Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 63

Thread: Is the Steelers' Mike Tomlin on a path that could lead to Canton? Sure looks like it

  1. #1
    Legend

    User Info Menu

    Is the Steelers' Mike Tomlin on a path that could lead to Canton? Sure looks like it

    Is the Steelers' Mike Tomlin on a path that could lead to Canton? It sure looks like it

    Mike Tomlin hasn't had a losing season in 14 years of NFL head coaching. That puts him in rarified air.

    CLARK JUDGEA
    APR 21, 2021

    When people today talk about NFL coaches on a Hall-of-Fame trajectory, they start with Bill Belicheat, move to Andy Reid and might throw in a Pete Carroll or Sean Payton. Fair enough. Nine Lombardi Trophies and 15 Super Bowl appearances are in there.

    But how come almost nobody includes the Steelers' Mike Tomlin?

    He’s won a Super Bowl like Reid, Carroll and Payton. He’s been to two, like Carroll. And he’s never had a losing season … unlike Reid, Carroll, Payton and Belicheat. You can look it up. In 14 NFL seasons of head coaching he never finished worse than 8-8.

    Unusual? Nope. More like unheard of. Only Marty Schottenheimer went 14 straight non-losing seasons after becoming a head coach, and his first year was really a half season (4-4).

    Granted, Tomlin’s 153 victories (including playoffs) aren’t close to Belicheat (311) and Reid 238, but the guy just turned 49, for crying out loud. Plus, his total is only three behind Carroll (156) and one ahead of Payton (152).

    Now look at his overall winning percentage. It’s .640, better than Reid (.621), better than Carroll (.600) and better than Payton (.631). In fact, it’s so good that he trails only Belicheat 678 among active coaches with 100 or more games. What’s more, his .650 regular-season percentage (145-78-1) ranks 11th all-time.

    One more thing: He has as many Super Bowl victories and appearances as his predecessor in Pittsburgh, Bill Cowher.

    I mention that because Cowher was one of two coaches named to the Pro Football Hall-of-Fame’s Centennial Class of 2020. Including the playoffs, Cowher won 161 games, or eight more than Tomlin, and eight division titles … or one more than Tomlin. He also produced nine seasons with double-digit victories. But so has Tomlin. And while Cowher’s overall winning percentage of .623 is good, it’s not as good as Mike Tomlin’s.

    So what’s not to like here, people? Yet Tomlin’s resume is subject to endless dissection, and I’m not sure why. Maybe it’s this: Since reaching Super Bowl XLV in 2010, he’s 3-6 in the playoffs – with one postseason victory the past four seasons. He’s also 8-8 overall, where Cowher was 12-9, Reid is 17-15 and Belichick is 31-12.

    But Payton is 9-8, including 3-4 the past seven seasons, while Carroll is 11-10 and 3-5 since losing Super Bowl XLIX.

    Maybe it’s this: He’s had five “one-and-dones” in playoff history, including four times in the wild-card round – with the latest a loss to Cleveland in the 2020 postseason after the Steelers opened the year 11-0. By contrast, Carroll has had three one-game playoff exits and Payton two.

    Or maybe it’s just that he’s had two tough acts to follow. Chuck Noll won four Super Bowls in six years as the Steelers dominated the 1970s, and Cowher returned the team to prominence after a mediocre 1980s that included four non-winning seasons and two playoff wins.

    All I know is that Mike Tomlin has his share of detractors, including one notable former Steeler -- Hall-of-Fame quarterback Terry Bradshaw.

    “I don’t think he’s a great coach at all,” he said in a 2016 FOX interview. “He’s really a great cheerleader type. I don’t know what he does.”

    I do. He wins a lot of games, never had a losing season and has a Super Bowl ring. Plus, the Steelers value him. They gave him a contract extension Tuesday that runs through 2024.

    I know, he has plenty of time to complete his resume, so we can withhold judgment on his career until he’s finished. But that hasn’t stopped us speculating about Hall-of-Fame trajectories for others still in the game.

    So why not Tomlin? All I know is that, like a few of his contemporaries, he’s on the right path.

    https://www.si.com/nfl/talkoffame/nf...d-hall-of-fame
    Steel Maniac predicted no RBs would be chosen in the 1st round, so of course we selected:

    1(24) Najee Harris RB Alabama


  2. #2
    Legend

    User Info Menu

    This guy kinda made the case for and against him.

    I think Mike Tomlin wouldn’t consider it until his career is done. His future success or failures will likely determine his fate imho. Could go either way.

  3. #3
    Hall of Famer

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by flippy View Post
    This guy kinda made the case for and against him.

    I think Mike Tomlin wouldn’t consider it until his career is done. His future success or failures will likely determine his fate imho. Could go either way.
    I doubt Tomlin has a long losing streak to end his coaching career.

    I also don’t think you have to win more than 1 SB to make it to Canton. If he continues to win at the same pace he is a lock.

    I think maybe its Noll but more than likely its Billicheat that made fans delusional with expectations.

    You don’t have to win a bunch of championships to make it as a HC. If you have a long career, win a ton of games and impact the lives of a bunch of players you will make it into Canton.

    When I hear people say he loses to too many sub .500 teams (not true, check Billicheats record vs .500 teams) what they are really saying is Tomlin needs to have a .825 winning percentage to be acceptable. That isn’t even possible in the modern era.
    Tomlin’s coming back so what can you do?


  4. #4
    Legend

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by feltdizz View Post
    I doubt Tomlin has a long losing streak to end his coaching career.

    I also don’t think you have to win more than 1 SB to make it to Canton. If he continues to win at the same pace he is a lock.

    I think maybe its Noll but more than likely its Billicheat that made fans delusional with expectations.

    You don’t have to win a bunch of championships to make it as a HC. If you have a long career, win a ton of games and impact the lives of a bunch of players you will make it into Canton.

    When I hear people say he loses to too many sub .500 teams (not true, check Billicheats record vs .500 teams) what they are really saying is Tomlin needs to have a .825 winning percentage to be acceptable. That isn’t even possible in the modern era.
    Yes, I’m pretty sure he’s a lock, but I want to see him win so much he gets in on his first ballot. That’s still up in the air.

  5. #5
    Legend

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by feltdizz View Post
    I doubt Tomlin has a long losing streak to end his coaching career.

    I also don’t think you have to win more than 1 SB to make it to Canton. If he continues to win at the same pace he is a lock.

    I think maybe its Noll but more than likely its Billicheat that made fans delusional with expectations.

    You don’t have to win a bunch of championships to make it as a HC. If you have a long career, win a ton of games and impact the lives of a bunch of players you will make it into Canton.

    When I hear people say he loses to too many sub .500 teams (not true, check Billicheats record vs .500 teams) what they are really saying is Tomlin needs to have a .825 winning percentage to be acceptable. That isn’t even possible in the modern era.
    Even if he had the .825 win percentage, some would move the goal posts would again
    Taking pride in the fact that I'm right so often and he is wrong so often, that Steel Maniac has to have me on "Ignore"

  6. #6
    Backup

    User Info Menu

    Regular season record is great for sure, and he has that going for him, but......

    8-8, (3-6 since 2011), and 5 one-and-done appearances, isn't quite the positive endorsement for an easy selection into the HOF

    He might make it in eventually based on consistent regular seasons, but something tells me it will get harder and harder if the playoff dud performances continue

  7. #7
    Legend

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by feltdizz View Post
    I doubt Tomlin has a long losing streak to end his coaching career.

    I also don’t think you have to win more than 1 SB to make it to Canton. If he continues to win at the same pace he is a lock.

    I think maybe its Noll but more than likely its Billicheat that made fans delusional with expectations.

    You don’t have to win a bunch of championships to make it as a HC. If you have a long career, win a ton of games and impact the lives of a bunch of players you will make it into Canton.

    When I hear people say he loses to too many sub .500 teams (not true, check Billicheats record vs .500 teams) what they are really saying is Tomlin needs to have a .825 winning percentage to be acceptable. That isn’t even possible in the modern era.
    since you brought it up? what is his record? and what's tomlin's ?

    and even better if you have those type of stats at your disposal,
    what;s BBs record vs. sub .300 teams? what's tomlin's?

  8. #8
    Pro Bowler

    User Info Menu

    No doubt, it is pretty much a lock.

  9. #9
    Legend

    User Info Menu

    Wolfley: The right thing to do

    By CRAIG WOLFLEY

    When I heard the news that Mike Tomlin re-upped with the Steelers, I couldn’t help but smile. It was the right thing to do.

    I love consistency. Ballplayers in general love consistency, whether it be in message, expectations or routine. Especially when you string 14 seasons of non-losing (otherwise known as “winning”) seasons together. Throw in seven AFC North titles, add nine playoff berths, two Super Bowl appearances and one championship, and you have a winner.

    Tomlin has the third most regular-season wins among active coaches. There aren't too many geographical areas outside of the ‘Burgh that can lay claim to that. Consistency brings stability, and in the brave new world of Covid, and all it implies, stability is king.

    The 15 best transfer pickups in college basketball so farHow LSU is trying to recreate elements of 2019 seasonLate Kick: Ohio State winning with 'loaded' wide receiver roomCBS Sports names college football coaches under most pressure in 2021Joel Klatt on Mac Jones: 'He's a poor man's Joe Burrow'

    I have been privileged to observe and experience Tomlin up close and personal. I’ve watched intently from a sideline observer’s post for most of my 20-plus seasons covering Steelers football. During that time, three things about Tomlin stand out to me.

    From Day One, when he was introduced on the South Side at a press conference, Mike has always impressed me as being “Large, and in-charge.”

    Also, Tomlin, like Chuck Noll, was more of a teacher. He's always coaching, but teachable life lessons seem to find their way into many conversations.

    And, finally, whether you agree or disagree with his decision-making, he has always acted decisively.

    I was fortunate to be in the room when Tomlin was introduced to the media as the next head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers. I’m a fan of body language, and first impressions. And from the first moment Mike took the mike at the podium, there has never been a moment when I wondered who Tomlin was. Or who was in charge. The man wears alpha-male like water wears wet.

    Truman-esque in word and deed, “The Buck Stops Here” was never more apparent than when, up at training camp a number of years ago, I was watching from the sideline while standing next to Kevin Colbert. It was the first day of pads, and during the team portion of practice, the hitting was immediately ferocious, and the tackling was to the ground. I tried to subtly ask Colbert if this was a scrimmage, or if the boys were a little frisky early in camp. Kevin was either in the dark like the rest of us, or he wasn’t saying. But it was obvious, as the practice unfolded, that the mandate had come down that tackling was happening, and big hitting was encouraged. Later, we found it was Mike’s choice, and as he said later, he didn’t tell anybody else until just before, because he joked that he "didn’t want to be talked out of it.”

    The teacher/coach in Tomlin is always readily apparent - whatever the position, wherever the field of instruction; on the field or off the field; whether expounding on football, or football “life.” Coach Noll was a great communicator in personal expectations and making sure young players were aware of their words. Noll didn’t just “talk the talk,” but he walked it as well. Tomlin is the same, and that's why it wasn't a surprise that as I happened to be sitting nearby when Lawrence Timmons was getting interviewed early in his Steelers career, Mike happened by and suddenly came alongside the young Timmons. He appropriately reminded LT to “under-promise, over-deliver.”

    One of the things I love to do during a Steelers practice is follow within earshot of what Tomlin is coaching up at the moment. You can learn a lot if you keep your mouth shut and just observe and listen. He might be talking hand placement while jamming a blocker, asking specifically what a defender is looking at while coming off the edge, yelling at a newbie standing on the sideline if he’s listening to the call just made out on the field, telling a cornerback to “snap his head around” while transitioning from running in man coverage to ball location, or discussing the importance of footwork in Cover-2 against an inside slant. Guys who have played for Tomlin will attest to his football knowledge. And that goes for the offensive end of the business as well as special teams.

    But it’s the personal touches I love, when Mike can cajole, chastise and encourage a guy, all at once. That’s coaching.

    In 2010, after the Steelers defeated the Baltimore Ravens in one of those epic 13-10 “two trains, one track” games, I was standing outside the Steelers locker room while Tomlin stood at the doorway. Mike was quick to remind young Isaac Redman that fame was fleeting. Redman had caught a game-winning TD catch with 2:51 remaining. Redman, along with James Harrison, stayed on the field after the final gun. They were being interviewed by national TV. Both Isaac and James were making their way slowly up the tunnel toward the visiting team’s locker room. Redman, dragging a little bit, was just behind James. Tomlin yelled “C’mon Isaac! You gotta make more plays than that if you want to stay out in the field with Deebo!”

    Decisiveness is the summation of a coach’s “gut instinct.” Making the proper call when the game is on the line takes steel nerves and absolute faith in your staff, your players and ultimately yourself. No coach can be successful without being decisive. Players can smell an indecisive coach’s fear a sideline away.

    When Heath Miller hit the turf inches short of a touchdown in Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego during the 2015 season, the sideline on the Steelers' side erupted in frantic activity. Players rushed about, coaches were talking and pointing. Except for one. Tomlin had it. He knew exactly what he wanted. The Steelers were down 20-17 to the San Diego “Super-Chargers.” A flag had been thrown, giving Tomlin the opportunity to decide whether or not to go for the win or send out the field goal unit to tie it up.

    There was no hesitation whatsoever. I had as good a view of Tomlin operating under the most intense pressure you can imagine. Fully “large and in-charge,” Tomlin never blinked, lived in his fears, or even hesitated. Looking Stuart Scott's “as cool as the backside of the pillow,” Tomlin sent Le'Veon Bell onto the field and into the Wildcat. Following a kick out block by Rosie Nix, and some superb work on a search and destroy mission by Dave DeCastro, Bell, with time expired, landed in the end zone for the “W.”

    So, yeah, I’m glad the Steelers and Tomlin came to agreement, just as I was when Coach Noll was re-upped and when Bill Cowher was re-upped.

    I know it seems rather incredible that the Steelers have only had three head coaches since 1969. But the proof of the “Rooney Way” is in the results. As I was said years ago, the Steelers “have a plan, work the plan, and stick with the plan.” Re-upping Mike was the right thing to do. He’s earned it.

    To quote my legendary coach, Chuck Noll, “Change for the sake of change is no change.”

    https://247sports.com/nfl/pittsburgh...rs--164558128/
    Steel Maniac predicted no RBs would be chosen in the 1st round, so of course we selected:

    1(24) Najee Harris RB Alabama


  10. #10
    Legend

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by hawaiiansteel View Post
    Wolfley: The right thing to do

    By CRAIG WOLFLEY

    When I heard the news that Mike Tomlin re-upped with the Steelers, I couldn’t help but smile. It was the right thing to do.

    I love consistency. Ballplayers in general love consistency, whether it be in message, expectations or routine. Especially when you string 14 seasons of non-losing (otherwise known as “winning”) seasons together. Throw in seven AFC North titles, add nine playoff berths, two Super Bowl appearances and one championship, and you have a winner.

    Tomlin has the third most regular-season wins among active coaches. There aren't too many geographical areas outside of the ‘Burgh that can lay claim to that. Consistency brings stability, and in the brave new world of Covid, and all it implies, stability is king.

    The 15 best transfer pickups in college basketball so farHow LSU is trying to recreate elements of 2019 seasonLate Kick: Ohio State winning with 'loaded' wide receiver roomCBS Sports names college football coaches under most pressure in 2021Joel Klatt on Mac Jones: 'He's a poor man's Joe Burrow'

    I have been privileged to observe and experience Tomlin up close and personal. I’ve watched intently from a sideline observer’s post for most of my 20-plus seasons covering Steelers football. During that time, three things about Tomlin stand out to me.

    From Day One, when he was introduced on the South Side at a press conference, Mike has always impressed me as being “Large, and in-charge.”

    Also, Tomlin, like Chuck Noll, was more of a teacher. He's always coaching, but teachable life lessons seem to find their way into many conversations.

    And, finally, whether you agree or disagree with his decision-making, he has always acted decisively.

    I was fortunate to be in the room when Tomlin was introduced to the media as the next head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers. I’m a fan of body language, and first impressions. And from the first moment Mike took the mike at the podium, there has never been a moment when I wondered who Tomlin was. Or who was in charge. The man wears alpha-male like water wears wet.

    Truman-esque in word and deed, “The Buck Stops Here” was never more apparent than when, up at training camp a number of years ago, I was watching from the sideline while standing next to Kevin Colbert. It was the first day of pads, and during the team portion of practice, the hitting was immediately ferocious, and the tackling was to the ground. I tried to subtly ask Colbert if this was a scrimmage, or if the boys were a little frisky early in camp. Kevin was either in the dark like the rest of us, or he wasn’t saying. But it was obvious, as the practice unfolded, that the mandate had come down that tackling was happening, and big hitting was encouraged. Later, we found it was Mike’s choice, and as he said later, he didn’t tell anybody else until just before, because he joked that he "didn’t want to be talked out of it.”

    The teacher/coach in Tomlin is always readily apparent - whatever the position, wherever the field of instruction; on the field or off the field; whether expounding on football, or football “life.” Coach Noll was a great communicator in personal expectations and making sure young players were aware of their words. Noll didn’t just “talk the talk,” but he walked it as well. Tomlin is the same, and that's why it wasn't a surprise that as I happened to be sitting nearby when Lawrence Timmons was getting interviewed early in his Steelers career, Mike happened by and suddenly came alongside the young Timmons. He appropriately reminded LT to “under-promise, over-deliver.”

    One of the things I love to do during a Steelers practice is follow within earshot of what Tomlin is coaching up at the moment. You can learn a lot if you keep your mouth shut and just observe and listen. He might be talking hand placement while jamming a blocker, asking specifically what a defender is looking at while coming off the edge, yelling at a newbie standing on the sideline if he’s listening to the call just made out on the field, telling a cornerback to “snap his head around” while transitioning from running in man coverage to ball location, or discussing the importance of footwork in Cover-2 against an inside slant. Guys who have played for Tomlin will attest to his football knowledge. And that goes for the offensive end of the business as well as special teams.

    But it’s the personal touches I love, when Mike can cajole, chastise and encourage a guy, all at once. That’s coaching.

    In 2010, after the Steelers defeated the Baltimore Ravens in one of those epic 13-10 “two trains, one track” games, I was standing outside the Steelers locker room while Tomlin stood at the doorway. Mike was quick to remind young Isaac Redman that fame was fleeting. Redman had caught a game-winning TD catch with 2:51 remaining. Redman, along with James Harrison, stayed on the field after the final gun. They were being interviewed by national TV. Both Isaac and James were making their way slowly up the tunnel toward the visiting team’s locker room. Redman, dragging a little bit, was just behind James. Tomlin yelled “C’mon Isaac! You gotta make more plays than that if you want to stay out in the field with Deebo!”

    Decisiveness is the summation of a coach’s “gut instinct.” Making the proper call when the game is on the line takes steel nerves and absolute faith in your staff, your players and ultimately yourself. No coach can be successful without being decisive. Players can smell an indecisive coach’s fear a sideline away.

    When Heath Miller hit the turf inches short of a touchdown in Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego during the 2015 season, the sideline on the Steelers' side erupted in frantic activity. Players rushed about, coaches were talking and pointing. Except for one. Tomlin had it. He knew exactly what he wanted. The Steelers were down 20-17 to the San Diego “Super-Chargers.” A flag had been thrown, giving Tomlin the opportunity to decide whether or not to go for the win or send out the field goal unit to tie it up.

    There was no hesitation whatsoever. I had as good a view of Tomlin operating under the most intense pressure you can imagine. Fully “large and in-charge,” Tomlin never blinked, lived in his fears, or even hesitated. Looking Stuart Scott's “as cool as the backside of the pillow,” Tomlin sent Le'Veon Bell onto the field and into the Wildcat. Following a kick out block by Rosie Nix, and some superb work on a search and destroy mission by Dave DeCastro, Bell, with time expired, landed in the end zone for the “W.”

    So, yeah, I’m glad the Steelers and Tomlin came to agreement, just as I was when Coach Noll was re-upped and when Bill Cowher was re-upped.

    I know it seems rather incredible that the Steelers have only had three head coaches since 1969. But the proof of the “Rooney Way” is in the results. As I was said years ago, the Steelers “have a plan, work the plan, and stick with the plan.” Re-upping Mike was the right thing to do. He’s earned it.

    To quote my legendary coach, Chuck Noll, “Change for the sake of change is no change.”

    https://247sports.com/nfl/pittsburgh...rs--164558128/
    What does this clown know. He's a stinkin reporter. He say Tomlin reminds him of Noll? What does he know about Chuck Noll? I bet he is a 20 year old who doesn't know what he's talking about. I LIVED THAT ERA!!!

    To quote vp candidate Benson:

    I watched Chuck Noll (on TV), I saw the man coach players up close (a zoom shot). Tomlin my friend is no Chuck Noll!!!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •