Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: The Casey Hampton question

  1. #1
    Legend hawaiiansteel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Hawaii 5-0
    Posts
    14,729

    The Casey Hampton question

    The Casey Hampton question
    SteelersToday 2/6/10


    Probably the biggest question facing the Pittsburgh Steelers is what to do with nose tackle Casey Hampton.

    Hampton will be an unrestricted free agent. As an unrestricted free agent, Hampton is free to negotiate with any NFL team, and the Steelers would not have the option of matching the offer. Moreover, unlike with restricted free agents, the Steelers would not receive compensatory draft picks if another team were to sign Hampton. He would just be gone. And the Steelers would get nothing in return. Kind of like when Alan Faneca left the team as an unrestricted free agent.

    So what should the Steelers do?

    Before we answer that question, we first have to establish just how important Casey Hampton is to the Steelers. Of the 5 key free agents (Hampton, Ryan Clark, Willie Colon, Willie Parker and Jeff Reed), Hampton is by far the most important. This is true for two key reasons. Firstly, the nose tackle is the foundation of the 3-4 defense. The second reason that Hampton is so import is that finding a replacement in the draft is exceedingly difficult.

    I think this is a very bad year for nose tackles. I like Tennesseeís Dan Williams and think he is going to be a 1st round draft pick. Iím not as fond of Terence Cody, from Alabama. Fans have been slobbering over Cody on Steelers message boards. However, Cody has issues. While he is a gargantuan player (6?4?, 370 lbs.), he has always struggled with conditioning (translation: heís a fat slob who gets winded much too quickly). At best, he is a two down player. I can just see coach Tomlin placing Cody on the physically unable to perform (P.U.P.) listÖÖ..permanently.

    So understanding how important Hampton is to the defense, and realizing how hard he will be to replace, the Steelers have a limited number of options.

    The option that Hampton would prefer is that the Steelers offer him a long-term contract.

    According to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Ken Zuckerman, an agent for Priority Sports & Entertainment, said a player of Hamptonís caliber might command a five-year deal worth as much as $40 million on the open market.


    Zuckerman also said that almost half of that money would be guaranteed.

    The problem is that Hampton will be 33 years old next season. A five-year deal would lock him in until heís 38 years old. He is very unlikely to play that long.

    Assuming the Steelers donít want to make a long-term commitment to Hampton, but want to maintain his services until they can find a suitable replacement, they could always place the franchise tag on him.

    A franchise tag would prevent Hampton from hitting the open market when the free agent signing period begins on March 5, 2010.

    Rather than hitting the open market, the Steelers would retain Hamptonís services for one year, and would be obligated to pay him the average of the top 5 salaries made by defensive linemen in 2009. That figure hasnít yet been released by the NFL Players Association, but last year the cost of franchising a defensive tackle was slightly more than $6 million. Hampton counted for $6,652,000 against the Steelersí salary cap last year, so franchising him wouldnít cause much of a change.

    However, Hampton has gone on the record to let the organization know that if they apply the franchise tag to him, ďit will be a problemĒ.

    Hampton knows that this may be his last opportunity to get a long-term contract, and he doesnít want to lose it. A franchise tag would delay a long-term deal for an additional year and reduce his chances of getting one.

    If the Steelers did place a franchise tag on Hampton, they would have to choose whether to use the exclusive or non-exclusive franchise tag. The exclusive tag would prevent Hampton from negotiating with other teams. The non-exclusive tag would allow him to negotiate with other teams. However, the Steelers would have the right to match any offer that he receives, and if they decline to match the offer, they would get two first-round picks in return.

    Another option available to the Steelers is to place the transition tag on Hampton. The transition tag is similar to the non-exclusive franchise tag. The transition tag allows the player to negotiate with other teams, and gives the Steelers the right to match any offers that he receives. However, if they didnít choose to match the offer, they would get no draft picks as compensation.

    Hampton has publicly stated that the Steelers promised not to place the franchise tag on him. If so, then the Rooneys might feel obligated to uphold their promise.

    I donít know whether any promises were made to Hampton or not. But if I were the Steelers, I would definitely not use any option that allows Hampton to walk away without any form of compensation. Thatís what happened to Alan Faneca, and is probably what is going to happen to Willie Parker, and I think that is poor decision making.

    If I were the Steelers, I would place the non-exclusive franchise tag on Hampton. That way, if the Steelers did commit to allow Hampton to test free agency, they would still be upholding their promise. However, if Hampton ended up leaving, the Steelers would get two first round picks as compensation. That would allow the Steelers a lot of flexibility in the 2011 draft.

    In the interim, the Steelers could use Chris Hoke as the starter. Hoke is no Hampton, but he fills in admirably when Hampton needs to take a breather. He actually started 12 games in 2004 (including 2 playoff games) when Hampton tore his ACL.

    By utilizing the non-exclusive franchise tag on Hampton, the Steelers would potentially maintain his services for 2010, but they could also select a nose tackle in the draft. Since very few Steelers defensive draft picks are able to play in Dick LeBeauís defense during their rookie year, this plan would allow the Steelers time for a rookie to learn the defense.

    Of course, Iíve learned over the years that it is impossible to guess what the Steelers are going to do in the draft. Iím sure the Steelers will do something that I never even thought of (like sign Hampton to a 3 year deal and draft a tight end in the first round of the draft).

    But of course that is why this time of year is so much fun. The Steelers always keep us guessing.

  2. #2
    Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,515

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by hawaiiansteel
    However, Hampton has gone on the record to let the organization know that if they apply the franchise tag to him, ďit will be a problemĒ.
    I've liked Hampton; and in 10 years when we look back, I will fondly refer to him. Back when people were saying we have Hoke. Hoke can do the job better than Hampton, I was a firm Hampton backer.

    These past couple years (starting basically when Tomlin PUP'd him for being a fat@s$), his act has worn thin--he's given so many indications that he is somehow owed something, being a veteran & star player. I hate that mentality.

    And the fact that he's made the comment above, it also shows just total disrespect to the team, the Rooneys, and the whole process. I liken it to a time with the Lakers, and Shaq were having contract negotiations. Famously, after a play Shaq made, he yelled (at the Buss family) "pay me my _____ money!" or something to that effect.

    That precipitated the moving of Shaq.

    This kind of negotiation, it may work in the hood or wherever you're from. But these guys always be harping about being a pro, professional, etc. That's not how a professional conducts himself.
    Guys and gals,
    If you play fantasy football, go to the FF forum here and read my thread. I'd appreciate some feedback on it.

  3. #3
    Pro Bowler
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Yakima, Washington, United States
    Posts
    1,382

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by hawaiiansteel
    The Casey Hampton question
    SteelersToday 2/6/10


    Probably the biggest question facing the Pittsburgh Steelers is what to do with nose tackle Casey Hampton.

    Hampton will be an unrestricted free agent. As an unrestricted free agent, Hampton is free to negotiate with any NFL team, and the Steelers would not have the option of matching the offer. Moreover, unlike with restricted free agents, the Steelers would not receive compensatory draft picks if another team were to sign Hampton. He would just be gone. And the Steelers would get nothing in return. Kind of like when Alan Faneca left the team as an unrestricted free agent.

    So what should the Steelers do?

    Before we answer that question, we first have to establish just how important Casey Hampton is to the Steelers. Of the 5 key free agents (Hampton, Ryan Clark, Willie Colon, Willie Parker and Jeff Reed), Hampton is by far the most important. This is true for two key reasons. Firstly, the nose tackle is the foundation of the 3-4 defense. The second reason that Hampton is so import is that finding a replacement in the draft is exceedingly difficult.

    I think this is a very bad year for nose tackles. I like Tennesseeís Dan Williams and think he is going to be a 1st round draft pick. Iím not as fond of Terence Cody, from Alabama. Fans have been slobbering over Cody on Steelers message boards. However, Cody has issues. While he is a gargantuan player (6?4?, 370 lbs.), he has always struggled with conditioning (translation: heís a fat slob who gets winded much too quickly). At best, he is a two down player. I can just see coach Tomlin placing Cody on the physically unable to perform (P.U.P.) listÖÖ..permanently.

    So understanding how important Hampton is to the defense, and realizing how hard he will be to replace, the Steelers have a limited number of options.

    The option that Hampton would prefer is that the Steelers offer him a long-term contract.

    According to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Ken Zuckerman, an agent for Priority Sports & Entertainment, said a player of Hamptonís caliber might command a five-year deal worth as much as $40 million on the open market.


    Zuckerman also said that almost half of that money would be guaranteed.

    The problem is that Hampton will be 33 years old next season. A five-year deal would lock him in until heís 38 years old. He is very unlikely to play that long.

    Assuming the Steelers donít want to make a long-term commitment to Hampton, but want to maintain his services until they can find a suitable replacement, they could always place the franchise tag on him.

    A franchise tag would prevent Hampton from hitting the open market when the free agent signing period begins on March 5, 2010.

    Rather than hitting the open market, the Steelers would retain Hamptonís services for one year, and would be obligated to pay him the average of the top 5 salaries made by defensive linemen in 2009. That figure hasnít yet been released by the NFL Players Association, but last year the cost of franchising a defensive tackle was slightly more than $6 million. Hampton counted for $6,652,000 against the Steelersí salary cap last year, so franchising him wouldnít cause much of a change.

    However, Hampton has gone on the record to let the organization know that if they apply the franchise tag to him, ďit will be a problemĒ.

    Hampton knows that this may be his last opportunity to get a long-term contract, and he doesnít want to lose it. A franchise tag would delay a long-term deal for an additional year and reduce his chances of getting one.

    If the Steelers did place a franchise tag on Hampton, they would have to choose whether to use the exclusive or non-exclusive franchise tag. The exclusive tag would prevent Hampton from negotiating with other teams. The non-exclusive tag would allow him to negotiate with other teams. However, the Steelers would have the right to match any offer that he receives, and if they decline to match the offer, they would get two first-round picks in return.

    Another option available to the Steelers is to place the transition tag on Hampton. The transition tag is similar to the non-exclusive franchise tag. The transition tag allows the player to negotiate with other teams, and gives the Steelers the right to match any offers that he receives. However, if they didnít choose to match the offer, they would get no draft picks as compensation.

    Hampton has publicly stated that the Steelers promised not to place the franchise tag on him. If so, then the Rooneys might feel obligated to uphold their promise.

    I donít know whether any promises were made to Hampton or not. But if I were the Steelers, I would definitely not use any option that allows Hampton to walk away without any form of compensation. Thatís what happened to Alan Faneca, and is probably what is going to happen to Willie Parker, and I think that is poor decision making.

    If I were the Steelers, I would place the non-exclusive franchise tag on Hampton. That way, if the Steelers did commit to allow Hampton to test free agency, they would still be upholding their promise. However, if Hampton ended up leaving, the Steelers would get two first round picks as compensation. That would allow the Steelers a lot of flexibility in the 2011 draft.

    In the interim, the Steelers could use Chris Hoke as the starter. Hoke is no Hampton, but he fills in admirably when Hampton needs to take a breather. He actually started 12 games in 2004 (including 2 playoff games) when Hampton tore his ACL.

    By utilizing the non-exclusive franchise tag on Hampton, the Steelers would potentially maintain his services for 2010, but they could also select a nose tackle in the draft. Since very few Steelers defensive draft picks are able to play in bad word LeBeauís defense during their rookie year, this plan would allow the Steelers time for a rookie to learn the defense.

    Of course, Iíve learned over the years that it is impossible to guess what the Steelers are going to do in the draft. Iím sure the Steelers will do something that I never even thought of (like sign Hampton to a 3 year deal and draft a tight end in the first round of the draft).

    But of course that is why this time of year is so much fun. The Steelers always keep us guessing.
    I agree with the non-exclusive franchise tag. The Steelers should know if they will have Hampton in the fold before the draft. Maybe it won't make a difference, because beyond Williiams and possibly (I hope not) Cody, they won't draft a NT in the first two rounds anyway. No way do I give Hampton a 5 year contract worth that kind of money, no matter his importance.

  4. #4
    Legend
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    13,177

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Best two statements in the entire article

    Since very few Steelers defensive draft picks are able to play in bad word LeBeauís defense during their rookie year, this plan would allow the Steelers time for a rookie to learn the defense.
    So very true, but the defense isn't complicated is it according to some. Isn't this just a myth and just a coincidence that rookies never play.

    Of course, Iíve learned over the years that it is impossible to guess what the Steelers are going to do in the draft. Iím sure the Steelers will do something that I never even thought of (like sign Hampton to a 3 year deal and draft a tight end in the first round of the draft).
    CJ Spiller time!!!!!!!
    Playing Fantasy Football does not qualify you to be the in the front office or on the coaching staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers. They are professionals and you are not!

  5. #5
    Hall of Famer Dee Dub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,573

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    So very true, but the defense isn't complicated is it according to some. Isn't this just a myth and just a coincidence that rookies never play.
    Cha-ching!

    Had the Steelers drafted the likes of Ed Reed, Jon Beason, Patrick Willis, Darrell Revis, Jarius Bryd, Brian Cushing, etc., etc. they would have sat in year one and not done what they did for their perspective teams.....which was to play at a very high level.
    Steelers 2014 Draft

    1-Darqueze Dennard CB Michigan State
    2-Jordan Matthews WR Vanderbilt
    3-Jordan Tripp ILB/OLB Montana
    4-Christian Jones ILB Florida State
    5-Brent Urban DE Virginia
    5-Michael Schofield OG/OT Michigan
    6-Kadeem Edwards OG Tennessee State
    6-Ben Gardner DE Stanford
    7-Aaron Colvin CB Oklahoma

  6. #6

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    Best two statements in the entire article

    Since very few Steelers defensive draft picks are able to play in bad word LeBeauís defense during their rookie year, this plan would allow the Steelers time for a rookie to learn the defense.
    So very true, but the defense isn't complicated is it according to some. Isn't this just a myth and just a coincidence that rookies never play.

    Didn't Hampton start a few weeks into his rookie season?

  7. #7

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Dub
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    So very true, but the defense isn't complicated is it according to some. Isn't this just a myth and just a coincidence that rookies never play.
    Cha-ching!

    Had the Steelers drafted the likes of Ed Reed, Jon Beason, Patrick Willis, Darrell Revis, Jarius Bryd, Brian Cushing, etc., etc. they would have sat in year one and not done what they did for their perspective teams.....which was to play at a very high level.
    Are you saying that they would have sat as rookies for the Steelers, or that they would not be playing at a high level now if drafted by the Steelers?

    The Steelers play rookies who earn their way onto the field. Hampton and Kendrell Bell are examples. Is it really so bad to wait a year for a player to develop? Troy struggled as a rookie, but look at him now.

  8. #8
    Hall of Famer ikestops85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,180

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by phillyesq
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    Best two statements in the entire article

    Since very few Steelers defensive draft picks are able to play in bad word LeBeauís defense during their rookie year, this plan would allow the Steelers time for a rookie to learn the defense.
    So very true, but the defense isn't complicated is it according to some. Isn't this just a myth and just a coincidence that rookies never play.

    Didn't Hampton start a few weeks into his rookie season?
    Didn't Woodley get quite a bit of playing time his rookie season? What about Ziggy last year? I remember Gay seeing a decent amount of playing time his rookie year. Anthony Smith started 4 games his rookie year -- and we all know he wasn't the sharpest tool in the shed. BMac also had a lot of playing time his rookie year.

    The myth is not that the defense isn't complicated. The myth is that it is more complicated than everyone elses defense. The truth is we don't get to draft in the top 5 or top 10 ... and we normally have solid starters in every position. That is why we don't have many rookies showing up and starting right away. This year could be the exception if we lose Clark then we really have nothing at FS and if Gay doesn't regain his confidence one corner could easily be replaced -- although I think Lewis and Burnett could still step up.
    <a href=http://seahawknationblog.com/files/2011/02/roger-goodell.jpg target=_blank>http://seahawknationblog.com/files/2...er-goodell.jpg</a>

  9. #9
    Legend
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12,866

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by phillyesq
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Dub
    Quote Originally Posted by Oviedo
    So very true, but the defense isn't complicated is it according to some. Isn't this just a myth and just a coincidence that rookies never play.
    Cha-ching!

    Had the Steelers drafted the likes of Ed Reed, Jon Beason, Patrick Willis, Darrell Revis, Jarius Bryd, Brian Cushing, etc., etc. they would have sat in year one and not done what they did for their perspective teams.....which was to play at a very high level.
    Are you saying that they would have sat as rookies for the Steelers, or that they would not be playing at a high level now if drafted by the Steelers?

    The Steelers play rookies who earn their way onto the field. Hampton and Kendrell Bell are examples. Is it really so bad to wait a year for a player to develop? Troy struggled as a rookie, but look at him now.
    Listing 2 players over the last 15 years doesn't help the argument. Bell had one assignment too and it was to blitz.. for what it's worth he was never able to grasp the D either.

    I think the issue most have is when a vet goes down and the rookie or younger guy outplays him.

    I think the Steelers have always been patient with players and while it makes for good teams we became GREAT because of injuries to vets. If Maddox doesn't get hurt who knows when Ben sees the field. If Bettis doesn't get hurt does FWP shine in 2005 or rot on the sidelines?

    I don't think the best guy finds his way onto the field with our old philosophy. Vets who aren't as talented will still play before a rookie 9 out of 10 times.

    Wallace didn't play his way onto the field.. Sweed played his way off it.

    I think the best player seeing the field is a myth.

  10. #10
    Pro Bowler
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Delray Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,473

    Re: The Casey Hampton question

    Quote Originally Posted by NW Steeler
    I agree with the non-exclusive franchise tag. The Steelers should know if they will have Hampton in the fold before the draft. Maybe it won't make a difference, because beyond Williiams and possibly (I hope not) Cody, they won't draft a NT in the first two rounds anyway. No way do I give Hampton a 5 year contract worth that kind of money, no matter his importance.
    I agree...Casey would never see the end of that contract anyway. I'd rather make a clean break, sign Ryan Pickett early because when Wilfork breaks the bank, Casey's agent will use that as a springboard to his "value". Take the medicine & the comp pick & move on...
    It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust & sweat & blood...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •