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Thread: Pittsburgh Steelers Change Defensive Philosophy

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Lemming View Post
    Says something about how he feels about the LBers ability to rush the QB if you ask me.
    You might be right. But, I see it more as Lebeau understanding the importance of mixing it up. 3-4 D's traditionally have 2 gap DLmen. But, mixing in some sets where a DLman is shooting one gap, and a linebacker maybe asked to take on two makes sense. It makes sense from keeping an OL on their toes not knowing what the D is going to do. And it also makes sense to use the athletic ability of guys like McClendon and Heyward.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Captain QB View Post
    For the last two years the Steelers defense has been #1 in yards allowed, but otherwise very stale and non-intimidating. It couldn't get to the QB and it couldn't generate turnovers. The base philosophy of the defense was "tackle the catch" and hope the other team's offense made a mistake. That doesn't work. Defenses need to force the issue. Also keep in mind the Steelers were #2 in the NFL in time of possession, so the defense wasn't on the field as often, thus it didn't give up as many yards.

    If this defense can generate pressure on opposing QBs and force turnovers, then it doesn't need to be #1 in yards allowed.

    I agree with you. You can't take Steeler D stats as a prime indicator of effectiveness. Anyone watching this D last season realized they were not the number one D in the league. I also prefer aggressive D's, turnover/pressure/sack minded. D's who are feared, taking the action to the O rather than reacting to what the O does. Good post.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
    I agree with you. You can't take Steeler D stats as a prime indicator of effectiveness. Anyone watching this D last season realized they were not the number one D in the league. I also prefer aggressive D's, turnover/pressure/sack minded. D's who are feared, taking the action to the O rather than reacting to what the O does. Good post.
    And what team has more of a rep as an "attacking" defense than this one?
    Just a couple of years ago? Who created more fear than JH? Who attacked from EVERYWHERE like Troy? Who destroyed players in the secondary like Clark?

    DLs philisophy aint the issue, it is talent.

    JH was breaking down, Woodley was fat and injured, Troy hobbled.
    Add to that rule changes that hurts guys like JH and Clark from jarring the ball lose via big hits.

    Corners who cant catch to save their lives.
    Lewis lead the league in passes defensed with ZERO picks.
    That is not a passive catch and tackle, that is going after the ball and cant hold onto it.
    Let's pretent that was Rod Woodson?
    Does that happen?

    Cortez created 5 turnovers in THREE GAMES. Same pass rush, same DL Philosophy.

    That aint "scheme".

    Yet, we had the number 1 statistical defense.

    Does that make it the best? No.

    But in view of the above it is AMAZING that this defense had the success it had to rank number 1.

    The problem isnt passive play, it is lacking players.

    Keisel said "when we had Harrison and Woodley....." when he talked about the changes.

    I just see little confidence in THIS SET of Linebackers to create pressure.
    Last edited by Captain Lemming; 08-06-2013 at 04:50 PM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuthlessBurgher View Post
    Look at our opponents this year, and think about whether it would be prudent to sacrifice potential open lanes for running backs in favor getting more pressure in the passing game. Who scares you more, the RB or QB for each team?

    Tennessee. Chris Johnson over Jake Locker and it isn't close. Would much rather two-gap than one-gap here.

    Cincinnati. A.J. Green is a bona fide elite weapon and they have a couple of quality TE's too, but Dalton is more of a game manager type. Cincy can win games with a nasty defense and a solid running game (and they added the potentially electric Gio Bernard to complement the plodding Law Firm). Gimme the two-gap here as well.

    Chicago. Cutler to Marshall puts up numbers, but their offense revolves around the versatile Matt Forte (with Michael Bush complementing him). Two-gap.

    Minnesota. Adrian Peterson over Christian Ponder and it isn't close. Would much rather two-gap than one-gap here.

    New York. Chris Ivory isn't a world beater, but he's better than Mark Sanchez or Geno Smith with no one to throw to. Two-gap.

    Baltimore. Flacco flourished in the playoffs when his go-to guys were Boldin and Pitta. They are both gone now, and Torrey Smith is essentially a poor man's Mike Wallace. Ray Rice and Bernard Pierce are more dangerous. Two-gap.

    Oakland. Darren McFadden over Matt Flynn. Two-gap.

    New England. Brady is obviously always dangerous no matter what, but Welker and Hernandez are gone and who knows where Gronkowski will be in early November. They already run the ball more than people think (Ridley had over 1250 rushing yards and 12 rushing TD's last year), and they also plan to use Shane Vereen more creatively this year to make up for some of the talent lost. While Brady is your focus, obviously, you still have to respect the run.

    Buffalo. C.J. Spiller and Fred Jackson over Kevin Kolb and E.J. Manuel. Two-gap.

    Detroit. The Lions throw the ball more than anyone (Stafford threw the ball 727 times last season, and has over 10,000 passing yards in the last 2 seasons). When you have Calvin Johnson at your disposal, who can blame you? But they did bring in Reggie Bush this offseason, giving them a threat in backfield for the first time since Jahvid Best's concussions got the better of him. While the passing game is your focus, obviously, you still have to respect the run.

    Cleveland. Trent Richardson over Brandon Weeden and it isn't close. Would much rather two-gap than one-gap here.

    Miami. Lamar Miller is somewhat of an unknown in the Miami backfield, but Ryan Tannehill hasn't exactly established himself fully in the league either. Teams with developing QB's often run to set up the pass, though, so two-gap makes sense here.

    Green Bay. Aaron Rodgers is obviously the man, but the Pack added Eddie Lacy and Jonathan Franklin in the draft, so the offense shouldn't be as one-sided as it has been in the recent past. While Rodgers is your focus, obviously, you still have to respect the run.


    So, to recap, it seems to me like will be facing more potentially dominant RB's than we will truly elite passers this year (and I think that it is still important to respect the run, even when facing the likes of Aaron Rodgers and Tom Brady).
    If you listen to Butler, he says the D needs to be better at stopping the run to force teams to pass and then that's when you can go after the QB. So I don't see them sacrificing against the run to get pressure. I think I've heard Butler several times emphasize stopping the run as the foundation to everything they want to do this year.

  5. #25
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    This makes total sense. Our smallish LBs (Harrison included in the past few years) get swallowed up by massive 6'8 OTs that are now basically allowed to hold and hog tie a rusher. The rules, IMO, have shifted a bit in favor of the OT. You can thank James Harrison and Woodley for alot of that change.

    We (as well as any team in the league) need our interior linemen (whether in a 3-4 or 4-3, the scheme dictates) to push more. Hence someone's point why guys like JJ Watt have dominated lately. Times change!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Lemming View Post
    And what team has more of a rep as an "attacking" defense than this one?
    Just a couple of years ago? Who created more fear than JH? Who attacked from EVERYWHERE like Troy? Who destroyed players in the secondary like Clark?

    DLs philisophy aint the issue, it is talent.

    JH was breaking down, Woodley was fat and injured, Troy hobbled.
    Add to that rule changes that hurts guys like JH and Clark from jarring the ball lose via big hits.

    Corners who cant catch to save their lives.
    Lewis lead the league in passes defensed with ZERO picks.
    That is not a passive catch and tackle, that is going after the ball and cant hold onto it.
    Let's pretent that was Rod Woodson?
    Does that happen?

    Cortez created 5 turnovers in THREE GAMES. Same pass rush, same DL Philosophy.

    That aint "scheme".

    Yet, we had the number 1 statistical defense.

    Does that make it the best? No.

    But in view of the above it is AMAZING that this defense had the success it had to rank number 1.

    The problem isnt passive play, it is lacking players.

    Keisel said "when we had Harrison and Woodley....." when he talked about the changes.

    I just see little confidence in THIS SET of Linebackers to create pressure.
    But a coach should adjust their philosophy and playcalling to fit the players he has not the ones he wishes he had. LeBeau's defense is predicated on creating pressure and forcing mistakes and when it does that it is the best. The problem the last couple of years is that we rolled a template that worked 3-4 years ago and it failed to create pressure and turnovers but we saw little adjustment. Hopefully letting the DL attack more versus "occupy" is a step in the right direction.
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Lemming View Post
    And what team has more of a rep as an "attacking" defense than this one?
    Just a couple of years ago? Who created more fear than JH? Who attacked from EVERYWHERE like Troy? Who destroyed players in the secondary like Clark?

    DLs philisophy aint the issue, it is talent.

    JH was breaking down, Woodley was fat and injured, Troy hobbled.
    Add to that rule changes that hurts guys like JH and Clark from jarring the ball lose via big hits.

    Corners who cant catch to save their lives.
    Lewis lead the league in passes defensed with ZERO picks.
    That is not a passive catch and tackle, that is going after the ball and cant hold onto it.
    Let's pretent that was Rod Woodson?
    Does that happen?

    Cortez created 5 turnovers in THREE GAMES. Same pass rush, same DL Philosophy.

    That aint "scheme".

    Yet, we had the number 1 statistical defense.

    Does that make it the best? No.

    But in view of the above it is AMAZING that this defense had the success it had to rank number 1.

    The problem isnt passive play, it is lacking players.

    Keisel said "when we had Harrison and Woodley....." when he talked about the changes.

    I just see little confidence in THIS SET of Linebackers to create pressure.
    I agree, the talent is the issue.

    One gap or two, Ziggy Hood is not going to suddenly become JJ Watt.

    Worilds I think can be ok, but I've seen nothing to lead me to believe that he will be a force. I am excited about Jones. Woodley returning to form will be a major key.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo View Post
    But a coach should adjust their philosophy and playcalling to fit the players he has not the ones he wishes he had. LeBeau's defense is predicated on creating pressure and forcing mistakes and when it does that it is the best. The problem the last couple of years is that we rolled a template that worked 3-4 years ago and it failed to create pressure and turnovers but we saw little adjustment. Hopefully letting the DL attack more versus "occupy" is a step in the right direction.
    Yes, that is why the change is being made our LEGENDARY DC is making changes based on personell. My issue is ripping DL for a strategy that worked fine like he should have ALWAYS done it differently.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by flippy View Post
    If you listen to Butler, he says the D needs to be better at stopping the run to force teams to pass and then that's when you can go after the QB. So I don't see them sacrificing against the run to get pressure. I think I've heard Butler several times emphasize stopping the run as the foundation to everything they want to do this year.
    I would say that's dependent on opponent. You have to figure the Patriots and the Packers will be looking to throw against the Steelers and not bother to run much.

  10. #30
    Lemming...you stated "And what team has more of a rep as an "attacking" defense than this one?"

    About half the teams in the NFL? I was speaking about last season as stated in my post. No one feared the Steelers D last season.

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