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Thread: It's way too early to worry about Jarvis Jones

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Slapstick View Post
    Truthfully, JH did not look fast in that 100 yard dash...it was a combo of good blocking and the same indomitable will that made an undrafted player who was cut four times into a Defensive Player of the Year...
    So, what you are saying is JH played with heart. It's that special it factor that made him special. It's why I enjoy seeing it so much...when a guy hits the field and plays like he loves the game.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
    So, what you are saying is JH played with heart. It's that special it factor that made him special. It's why I enjoy seeing it so much...when a guy hits the field and plays like he loves the game.
    I don't think that it's even that...positive.

    I think that Harrison, much like Lambert, was just a pissed off wrecking ball of pure, concentrated meanness on the field...

  3. #43
    I'm not saying Jones fits this description but some players' "game speed" is faster than their "stopwatch speed". I recall that Franco was timed at 4.8 in the 40, which wasn't considered "fast" even in 1972. But when he broke into the clear he was seldom caught if it was a straight-out foot race. They had to have the angle to catch him.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by RobinCole View Post
    I'm not saying Jones fits this description but some players' "game speed" is faster than their "stopwatch speed". I recall that Franco was timed at 4.8 in the 40, which wasn't considered "fast" even in 1972. But when he broke into the clear he was seldom caught if it was a straight-out foot race. They had to have the angle to catch him.
    Possibly the most famous example of the vast difference between running in shorts and running in a helmet and pads while carrying a ball?

    Jerry Rice

  5. #45
    Hall of Famer ikestops85's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shoe View Post
    I would agree that there isn't a direct correlation between 40 time and playing ability, but to say that it is meaningless, isn't being objective. I'm struggling to think of an OLB with 4.9 speed, let alone an OLB with 4.9 speed who became a star.
    Vontaze Burflict ... 5.09 and 5.1 seconds in his 40 at the combine.
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  6. #46
    Hall of Famer ikestops85's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo View Post
    The guy on the sideline has to call the play. I've never understood why Timmons is not used more for blitzing.
    The guy on the sideline was asked that question during training camp last year. His answer was something like ...

    "I can keep sending Timmons but what backer do I have to cover?"

    It makes sense when you look at it from that perspective.
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  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by ikestops85 View Post
    The guy on the sideline was asked that question during training camp last year. His answer was something like ...

    "I can keep sending Timmons but what backer do I have to cover?"

    It makes sense when you look at it from that perspective.
    Yes, but isn't that what makes a blitz a blitz? You send more players than they can block, and hope that the QB does not have time to find the guy who was left uncovered. Obviously it isn't quite that simple, as the Steelers play a zone behind the blitz, but same idea...sending more players creates more openings in thew zone, sending fewer rushers causes the zone to be manned, but the receivers will have more time to find the opening.

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by steeler_fan_in_t.o. View Post
    Yes, but isn't that what makes a blitz a blitz? You send more players than they can block, and hope that the QB does not have time to find the guy who was left uncovered. Obviously it isn't quite that simple, as the Steelers play a zone behind the blitz, but same idea...sending more players creates more openings in thew zone, sending fewer rushers causes the zone to be manned, but the receivers will have more time to find the opening.
    Correct...

    But, this has never been a gambling defense...very few defenses are...

    Again, the idea is to get pressure with four rushers when possible...the principles of the 3-4 and zone blitz allow you to send different rushers every time, confusing the protection and leading to unblocked pass rushers...

    When you don't have a good talent level in the NFL, no defense works...

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