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Thread: Chuck Noll: No. 5 all time on ESPN list

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by 7 UP View Post
    Woulda, shoulda, coulda means very little. Actual numbers and stats is what Im looking at. Noll actually has 4 rings. 4 Rings in 6 years is unheard of and may very well never be done by one coach again..........I give Walsh his due, and while he may be in the conversation, show me one hardcore fact that puts him ahead of the other three.
    4 rings in 6 years impressive true. But it won't happen again because nobody will have 9 hofers together for a decade.

    But really we are talking 4 rings in 22 years aren't we? Walsh's 3 in 10 looks good now doesn't it?

    The fact that those rings are so close show that talent of one set of players were key to Noll success. That is player over coaching.

    He had 5 hofers in the early 70s and that wasn't enough talent. He had 8 after Greene retired and could not do it.

    He had 17 years of coaching when he didn't have all of 9 of his hof players. Not one ring without all 9.

    Noll was still Steeler coach during Walsh ENTIRE CAREER, who had success?

    If Noll was better maybe he would have one of the rings Walsh had? Instead Nolls inability to win without ridiculous talent during the 80s got him fired.

    Walsh did what he did while using many different players. When your success depends on a certain group of players you gotta say it's more about the talent.

    Walsh's system was so great that it CONTINUED to have success after he retired.
    Last edited by Captain Lemming; 06-08-2013 at 06:17 PM.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Lemming View Post
    4 rings in 6 years impressive true. But it won't happen again because nobody will have 9 hofers together for a decade.

    But really we are talking 4 rings in 22 years aren't we? Walsh's 3 in 10 looks good now doesn't it?

    The fact that those rings are so close show that talent of one set of players were key to Noll success. That is player over coaching.

    He had 5 hofers in the early 70s and that wasn't enough talent. He had 8 after Greene retired and could not do it.

    He had 17 years of coaching when he didn't have all of 9 of his hof players. Not one ring without all 9.

    Noll was still Steeler coach during Walsh ENTIRE CAREER, who had success?

    If Noll was better maybe he would have one of the rings Walsh had? Instead Nolls inability to win without ridiculous talent during the 80s got him fired.

    Walsh did what he did while using many different players. When your success depends on a certain group of players you gotta say it's more about the talent.

    Walsh's system was so great that it CONTINUED to have success after he retired.
    I guess one could say Noll accumulated, trained, and orchestrated all that talent into the greatest, most dominating team of all-time.
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Discipline of Steel View Post
    I guess one could say Noll accumulated, trained, and orchestrated all that talent into the greatest, most dominating team of all-time.
    That would be fair. This is why Noll belongs.

    Walsh did similar with less dominating talent with more than one set of players who required a brand new system accomplish what they did.

    Noll "followed" the fundamental principles of the Lombardi, Brown, and Shula.
    He did it well as long as he had ridiculous talent.
    He got fired because he couldn't do it with less.

    Walsh created a system that was so revolutionary it was imitated by half the league.
    Walsh retired a champion with 3 but his system led to even more championships for the niners and elsewhere.

    Noll changed a franchise using tried and true methods pioneered by others.
    Walsh changed THE LEAGUE by creating a new way of winning and has a lasting impact on the NFL to this day.
    Last edited by Captain Lemming; 06-09-2013 at 02:00 AM.

  4. #14
    Legend hawaiiansteel's Avatar
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    5. Chuck Noll: Key to a franchise

    Only coach with four Super Bowl victories put Steelers among NFL's elite
    Originally Published: June 7, 2013
    ESPN.com

    No. 5 - Chuck Noll

    In 1969, Chuck Noll took over a Pittsburgh Steelers team that had never won a title of any kind. By the time he left 23 seasons later, the Steelers had become one of the NFL's greatest dynasties, with four Super Bowl wins.

    Noll's Steelers won nine AFC Central titles in all, and their four championships came in a six-year period, spanning the 1974 through 1979 seasons. The only coach to win four Super Bowls, Noll was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1993.

    Starting during his playing days, Noll was groomed by some of the greatest coaches in NFL history. The Cleveland Browns selected him out of Dayton in the 1953 draft, giving him a chance to win two NFL championships while playing offensive line and linebacker for seven seasons under Paul Brown.

    Noll got his start in coaching in 1960, the year after he finished his playing career, as a defensive assistant under Sid Gillman with the AFL's Los Angeles Chargers. He followed the franchise to San Diego and worked with Gillman fox six seasons, then moved to Don Shula's staff with the Baltimore Colts in 1966 before landing his first -- and only -- head-coaching job three years later.

    Noll had almost become Patriots' head coach days before the Steelers hired him in 1969. Boston owner Billy Sullivan's two finalists were Noll and New York Jets assistant Clive Rush. Since the Jets had just defeated the Colts in Super Bowl III, Sullivan opted for Rush. The Patriots went 5-16 under Rush, who was gone after a 1-6 start in 1970.

    Noll believed in building through the draft and emphasizing defense. Pittsburgh's 1974 draft, which featured four future Hall of Famers -- Lynn Swann, Jack Lambert, John Stallworth and Mike Webster -- among the team's first five picks, is widely acknowledged as the best in NFL history. The Steelers' "Steel Curtain" was one of the most feared defenses of the 1970s.

    Hall of Famers Joe Greene, Jack Ham, Mel Blount, Terry Bradshaw, Lambert, Swann and Stallworth played their entire careers under Noll. Coaches who worked under Noll include Tony Dungy, John Fox and Bud Carson.

    -- Shawna Seed

    NOLL THROUGH THE EYES OF A PLAYER: MEL BLOUNT

    The big thing with Chuck Noll was how consistent he was dealing with players. As a player, you always knew what to do and when to do it. He was always consistent with how he dealt with people. It didn't matter if you came from Penn State or Florida A&M or whether you were from USC or Southern University.

    I don't see current coaches dealing with players the way he did. It's a different game now, and I see a lot of coaches getting caught up in the media with the way they deal with players. You see it on the sidelines. Chuck Noll was always consistent. You wouldn't see him give a high five if you made a great play or get in your face if you made a bad play. I guess that would make Chuck Noll a dinosaur now.

    His pregame speeches were usually him talking about the game plan and how we had to use our fundamentals. But I was talking to Joe Greene about this the other day. The one pregame we never forgot was before our playoff game against the Oakland Raiders in 1974.

    The week before, the Raiders beat the Miami Dolphins. Somebody saw that John Madden said the two best teams in football played that week and that was the Super Bowl. Chuck came in and said we were going out there and were going to win this game. He said we have the best team. We all looked around and said, "Wow." We had never seen that from Chuck. We went out there, won the game and went on to win our first Super Bowl.

    -- Former Steelers defensive back and Hall of Famer Mel Blount, as told to John Clayton

    ESPN "Greatest Coaches in NFL History" voting panel: Chris Berman, Jeffri Chadiha, John Clayton, Colin Cowherd, Mike Ditka, Gregg Easterbrook, Herm Edwards, David Fleming, Ashley Fox, Greg Garber, Mike Golic, Suzy Kolber, Eric Mangini, Chris Mortensen, Sal Paolantonio, Bill Polian, Rick Reilly, Mike Sando, Adam Schefter, Ed Werder, Seth Wickersham, Trey Wingo.

    http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/page/...ory-chuck-noll

  5. #15
    Hall of Famer SteelCrazy's Avatar
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    He also drafted the 9 HOF'ers which solidifies my point. You make it sound as if it were unfair. Those players came about because of Noll. Walsh came up with dink and dunk timing patterns to open up the occasional long pass. OK.......

  6. #16
    Chuck Noll is most definitely a top 5 head coach...

    Better than Walsh? That's rough...

    Equal to Walsh? Perhaps...


    Walsh had his fair share of great players as well... Montana, Jerry Rice, Ronnie Lott...he traded for Steve Young and helped to mold him into a HoF player...not to mention Charles Haley, who probably should be in the HoF...

  7. #17
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    If Chuck Noll wasn't such a recluse, he'd easily be #1 on this list. He didn't like talking about football when he was coaching. And when his Steeler's career was done, he disappeared. If he talked about football or stayed engaged, everyone would agree he's the best and there wouldn't be any question.

    The guy architected the greatest dynasty in NFL history. And he did it when teams were really good. And he treated football as a 9-5 job. Noll was different. He was efficient. He was emotionless. But he won. And he got the most out of players.

    Coaches need players and some luck to be really good. Noll had both. And he made the most out of it.

  8. #18
    Hall of Famer SteelCrazy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flippy View Post
    If Chuck Noll wasn't such a recluse, he'd easily be #1 on this list. He didn't like talking about football when he was coaching. And when his Steeler's career was done, he disappeared. If he talked about football or stayed engaged, everyone would agree he's the best and there wouldn't be any question.

    The guy architected the greatest dynasty in NFL history. And he did it when teams were really good. And he treated football as a 9-5 job. Noll was different. He was efficient. He was emotionless. But he won. And he got the most out of players.

    Coaches need players and some luck to be really good. Noll had both. And he made the most out of it.
    Now that makes sense.

  9. #19
    Legend papillon's Avatar
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    This types of lists are like t i t s on a boar, useless. Each coach has something that he did to make him standout, Lombardi 74% winning, Walsh an offense that changed the league, Shula 347 wins, Noll 4 rings, etc. You can make a case any one of them is better than the others, so why bother, celebrate the ones you like and forget the ones you don't like. But trying to rank them is a fruitless endeavor.

    Pappy


    1.15) Ryan Shazier - ILB/OLB
    2.46) Stephon Tuitt - DE
    3.97) Dri Archer - RB
    4.118 ) Martavis Bryant - WR
    5.157) Shaquille Richardson - CB
    6.173) Wesley Johnson - OT
    6.192) Jordan Zumwalt - ILB
    7.215) Daniel McCullers - DT
    7.230) Rob Blanchflower - TE

    "Before you can win a game, you have to not lose it." -- Chuck Noll

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by papillon View Post
    This types of lists are like t i t s on a boar, useless. Each coach has something that he did to make him standout, Lombardi 74% winning, Walsh an offense that changed the league, Shula 347 wins, Noll 4 rings, etc. You can make a case any one of them is better than the others, so why bother, celebrate the ones you like and forget the ones you don't like. But trying to rank them is a fruitless endeavor.

    Pappy
    My point was to contradict the notion that Walsh wasn't worthy of those mentioned.

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