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Thread: Steelers will count on 'Typical Steve McLendon' to emerge in Casey Hampton's absence

  1. #31
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    A hungry Dog will find a way to eat. McClendon's body transformation and dedication to learning his trade over the years shows me he is hungry. I will put my money on those players to succeed. Time for him to eat.



  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Sugar View Post
    Because it's a high scoring league, the #1 priority is to keep the other team from scoring. Second would be to keep the other team from advancing as much as possible to try and ensure better field position for your offense. If you can get a turnover in the process?? Gravy!
    I agree, and the key is and always has been pressure. Pressure creates turnovers from quick poor decisions. Pressure creates field position. And most importantly pressure lowers the other teams chances to score. Our front 7 determine much of that, hence all the money invested into the front 7.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Sugar View Post
    Because it's a high scoring league, the #1 priority is to keep the other team from scoring. Second would be to keep the other team from advancing as much as possible to try and ensure better field position for your offense. If you can get a turnover in the process?? Gravy!
    Last year's defensive stats:

    Defensive YPG - Steelers finished first by a whopping 15 YPG. Denver, San Fran, Seattle, Chicago round out the top 5

    Defensive PPG - Seattle (by far), San Fran, Chicago, Denver, Atlanta top 5. Steelers finished 6.

    Defensive turnovers - Chicago (44), New England (41), Giants (35), Arizona (33), Atlanta and Seattle (31)...........way down the list Steelers (20)

    So, if you simply judge using the Steelers as reference, you have a team that gives up few yards, few points, but got no turnovers and missed the playoffs. However, using some other teams you see that Denver and San Fran had strong Ds when it came to scoring and yards but, like the Steelers, were unable to get the turnovers (24 and 25 respectively). They still had strong playoff years, however, you can also state that it was the inability to create some easy turnovers that led directly to Denver's loss to the Ravens.

    So the verdict is.........inconclusive!!

    That being said, I believe that the biggest key is something that is not in these stats, and that is timing. Like most sports, the key is to make the big play at the right time.

  4. #34
    Correlation is deceptive. There are so many factors that go into a W or a L. What if an O is ineffective? Or the D is shut down for 3 quarters only to fall apart when it matters? There are so many scenerios that play into a winning or losing ball club.

    For D, I truly believe in a pass first high scoring league you MUST be able to get consistent pressure. Yes, you will give up more big plays. But, you also make more big plays. You must get another team out of their game...and you only do that by getting in the QBs face.
    Last edited by Shawn; 06-06-2013 at 04:22 PM.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by steeler_fan_in_t.o. View Post
    Last year's defensive stats:

    Defensive YPG - Steelers finished first by a whopping 15 YPG. Denver, San Fran, Seattle, Chicago round out the top 5

    Defensive PPG - Seattle (by far), San Fran, Chicago, Denver, Atlanta top 5. Steelers finished 6.

    Defensive turnovers - Chicago (44), New England (41), Giants (35), Arizona (33), Atlanta and Seattle (31)...........way down the list Steelers (20)

    So, if you simply judge using the Steelers as reference, you have a team that gives up few yards, few points, but got no turnovers and missed the playoffs. However, using some other teams you see that Denver and San Fran had strong Ds when it came to scoring and yards but, like the Steelers, were unable to get the turnovers (24 and 25 respectively). They still had strong playoff years, however, you can also state that it was the inability to create some easy turnovers that led directly to Denver's loss to the Ravens.

    So the verdict is.........inconclusive!!

    That being said, I believe that the biggest key is something that is not in these stats, and that is timing. Like most sports, the key is to make the big play at the right time.
    Factor in we were tied for 15th in sacks with 37 and that will tell you why we don't get turnovers. It all starts with attacking the QB and we haven't done that very well for 2-3 years.
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
    Correlation is deceptive. There are so many factors that go into a W or a L. What if an O is ineffective? Or the D is shut down for 3 quarters only to fall apart when it matters? There are so many scenerios that play into a winning or losing ball club.

    For D, I truly believe in a pass first high scoring league you MUST be able to get consistant pressure. Yes, you will give up more big plays. But, you also make more big plays. You must get another team out of their game...and you only do that by getting in the QBs face.
    "Consistent pressure" is the key and when you are predictable and the opponents know exactly who is going to rush the QB then you aren't going to get consistent pressure.

    Even Carson Palmer said after the Raiders game he knew exactly what we were doing on defense. You don't think everyone else did too?
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo View Post
    "Consistent pressure" is the key and when you are predictable and the opponents know exactly who is going to rush the QB then you aren't going to get consistent pressure.

    Even Carson Palmer said after the Raiders game he knew exactly what we were doing on defense. You don't think everyone else did too?
    In the 4-3, don't you always know who is rushing the QB?

    The biggest problem with pressure is guys not winning their individual matchups. Dick Lebeau can scheme to get Woodley one-on-one with a TE or a RT; he can't actually make Woodley get pressure - that needs to come from him.

    The problem is not the scheme, the problem is the lack of execution. That needs to come from the players.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by phillyesq View Post
    In the 4-3, don't you always know who is rushing the QB?

    The biggest problem with pressure is guys not winning their individual matchups. Dick Lebeau can scheme to get Woodley one-on-one with a TE or a RT; he can't actually make Woodley get pressure - that needs to come from him.

    The problem is not the scheme, the problem is the lack of execution. That needs to come from the players.
    This is 100% true...

    Did LeBeau call a different defense for Cortez Allen than he did for Keenan Lewis? No.

    While Lewis was around the ball a lot (23 PDs) Allen caused more turnovers...

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo View Post
    It worked so well contributing to 8 losses last year and missing the play offs. Get just 10 more sacks over the course of the season and a few more INT that could have been significant.
    Don't turn the ball over 8 times on offense and we win the cleveland game easy. Score more points on sorry teams and we win 11. Blaming it all on one side of the ball is short sighted. I agree we relied too much on some aging players, but those backups need to step up when called on and they didn't do that.

    I still think that the biggest problem was coaching, particularly on the offensive line. It just seems strange that the coach goes from one team to another and the injury problems follow him. It really comes down to technique and our offensive line had terrible technique for the past few years.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by phillyesq View Post
    In the 4-3, don't you always know who is rushing the QB?

    The biggest problem with pressure is guys not winning their individual matchups. Dick Lebeau can scheme to get Woodley one-on-one with a TE or a RT; he can't actually make Woodley get pressure - that needs to come from him.

    The problem is not the scheme, the problem is the lack of execution. That needs to come from the players.
    Really? No way. I never knew that Dwight Freeney was going to rush the passer every time. I was always fooled.
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