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Thread: Take a chance on Colt Lyerla?

  1. #21
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    Oh I see an allergy as it triggers different in different people. Got it. Yea I still think that if someone is a true addict the NFL is a had place to recover. Maybe some have done it. But it would seem very hard to me. But I guess it could be a good motivator. If someone can do it and stay clean and sober while in the NFL WOW very good for them. I think Farve did it. Became addicted to pain meds then got cleaned up and still played. Wonder if he is still clean and sober after NFL?

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Laser View Post
    Oh I see an allergy as it triggers different in different people. Got it. Yea I still think that if someone is a true addict the NFL is a had place to recover. Maybe some have done it. But it would seem very hard to me. But I guess it could be a good motivator. If someone can do it and stay clean and sober while in the NFL WOW very good for them. I think Farve did it. Became addicted to pain meds then got cleaned up and still played. Wonder if he is still clean and sober after NFL?
    It can be good and bad. It's bad because of the lifestyle and stress. It's also bad because the NFL doesn't know squat about addiction nor is it treated properly. But, if done correctly being in the NFL could be a very good thing. It's gives leverage to the accountability which is HUGE in early recovery. Meaning the player has much to lose if he relapses.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
    This is part of the problem. Comparing addiction to hitting women is like comparing diabetes to rape. Lets not forget the NFL knows nothing and I mean nothing about addiction treatment. They treat it like its a moral, weak, bad person issue. If that were true, you would expect those individuals who have displayed morality, ethics, and work ethic to have lower rates of addiction. You would expect priests, pilots, docs, CEOs, pastors, nurses, etc to have lower rates of addiction. But, that isn't what you see. After you get a high school diploma, the percentages are roughly the same in all lines of work. I have met many hard working, talented addicts who were considered "good people", but for some reason couldn't put the drink down. They react to mood altering substances like an allergy. So, when I see people judge addicts I realize it comes from a place of ignorance about the disease process...and the fact that people can and do get better.

    People who enter the treatment center I work for who complete 4-6 weeks with us have around a 60% chance of remaining alcohol and drug free for a year+ if part of our extended care program. How do we know? We continuously drug test.
    I've heard Dr Drew say your chances of recovering from addiction are worse than your chances of beating cancer.

  4. #24
    Legend hawaiiansteel's Avatar
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    I think how Lyerla does in the interviews with teams at the Combine will be very important as to whether or not he ends up getting drafted.

    it only takes one team to want to give him a chance because of his great athleticism, but I highly doubt it will the Pittsburgh Steelers.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by flippy View Post
    I've heard Dr Drew say your chances of recovering from addiction are worse than your chances of beating cancer.
    Which cancer? Testicular or pancreatic? One carries about a 99% cure rate even in stage 3-4 and the other is a death sentence. I wouldn't get my addiction information from a guy paid to make for good TV.

    Depends on who you ask. Unfortunately, its about resources. Those people with enough money for good treatment have a fair shot at this. 90% of physicians who enter treatment stay sober 5+ years. Airline pilots are 92%. Those are numbers I know are well documented throughout literature. So frankly, if Dr. Drew said that he is mistaken. Like I said, if I can get someone through 4-6 weeks and get them into extended treatment 60% will stay sober for at least a year. Those that make it 5 years have a 50/50 chance of relapse.

    It's about solid treatment and accountability. Now, if you are speaking about those who never get to treatment...he is right the odds are terrible...especially for IV heroin and crystal methamphetamine.

  6. #26
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    This guy declined to enter the Drug Court Program that would have given him the opportunity to have his charges dismissed after completion of the program. If he's not smart enough to take this gift then there's no reason to have another problem just waiting to happen on the team. PASS!

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
    Which cancer? Testicular or pancreatic? One carries about a 99% cure rate even in stage 3-4 and the other is a death sentence. I wouldn't get my addiction information from a guy paid to make for good TV.

    Depends on who you ask. Unfortunately, its about resources. Those people with enough money for good treatment have a fair shot at this. 90% of physicians who enter treatment stay sober 5+ years. Airline pilots are 92%. Those are numbers I know are well documented throughout literature. So frankly, if Dr. Drew said that he is mistaken. Like I said, if I can get someone through 4-6 weeks and get them into extended treatment 60% will stay sober for at least a year. Those that make it 5 years have a 50/50 chance of relapse.

    It's about solid treatment and accountability. Now, if you are speaking about those who never get to treatment...he is right the odds are terrible...especially for IV heroin and crystal methamphetamine.
    I guess your numbers depend on the drug of choice then? I also know that it needs to be a baby step thing to recover and stay recovered. But dang on the 1 year and 5 year does not sound or seem impressive with how long most people live. I would not want that monkey on my back for the next 20, 30, 40 years. My addiction to bad food is hard enough. Good thing I never got hooked on alcohol that runs in both sides of my family. Addiction is no joke and sad. I have even more respect for you Shawn. Keep working had at your job helping people!

  8. #28
    Hall of Famer Djfan's Avatar
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    Well done Shawn. Glad to hear your story. I would rather see the Steelers pay for the guy's one year residency addiction program than pick him. We have needs that can be met with safer bets.
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
    Glad my employer stuck it out with me over 6 years ago when I needed treatment for addiction issues. Glad my current employer actually considers my recovery an asset. Addiction properly treated can actually be an asset in someone's life. If the Steelers used this as an opportunity to invest in a talented addict, I would be excited to give him a chance.
    I am glad for you that your employer stuck it out with you. I am happy you were able to overcome your addiction.

    The circumstances are probably different for this young man than the were for you. Did your employer know about your addiction before or after they hired you? I suspect that your employer wouldn't had hired you if they knew you had an addiction before they hired you. If they found out about your addiction after they hired you then the right thing to do was to give you a chance to overcome your addiction. There are reasons why many employers require drugs screens for future and sometimes current employees.

    There are many variables involved with addiction. It's well documented that addiction ruins careers, lives, and families. I don't know how serious the addiction the young man has to cocaine. He could be a functional addict or he could eventually let his addiction ruin his life. It will be better if the Steelers bring a player on board that doesn't have the "cocaine question mark" next to his name.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
    This guy declined to enter the Drug Court Program that would have given him the opportunity to have his charges dismissed after completion of the program.
    Wow....big time red flag. Pretty hard to help a guy who doesn't want to be helped.

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