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Thread: Blount force trauma

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo View Post
    I think Bell and Blount's carries will be determined by who is delivering the yards. IMO Bell needs to keep a fire under his butt and perform because Blount is going to want to be on the field. That is a great situation to have and if both perform we can keep them both fresh and healthy for the entire season.

    I'd love to see both in the backfield at the same time on occasion. The Steelers have some weapons. Wil Johnson is also reported at OTAs as catching everything thrown his way and he is way more athletic than most FBs in this league. You have to wonder with the ability we have to catch the ball out of the backfield how many three WR sets will we really ever have to use?????
    I agree. Everyone by now knows how much I like Bell. But, coming out of college I liked Blount almost as much. Blount is no joke, and he is a guy who can start in this league. He is a guy who can carry a load. If Bell doesn't play with his hair on fire (which effort has never been an issue with him) he will lose carries. Bell is hands down the more complete back but Blount is a punisher and he likes to hurt people. I love this combo and I love they will push each other. I truly believe if this OL can get it's ish together this will be the best backfield in the AFC.

  2. #12
    Legend hawaiiansteel's Avatar
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    Game Rewind Notebook: Blount drops the hammer

    By Marc Sessler
    Around the League Writer
    Published: July 5, 2014

    The Steelers have gained speed on both sides of the ball, but Pittsburgh hasn't abandoned its quest to blast people with the run.

    In an AFC North flush with talented young backs, Pittsburgh's stable of horses offers something for everyone: A long-term anchor in "Making the Leap" candidate Le'Veon Bell, a tantalizing X factor in rookie Dri Archer, and a hammer-dropping change-of-pace runner in LeGarrette Blount.

    I went back and watched all of Blount's snaps for a closer look at what he can offer the Steelers come September:

    What he is

    Blount is all power. Thunder to Bell's lightning, the former Buccaneers and Patriots runner gives Pittsburgh a short-yardage pounder with the ability to draw blood.

    He's far from elusive, but Blount is no cinch to bring down. After averaging five yards per carry during his 1,000-yard rookie campaign in 2010, he equaled that YPC figure again last season on 152 rushes with New England. Blount was one of only three backs with 150-plus carries to average five or more yards per tote in 2013.

    The 250-pounder relies on strong blocking and struggles when he doesn't get it. Still, Blount's 2.7 yards after contact per attempt ranked seventh in the NFL, per Pro Football Focus. His strength can overwhelm smaller defenders.

    He fit nicely into the power ground game New England leaned on down the stretch in 2013: Blount's 189 yards in the regular-season finale against the Bills was followed by his 166-yard, four-touchdown jaunt against the Colts in the AFC Divisional Playoffs.

    What I saw in the postseason tilt was a bruising runner who -- in his best moments -- found the crease in short-yardage situations and helped wear down a winded defense.

    As shown in the embedded clip, when Indy's thin front seven lost the battle at the line, Blount made the most of his adequate speed for chunk yardage into the secondary. He's an ideal late-game thumper: His first eight carries against the Colts netted 21 yards; his final eight chalked up 112.

    What he isn't

    For starters, he isn't a featured back. Blount is best used on a carry count between the tackles.

    The Steelers, though, don't need him to wiggle outside when they have Bell's agility and lateral movement. Most of Blount's big bursts channeled through inside gaps, as he's not quick enough to beat defenders around the edge.

    Ball protection is a concern after seeing Blount lose eight of his 12 fumbles over the past four seasons. His playing time in Pittsburgh will rely on mistake-free snaps that move the chains.

    The future

    Pittsburgh plucked Blount off the open market before the Ravens had a chance to. It's a move that should pay off in the rough-and-tumble AFC North.

    As a runner expected to spell Bell for six to eight carries per game, Blount will get his chance to score touchdowns and chew up late-game yardage. As we saw in Tampa and New England, he can carry the load out of necessity, which should come in handy if the Steelers are chasing the playoffs and want to rest Bell for January.

    In two offseasons, Pittsburgh has replaced a tired, bland stable of backs with youth (Bell), power (Blount) and speed (Archer). With Ben Roethlisberger running the show, the Black and Gold won't be an easy out in the AFC's most rugged division.

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap200...er_atl_sessler

  3. #13
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    Bell is far from lightning

    Blount is all power. Thunder to Bell's lightning
    I guess it makes the article read better but not exactly what Bell's game is built on. I wouldn't be surprised if Blount was actually faster. Bell's game is versatility because he does so much well ala Chuck Foreman in the day with the Vikings.
    Last edited by Oviedo; 07-07-2014 at 09:43 AM.
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  4. #14
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    Not lightning but certainly agile and quick. Blount may have the better long speed but I think bell is probably a lot more explosive off the snap

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo View Post
    Bell is far from lightning



    I guess it makes the article read better but not exactly what Bell's game is built on. I wouldn't be surprised if Blount was actually faster. Bell's game is versatility because he does so much well ala Chuck Foreman in the day with the Vikings.
    I really like the Foreman comparison. Spot on.

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