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Thread: Timmons "Haters" Still Out There?

  1. #11
    Timmons has played pretty well recently, but I want to see elite performance from him consistently.

    Also, Ovi, I thought you had been saying all year that Timmons should be attacking the LOS and not playing in coverage. Seems that having him drop in coverage worked out ok.

  2. #12
    Administrator steelz09's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by birtikidis View Post
    People don't realize what Timmons does to the other teams TE's. He can match up with any of them and taken out of the game. There's more to football than just sacks.
    Timmons, just like most LBs in the league would get toasted by Jimmy Graham, Vernon Davis, Gronkowski, Hernandez, etc.

    If I remember correctly, Cortez Allen covered Gronkowski most of the game last year because he #1 - Has size #2 - Athletic ability. Most corners have the athletic ability but can't match up physically.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by phillyesq View Post
    Timmons has played pretty well recently, but I want to see elite performance from him consistently.

    Also, Ovi, I thought you had been saying all year that Timmons should be attacking the LOS and not playing in coverage. Seems that having him drop in coverage worked out ok.
    I still would have him attacking the LOS at least 50% of the time. Like we saw last night he makes things happen doing that. Greaty he was in coverage for the INT but he will do more damage going after the QB than waiting for an INT.
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo View Post
    I still would have him attacking the LOS at least 50% of the time. Like we saw last night he makes things happen doing that. Greaty he was in coverage for the INT but he will do more damage going after the QB than waiting for an INT.
    Both of Timmons' INTs this season were set up by him going after the QB...just when the opposing QB is expecting him to rush, LeBeau has him drop into coverage, leading to the INT...

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by birtikidis View Post
    People don't realize what Timmons does to the other teams TE's. He can match up with any of them and taken out of the game. There's more to football than just sacks.
    this is simply, not true.

    remember the oakland game timmons was beaten by a no name TE for a critical 1st down. This was in the stretch of the 1st 3 games where timmons was practically invisible, outside of giving up big plays. To say he is the best LB and brings it "every week" is just seeing what someone wants to see. If I recall, he had 11 total tackles in those 1st three games. They count too, right?

    and while he played well last night, he was far from perfect. He was bailed out by a horrible holding call after missing a wide open tackle on the KC touchdown pass. That very well may have cost the steelers a victory if not for the generous call. Lets see a couple of full seasons from timmons before we anoint him into the HOF.

  6. #16
    Legend hawaiiansteel's Avatar
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    Timmons breaks mold of Pittsburgh's linebackers

    CHRIS ADAMSKI, Associated Press
    Thursday, November 15, 2012



    Pittsburgh Steelers inside linebacker Lawrence Timmons (94) intercepts a pass in front of Kansas City Chiefs tight end Steve Maneri (87) in overtime of an NFL football game, Monday, Nov. 12, 2012, in Pittsburgh. The Steelers won 16-13. Photo: Don Wright / AP

    PITTSBURGH (AP) James Harrison rarely holds back when it comes to controversial comments.

    Larry Foote's a congenial chatterbox on and off the field.

    And among great Pittsburgh Steelers linebackers of the recent past, Joey Porter was known for his trash talking and James Farrior for his vocal leadership.

    Something about the position, maybe.

    Then, of course, there's Lawrence Timmons, arguably the best linebacker for the best statistical defense in the NFL. Timmons hardly fits the mold of a loud and rambunctious Steelers linebacker past or present.

    But he's just as productive, if not more. And he will be in focus when his Steelers (6-3) face the Baltimore Ravens (7-2) in an AFC North showdown Sunday night.

    "Man, if Lawrence says more than two words to you, I guess you're his friend," Steelers nose tackle Casey Hampton quipped. "I might not be his friend. I don't think he's said more than two words to me since he's been here."

    Quiet and mild-mannered in the Steelers' locker room, Timmons maintains a steely focus when he's in the heat of battle. And the Steelers will need that this week.

    The freakishly athletic former first-round pick is in his fourth season as a starter, but he's still the junior member of a veteran Pittsburgh corps. With Harrison and Foote in their 30s and LaMarr Woodley shaking off nagging hamstring injuries, Timmons has been the Steelers' most consistent playmaker at linebacker.

    His interception of Matt Cassel and 23-yard return inside the Kansas City 10-yard line set up the winning field goal early in overtime of a 16-13 victory over the Chiefs Monday.

    "He told me that he was one of the top offensive prospects coming out of high school, and I used to deny that," Steelers defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau said. "But after that run he made Monday night, I think he's got a point."

    The 75-year-old LeBeau chuckled. But he wasn't joking a few moments later when he said, "I think Lawrence has been playing at a Pro Bowl level for several years now."

    Timmons has yet to be selected for a Pro Bowl. LeBeau said that's because he's been overshadowed on his own team by the likes of Harrison, Woodley and Farrior, who have seven berths between them.

    In the Steelers' 3-4 scheme, it's the outside linebackers who rack up the sacks. Timmons has played there at times for Pittsburgh, but he's settling into his inside spot next to Foote. That hasn't taken away, though, from the versatility that might be his greatest asset.

    "I feel like I can fill in anywhere to help the defense," Timmons said. "I love getting put in the game plans and I like being in spaces where I can make plays. That means a lot to me.

    "(LeBeau) has set up things for me to roam around, play in space which I love doing and also blitz the passer. It's fun."

    A chiseled 6-1, 234 pounds, Timmons is big enough to be an effective tackler but fast enough to be a strong safety. That's exactly how LeBeau sees it. When Foote calls Timmons "the Troy Polamalu of the front seven," it's because of his polite and soft-spoken ways. LeBeau actually uses Timmons as the Polamalu of the front seven.

    Particularly with Polamalu out with a calf injury for much of this season, Timmons has increasingly been playing in centerfield on passing downs.

    "Each year, he's just been getting better and better and lately he's started to be a big-time playmaker for us," Foote said. "The sky's the limit for Lawrence."

    That's a familiar offseason refrain in Pittsburgh about Timmons, who has shown some flashes of brilliance but hasn't been the consistently dominant player that the 2007 No. 15 overall draft pick should be. In the past 12 years, franchise quarterback Ben Roethlisberger is the only player the Steelers have drafted with an earlier pick than No. 15.

    It seems as if every summer, Timmons is the popular choice as Pittsburgh's "breakout" player. That talk was amplified when he signed a six-year, $50 million contract extension in August of 2011.

    But now, he seems to be living up to it.

    "I'm always trying to be real hard on myself," Timmons said. "I hate to make mistakes so I'm always concentrating and I try to be real focused. I'm always trying to be the best."

    On the field, there's no question. Competing in a locker room game of shuffleboard of table tennis, Timmons' intensely competitive nature shines through, as well.

    But when he's not competing, the "good ol' quiet Southern boy," as Foote puts it, comes out. Early in his career, a common sight in the bustling and crowded pre-practice locker room was Timmons flat on his back, a jersey over his face for an early-afternoon cat nap.

    "I guess that's him resting up," said Hampton, "because on the field, he's anything but quiet. He don't say a lot, but he speaks with his pads and his play playing hard, playing physical.

    "He can keep on being quiet, saving all his energy, as long as he keeps making plays for us."
    ___

    NOTES: LB Chris Carter was placed on injured reserve because of an abdominal injury. The team promoted LB Marshall McFadden from the practice squad to take his roster spot and added TE Jamie McCoy to the practice squad. ... RB Rashard Mendenhall practiced fully for the second consecutive day and aims to play Sunday for the first time in more than a month because an Achilles injury.
    ___

    http://www.greenwichtime.com/sports/...#ixzz2CMCgpyrY

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawaiiansteel View Post
    Timmons breaks mold of Pittsburgh's linebackers

    CHRIS ADAMSKI, Associated Press
    Thursday, November 15, 2012



    Pittsburgh Steelers inside linebacker Lawrence Timmons (94) intercepts a pass in front of Kansas City Chiefs tight end Steve Maneri (87) in overtime of an NFL football game, Monday, Nov. 12, 2012, in Pittsburgh. The Steelers won 16-13. Photo: Don Wright / AP

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — James Harrison rarely holds back when it comes to controversial comments.

    Larry Foote's a congenial chatterbox on and off the field.

    And among great Pittsburgh Steelers linebackers of the recent past, Joey Porter was known for his trash talking and James Farrior for his vocal leadership.

    Something about the position, maybe.

    Then, of course, there's Lawrence Timmons, arguably the best linebacker for the best statistical defense in the NFL. Timmons hardly fits the mold of a loud and rambunctious Steelers linebacker — past or present.

    But he's just as productive, if not more. And he will be in focus when his Steelers (6-3) face the Baltimore Ravens (7-2) in an AFC North showdown Sunday night.

    "Man, if Lawrence says more than two words to you, I guess you're his friend," Steelers nose tackle Casey Hampton quipped. "I might not be his friend. I don't think he's said more than two words to me since he's been here."

    Quiet and mild-mannered in the Steelers' locker room, Timmons maintains a steely focus when he's in the heat of battle. And the Steelers will need that this week.

    The freakishly athletic former first-round pick is in his fourth season as a starter, but he's still the junior member of a veteran Pittsburgh corps. With Harrison and Foote in their 30s and LaMarr Woodley shaking off nagging hamstring injuries, Timmons has been the Steelers' most consistent playmaker at linebacker.

    His interception of Matt Cassel and 23-yard return inside the Kansas City 10-yard line set up the winning field goal early in overtime of a 16-13 victory over the Chiefs Monday.

    "He told me that he was one of the top offensive prospects coming out of high school, and I used to deny that," Steelers defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau said. "But after that run he made Monday night, I think he's got a point."

    The 75-year-old LeBeau chuckled. But he wasn't joking a few moments later when he said, "I think Lawrence has been playing at a Pro Bowl level for several years now."

    Timmons has yet to be selected for a Pro Bowl. LeBeau said that's because he's been overshadowed on his own team by the likes of Harrison, Woodley and Farrior, who have seven berths between them.

    In the Steelers' 3-4 scheme, it's the outside linebackers who rack up the sacks. Timmons has played there at times for Pittsburgh, but he's settling into his inside spot next to Foote. That hasn't taken away, though, from the versatility that might be his greatest asset.

    "I feel like I can fill in anywhere to help the defense," Timmons said. "I love getting put in the game plans and I like being in spaces where I can make plays. That means a lot to me.

    "(LeBeau) has set up things for me to roam around, play in space — which I love doing — and also blitz the passer. It's fun."

    A chiseled 6-1, 234 pounds, Timmons is big enough to be an effective tackler but fast enough to be a strong safety. That's exactly how LeBeau sees it. When Foote calls Timmons "the Troy Polamalu of the front seven," it's because of his polite and soft-spoken ways. LeBeau actually uses Timmons as the Polamalu of the front seven.

    Particularly with Polamalu out with a calf injury for much of this season, Timmons has increasingly been playing in centerfield on passing downs.

    "Each year, he's just been getting better and better — and lately he's started to be a big-time playmaker for us," Foote said. "The sky's the limit for Lawrence."

    That's a familiar offseason refrain in Pittsburgh about Timmons, who has shown some flashes of brilliance but hasn't been the consistently dominant player that the 2007 No. 15 overall draft pick should be. In the past 12 years, franchise quarterback Ben Roethlisberger is the only player the Steelers have drafted with an earlier pick than No. 15.

    It seems as if every summer, Timmons is the popular choice as Pittsburgh's "breakout" player. That talk was amplified when he signed a six-year, $50 million contract extension in August of 2011.

    But now, he seems to be living up to it.

    "I'm always trying to be real hard on myself," Timmons said. "I hate to make mistakes so I'm always concentrating and I try to be real focused. I'm always trying to be the best."

    On the field, there's no question. Competing in a locker room game of shuffleboard of table tennis, Timmons' intensely competitive nature shines through, as well.

    But when he's not competing, the "good ol' quiet Southern boy," as Foote puts it, comes out. Early in his career, a common sight in the bustling and crowded pre-practice locker room was Timmons flat on his back, a jersey over his face for an early-afternoon cat nap.

    "I guess that's him resting up," said Hampton, "because on the field, he's anything but quiet. He don't say a lot, but he speaks with his pads and his play — playing hard, playing physical.

    "He can keep on being quiet, saving all his energy, as long as he keeps making plays for us."
    ___

    NOTES: LB Chris Carter was placed on injured reserve because of an abdominal injury. The team promoted LB Marshall McFadden from the practice squad to take his roster spot and added TE Jamie McCoy to the practice squad. ... RB Rashard Mendenhall practiced fully for the second consecutive day and aims to play Sunday for the first time in more than a month because an Achilles injury.
    ___

    http://www.greenwichtime.com/sports/...#ixzz2CMCgpyrY
    Great article and Timmons is "the best" of the LBs when you compare him to the underperforming Harrison and Woodley. IMO he has been the best player on defense all season long (Ryan Clark is close).
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Spaghetti View Post
    this is simply, not true.

    remember the oakland game timmons was beaten by a no name TE for a critical 1st down. This was in the stretch of the 1st 3 games where timmons was practically invisible, outside of giving up big plays. To say he is the best LB and brings it "every week" is just seeing what someone wants to see. If I recall, he had 11 total tackles in those 1st three games. They count too, right?

    and while he played well last night, he was far from perfect. He was bailed out by a horrible holding call after missing a wide open tackle on the KC touchdown pass. That very well may have cost the steelers a victory if not for the generous call. Lets see a couple of full seasons from timmons before we anoint him into the HOF.
    incredible.... this is the problem with Timmons detractors. Every LB in the HOF has been beat by a no name a few times... they have missed tackles that "cost the team victories" in the 2nd and 3rd quarters... they have disappeared for stretches...

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by feltdizz View Post
    incredible.... this is the problem with Timmons detractors. Every LB in the HOF has been beat by a no name a few times... they have missed tackles that "cost the team victories" in the 2nd and 3rd quarters... they have disappeared for stretches...
    Barry Sanders was tackled behind the line of scrimmage many times. Dan Marino was picked off many times. Jerry Rice dropped many balls. Even the best have a bad play every now and then. In this day and age, you can be sure that there will be video on it when it happens. I'm not saying that Timmons is in that level of play, but that he has been a difference maker for this team this year. He should be respected, IMO, not ripped for how well he has played.

  10. #20
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    People rip him because he was a first round draft choice and he isn't playing like Lawrence Taylor, he's Lawrence Timmons and he's still getting better. He was junior when he was drafted (and young junior), Harrison, Foote and Farrior were established and Woodley took the world by storm. Now as Timmons is developing and becoming the player the Steelers hoped he would be, he gets ripped for taking so "long" to develop.

    Woodley hit stride immediately (he may have peaked already), Harrison was an animal, Farrior was probably the best 3-4 ILB in the league and that left Foote who was very good at that time. Everyone thought he would play outside and when Woodley and Harrison kept him on the bench as OLB the Steelers wanted to get his athleticism on the field, so they moved him inside. This was viewed not as getting an athlete on the field, but as trying to save face of a failed pick (which couldn't have been further from the truth).

    Fans perception is what has been his downfall not his play. We see him struggle to get off a block as an OLB (after playing ILB) and think he stinks, but in reality, he's probably the only backer on the team that can actually play both and hold his own. Personally, I'm looking for him to continue to get better, he'll have so-so games and a rare poor game, but he's going to be the backer that the other team tries to avoid.

    Good player, high intensity on the field, doesn't brag and does his job, what is there not to like?

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