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Thread: Public Opinion: How people think

  1. #1
    Legend
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    Public Opinion: How people think

    Just wanted to share with you folks a very small (one person) sampling of how people think. I posted this in a thread awhile back, but thought it was deserving of it's own thread so that other folks might share and/or get an understanding of how the great unwashed masses think.

    Last week I took a road trip to FL to visit my brother. Had a great time...the treasure coast area of FL is very cool...and if there was work available there I could move in a heartbeat!

    Anyway, one night we went out to one of my bro's hangouts and he was introducing me to his friends. One of them was a 30-something woman who had moved there from Pittsburgh. Die hard Pittsburgh sports fan...she was wearing a Crosby jersey that night even.

    Eventually she brought up the subject of Ben and we chatted briefly. She did most of the talking while I pretty much listened.

    Her opinion is that Ben was guilty. I asked why and she said: Because I have a friend who was out in the Burgh one night...she ran into Ben and asked if he would have his picture taken with her. He said no and was kind of a jerk about it...so that tells me he's not a very good guy.

    That's when the conversation ended.

    So there you have it...there are plenty more out there just like her. He wasn't willing to have a pic taken and was kind of a jerk about it so I'm sure he is capable of rape.


  2. #2
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    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    Unfortunately D, there is more to Ben's current situation and past behavior. Guilty or not guilty, Ben put himself in a compromising situation. A situation that lead to an accusation. A situation that he controlled.

    The league and organization would not punish him if he did not do anything wrong. Ben would had denied any wrong doing like he did in the Mcnaulty case. He did not deny any wrong doing. My opinion is that Ben needs to stay away from the alcohol and club life for a while. Maybe until his career as a professional athlete is over. Same with the motor cycles. I think most will agree that something must change for Ben to stay out of the headlines.

    Do you agree that if Ben continues down the same path, that he will no longer be a Steeler?

  3. #3
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    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    I don't think it's one non photo or douche moment that makes a girl think Ben is a rapist. It's the 2 for 1 accusations, the helmet, the stories of Ben refusing to pay 5 bucks because he is a star and countless rumors and stories that preceed him.

    People act like Ben's accident or his photo douchery by a fan is the reason he was accused of rape. I It's everything PLUS the multiple accusations that works against the guy right now.

    It's like the Barry Bonds roid accusations... a large part of the hate is because Bonds isn't a likable guy. If Bonds was a nice guy he would stull be in the league right now but the guy is known by some as a jerk.

    Whether some want to admit it or not Ben admitted being an azzz to teammates when the fame came, he admitted to taking a large portion of the sacks, he has taken the blame for being less than good regarding his actions in the latest incident. The naysayers and homers can try to wash away his sins due to his on field accomplishments but at some point they need to realize they can't save Ben from himself. He has a long road ahead of him and no one else is to blame.

    I've talked to a ton of Steeler fans and they are tired of defending him... they ate tired of the drama and expect better from the QB of their beloved franchise. Acting like Ben is a victim of his fame won't work... He has too much disposable income and too much power and wealth to get sympathy from us for having sex with a hotel employee who was unstable. It's not like Ben was walking down the street and was hit with 2 accusations.. He works hard, plays even harder, bar hops and looks for tail at bars. It's not against the law but it definitely makes it easier to get in trouble when you add the money and civil case to the equation.

  4. #4
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    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    Quote Originally Posted by BURGH86STEEL
    Unfortunately D, there is more to Ben's current situation and past behavior. Guilty or not guilty, Ben put himself in a compromising situation. A situation that lead to an accusation. A situation that he controlled.

    The league and organization would not punish him if he did not do anything wrong. Ben would had denied any wrong doing like he did in the Mcnaulty case. He did not deny any wrong doing. My opinion is that Ben needs to stay away from the alcohol and club life for a while. Maybe until his career as a professional athlete is over. Same with the motor cycles. I think most will agree that something must change for Ben to stay out of the headlines.

    Do you agree that if Ben continues down the same path, that he will no longer be a Steeler?
    He is being punished due to the negative publicity...nothing more.

    Due to the possibility of a pending civil suit (possibly even one that will be filed by him against the accuser and/or the accuser's friends) he is advised not to say anything.

    You are asking a loaded, unfair question and you know that. Ben went out with friends and bodyguards...he did the right thing to protect himself and was still accused of something. Only the people who were there know why he was accused.

    Quote Originally Posted by feltdizz
    I don't think it's one non photo or douche moment that makes a girl think Ben is a rapist. It's the 2 for 1 accusations, the helmet, the stories of Ben refusing to pay 5 bucks because he is a star and countless rumors and stories that preceed him.
    I was the one standing there and talking to her you nimrod. She said she believes he is guilty because he was kind of a jerk to a friend who wanted to take a pic with him. Period.

    And the helmet thing is an entirely different matter. Pro athletes w/out a clause in their contracts preventing it ride cycles all the time...with or without helmets. Some old lady turned in front of Ben when he was doing 25mph through town. That could happen to anyone. I see Packers players riding helmetless in Green Bay all the time.

    Anyone lumping the cycle accident in with these accusations is, quite frankly, a moron.

  5. #5
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    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    Thanks for the name calling...

    If she based it entirely on the photo incident then I agree she is off her rocker...

    But if she was wearing a Crosby jersey I'm sure she has knowledge of the other incidents involving Ben. It's azz backwards to think a Pittsburgh fan is a blank canvas with only one friends story as the sole reason for her opinion.

    Like I stated earlier... it's not about the law with the helmet... It's the increased risk one takes by riding without a helmet. I don't care what Packers do but I think it's an unnecessary risk for a player to take.

    Funny how Ben hasn't jumped on any bikes without helmets since the accident and he has held a press conference stating he will make better decisions and live up to his employer and fans expectations. Yet you continue to stick your head and the sand and scream how Ben shouldn't change a thing. Makes me wonder if you are being difficult just to be difficult.

  6. #6

    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    If it's in the news, it's true.

    That's how people think.
    "That's just Ben being Superman" -John Madden, Super Bowl XLIII

  7. #7
    kaydee
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    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    Quote Originally Posted by stlrz d
    Her opinion is that Ben was guilty. I asked why and she said: Because I have a friend who was out in the Burgh one night...she ran into Ben and asked if he would have his picture taken with her. He said no and was kind of a jerk about it...so that tells me he's not a very good guy.

    That's when the conversation ended.

    So there you have it...there are plenty more out there just like her. He wasn't willing to have a pic taken and was kind of a jerk about it so I'm sure he is capable of rape.

    I've been out and about in the 'Burgh and have seen Ben in action while in the bars. Quite frankly, he is a jerk. That in and of itself doesn't make Ben a rapist, however, I wouldn't rule it out from what I've seen of his behavior in the bars. That's just my opinion, though. Does that make Ben guilty of rape? No. Is he innocent of rape? No. It's a shame, though, isn't it, that there's still doubt among so many diehard, faithful Steeler fans.

    I hate, hate, hate having to talk about our QB like this. I just wish it would all go away.

  8. #8
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    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    Quote Originally Posted by BURGH86STEEL
    Unfortunately D, there is more to Ben's current situation and past behavior. Guilty or not guilty, Ben put himself in a compromising situation. A situation that lead to an accusation. A situation that he controlled.

    The league and organization would not punish him if he did not do anything wrong. Ben would had denied any wrong doing like he did in the Mcnaulty case. He did not deny any wrong doing. My opinion is that Ben needs to stay away from the alcohol and club life for a while. Maybe until his career as a professional athlete is over. Same with the motor cycles. I think most will agree that something must change for Ben to stay out of the headlines.

    Do you agree that if Ben continues down the same path, that he will no longer be a Steeler?
    I don't know how any rational person could disagree with your post.



    "I hate him. Everybody says I'm supposed to be polite when I talk to you all, but I hate him..." "He talks too much, he doesn't make sense, he's fat, he's sloppy, he acts like he's the best thing since sliced bread. He's ugly, he stinks, his mouth stinks, his breath stinks, and basically his soul stinks, too.

    "Not too many people have personalities like that and survive in life. I don't know how he does it."


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  9. #9

    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    http://www.pittsburghpostgazette.com/pg ... 151-66.stm

    Ben's behavior disappointing for many fans
    Some say dump him, but most rely on Rooneys
    Saturday, April 17, 2010
    By Mackenzie Carpenter, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    There were a lot of complaints about stomachaches, a few declarations of undying love, but mostly it was all about rage, betrayal, the myriad uses of No. 7 jerseys and Terrible Towels -- as a wash rag, kindling and the like.

    Ben Roethlisberger, embattled Steelers quarterback, may have escaped rape charges this week in Georgia but not the disgust, disappointment and fury of fans -- most of whom either want him suspended without pay or traded, according to various Post-Gazette surveys.

    A Post-Gazette.com poll posted Monday, and running through Sunday, asked what the Steelers organization should do with Mr. Roethlisberger, and a plurality -- 44 percent -- of 23,299 respondents voted to suspend Mr. Roethlisberger without pay.

    But an online, admittedly unscientific, survey yielded more ominous news for Mr. Roethlisberger. A request for reader opinion posted Friday for two hours on Post-Gazette.com prompted nearly 300 e-mailed responses -- and more than a dozen phone calls -- from Panama, Connecticut, California and throughout an anguished Steelers Nation.

    "This is an abomination," said Mark France, 45, of Dormont, who called for the Steelers to get rid of Mr. Roethlisberger. "Anything short of that will hurt their brand name and the NFL's image, not to mention send a signal to players that such conduct is OK."

    Indeed, most of the e-mailed responses -- many of them lengthy, thoughtful and emotional -- veered towards trading him to other, less "classy" franchises in order to restore the image of the team and the fabled Rooney organization.

    "I bleed black and gold," declared Stacey Lowery Bretz, a professor of chemistry at Miami University in Ohio. "How can he even look Ambassador [to Ireland Dan] Rooney in the eyes ever again? Shame on him."

    "If the Steelers do anything other than trade or release [Mr. Roethlisberger] their reputation is seriously damaged in my view," wrote Donny Pecano, 32, of Los Angeles.

    Thomas Berry, a Colorado resident, didn't grow up in Pittsburgh and wasn't raised as a Steelers fan, but "I fell in love with the team just five years ago, watching guys like Jerome Bettis, Hines Ward, and Troy Polamalu, who are not only great players, but they also appear to be great human beings," as are, he added, the Rooney family, which has built "an incredible organization based on character over the years."

    As for the towels and jerseys beloved by Steelers fans everywhere?

    "Our Terrible Towels are now only good for washing the vehicles," e-mailed someone called "Pigtrout," while Michael Presto of Atlanta described how his three boys went to the Thrashers/Penguins game Saturday night, and "all three of them came down the steps wearing Big Ben's jersey. I immediately sent them back up to their rooms to put on another Pittsburgh jersey of some type.

    "My 8-year old turned to me and said 'But why, daddy? This is my favorite shirt.' Please ask Big Ben how he would have answered that question for me."

    One Facebook group -- "Steelers Fans Sending the Rooneys Our #7 Jerseys" -- exhorted its 40-plus members to drop them in the mail.

    "I never want to wear that jersey again," wrote the Facebook group founder, Emily Best, of Butler. "I would be embarrassed to be seen supporting him in public."

    A number of women e-mailed the Post-Gazette to say their support was undimmed.

    Anne Cooper, a fan since the 1970s, said she felt Mr. Roethlisberger was being "railroaded" by the media "and a lot of so-called fans."

    Ms. Cooper, 40, of Charleston, W.Va., expressed skepticism about "what the alleged 'victim' claims happened," noting inconsistencies in various media reports. "The fact that I have said since the beginning that he is innocent until proven guilty and now that there is no proof of guilt, the media won't let it go. I wish they would put themselves in his shoes for one day."

    Ultimately, though, most of the respondents expressed faith that the Rooney family would make the right decision.

    "A two- or four-game suspension does seem fair, however, and hopefully it becomes the shot across Ben's bow he needs to straighten himself out and begin behaving like the decent man and team representative he's well-paid to be," wrote Dave Lindsay, 38, a former Erie resident now in Port Townsend, Wash. "We are not the Raiders. And the Rooneys are not Al Davis. We are Steelers."

    As for Steelers fans? "Winning ISN'T the only thing," said Richard Bodek, a history professor in South Carolina's College of Charleston, while Antuane Brown, 36, of Atlanta, reached back into ancient history to note that Mr. Roethlisberger needs to remember where he came from.

    "He needs someone to remind him, like the servant of Marcus Aurelius, 'You're just a man,' " Mr. Brown wrote.

    On Banksville Road, the owner of Metro Heating and Cooling posted a sign saying "7 Get Married."

    Mackenzie Carpenter: mcarpenter@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1949.


    Read more: http://www.pittsburghpostgazette.com/pg ... z0lOWYdiAi

  10. #10
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    Re: Public Opinion: How people think

    Quote Originally Posted by Flasteel
    Quote Originally Posted by BURGH86STEEL
    Unfortunately D, there is more to Ben's current situation and past behavior. Guilty or not guilty, Ben put himself in a compromising situation. A situation that lead to an accusation. A situation that he controlled.

    The league and organization would not punish him if he did not do anything wrong. Ben would had denied any wrong doing like he did in the Mcnaulty case. He did not deny any wrong doing. My opinion is that Ben needs to stay away from the alcohol and club life for a while. Maybe until his career as a professional athlete is over. Same with the motor cycles. I think most will agree that something must change for Ben to stay out of the headlines.

    Do you agree that if Ben continues down the same path, that he will no longer be a Steeler?
    I don't know how any rational person could disagree with your post.
    I agree... Ben even states how he has to change for the better...

    I can't see how or why anyone would think Ben did everything right and is somehow a victim in all of this.

    Maybe it's for their own conscious... who knows.

    I just want an off season with no Ben drama. That is an off season I can handle and it's one where I wouldn't question Ben's off field decisions that hurt the team.

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