. But as with everything else, it’s wait-and-see until he straps it up with the big boys.
    Green’s demeanor shows through in his attention to detail and dedication to dishing out dirt naps, even to “the echo of the whistle the next valley over.”
    You have to love that kind of “Demeanor.”
    I'll go with Wolfley's assessment, He obvious see lots to like

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ-STEELER View Post
    wolfley's thoughts
    To do that, you need attitude. So when Steelers offensive line coach Adrian Klemm addressed the media and offered the buzz word “Demeanor,” while describing third-round draft pick Kendrick Gr was all ears.


    If last year showed us anything, you gotta move 'em, you can’t ask ’em “to move a man from A to B against his will,” as offered by Russ Grimm, echoing his college coach and Pitt great Joe Moore.
    It's the lost art of people-moving.
    Things have changed, my friends. I know in my heart of hearts it’s for the better, but at the same time it feels as if everything that developed you, tested you, made you tougher, has been taken away: Oklahoma drills, padded practices, two-a-days, long training camps, Highlander pass pro (one-on-one’s, there can be only one) - all of those markers along the way that let you know where you stood in the pack of alpha males.
    So, it was with great interest that I settled into some serious film study of Green. And I have to tell you that it was like watching a throwback film to the “days of yore.”


    From my notes:
    * Powerful hamhocks and core. Plays the “under and up” leverage game well. He’s obviously an adherent to the “ask no quarter, give no quarter” school of mayhem. His “demeanor,” to quote Klemm, is that of the '80s or '90s, when the emphasis was on getting movement and finishing your block. And it was more of a personal thing than anything else. This guy finishes like I do on steak night at Golden Corral.
    * Keeps his head on a swivel during twist stunts on passes. Didn’t get ear-holed the way I did when I was a young buck. We had a saying, back in the day, “Something going away; something’s coming back.” It was a reminder on twist stunts that just because your man was going away, don’t be lulled into not seeing someone coming back at you. Not to worry, Kendrick already has it figured out.
    * What I really loved was Green going out of his way to help out his wingman and drill a guy. We used to refer to it as “snipering” a guy while using the Belushi technique (reference to “Animal House” when John Belushi was scoping out Dean Wormer’s office). Literally, Green, finding no one in his “fly-zone” at LG, roared down and T-boned the man bull-rushing over the OC and dropped him like a bad habit. He’s a one-man demolition derby.
    * Shows excellent ability to “drop anchor” on a bull rush. Using natural, God-given leverage, Green seems comfortable in grinding bull-rushes to a halt. Again, going back to his 6-2 height, being a squat monster can be a huge positive when guys are trying to test your chin.
    * While playing OG, and facing a bubble, Green showed good body control and patience as he climbed to the second level. And, well, there’s really no technical term to describe this, so I’ll just say what my notes say: He physically “assaulted” the ILB playing over him, and did so while keeping his feet under him as the hamhocks engaged in four-wheel drive. Love it.


    * I don’t know Green’s athletic background, but it wouldn’t surprise me if he’s done some “wrasslin.” Watching his body mechanics and the way he moves when engaging in stand-up grappling reminded me of the late, great Carlton Haselrig. Displaying tremendous balance sensitivity, Carlton could tell when he had his opponent off-balance. And as soon as he felt his opponent get a little out of kilter, it was Slam City. I had similar thoughts as I watched Green finish off some of his opponents. Green even seemed proficient in rag-dolling (using a push-pull technique) in some of his finishing efforts.
    * I haven’t seen enough on his open-field search-and-destroy modes of destruction. Being able to assess the “lay of the land” while on the pull takes some time, but from everything I’ve seen thus far it shouldn’t take too long to get up to speed when he hoofs it.
    * Run or pass, he works his hands inside very well, and technically looks to be proficient and aware of his hand placement. He could stand to do a little violent hand work with punch pads in the offseason, which would help his passing of guys off on twist stunts. Some young guys take a couple years of learning to be aware of their hand placement. Green looks to be there already.
    * I was also impressed with his innate ability to stay on the same level as his wingman, whether he’s playing OC or OG. If you get too staggered in pass pro, guys are susceptible to getting picked on the twists.
    (I can tell you stories of our younger years, when Tunch Ilkin and I were playing side by side; and he didn’t protect my hip and I got drilled. Oh, how he laughed in the huddle. I wanted to kill him.)
    At first glance, overall, I love the pick. But as with everything else, it’s wait-and-see until he straps it up with the big boys.
    Green’s demeanor shows through in his attention to detail and dedication to dishing out dirt naps, even to “the echo of the whistle the next valley over.”
    You have to love that kind of “Demeanor.”
    Aside from going blind with the font color, this is a great synopsis of Green. As I posted before, Williamson on SNR said Green "is the kind of player that wears on you.....by the end of the game you want nothing to do with him".

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