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Thread: Anyone who thinks Tomlin or Colbert are going anywhere

  1. #111
    Hall of Famer Dee Dub's Avatar
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    ..and more...

    Nick Saban: Middle of the Field Safety Coverage Principles (part III - Cover 1)



    Cover 1

    Just like it sounds, man-free coverage is man-to-man defense with a free safety in the deep hole (and a linebacker in the shallow hole). Players simply line up and play the respective man across from them.

    1. Corners always take the first receiver outside (and use the MOF divider just like in C3)
    2. The Strong Safety displaces to the second receiver
    3. The Mike and Sam play the backs respectively (Sam has first back out strong / Mike has third back)
    4. The Will takes the first back out weak or the second receiver weak.




    As can be found on page 167 of the LSU playbook, where it explains Cover 1 assignments and adjustments to each formation. The position-maintenance covered in the first section of this series plays a major part in funnelling receivers into the free safety / rat-in-the-hole help and eliminates duplication of effort. With man coverage, there becomes fewer opportunities for interceptions, but it increases the chances of an incompletion.
    The main nuance of this coverage has to do with a challenging/conflicting assignments for the backers. Because the main thrust of the defense is to stop the run from the inside out and keeping the defenders playing fast, the premise is to keep the linebackers focused on the backs and TE. Saban uses an alert code (RAT) to prevent a potentially ‘coverage breaking’ route.

    “RAT” is used to alert inside backers of the strong safety passing off his responsibility (tight end) to the inside linebackers. When the second receiver (tight end) stems inside (shallow), if the strong safety ran with him, he would be immediately vacating the perimeter (where the run game would likely be attacking) as well as running into the path of the (run game) pursuing linebackers (potential rub/pick). To quickly circumvent this hazard, when the tight end stems inside, the strong safety will declare/yell “RAT!”. “Rat” means a guy is coming into the funnel (is being funneled) and the remaining defender in the hole should cut/reroute and jump this receiver as he approaches.


    This call accomplishes two things. First, it alerts the next backer over (Sam) that the strong safety will take his assigned man (first back out), and he should now adjust to the second back out strong. Secondly, it tells the Mike, who is the “rat in the hole” that he is going to have company soon (crossing tight end) and can jump this route as it comes.

    This leaves the defense with +1 in the box, putting 3 linebackers on 2 (remaining) backs (see diagram below).

    Because the 'rat' rules can be influenced by the first crosser, how does all this shake out in a real-time scenario? How is it all able to remain consistent and adjust to multi-level passing attacks? In the example below, the "shallow" or "NCAA" post/dig concept is utilized to attack the defensive coverage at 3 levels.

    The corners obviously eliminate the outside receivers. Because the Y aligns inside the divider and is being funnelled into middle-of-the-field coverage, the strong safety aligns outside and his vertical positioning on him will be low-shoulder (see first post on position maintenance). This puts the strong safety in perfect position to deny the vertical-to-inside breaking dig route (with additional free safety sitting over the top in the deep hole to deny the dig and the post). Because the second receiver immediately takes an inside route (shallow), he is passed off to the rat-in-the-hole (S) who is looking to cut this receiver as he comes across the formation. The flow-side backer (M) to the side the back (F) releases takes his man into the flat/flare. Because the back is accounted for by the absolute 'funnel' rules (2 on 1), the W, who has released his shallow to the rat, is free to ROBOT (Roll and Run to find the seam/TE). Since he is not threatened by #1, #2, or #3 weak, the W, in this concept immediately bails to find the TE and rob the intermediate hole (ROBOT). This provides a 3-level-man-defense against this concept.
    Obviously, walking out a linebacker on a weak receiver is not ideal, so what happens if a back motions out of the backfield or you are confronted with a true 1-back set? Do you displace a linebacker and leave yourself vulnerable to inside run? This isn't a good option, therefore a second alternative is offered ("1 Alert").
    1 ALERT

    Because we just want linebackers matched up with backs and tight end, when confronted with a second receiver weak, “1 Alert” is used to precipitate an adjustment by the safeties. The defense will spin the safeties to the second receiver weak.

    1 Alert means the tight end and remaining backs are taken by linebackers. All breaks are taken by safeties. To accommodate or adjust to this, the safeties will spin the coverage (typically away from the TE). Rather than walking out backers, the safeties adjust and the S takes the TE, leaving the M & W on the remaining back (2 on 1, as pictured below).

    This essentially slides the backers away from the spin, leaving a 2 on 1 advantage with the linebackers on the remaining back. The linebacker to the side the back releases takes the back, the remaining linebacker becomes the rat in the hole. In summary;

    • “Funnel” when LBs have 3 on 2 versus the backs
    • “Alert” when LBs have 2 on 1 versus the backs.









    Steelers 2014 Draft

    1--Justin Gilbert CB Oklahoma State
    2--Jordan Matthews WR Vanderbilt
    3-- -- Traded --
    3B--C.J. Fiedorwicz TE Iowa
    4--Jordan Tripp ILB Montana
    5--Brent Urban DE Virginia
    6--Michael Schofield OT Michigan
    7--Kadeem Edwards OG Tennessee State









  2. #112
    Hall of Famer Dee Dub's Avatar
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    I had asked if anyone could tell us what one new thing has been introduced/added to the 3-4 zone blitz in tghe past 40 years, and nobody could. The fact of the matter is there has been one thing that has been added. And it was Nick Saban and Bill Belicheck who did it. It's called "Pattern Match".

    Nick Saban, currently the head coach at Alabama, was the defensive coordinator under Bill Belichick when the two were with the Cleveland Browns in the early 1990s. While speaking to high school coaches at a recent clinic, Saban summed up the early problems of traditional spot-dropping zone coverage: "Well, when Marino's throwing it, that old break on the ball **** don't work."
    The answer that Saban, Belichick, and many others developed was "pattern-match" coverage — essentially man coverage that uses zone principles to identify the matchups. As Saban explained at the 2010 Coach of the Year Clinics Football Manual clinic:
    You can play coverages in three ways. You can play zone, man, or pattern-match man. Pattern-match man is a coverage that plays the pattern after the pattern distribution. That means you pick up in man coverage after the receivers make their initial breaks and cuts. We number receivers from the outside going inside. If the number-one receiver crosses with the number-two receiver, we do not pick up the man coverage until they define where they are going.
    In other words, the zone blitz had come full circle. What began as a way to blitz without playing man coverage had started incorporating man coverage all over again, this time in an entirely new way.
    Using pattern-match principles allowed defenses to overcome the deficiencies in both the manic, risk-heavy man-to-man blitzes and the easy-to-exploit soft spots in the zone-coverage scheme. There was now a way to keep the safety of the zone and the tighter coverage of man-to-man. Defenses had finally done for blitzing what Walsh had done for passing — keeping the reward but eliminating the risk.
    The nuances of a pattern-match zone blitz are, as one would guess, rather extensive, but the principle is simple. "I had the opportunity to work for [current New Orleans Saints defensive coordinator] Steve Spagnuolo," said University of Pittsburgh secondary coach Matt House at a coaching clinic in Pittsburgh this past summer. "He had a great analogy talking about zone pressure. He said, 'All you do is roll out the basketball and tell the players to play three-on-three.' The players will talk, communicate, and switch on the picks. We do the same thing in zone-dog coverage."
    http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8428129/


    Steelers 2014 Draft

    1--Justin Gilbert CB Oklahoma State
    2--Jordan Matthews WR Vanderbilt
    3-- -- Traded --
    3B--C.J. Fiedorwicz TE Iowa
    4--Jordan Tripp ILB Montana
    5--Brent Urban DE Virginia
    6--Michael Schofield OT Michigan
    7--Kadeem Edwards OG Tennessee State









  3. #113
    Hall of Famer Dee Dub's Avatar
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    Now, how anyone could say that Nick Saban runs a vanilla coverage behind his front 7 and that he runs a 1 gap/hybrid 3-4 is someone who really doesn't know what he is talking about.

    But it sure sound good, huh?


    Steelers 2014 Draft

    1--Justin Gilbert CB Oklahoma State
    2--Jordan Matthews WR Vanderbilt
    3-- -- Traded --
    3B--C.J. Fiedorwicz TE Iowa
    4--Jordan Tripp ILB Montana
    5--Brent Urban DE Virginia
    6--Michael Schofield OT Michigan
    7--Kadeem Edwards OG Tennessee State









  4. #114
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Dub View Post
    Now, how anyone could say that Nick Saban runs a vanilla coverage behind his front 7 and that he runs a 1 gap/hybrid 3-4 is someone who really doesn't know what he is talking about.

    But it sure sound good, huh?
    The fact of the matter is this thread got derailed by YOU (because thats what you do) over my belief that Jarvis Jones is not up to speed with LeBeau's schemes. It has nothing to do with "middle of the field safety coverage". I don't care what Nick Saban does at Alabama (just because they coached on the same staff 15 years ago doesn't mean their playbooks are EXACTLY the same). I am talking about Georgia and Todd Grantham. You can cut and paste articles all you want from things you read online. I am talking about what I see from tape and the program that Grantham/Richt run at Georgia (in particular relating to the LBer play from the rush LB spot that Jarvis Jones played and what they ask from that position. I could care less about "middle of the field safety coverage" The bottom line is that if Jones was up to speed he would not be still splitting time with Worilds in situational football. Don't give me the concussion crap either!!! You basically told me I don't know football,and don't know the differences between variations of the 3-4, which is what I have done my whole life. You are a blowhard that does nothing but read articles online posted by amateurs and start threads that "toot your own horn. Anyone who knows me on here knows that I don't get confrontational with anyone and mostly only talk about player evaluation and moves i feel(or have heard) the Steelers should/will make. You are a gasbag who ALWAYS contradicts everything I say. If I say the sky is blue you say no it's not. You always dig up 2 year old posts that say "look at me I told you this would would happen", funny how you never dig up all the utter crap that you post like Matt Barkley is the man or Rahim Moore or Alameda Ta'amu should be our first round pick!!" I have zero time for your nonsense and twisting of facts. Have a nice life and I'm done with you. I am sure some will continue to stroke your ego, but not me.
    Last edited by steelerkeylargo; 11-09-2013 at 08:12 AM.
    Trade our 1/15 to SF for 1/29 & 2/56

    1) Kyle Fuller-CB-Va Tech
    2) Jordan Mathews-WR-Vandy
    2) Brandon Thomas-OL-Clemson
    3c) Kelsey Quarles-DE-South Carolina
    4) Lache Seastrunk-RB-Baylor
    5))Prince Shembo-OLB-Notre Dame
    5c) Khyri Thornton-DT-Southern Miss
    6) Aron Colvin-DB-Oklahoma
    6c)Max BulloughILB-Mich St
    7) Henry Josey-RB-Missouri













  5. #115
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Dub View Post
    Now, how anyone could say that Nick Saban runs a vanilla coverage behind his front 7 and that he runs a 1 gap/hybrid 3-4 is someone who really doesn't know what he is talking about.

    But it sure sound good, huh?
    Uhhh...you might want to go back and read...he was talking about Grantham, not Saban....

    But thanks for the very thorough explanation of Saban's coverages. I have learned a bit from reading this thread.

  6. #116
    Administrator steelz09's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBuckeye View Post
    Funny thing ... I'm sitting here watching Stanford v Oregon .. and it occurs to me that David Shaw, HC at Stanford would be a perfect match for the Steelers. Offensive minded coach (OC for the entirety of Harbaugh's tenure at Stanford) who runs a system that has a nice mix of run and pass.
    What interests me about this is seeing if some of the same people who rip Tomlin will rip this idea, and what their basis for doing so would be ... lol
    uhhhh... here we go again

  7. #117
    Quote Originally Posted by steelz09 View Post
    uhhhh... here we go again
    Just saying. I've heard names like Urban Meyer, who runs a system nowhere near what people have stated they want to see. Here's a guy whose system screams STEELERS FOOTBALL ... seems to me his name should have been brought up before by those who want Tomlin gone ... I can't for the life of me figure out why it hasn't been

  8. #118
    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBuckeye View Post
    Just saying. I've heard names like Urban Meyer, who runs a system nowhere near what people have stated they want to see. Here's a guy whose system screams STEELERS FOOTBALL ... seems to me his name should have been brought up before by those who want Tomlin gone ... I can't for the life of me figure out why it hasn't been
    Because Art II made the decision to hire Haley and everyone is afraid of criticizing him?

  9. #119
    Quote Originally Posted by BlitzTo7 View Post
    Because Art II made the decision to hire Haley and everyone is afraid of criticizing him?
    Just one man's opinion, but I'd take a guy like Shaw over Haley as OC every day of the week and thrice on Sunday! That's assuming you could even get him to listen to such a preposterous idea. Leave a cushy HC job at a place like Stanford for what would amount to less than a lateral move? #wishfulthinking

  10. #120
    Pro Bowler
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    With regard to Haley: Anyone here think that coaching is a learning experience unto itself? i.e. You aren't the coach you were five years ago? (Presumably, you have gotten better?)

    And given that, since we've invested two years now into Haley, we should look to continue along--instead of changing course, hiring a new OC, and the players having to adapt again? That is what bad teams do.

    I mean presumably, those who want Haley gone, also want a change in offensive philosophy (different system). How long before our team grasps that? And how many years do we have in Ben, that we want to blow on him and the offense learning a new system?

    Think back to Coughlin way back when, as an example of a coach "improving" or adapting. He had strict rules, in terms of being on time, etc. The GIANTS bristled against it, and the team suffered. But it was only until Coughlin was willing to be more accomodating (of the pro game), that we saw the GIANTS become the team they did. He learned.

    I think Haley should be given that opportunity too (and I think he's taken it, to a degree).

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