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Thread: Interesting SI Comments...

  1. #11
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    Re: Interesting SI Comments...

    The players did vote for the grass...I would too! I would bet if they asked them if they wanted the grass at Heinz field or some type of new grass...They would vote for new grass! Unfortunately, as long as the panthers play there the Steelers get "leftovers" from the Panthers home game. It will be very difficult and costly to give them an A+ field come Sunday when the field is torn up during a Panthers game. Just remember...The opposing team has to play on the same field. How ever it impacts the Steelers...It does the same for the opposition. From experience, "Sloppy" fields...Bad weather game...Requires a "Bus" type of runner. A RB with more RB skills, North & South runner, runs through arm tackles, and low center gravity. A little extra weight also helps. When the field gets bad...Parker is the complete opposite type of runner you look for. Davenport was a little better than Parker but his upright running and lack of field vision didn't make him the answer. Mendenhall & Russell look like they come from that mold. Mendenhall can do both. Russell did it at Minnesota. We should see an upgrade in the running game during bad field conditions this year.



  2. #12
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    Re: Interesting SI Comments...

    I think the slop was beneficial in the Bus' heyday, but now it hinders the ability of guys like Willie Parker and Santonio Holmes. However, one major advantage is in the kicking game. Jeff Reed knows all about the footing and the wind patterns at Heinz, while opposing kickers haven't got a clue.

  3. #13
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    Re: Interesting SI Comments...

    take the game against miami as an example. the conditions made it a very level playing field and no way would that game of been close if it was played in decent conditions. i have always thought it hurts the defense more well especially db's i would think. the wr's and te's know where they are going to cut and what route they are running.

  4. #14
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    Re: Interesting SI Comments...

    Quote Originally Posted by frankthetank1
    take the game against miami as an example. the conditions made it a very level playing field and no way would that game of been close if it was played in decent conditions. i have always thought it hurts the defense more well especially db's i would think. the wr's and te's know where they are going to cut and what route they are running.
    frank that is a ONCE IN A LIFETIME game. The conditions will probably never be that bad again..anywhere.
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  5. #15
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    Re: Interesting SI Comments...

    Quote Originally Posted by Flasteel
    Quote Originally Posted by ShawnMedGuy
    From my understanding a slower field helps the D. This is something I have always been told and took it as fact.
    A slow field (ie: tall grass) negates any speed advantage a team might have, irrespective of offense or defense, but a muddy/ slippery field gives a decisive edge to a team's passing offense. Defenses have to react more whereas quarterbacks and receivers know where they're going in advance and don't have to rely on split-second cuts (they'll take chop-steps or slow their stems somewhat). It can make life kind of rough for a running back to get to the edge or cut-back to find a hole, which is why in those conditions you'll normally see teams try to pound it between the tackles or take to the air (despite a slippery ball).
    This would make sense except that they don't practice on it, they practice on field-turf.
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