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Thread: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

  1. #1

    Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Senior Bowl weight-in
    ----------------------
    I know it may be upsetting for many of you to discover the animal you cherish is of the opposite political party.

    Would former President Bill Clinton ever be able to admit to himself that the late Socks was a Republican? Could Democrats ever bring themselves to forgive Checkers, the dog – and a Democrat – who belonged to Richard M. Nixon and whose mention in the famous 1952 “Checkers speech” helped save Nixon’s political career?

    When cats are born, they believe they are in a state of liberty, and from then on they are determined to keep it that way. No one tells them what to do. They don’t believe it takes a village, because they know they might have to take instructions from the village idiot in the local government.

    And, sorry if you’ve got one and you’re a Republican — but dogs are liberal Democrats. Some are possibly Socialists, though probably none will ever admit it.

    Dogs are communal by nature. They run in packs. They dream of their days as wolves, sharing responsibilities.

    Sure there’s a pecking order – an alpha, a beta and a zeta. It’s only humans who pretend that egalitarianism levels the playing field entirely.

    Unfortunately, this instinct to subvert their personal welfare to the good of the whole also makes dogs easy to control. Big brother, in the form of their human masters, creates laws and executive orders that dogs slavishly abide.

    Canines want rules and regulations to follow. If you could teach them to read and talk, they’d be carrying Mao’s Little Red Book and citing its verses.

    They show little initiative. A dog is not particularly entrepreneurial and would never start a small business. If he did, he’d let you tax it at confiscatory rates — as long as you gave him a treat.

    The best you can do with a dog is train him to work on an assembly line, doing the same trick, time after time. He’s a natural proletarian, waiting for his union card to come through.

    Dogs will also happily take a government job.

    Dogs were very excited when President George W. Bush created the Department of Homeland Security. They were more than ready to sniff for bombs or protect secure government sites, that sort of thing. One even signed up for the raid that took out Bin Laden.

    But dogs also want to save the world generally. They’re bleeding heart liberals.

    Some, you may have noticed, are community organizers, herding sheep and other creatures of the field into groups for the betterment of their welfare.

    Many dogs eagerly sign up each year for government programs to assist the blind. And who ever heard of a cat running into burning building to save their owner?

    Which brings us back to cats.

    Have you ever tried to get a cat to do something? Anything at all? Out of pure principle, they will reject your command — even if they know full well it will benefit them.

    Because above all else, above even their personal welfare, cats value freedom.

    How else to explain that cats will spend all day looking out the window, but then if you put a leash on them to take them out, they’ll drop to the floor and scowl at you as if you were worst thing possible —perhaps an auditor from the Internal Revenue Service.

    While we’re on the topic, cats would never pay taxes. Taxes are for suckers, they’d tell you.

    But put a leash on the dog, and he’ll happily trot out the door and go wherever you take him.

    This is really why cats hiss at dogs – not because dogs chase them.

    My cats watch me endlessly throwing a tennis ball for my border collie – supposedly the smartest dog – and sneer with contempt. Such mindless obedience to a task. Such desperation to please. Disgusting.

    Unlike dogs, cats have not had the ability to hunt bred out of them. I mean dogs can hunt, but only to chase their prey up a tree.

    Cats finish the job. They are natural proponents of the Second Amendment. If they could get their paws around a trigger, they’d shoot to kill. Dogs are born skeet shooters - fishermen who throw their catch back in the lake.

    What’s more, cats would gladly enforce the death penalty. Particularly for dogs.

    Cats favor a foreign policy that is so assertive they sometimes need to be declawed. Dogs run together in a U.N.-style “dog park,” where they willingly submit to an overseeing body of owners whom they charge with keeping the peace.

    But cats are to the left dogs when it comes to the environment. Just watch how they carefully cover up their business in their sandboxes, keeping everything fresh and nice. Dogs will – how shall we say – pollute right in your front lawn.

    This doesn’t make dogs Republicans or cats Democrats. It just means that sometimes they can see the other side’s point.

    Which of course makes them each wiser than their elected representatives in Washington.

    Keith Koffler, who covered the White House as a reporter for CongressDaily and Roll Call, is editor of the blog White House Dossier.



    Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/08 ... z1krRaCOT4
    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

  2. #2

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    East-West Shrine Game



    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

  3. #3

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Player Pos College Height Weight Arms Hands 40 225 VERT JUMP 20S 60S 3 Cone
    .
    Nathaniel Allen FS South Florida 6'0" 207 31 9 3/8 16
    .
    Jonathon Amaya FS Nevada 6'1" 203 31 1/4 8 1/4 8
    .
    Lucien Antoine FS Oklahoma State 6'0" 215 32 1/4 9 3/8 28
    .
    Javier Arenas CB Alabama 5'9" 197 30 7/8 9 1/2
    .
    Larry Asante SS Nebraska 6'0" 212 31 1/2 9 14
    .
    Eric Berry SS Tennessee 5115 211 33 1/4 9 5/8 19
    .
    Cornelius Brown CB Texas-El Paso 5'11" 198 31 1/2 10 11
    .
    Morgan Burnett SS Georgia Tech 6'1" 209 31 3/4 9 16
    .
    Crezdon Butler CB Clemson 6'0" 191 32 8 3/4 17
    .
    Nolan Carroll CB Maryland 5'11" 204 31 9 1/4
    .
    Chris Chancellor CB Clemson 5'9" 177 30 1/2 9 3/8 14
    .
    Kam Chancellor FS Virginia Tech 6'3" 231 33 9 1/2 22
    .
    Barry Church SS Toledo 6'1" 222 33 1/4 9 3/8 19
    .
    Kurt Coleman SS Ohio State 5'10" 192 30 3/4 9 1/8 19
    .
    Chris Cook CB Virginia 6'2" 212 32 1/2 9 1/4 7
    .
    Perrish Cox CB Oklahoma State 5'11" 195 30 8 3/8 12
    .
    Dominique Franks CB Oklahoma 5'11" 194 31 1/2 9 3/4 10
    .
    Brandon Ghee CB Wake Forest 6'0" 192 32 1/2 10 1/2 15
    .
    Marshay Green CB Mississippi 5'9" 180 31 1/2 10


    .
    Joe Haden CB Florida 5106 193 32 3/4 9 1/2 18
    .
    Chris Hawkins CB LSU 6'0" 187 32 9 7/8 16
    .
    Brian Jackson CB Oklahoma 6'1" 202 34 9 3/4 20
    .
    Kareem Jackson CB Alabama 5'10" 196 30 9 1/8 13
    .
    A.J. Jefferson CB Fresno State 6'0" 193 32 1/2 9 1/4 7
    .
    Chad Jones FS LSU 6'2" 221 32 1/2 9 9
    .
    Reshad Jones SS Georgia 6'1" 214 32 9 24
    .
    Kendrick Lewis FS Mississippi 6'0" 198 30 1/2 8 5/8 16




    Myron Lewis CB Vanderbilt 6'2" 203 34 9 5/8 10
    .
    Trevard Lindley CB Kentucky 5'11" 183 32 5/8 10 1/8 9
    .
    Taylor Mays FS Southern Cal 6031 230 34 10 1/4 24
    .
    Kyle McCarthy SS Notre Dame 6'0" 205 29 1/2 8 7/8 24
    .
    Devin McCourty CB Rutgers 5106 193 32 9 16
    .
    Sherrick McManis CB Northwestern 5'11" 195 30 3/4 9 1/4
    .
    Joshua Moore DB Kansas State 5'11" 188 31 3/4 9 1/8 2
    .
    Jerome Murphy CB South Florida 6'0" 196 32 1/4 9 16
    .
    Akwasi Owusu-Ansah CB Indiana (PA) 6'0" 207 32 1/2 9 1/8
    .
    David Pender CB Purdue 6'0" 180 32 9 8
    .
    Josh Pinkard CB Southern Cal 6'1" 214 32 1/4 9 1/8
    .
    Nick Polk FS Indiana 5'11" 211 33 9 3/8 14


    .
    Patrick Robinson CB Florida State 5'11" 190 30 1/2 8 1/4 15
    .
    Dennis Rogan FS Tennessee 5'9" 185 30 1/2 8 3/4
    .
    Myron Rolle SS Florida State 6'2" 215 32 1/2 9 1/8 21
    .
    Devin Ross CB Arizona 5'10" 183 30 8 1/2 16
    .
    Amari Spievey CB Iowa 5'11" 195 32 9 5/8
    .
    Darian Stewart FS South Carolina 5'11" 213 32 1/2 8 7/8 12
    .
    Darrell Stuckey FS Kansas 5'11" 205 31 9 3/4 17
    .
    Earl Thomas SS Texas 5102 208 31 1/4 9 3/8 21
    .
    Kevin Thomas CB Southern Cal 6'0" 192 32 9 19
    .
    Syd'quan Thompson CB California 5'9" 186 31 9 3/8
    .
    Walter Thurmond CB Oregon 5'11" 189 32 3/4 9 5/8
    .
    Vern Verner CB UCLA 5'10" 189 31 9 1/8 11
    .
    Stephan Virgil CB Virginia Tech 5'11" 183 32 10 1/4 12
    .
    Jamar Wall CB Texas Tech 5'10" 204 31 9 15
    .
    T.J. Ward FS Oregon 5'10" 211 30 3/4 9 1/4 19
    .
    Donovan Warren CB Michigan 5'11" 193 30 1/2 9 1/4 12
    .
    Kyle Wilson CB Boise State 5100 194 30 1/2 9 1/8 25
    .
    Justin Woodall SS Alabama 6'1" 223 32 1/2 9 1/2 13
    .
    Major Wright FS Florida 5'11" 206 31 9 3/4 14
    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

  4. #4

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    NFL likes to size up prospects

    Linebacker Jon Abbate is leaving Wake Forest early to pursue a professional football career. But it's evident he already has a complete education in the NFL draft process.

    Abbate was as productive a defender as could be found in the Atlantic Coast Conference. He started each of his first three seasons at Wake Forest and became only the third player in conference history to lead his team in tackles as a freshman, sophomore and junior. He earned All-ACC acclaim in 2006 when he posted a career-best 120 tackles on a conference championship team.

    Abbate would have been a candidate for the Butkus Award as college football's best linebacker had he returned to Wake in 2007. But Abbate saw no point in returning to the ACC for his senior season.

    "Unless someone could promise me if I went back that I'd grow three inches, the decision was pretty easy," Abbate said. "I could have gone back and been productive again, had another 100-plus tackles. But I'd be in the same situation with my height as a knock."

    And it's a big knock. Abbate played middle linebacker for Wake Forest. The school listed him at 5-11, 245 pounds. At the NFL scouting combine, Abbate measured 5-9½, 231 pounds.

    That's too small to play middle linebacker in the NFL. He'd be engulfed by blockers who are 70 to 80 pounds heavier. So most NFL teams have slid Abbate to outside linebacker on their draft boards. But he only ran a 4.99 40-yard dash at the combine. That's too slow to play outside in the NFL.

    Abbate figures to be another of the countless collegians who falls victim to the NFL draft process every April. They were great college players – but they do not project to be as successful at the next level because of a missing measurable or two.

    Fit the mold

    There's a misconception that the NFL drafts the best players. In fact, the NFL drafts the players with the best chance for success at the next level. So the NFL looks for players with specific measurables.

    "The measurables are a piece of the puzzle, like the Wonderlic test," said Baltimore Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome. "You can't put too much weight on the measurables – but big, fast guys do play in our league."

    The NFL wants productive players like Abbate – but it wants them to fit the prototypes in height, weight and speed. Intelligence, hand size and arm length also come into play at various positions.

    So good players like Abbate are shoved down the draft board. All-Americans like Justin Blalock of Texas and Heisman Trophy winners like Troy Smith of Ohio State will probably be nudged down as well.

    Blalock started four years at Texas at right tackle and was a three-time All-Big 12 selection. But the NFL looks for offensive tackles that are 6-5, 310. Blaylock is only 6-3, so most NFL teams have moved him inside to guard.

    The NFL wants tackles with length. You need long arms and legs to steer the speed rushers coming off the edge. The prototype would be Tony Ugoh, a three-year starter and All-SEC selection as a senior at Arkansas. He goes 6-5, 301 with 36-inch arms. He will benefit on draft day from his measurables.

    Arron Sears doesn't fit the prototype. Neither does Tala Esera or Steve Vallos. Sears was a three-year starter and two-time All-SEC left tackle at Tennessee. But he's only 6-3, so NFL teams have moved him inside to guard as well. Also moving inside will be Esera, an All-WAC left tackle at Hawaii, and Vallos, an All-ACC right tackle at Wake Forest. Esera is only 6-3 and Vallos 6-2½.

    The NFL can live with shorter guards. The prototype there is 6-4, 305. The NFL can live with even shorter centers. The prototype there is 6-3, 300.

    Wanted: tall QBs

    But the NFL cannot live with shorter quarterbacks. The prototype for the position is 6-3, 220 pounds.

    The NFL wants its quarterbacks to stand at eye level with the offensive and defensive linemen. To make plays down the field, you must be able to see down the field. A 6-0 quarterback is continually looking through windows in his pass protection to throw.

    That's why Michigan State's Drew Stanton figures to be drafted higher than Smith – even though Smith won the Heisman as the best player in college football playing in the same conference as Stanton. But Smith goes only 6-0, 226. Stanton is 6-3, 226.

    "I can't do anything about the height thing," Smith said. "I don't think you can play taller than what you are. You make it seem like being 6-foot is a disease."

    Big hands catch on

    Wide receivers come in all sizes. Pro Bowler Steve Smith is 5-9, and Georgia Tech's Calvin Johnson, the top receiver in the 2007 draft, goes 6-5, 239 pounds. But hand size is critical at this position.

    Bigger hands translate to more reliable hands on draft day. Nine-inch hands are good, 10-inch hands are better. Johnson has hands that measure 9¾. Ted Ginn Jr. of Ohio State is six inches shorter (5-11) than Johnson but has bigger hands. They measure 10 inches across. David Clowney of Virginia Tech has 10¼-inch hands. He's 6-0, 188 pounds with 4.39 speed. The NFL loves his measurables.

    Wideouts with small hands generally are moved to defensive back earlier in their football careers. The only cornerback on this draft board with 10-inch hands is Marcus McCauley of Fresno State (10¼).

    Ten of the top 35 cornerbacks on the 2007 draft board have hands smaller than nine inches. Only four of the top 40 wide receivers in this draft have hands smaller than nine inches.

    In the thick of it

    Height isn't as big a factor for running backs as thickness. Barry Sanders was only 5-8 but was thick across the thighs and chest. He weighed 205 pounds and could absorb a hit.

    The NFL prototype for the position is 5-11, 215 pounds with 4.4 speed. Marshawn Lynch of California fits the prototype to a tee at 5-11, 215 with 4.48 speed. That will get him drafted in the first round – not necessarily the 1,356 rushing yards he gained last season in the Pac-10.

    Garrett Wolfe rushed for 1,928 yards in 2006 at Northern Illinois and has 4.39 speed. But he stands 5-7 and weighs only 186 pounds. There are questions in draft rooms about his durability. Can he can absorb NFL punishment from tacklers and survive a 16-game season?

    There are exceptions in every draft. Small players make it every year. So do short players. And slow players. But they earn their spots in training camp in August. They don't get the benefit of the doubt in April.

    "There are things you can't measure, such as instincts," Abbate said, "and no one is going to outwork me. Heart and hustle are what made me successful on the collegiate level – and that's what's going to make me successful in this league. No one is going to outwork me."

    But players without the measurables have to work a little bit harder.


    MEASURING UP: OFFENSE

    The minimum measurables for each position in the NFL draft:

    Quarterback
    Measurables: 6-3, 220, 4.75 speed
    Key trait: A quarterback doesn't need to be a runner, but he must have foot quickness for escapability.
    Prototype: Jay Cutler (6-3, 226, 4.77 speed). Denver, 1st round, 2006.
    Exception: Drew Brees (6-0, 213, 4.81 speed). San Diego, 2nd round, 2001.

    Halfback
    Measurables: 5-11, 215, 4.40 speed
    Key trait: Defenders are bigger in the NFL and deliver bigger hits than they do in college. So runners must have some thickness through their legs and chest to absorb 16 weeks of punishment.
    Prototype: Joseph Addai (5-11, 214, 4.40 speed). Indianapolis, 1st round, 2006.
    Exception: Maurice Jones-Drew (5-6½, 207, 4.39 speed). Jacksonville, 2nd round, 2006.

    Fullback
    Measurables: 6-0, 240, 4.60 speed
    Key trait: NFL looks for fullbacks who are blockers first, receivers second, runners third. So the day of the 230-pound fullback is coming to an end.
    Prototype:Cory Schlesinger (6-0, 247). Detroit, 6th round, 1995.
    Exception:B.J. Askew (6-3, 233). N.Y. Jets, 3rd round, 2003.

    Wide receiver
    Measurables: 6-2, 200, 4.40 speed
    Key trait: Speed to stretch the field. You can find possession receivers in the second day of every draft. The speed all goes in the first day.
    Prototype: Roy Williams (6-2½, 212, 4.37 speed). Detroit, 1st round, 2004.
    Exception: Anquan Boldin (6-0½, 216, 4.62 speed). Arizona, 2nd round, 2003.

    Tight end
    Measurables: 6-5, 250, 4.50 speed
    Key trait: Running teams want bigger tight ends to block. Passing teams want faster tight ends to stretch defenses.
    Prototype: Todd Heap (6-5, 252). Baltimore, 1st round, 2001.
    Exception:Alge Crumpler (6-2, 262). Atlanta, 2nd round, 2001.

    Offensive tackle
    Measurables: 6-5, 310, 34-inch arms
    Key trait: Pass protection is more steering than blocking on the edge. So tackles need long arms to shove rushers wide of the pocket. Height and 35-inch arms are the attractive commodities.
    Prototype: D'Brickashaw Ferguson (6-6, 312, 35½-inch arms). NY Jets, 1st round, 2006.
    Exception: Jordan Gross (6-4, 300, 33¼-inch arms). Carolina, 1st round, 2003.

    Guard
    Measurables: 6-4, 305, 33-inch arms
    Key trait: Arm length is less important inside, where guards are asked to block in a closet. It's more important to have lower-body thickness to anchor against the growing number of 310-pound defensive tackles.
    Prototype:Logan Mankins (6-4, 307). New England, 1st round, 2005.
    Exception:Jake Scott (6-5, 295). Indianapolis, 5th round, 2004.

    Center
    Measurables: 6-3, 300, 32-inch arms
    Key trait: Bulk is less important than athleticism. A center needs to pull, slide over to help the guard and also step out on the middle linebacker. But the center also needs some anchor against 3-4 defenses when a nose tackle is on his helmet.
    Prototype:Nick Mangold (6-3½, 300). N.Y. Jets, 1st round, 2006.
    Exception:Todd McClure (6-1, 289). Atlanta, 7th round, 1999.

    MEASURING UP: DEFENSE

    The minimum measurables for each position in the NFL draft:

    Defensive end
    Measurables: 6-4, 270, 4.6 speed
    Key trait: Size is flexible depending on if it's a 4-3 defense or a 3-4, or if the end is playing strong side or weak. Bulk is needed on the strong side, speed on the weak side.
    Prototype: Justin Smith (6-4, 275, 4.58 speed). Cincinnati, 1st round, 2001.
    Exception: Dwight Freeney (6-1, 268, 4.39 speed). Indianapolis, 1st round, 2002.

    Defensive tackle
    Measurables: 6-3, 305
    Key trait: In an era of specialization, the NFL rotates pass rushers into the game on passing downs. The NFL wants tackles who can play the run.
    Prototype:Kevin Williams (6-4, 304). Minnesota, 1st round, 2003.
    Exception:Casey Hampton (6-1, 314). Pittsburgh, 1st round, 2001.

    Outside linebacker
    Measurables: 6-3, 240, 4.50 speed
    Key trait: The outside linebackers need to be the most versatile players on the field. They must have the bulk to stalemate pulling guards and tackles on run downs and the speed to chase running backs down the field in pass coverage.
    Prototype: Derrick Johnson (6-3, 242, 4.50 speed). Kansas City, 1st round, 2005.
    Exception:Ernie Sims (5-11, 231, 4.50). Detroit, 1st round, 2006.

    Middle linebacker
    Measurables: 6-2, 240, 4.60 speed
    Key trait: Middle backers often have to engage a center or guard on rushing downs, so he must have the upper-body strength to stalemate a block in the hole.
    Prototype: Dan Morgan (6-2, 240, 4.59 speed). Carolina, 1st round 2001.
    Exception:Lofa Tatupu (5-11½, 238, 4.83). Seattle, 2nd round, 2005.

    Cornerback
    Measurables: 5-11, 190, 4.40 speed
    Key trait: Speed, speed, speed: Speed to break on the ball, speed to turn and run with a wide receiver, speed to come up in run support.
    Prototype: Marcus Trufant (5-11, 199, 4.38 speed). Seattle, 1st round, 2003.
    Exception: Jason David (5-8½, 175, 4.37 speed). Indianapolis, 4th round, 2004.

    Safety
    Measurables: 6-0, 200, 4.45 speed
    Key trait: In the 1990s, the NFL looked for run-support safeties. In the 2000s, the search is on for ballhawks. Now it's more important to play the ball when it's in the air than when it's on the ground. So the days of the 4.50 safeties are dwindling.
    Prototype: Michael Huff (6-0, 204, 4.34 speed). Oakland, 1st round, 2006.
    Exception:Bob Sanders (5-8, 204, 4.40 speed). Indianapolis, 2nd round, 2004
    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

  5. #5
    Pro Bowler
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    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Quote Originally Posted by PSU_dropout43
    Cornerback
    Measurables: 5-11, 190, 4.40 speed
    Key trait: Speed, speed, speed: Speed to break on the ball, speed to turn and run with a wide receiver, speed to come up in run support.
    Prototype: Marcus Trufant (5-11, 199, 4.38 speed). Seattle, 1st round, 2003.
    Exception: Jason David (5-8½, 175, 4.37 speed). Indianapolis, 4th round, 2004.
    I wouldn't say that Jason David is the exception. More that he reinforces the stereotype...

  6. #6

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Player College Height Weight Arms Hands 40 225 VERT JUMP 20S 60S 3 Cone


    .
    Seyi Ajirotutu Fresno State 6033 204 32 5/8 9 3/8 4.53 14 9'07
    .
    Danario Alexander Missouri 6050* 215 34 3/4 10 DNP DNP DNP DNP
    .
    Alric Arnett West Virginia 6016 188 32 1/2 9 4.52 40.0 10'02
    .
    Brandon Banks Kansas State 5066 149 30 8 1/4 4.43 9'01
    .
    Chris Bell Norfolk State 6021 211 32 1/4 9 1/8 4.47 15 9'09
    .
    Arrelious Benn Illinois 6010 219 32 1/4 9 3/8 4.48 20 37.0 9'10
    .
    Nyan Boateng California 6010 204 33 1/4 9 3/8 4.64 14
    .
    Dezmon Briscoe Kansas 6020 207 33 1/2 9 1/2 4.61 9
    .
    Antonio Brown Central Michigan 5101 186 31 9 4.50 13
    .
    Dez Bryant Oklahoma State 6020 225 34 9 3/4 DNP
    .
    Chris Carter Cal Davis 5110* 191 30 3/4 9 3/8 DNP 12
    .
    Riley Cooper Florida 6033 222 32 5/8 10 3/8 4.52
    .
    Eric Decker Minnesota 6031 217 31 9 1/8 DNP 15
    .
    Marcus Easley Connecticut 6026 210 32 3/4 8 1/2 4.46 16 10'03
    .
    Jacoby Ford Clemson 5087 186 30 1/2 9 1/4 4.28 13
    .
    David Gettis Baylor 6030 217 34 10 4.47 15 10'04
    .
    Mardy Gilyard Cincinnati 5117 187 32 1/4 9 1/8 4.56 39.0
    .
    Shay Hodge Mississippi 6012 209 33 9 1/4 4.57 11
    .
    Brandon James Florida 5060* 176 29 3/4 8 3/4 DNP 14
    .
    Donald Jones Youngstown State 6003 214 32 9 4.47 20 41.0


    .
    Kevin Jurovich San Jose State 5115 188 30 1/2 9 1/2 DNP 14
    .
    Brandon LaFell LSU 6024 211 32 3/4 8 3/4 4.59 9'05
    .
    Brandon Long Louisville 6021 216 31 1/4 9 3/4 4.46 20 41.5 10'03
    .
    Chris McGaha Arizona State 6007 201 31 3/4 10 1/8 DNP 19 40 10'02
    .
    Kerry Meier Kansas 6021 224 32 9 3/8 4.62 13 9'07
    .
    Carlton Mitchell South Florida 6027 215 32 1/2 9 1/2 4.49 16 10'02
    .
    Preston Parker North Alabama 5112 199 30 3/8 9 1/4 4.67 16 9'09
    .
    Jared Perry Missouri 6006 178 32 9 4.58 11 10'01
    .
    Taylor Price Ohio 6003 204 31 1/4 9 1/2 4.41 16 37.0
    .
    Brandon Reed Utah 6001 191 31 3/4 9 3/8 4.54 15
    .
    Andre Roberts Citadel 5107 195 31 1/2 9 1/2 4.46 15 10'00
    .
    Emmanuel Sanders Southern Methodist 5107 186 32 9 1/4 4.41 12 39.5 10'06
    .
    Jordan Shipley Texas 5112 193 30 1/2 9 5/8 4.57 16
    .
    Golden Tate Notre Dame 5102 199 30 1/2 9 1/4 4.42 17 10'00
    .
    Demaryius Thomas Georgia Tech 6032 224 33 10 1/2 DNP DNP
    .
    Verran Tucker California 6020* 200 33 1/4 9 1/4 DNP DNP
    .
    Chastin West Fresno State 6000* 212 32 3/4 9 7/8 4.54 15
    .
    Blair White Michigan State 6022 209 31 1/2 9 1/4 4.50 18
    .
    Damian Williams Southern Cal 6005 197 31 3/4 9 1/4 4.53 19 38.0
    .
    Jeremy Williams Tulane 6001 206 31 1/2 10 4.57 14


    .
    Kyle Williams Arizona State 5100 188 30 9 1/8 4.43 11 33.0
    .
    Mike Williams Syracuse 6014 221 32 1/2 9 1/4 4.45 8 33.5
    .
    Stephen Williams Toledo 6044 210 33 1/4 9 1/8 4.48 15 36.5 10'05
    .
    Ryan Wolfe UNLV 6010* 205 32 1/2 9 1/2 DNP 13
    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

  7. #7

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Full Name School Ht Wt Arm Hand Bench 40-1 40-2

    Seyi Ajirotutu Fresno State 6033 204 32 5/8 9 3/8 14 4.56 4.55
    Danario Alexander Missouri 6045 215 34 3/4 10 INJ
    Alric Arnett West Virginia 6016 188 32 1/2 9 DNB 4.50 4.49
    Brandon Banks Kansas State 5066 149 30 8 1/4 DNB 4.40 4.41
    Chris Bell Norfolk State 6021 211 32 1/4 9 1/8 15 4.53 4.50
    Arrelious Benn Illinois 6010 219 32 1/4 9 3/8 20 4.56 4.53
    Nyan Boateng California 6010 204 33 1/4 9 3/8 14 4.75 4.73
    Dezmon Briscoe Kansas 6020 207 33 1/2 9 1/2 9 4.63 4.68
    Antonio Brown Central Michigan 5101 186 31 9 13 4.54 4.59
    Dez Bryant Oklahoma State 6020 225 34 9 3/4 DNB INJ
    Chris Carter Cal-Davis 5113 191 30 3/4 9 3/8 12 INJ
    Riley Cooper Florida 6033 222 32 5/8 10 3/8 DNB 4.53 4.59
    Eric Decker Minnesota 6031 217 31 9 1/8 15 INJ
    Marcus Easley Connecticut 6026 210 32 3/4 8 1/2 16 4.41 4.39
    Jacoby Ford Clemson 5087 186 30 1/2 9 1/4 15 4.25 4.28
    David Gettis Baylor 6030 217 34 10 15 4.46 4.47
    Marshwan Gilyard Cincinnati 5117 187 32 1/4 9 1/8 DNB 4.59 4.65
    Vareion Hodge Mississippi 6012 209 33 9 1/4 11 4.60 4.60
    Trindon Holliday LSU
    Donald Jones Youngstown State 6003 214 32 9 20 4.48 4.52
    Kevin Jurovich San Jose State 5115 188 30 1/2 9 1/2 14 DNR
    Brandon LaFell LSU 6024 211 32 3/4 8 3/4 DNB 4.64 4.59
    Scott Long Louisville 6021 216 31 1/4 9 3/4 20 4.47 4.47
    Chris McGaha Arizona State 6007 201 31 3/4 10 1/8 19 INJ
    Kerry Meier Kansas 6021 224 32 9 3/8 13 4.65 4.65
    Carlton Mitchell South Florida 6027 215 32 1/2 9 1/4 16 4.44 4.46
    Preston Parker North Alabama 5112 199 30 3/8 9 1/4 16 4.69 4.67
    Jared Perry Missouri 6006 178 32 9 11 4.56 4.59
    Taylor Price Ohio 6003 204 31 1/4 9 1/2 16 4.42 4.40
    David Reed Utah 6001 191 31 3/4 9 3/8 15 4.58 4.55
    Andre Roberts Citadel 5107 195 31 1/2 9 1/2 15 4.44 4.47
    Emmanuel Sanders SMU 5107 186 32 9 1/4 12 4.39 4.42
    Jordan Shipley Texas 5112 193 30 1/2 9 5/8 16 4.60 4.65
    Golden Tate Notre Dame 5102 199 30 1/2 9 1/4 17 4.40 4.38
    Demaryius Thomas Georgia Tech 6032 224 33 10 1/2 INJ
    Verran Tucker California 6015 200 33 1/4 9 1/4 INJ
    Chastin West Fresno State 6003 212 32 3/4 9 7/8Q 15 4.57 4.55
    Blair White Michigan State 6022 209 31 1/2 9 1/4 18 4.52 4.47
    Kyle Williams Arizona State 5100 188 30 9 1/8 11 4.41 4.41
    Jeremy Williams Tulane 6001 206 31 1/2 10 14 4.60 4.59
    Stephen Williams Toledo 6044 210 33 1/4 9 1/8 15 4.54 4.52
    Damian Williams USC 6005 197 31 3/4 9 1/4 19 4.47 4.55
    Mike Williams Syracuse 6014 221 32 1/2 9 1/4 8 4.60 4.55
    Ryan Wolfe UNLV 6010 205 32 1/2 9 1/2 13 DNR

    Seyi Ajirotutu/Fresno St.; displayed no burst, very choppy running routes, and could not run to the deep ball.

    Alric Arnett/West Virginia; displayed solid hands and effectively adjusted to passes.

    Brandon Banks/Kansas St.; very explosive on the field, showed a great burst, and incredibly quick feet. Caught the ball well all afternoon.

    Chris Bell/Norfolk St.; caught the ball well, yet ran poor routes, showing limited quickness, and lacked burst in his game.

    Arrelious Benn/Illinois; fluid receiver that ran better than expected routes and displayed better than expected hands.

    Nyan Boateng/California; showed minimal quickness and struggled running routes, yet displayed strong and soft hands catching the ball very well.

    Dezmon Briscoe/Kansas; caught the ball well, yet showed no quickness or burst.

    Antonio Brown/Central Michigan; ran terrific routes and displayed both soft and strong hands.

    Riley Cooper/Florida; displayed great hands, yet displayed no burst or quickness.

    Marcus Easley/Connecticut; long strider who displayed marginal quickness and no burst.

    Jacoby Ford/Clemson; stood out in every aspect. Ran great routes, showed a terrific burst of speed, and caught everything thrown in his direction.

    David Gettis/Baylor; did not practice to his forty time, slow off the line, and showed no burst.

    Marshawn Gilyard/Cincinnati; ran good routes caught the ball well, and displayed a lot of natural pass catching skills.

    Shay Hodge/Mississippi; caught the ball well, displaying good timing, snatching the ball in the air.

    Trindon Holliday/LSU; quick running routes, displayed a great burst, yet was inconsistent catching the ball, dropping several easy passes.

    Donald Jones/Youngstown St.; inconsistent catching the ball, all too often letting the ball get inside his body, thus resulting in drops.

    Kevin Jurovich/San Jose St.; very natural catching the ball, displaying good hand/eye coordination, and making the reception away from his frame.

    Brandon LaFell/LSU; ran adequate routes, displaying strong hands plucking the ball out the air.

    Scott Long/Louisville; ran effective routes and practiced fast, outrunning many of the passes thrown to him. Extends and made the reception outside of his frame.

    Chris McGaha/Arizona St.; struggled throughout the day and never seemed to get his feet underneath him.

    Kerry Meier/Kansas; ran better than expected routes, yet showed no burst and let a few passes slip through his hands.

    Carlton Mitchell/South Florida; practiced to his forty time, making the reception in stride; nicely adjusting to the errant throw and then grabbing the pass out of the air.

    Preston Parker/North Alabama; showed marginal quickness and bobbled too many passes. Will work out during the Florida St. pro day.

    Jared Perry/Missouri; caught the ball well and showed good concentration.

    Taylor Price/Ohio; strong practice session. Showed a great burst of speed, turns it on in one step, then extends and snatches the ball in the air. Terrific hand/eye coordination and extended to make the reception away from his frame.

    David Reed/Utah; solid pass catching skills, yet did not stand out in any single area.

    Andre Roberts/Citadel; had a lot of uncharacteristic drops, did run nice routes.

    Emmanuel Sanders/SMU; terrific overall performance, ran great routes, showed a terrific burst, and had the ability to turn it on in a single step. Caught the ball well all day.

    Jordan Shipley/Texas; struggled running routes, showing no burst in his game, and looked slow in drills.

    Golden Tate/Notre Dame; dropped some passes early, then picked up the pace. Ran good routes, was catching everything throw in his direction by the end of the session.

    Chastin West/Fresno St.; ran adequate routes and effectively extended to make the reception away from his frame.

    Blair White/Michigan St.; shows no speed or burst, yet comes out of his routes well and effectively catches the ball.

    Kyle Williams/Arizona St.; started off hot, running good routes, displaying top quickness, and catching the ball well. Faded toward the end.

    Jeremy Williams/Tulane; caught the ball well, yet looked rather ordinary through most of the day.

    Stephen Williams/Toledo; showed no burst or quickness, and dropped a number of passes.

    Damian Williams/USC; a lot of drops early and looked very average all day.

    Mike Williams/Syracuse; shows no quickness in his game, very slow off the line, and has no burst. Picked it up as the session went along, but overall looked very uninspired.
    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

  8. #8
    Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Cincitucky (Stinktown, U.S.A.)
    Posts
    4,036

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Wow. They loved Benn. I thought he looked terrible. He has trouble locating the ball and had several drops.
    Even if Bill Belichick was getting an atomic wedgie, his face would look exactly the same.

  9. #9

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Player College Height Weight Arms Hands 40 225 VERT JUMP 20S 60S 3 Cone


    .
    Matthew Asiata Utah DNP
    .
    Joique Bell Wayne State 5110* 220 31 1/2 9 4.65 36.5 10'00
    .
    Jahvid Best California 5101 199 31 3/4 9 4.35 18 9'03
    .
    LeGarrette Blount Oregon 6004 241 33 1/2 10 4.62 19 9'09
    .
    Chris Brown Oklahoma 5103 210 29 9 1/8 4.58 17 36.0 9'07
    .
    John Conner Kentucky 5111 246 32 8 1/2 4.72 24 9'03
    .
    Andre Dixon Connecticut 6006 205 32 1/4 10 1/8 4.64 40.0 9'08
    .
    Anthony Dixon Mississippi State 6006 233 32 5/8 9 3/4 4.65 15 10'01
    .
    Jonathan Dwyer Georgia Tech 5112 229 31 8 5/8 4.59 15 8'11
    .
    Toby Gerhart Stanford 6000 231 32 9 5/8 4.53 22 38.0 9'10
    .
    Montario Hardesty Tennessee 5116 225 31 9 1/2 4.49 21 41.0 10'04
    .
    Rashawn Jackson Virginia 6010 239 33 9 7/8 4.73 9'09
    .
    Javarris James Miami (FL) 6002 212 32 9 5/8 4.53 21 36.0 9'07
    .
    Stafon Johnson USC 5107 214 30 3/8 8 3/4 4.66 13 9'10
    .
    Darius Marshall Marshall 5092 190 30 3/4 9 4.56 14 9'01
    .
    Ryan Mathews Fresno State 5115 218 31 9 1/4 4.53 19 36.0 10'01
    .
    Dexter McCluster Mississippi 5086 172 29 1/4 8 3/8 4.58 20 37.5 9'10
    .
    Joe McKnight USC 5113 198 31 3/4 9 1/8 4.47 18 36.5 10'08
    .
    Shawnbrey McNeal Southern Methodist 5091 194 30 1/2 9 3/8 4.56 14 36.0 9'04
    .
    Lonyae Miller Fresno State 5114 221 30 3/4 8 7/8 4.53 26 36.5 10'00


    .
    Brandon Minor Michigan 6000* 214 32 9 DNP DNP DNP DNP
    .
    Pat Paschall North Dakota State 5115 209 32 5/8 9 1/4 4.69 15 38.5 9'10
    .
    Charles Scott LSU 5113 238 33 9 1/2 4.67 9'03
    .
    CJ Spiller Clemson 5105 196 30 1/2 10 1/8 4.37 18 DNP DNP
    .
    James Starks Buffalo 6021 218 33 3/4 9 1/2 4.50 15 36.0 9'11
    .
    Ben Tate Auburn 5110 220 31 1/4 9 4.43 26 40.5 10'04
    .
    Manase Tonga BYU 5112 245 31 7/8 9 3/8 4.85 19
    .
    Keith Toston Oklahoma State 5116 213 32 3/4 9 1/4 4.70 22 32
    .
    Keiland Williams LSU 5110* 233 30 8 3/4 DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

  10. #10

    Re: Senior Bowl & East-West Shrine weight-ins

    Rankings NFL Combine Senior Bowl Media Contact Combine Report: Tight Ends
    27

    Feb

    Complete information on the tight ends that participated at the combine. Included are official height, weight, arm length, hand size , bench results plus two hand timings in the forty. Practice reports for all who participated are also included.
    Full Name School Ht Wt Arm Hand Bench 40-1 40-2
    Nate Byham Pittsburgh 6037 268 33 1/2 10 DNL 4.97 4.97
    Dorin Dickerson Pittsburgh 6013 226 34 9 3/4 24 4.50 4.47
    Ed Dickson Oregon 6042 249 33 9 3/4 23 4.65 4.66
    Jim Dray Stanford 6046 246 33 10 1/8 17 DNR
    Brody Eldridge Oklahoma 6046 261 32 1/2 9 5/8 DNL DNR
    Dedrick Epps Miami-Fl 6033 250 33 1/8 9 7/8 19 DNR
    Riar Geer Colorado 6027 256 33 10 1/8 13 4.97 5.03
    James Graham Miami-Fl 6062 260 35 10 5/8 DNL 4.58 4.55
    Garrett Graham Wisconsin 6031 243 32 9 1/2 20 4.66 4.68
    Jermaine Gresham Oklahoma 6052 261 34 3/4 9 5/8 20 4.73 4.71
    Rob Gronkowski Arizona 6062 264 34 1/4 10 3/4 23 DNR
    Clay Harbor Missouri State 6025 252 32 5/8 9 1/2 30 4.56 4.63
    Aaron Hernandez Florida 6023 245 32 1/4 9 3/4 DNL DNR
    Michael Hoomanawanui Illinois 6035 264 33 10 1/8 25 DNR
    Jaron Mastrud Kansas State 6053 256 33 1/2 9 1/4 DNL DNR
    Anthony McCoy USC 6044 259 34 10 3/8 19 4.69 4.74
    Tony Moeaki Iowa 6030 245 33 1/4 10 1/8 18 4.72 4.67
    Colin Peek Alabama 6052 254 34 9 5/8 19 DNR
    Dennis Pitta BYU 6044 245 32 1/4 10 27 4.62 4.68
    Andrew Quarless Penn State 6043 254 34 10 1/4 23 4.59 4.63

    Nate Byham/Pittsburgh; showed no burst in his game and lumbered about the field. Adequate strength in blocking drills.

    Dorin Dickerson/Pittsburgh; explodes off the line into pass routes or blocks, stays low to the ground, and ran good routes. Caught the ball relatively well, yet did not display strong hands and had some fastballs slip by.

    Ed Dickson/Oregon; played with good leverage, extends his hands, and looks the ball in. Ran relatively sharp routes. Made a number of solid over-the-shoulder receptions downfield.

    Brody Eldridge/Oklahoma; caught the ball relatively well though he shows no speed. Blocks with good lean and showed good jolt at the point of attack.

    Riar Geer/Colorado; displayed some explosion blocking, good hand/eye coordination, and extends to make receptions away from his frame. Dropped a lot of passes throughout the session.

    Garrett Graham/Wisconsin; fluid, adjusts well on errant throws, and snatches the ball from the air. Marginal strength in blocking drills.

    Jimmy Graham/Miami; played with excellent body control, fluid moving about the field, and displayed good quickness in his game. Very natural catching the football. Needs to brush up his route running, yet overall a very good session.

    Jermaine Gresham/Oklahoma; caught the ball well with his hands, although he did let a few passes slip by. Slow footed and choppy into routes. Displayed no burst. And really struggled to run to the deep throw.

    Clay Harbor/Missouri St.; did not practice to the speed of which he timed earlier in the day, showed some quickness in his game, and better than expected strength.

    Anthony McCoy/USC; started slow, then picked it up as the session progressed. Practiced faster than his forty time. Ran poor routes. Did not seem very sure of himself.

    Tony Moeaki/Iowa; good overall session. Caught everything that was thrown in his direction. Made several solid deep receptions and displayed soft hands.

    Dennis Pitta/BYU; caught the ball well, smooth and fluid about the field, and nicely adjusted to errant passes. Marginal strength as a blocker.

    Andrew Quarless/Penn St.; looked athletic and ran well, yet was inconsistent catching the football. Lacked balance and was consistently slipping on the field. Dropped a few too many passes. Showed a lot of upside, but has to pull it together.
    Woman: "Sir, what have you given us?"
    Benjamin Franklin: "A Republic, madam, if you can keep it."

    [youtube:razli5ow]KFXuGIpsdE0[/youtube:razli5ow]

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