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Thread: Wexell: OLB Jarvis Jones Making Steady Progress

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by BURGH86STEEL View Post
    I suppose you don't understand what Butler is attempting to teach Jones.
    He described it pretty clearly:

    "He has to get down and what we call walk the dog -- collapse the pocket, taking the big, freaking, 350-pound guy, getting right in his face and walking him back to the quarterback."

    We saw JH do that week in and week out.
    I contend that Jarvis will rush the passer effectively, but not using THAT method.
    If we are counting on him to simply push tackles back to work his way to the QB, collapsing the pocket he aint that guy.
    Again he is NOT describing a powerful shot that might throw a big man off balance, allowing you to get around him.

    He is describing pushing him back, back, back, to the QB, a feat requiring superior strength, especially when your opponent is heavier.
    Any tackle that can be pushed back like that by an average sized LBer who is not freakishly powerful like JH, would get whooped by every 4/3 defensive end in the league and could not play at this level.

    Hows about you bump this post the first time Jarvis does what coach described to a tackle. It will not happen.
    Last edited by Captain Lemming; 08-16-2013 at 03:03 AM.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Lemming View Post
    He described it pretty clearly:

    "He has to get down and what we call walk the dog -- collapse the pocket, taking the big, freaking, 350-pound guy, getting right in his face and walking him back to the quarterback."

    We saw JH do that week in and week out.
    I contend that Jarvis will rush the passer effectively, but not using THAT method.
    If we are counting on him to simply push tackles back to work his way to the QB, collapsing the pocket he aint that guy.
    Again he is NOT describing a powerful shot that might throw a big man off balance, allowing you to get around him.

    He is describing pushing him back, back, back, to the QB, a feat requiring superior strength, especially when your opponent is heavier.
    Any tackle that can be pushed back like that by an average sized LBer who is not freakishly powerful like JH, would get whooped by every 4/3 defensive end in the league and could not play at this level.
    Hows about you bump this post the first time Jarvis does what coach described to a tackle. It will not happen.
    Players don't need to be able to squat 700lbs or bench 500 lbs to have success. Many times players on both sides of the ball use the combination of technique, leverage, speed, and timing to execute.

    Read the article again without being narrow minded. Butler stated, "But he's got to have a couple of rushes. He can't have all hand slaps, all getting on the edge of people. He's got to get down in the middle of people and what we call walk the dog on them, too."

    Having that ability to "walk the dog" will also aid Jones vs the run.

    The article goes on to state, "Jones showed glimpes of that ability Saturday night. He didn't get his sack but both he and Jason Worilds "walked the dog" at times the way the team's LOLB, Lamar Woodley, can."

    In essence, players need to have a variety of pass rush movies to attack pass protectors. Butler wants Jones to develop a variety of ways to attack pass protectors based on the variety of ways the Steelers defense attacks offenses.

    Jones can't always go outside or inside to rush the QB. Sometimes the goal may be to free up another player or something else. Butler stated, "There are some things, some defenses we call, where he's got to stay outside and stay within the discipline of the defense. And right now he's got to learn which is which."

    If Jones develops into the type of pass rusher the Steelers believe he can become then there will be times that his presence will free other players to have success. Right now Jones is learning when to "walk the dog", rush inside, rush outside, and the other intricacies of the defense.

    All the Steelers LB's "walked the dog" in the past. Some had more success then others. I believe there will be times that Jones will have success "walking the dog"
    Last edited by BURGH86STEEL; 08-16-2013 at 07:40 AM.

  3. #13
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    James C Wexell ‏@jimwexell:

    Jarvis Jones getting all 1st-team reps at rolb today.

    https://twitter.com/jimwexell

  4. #14
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    Steelers Jarvis Jones simply making plays

    By Neal Coolong on Aug 20 2013



    Through two preseason games, rookie outside linebacker Jarvis Jones has been in on two fumbles - forcing one and recovering another. He just seems to find a way to make plays, regardless of how he looks while he's doing it.

    You've heard That Guy - the one who breathlessly exclaims a player "just makes plays."

    That Guy might even work for ESPN or NFL Network. There are plenty of Those Guys within both media outlets. There's nothing really tangible to what they're saying. The idea of "just making plays" is a bit cliche and intangible.

    The problem with those kinds of things is you know when you see them.

    Steelers outside linebacker Jarvis Jones has been both praised and decried on this site for issues ranging from his weight to his lower body strength to his technique. It didn't seem any of that criticism was unfair or unwarranted.

    But through two preseason games, he just simply seems to be making plays.

    Jones took over quickly for starter Jason Worilds, and on one of his first plays, a power run right at him, Jones did a nice job gaining the edge on tight end Fred Davis. As the runner came toward him, he remained locked on Davis, not surrendering outside position. He got off the block and eventually, the ball carrier was taken down.

    A decent play, certainly one he'll be expected to make, given the opportunity during the regular season.

    But it was as if the mundane just doesn't suit Jones. Or the game itself doesn't make him wait long before being in on something big.

    Out of nowhere, he goes unblocked, and forces a fumble. He recovered one in the Steelers' first preseason game.

    He just makes plays.

    It was the lone quality play in a particularly run of snaps at that point in the game. In six plays, there were three turnovers - two by Washington - and quarterback Kirk Cousins was injured. Jones' presence alone doesn't do much, and his technique is commensurate with that of a rookie. But through two preseason games, he's had a hand in more turnovers than Jason Worilds has in his entire career.

    This was a team looking for a difference-maker on the defensive side of the ball, and Jones appears to be that - if such a question is answered through preseason play.

    It doesn't seem to matter how he's doing it; he's just making plays.

    http://www.behindthesteelcurtain.com...eason-starting

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