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Thread: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

  1. #21

    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Quote Originally Posted by hawaiiansteel
    from Deebo's blog:



    jharrison9292L - my thoughts

    Whatís Really Going On?

    May 26, 2011
    ...

    I wonder why the NFL is suddenly coming down so hard on playerís safety issues. I canít help but think itís not actually for the safety of the players.

    http://jharrison9292.wordpress.com/2011 ... -going-on/
    Yes, James (sir!), I believe you are correct - IMO the main reasons are:

    1) "Your honor, it's not our fault they're all brain dead, we tried so hard to protect them ..." and,

    2) "We have to tap that virgin demographic of cute little housewives who like to see big strong men running around, but don't really want to see big hits ... there's more of them than hard core old-time football fans, we can throw the latter under the bus to open the new revenue stream". Hello SD, Indy ... good bye Pittsburgh/Baltimore.

    And ... not only have they neutered defenses built like ours, but they've neutered Ben - his comparative advantage was that he wouldn't go down where other QBs would. Now, since no QB is going to be tackled much (the penalty for a fine/ejection/etc. is too high, the hits will be namby-pamby at most), Ben's amazing elusiveness and complete-the-pass-while-being-pummeled skills will be irrelevant and of historical interest only. Kind of like some secretary who's the fastest in the city at taking shorthand. What's "shorthand"?? And what's a "secretary"?


    We got our "6-PACK" - time to work on a CASE!

    HERE WE GO STEELERS, HERE WE GO!

  2. #22
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

    The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  3. #23
    Hall of Famer ikestops85's Avatar
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

    The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.
    I'm glad our forefathers didn't think like that. If they had we would still be having our afternoon tea.

    I like that Harrison is standing up for what he thinks is right. More players should do that. The fans should also let their opinion be known. It's good for the NFL to have to justify their position. I think Harrison is pointing out that officials will be embarrassed because of the vagueness in the way the rules are written. In my opinion the NFL has dug themselves a very deep hole with this rule change and I think it will be modified within a year after they start playing football again.

    and in keeping with my standard rant on this subject ... How in the hell can the NFL say it is interested in player safety and not mandate the use of safer equipment? Padding on top of equipment that has a very hard surface (i.e. helmets and shoulder pads) would take much of the shock out of the hit and be a lot safer for the players. Who cares if the players don't look 'cool' wearing it. Of course if they do that the teams would have to spend money instead of collecting it in the form of fines.
    <a href=http://seahawknationblog.com/files/2011/02/roger-goodell.jpg target=_blank>http://seahawknationblog.com/files/2...er-goodell.jpg</a>

  4. #24
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Quote Originally Posted by ikestops85
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

    The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.
    I'm glad our forefathers didn't think like that. If they had we would still be having our afternoon tea.

    I like that Harrison is standing up for what he thinks is right. More players should do that. The fans should also let their opinion be known. It's good for the NFL to have to justify their position. I think Harrison is pointing out that officials will be embarrassed because of the vagueness in the way the rules are written. In my opinion the NFL has dug themselves a very deep hole with this rule change and I think it will be modified within a year after they start playing football again.

    and in keeping with my standard rant on this subject ... How in the hell can the NFL say it is interested in player safety and not mandate the use of safer equipment? Padding on top of equipment that has a very hard surface (i.e. helmets and shoulder pads) would take much of the shock out of the hit and be a lot safer for the players. Who cares if the players don't look 'cool' wearing it. Of course if they do that the teams would have to spend money instead of collecting it in the form of fines.

    OK

    A football player wanting to take someone's head off without consequence and not wanting to adapt to rules is exactly like our forrfathers objecting to unfair taxation, the lack of voting rights and representation in government and the forced billeting of soldiers in private homes. I now see how they are exactly the same. Thanks for pointing that out so eloquently.

    Perhaps Harrison should get all his buddies from the "not really a union" and seize NFL headquarters in a revolution. Problem is these rules are being emplaced to protect the other half of the players on offense so they may not participate and we will just brand them Tories or Loyalists.

    There may even be some "traitors" on the defensive side of the ball like Ray Lewis, Clay Matthews and others who seem afraid to spout off and whine like James "Don Quixote" Harrison. We all know this only effects Harrison and no other player or team in the league. The reason it will effect him is because he won't keep his trap shut so he is daring them to do something. Not a smart team first approach.
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  5. #25
    Legend hawaiiansteel's Avatar
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Be happy, Harrison: NFL crackdown backs Steelers' 'nasty' rep

    By Vic Carucci NFL.com
    Senior Columnist
    May 26, 2011


    If I'm James Harrison or any other defensive player on the Pittsburgh Steelers, I'm not complaining about the fact the NFL is singling out me or my team for the flagrant hits we deliver.

    I'm embracing it.

    Hey, guys, the NFL has gone as far as to establish legislation -- calling for teams to be fined for players' repeated rule-breaking hits -- that for all practical purposes bears your name. And when anyone mentions the "Steelers rule," the first word that comes to mind is "nasty."

    You don't just think about the ultra-aggressive manner in which Pittsburgh's defenders play. You think about the way they're coached. You picture coach Mike Tomlin and defensive coordinator D!ck LeBeau encouraging a playing style that puts a premium on intimidation -- so much so that the league now is holding them directly responsible for when their players draw flags and fines on multiple occasions.

    This isn't meant to condone illegal or dangerous contact, such as the helmet-to-helmet variety. It's merely pointing out that, for as long as there has been football, there have been players and teams that have benefitted from having certain reputations. Invariably, badder is better.

    That's why Harrison had it all wrong with this Twitter posting: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots." What he should have posted was: "Thank you!"

    Harrison's teammate and fellow linebacker, LaMarr Woodley, seemed to better grasp the opportunity at hand with this tweet: "Thoughts on 'the steelers rule'??? lol I'm sorry that I'm not sorry we hit 2 hard."

    If I'm these guys, I'm milking that outlaw reputation for all that it's worth, because it could be worth a lot. It just might prove to be the deciding factor in a victory, providing that critical edge at the most critical time of a game.

    Think about it. Thanks to the league's obsession with reining in the Steelers' defense, opposing offenses have something extra to consider before the game even begins: Is it safe to wander into a particular part of the field? To reach up for a pass and expose too much of the body? To hang in the pocket for that extra second or two?

    When opposing players are thinking too much about the consequences of their actions, they're less likely to make the plays they're supposed to make. It's like adding a 12th man to what already ranks as one of the best defenses in the NFL.

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... -nasty-rep

  6. #26
    Hall of Famer AngryAsian's Avatar
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Quote Originally Posted by hawaiiansteel
    Be happy, Harrison: NFL crackdown backs Steelers' 'nasty' rep

    By Vic Carucci NFL.com
    Senior Columnist
    May 26, 2011


    If I'm James Harrison or any other defensive player on the Pittsburgh Steelers, I'm not complaining about the fact the NFL is singling out me or my team for the flagrant hits we deliver.

    I'm embracing it.

    Hey, guys, the NFL has gone as far as to establish legislation -- calling for teams to be fined for players' repeated rule-breaking hits -- that for all practical purposes bears your name. And when anyone mentions the "Steelers rule," the first word that comes to mind is "nasty."

    You don't just think about the ultra-aggressive manner in which Pittsburgh's defenders play. You think about the way they're coached. You picture coach Mike Tomlin and defensive coordinator D!ck LeBeau encouraging a playing style that puts a premium on intimidation -- so much so that the league now is holding them directly responsible for when their players draw flags and fines on multiple occasions.

    This isn't meant to condone illegal or dangerous contact, such as the helmet-to-helmet variety. It's merely pointing out that, for as long as there has been football, there have been players and teams that have benefitted from having certain reputations. Invariably, badder is better.

    That's why Harrison had it all wrong with this Twitter posting: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots." What he should have posted was: "Thank you!"

    Harrison's teammate and fellow linebacker, LaMarr Woodley, seemed to better grasp the opportunity at hand with this tweet: "Thoughts on 'the steelers rule'??? lol I'm sorry that I'm not sorry we hit 2 hard."

    If I'm these guys, I'm milking that outlaw reputation for all that it's worth, because it could be worth a lot. It just might prove to be the deciding factor in a victory, providing that critical edge at the most critical time of a game.

    Think about it. Thanks to the league's obsession with reining in the Steelers' defense, opposing offenses have something extra to consider before the game even begins: Is it safe to wander into a particular part of the field? To reach up for a pass and expose too much of the body? To hang in the pocket for that extra second or two?

    When opposing players are thinking too much about the consequences of their actions, they're less likely to make the plays they're supposed to make. It's like adding a 12th man to what already ranks as one of the best defenses in the NFL.

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... -nasty-rep

    Sounds pretty logical to me.

  7. #27
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Quote Originally Posted by AngryAsian
    Quote Originally Posted by hawaiiansteel
    Be happy, Harrison: NFL crackdown backs Steelers' 'nasty' rep

    By Vic Carucci NFL.com
    Senior Columnist
    May 26, 2011


    If I'm James Harrison or any other defensive player on the Pittsburgh Steelers, I'm not complaining about the fact the NFL is singling out me or my team for the flagrant hits we deliver.

    I'm embracing it.

    Hey, guys, the NFL has gone as far as to establish legislation -- calling for teams to be fined for players' repeated rule-breaking hits -- that for all practical purposes bears your name. And when anyone mentions the "Steelers rule," the first word that comes to mind is "nasty."

    You don't just think about the ultra-aggressive manner in which Pittsburgh's defenders play. You think about the way they're coached. You picture coach Mike Tomlin and defensive coordinator D!ck LeBeau encouraging a playing style that puts a premium on intimidation -- so much so that the league now is holding them directly responsible for when their players draw flags and fines on multiple occasions.

    This isn't meant to condone illegal or dangerous contact, such as the helmet-to-helmet variety. It's merely pointing out that, for as long as there has been football, there have been players and teams that have benefitted from having certain reputations. Invariably, badder is better.

    That's why Harrison had it all wrong with this Twitter posting: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots." What he should have posted was: "Thank you!"

    Harrison's teammate and fellow linebacker, LaMarr Woodley, seemed to better grasp the opportunity at hand with this tweet: "Thoughts on 'the steelers rule'??? lol I'm sorry that I'm not sorry we hit 2 hard."

    If I'm these guys, I'm milking that outlaw reputation for all that it's worth, because it could be worth a lot. It just might prove to be the deciding factor in a victory, providing that critical edge at the most critical time of a game.

    Think about it. Thanks to the league's obsession with reining in the Steelers' defense, opposing offenses have something extra to consider before the game even begins: Is it safe to wander into a particular part of the field? To reach up for a pass and expose too much of the body? To hang in the pocket for that extra second or two?

    When opposing players are thinking too much about the consequences of their actions, they're less likely to make the plays they're supposed to make. It's like adding a 12th man to what already ranks as one of the best defenses in the NFL.

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... -nasty-rep

    Sounds pretty logical to me.
    Also means that a player can take a "dive" or overly dramatize a hit and they have a better chance of getting a penalty flag thrown.
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  8. #28
    Legend hawaiiansteel's Avatar
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    Also means that a player can take a "dive" or overly dramatize a hit and they have a better chance of getting a penalty flag thrown.
    pretty soon the NFL will be like that other "futbol" game...


  9. #29

    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining

    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

    The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.
    The most money post in this thread.

    When Harrison said he wasn't going to change his play after the FIRST fine HE put himself in the bulls-eye. Some calls were definitely questionable contest them fine, but the constant whining is a war he cannot win.

  10. #30
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    Re: Starkey: James Harrison should quit complaining



    Umpire Joe West, the president of the World Umpires Association who was feet away from the impact that sidelined Posey, assures it's only part of the game -- "just as much as apple pie."

    "I can't tell you I would change anything, It's one of those things that's part of baseball, just as much as apple pie. You can't change the rules because it's been that way forever."

    West said a key part of the play had been missed in the aftermath.

    "What they're failing to look at is that (Posey) dropped the ball before the guy got there," West said. "That's why he was in a vulnerable position. That's why he was trying to find the ball. If he had caught the ball, he could have got his hands up and he could have defended himself. He could have absorbed the blow with both arms and his glove.

    "It's like a receiver going over the middle in football. If he bobbles the ball a couple of times, the linebacker is going to kill him."
    Maybe the NFL needs to be more like the MLB afterall...

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