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SteelCrazy
10-25-2012, 08:27 AM
I dont understand why Haley doesn't throw the deep ball at least 2-3 times a game. It would help open up all the underneath stuff he likes to throw. I get why he is running the plays he runs, but you'd think the deep ball would only help. Stretching the D out is a good thing. It helps all phases of the offense. I wish I could call a game or two. I'd show these guys how to run an Offense.
:cool:

Shawn
10-25-2012, 08:50 AM
Going deep is sooo last year.

SteelCrazy
10-25-2012, 10:18 AM
Yeah, I dont know what I was thinking.

Ghost
10-25-2012, 10:25 AM
I love when he goes deep to the sidelines to our 5'9" WR (who's covered) on 3rd and short when a 1st down would put the game away. That's awesome!!!

SteelCrazy
10-25-2012, 10:28 AM
I love when he goes deep to the sidelines to our 5'9" WR (who's covered) on 3rd and short when a 1st down would put the game away. That's awesome!!!

I put that on Ben. I'm sure Haley would have preferred a wide open Miller for the first.......

Jooser
10-25-2012, 11:47 AM
That's what she said! :D

hawaiiansteel
10-26-2012, 02:21 AM
Wallace looking for the deep ball

10/25/2012
By F. Dale Lolley, Staff writer dlolley@observer-reporter.com

http://www.observer-reporter.com/assets/8764766/10-25-steelers-instory.jpg

PITTSBURGH – Mike Wallace’s name had become synonymous with big plays in his first three NFL seasons.

But with new offensive coordinator Todd Haley’s emphasis on a short-passing game, the big plays have been few and far between for the Steelers’ big-play wide receiver.

That could change Sunday when the Steelers (3-3) host the Washington Redskins.

The Redskins (3-4) have given up 17 pass plays of 25 or more yards, which is good news for Wallace, who is averaging only 13.7 yards per catch – far below his career average of 18.7.

“Yeah, definitely,” said Wallace when asked if he was looking forward to the possibility of making some big plays against the Redskins. “You take all the big plays you can get. But you also have to look at the plays that they make as well. You can’t just think you’re going to go at them when they’re out there picking the ball off and getting fumbles.”

While Washington is giving up plenty of big plays and passing yards (340.4 per game) the Redskins also are forcing plenty of turnovers. Washington is plus-7 in turnover ratio, thanks to a defense that has 10 interceptions, returning four for touchdowns.

“I don’t look at them as giving up big plays or the opportunity for big plays,” said Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. “I look at them as being a takeaway machine. They take away the ball. They score on defense. To me, that’s something I have to keep my eyes on more than the big play being available.”

Still, the Steelers would like to take some shots deep with Wallace, who has a Steelers’ record 12 touchdown catches of 40 or more yards from Roethlisberger.

And coming off a game in which he dropped three passes, Wallace is looking for redemption.

“It’s one game. I feel like I’ll come back in a big way,” Wallace said. “I’m not down or anything like that. I had a bad game.

“Sometimes I try to run a little too early and take my eyes off the ball. I feel like I have it in my hands and try to turn and run. I just have to make sure I have it in my hands. You can’t run without the ball.”

Despite the three drops in Pittsbrugh’s 24-17 win at Cincinnati, Wallace had eight receptions, matching his career high. But those receptions went for only 52 yards – not the kind of production the Steelers are looking for from a receiver who had 15 passes thrown his way.

“I don’t shy away from them, even with drops,” Roethlisberger said. “I will always have confidence in them no matter what.”

And Wallace says the big plays are coming, if not this week, then in the coming weeks, as the players become more comfortable with the offense.

“Of course, I would want more opportunities,” Wallace said of the deep passes. “But we’re doing good as a team doing what we’re doing. As long as we’re winning and build and go in the right direction, we’re fine.

“I think Coach Haley is slowly but surely opening it up a little more. It’s still early in the season. He’s still figuring out the players that he has. Even though he saw us on film, you never know the guys until you get working with them. I think every week he’s learning more and giving us more opportunities. I think this week we’ll get a couple more.”

Odds and end zones

Coming off a career-high 122- yard rushing game against the Bengals in his first career start, running back Jonathan Dwyer was not at practice Wednesday because of personal issues. … Also sitting out Wednesday were running backs Rashard Mendenhall (Achilles tendon) and Isaac Redman (ankle), offensive tackle Marcus Gilbert (ankle) and linebacker Jason Worild (illness). … Center Maurkice Pouncey and linebacker Chris Carter, both of whom missed the game Sunday, were full participants.

http://www.observer-reporter.com/or/sports11/10-25-steelers-wallace

Chadman
10-26-2012, 11:17 AM
After reading the title, Chadman was waiting for someone to say 'it'.

Thankfully Jooser is as predictable as ever- well played Jooser, well played.

Let's face it, it's probably a length thing.

phillyesq
10-26-2012, 11:25 AM
I wonder if Haley is holding back a bit to unleash this later in the year. I generally like the methodical, ball control offense that he has installed, especially since it still incorporates the WRs. A deep shot here and there would be nice, especially if he can set it up with play action.

hawaiiansteel
10-26-2012, 02:01 PM
Steelers plan to rejuvenate passing game

By Alan Robinson
Published: Thursday, October 25, 2012

http://triblive.com/csp/mediapool/sites/dt.common.streams.StreamServer.cls?STREAMOID=Hsjl2 rFApxLco5oinUORb8$daE2N3K4ZzOUsqbU5sYta65Q$7p$EXMx 0bQ41K_c_WCsjLu883Ygn4B49Lvm9bPe2QeMKQdVeZmXF$9l$4 uCZ8QDXhaHEp3rvzXRJFdy0KqPHLoMevcTLo3h8xh70Y6N_U_C ryOsw6FTOdKL_jpQ-&CONTENTTYPE=image/jpeg

Steelers receiver Antonio Brown plays against Cincinnati at Paul Brown Stadium Stadium Oct. 21, 2012

Mike Wallace doesn’t think they’re scared anymore.

The Steelers’ big-play wide receiver sensed hesitation in defensive backs last season, the worry that in a second or two he would accelerate into the direct path of a precisely thrown Ben Roethlisberger deep pass.

Not now. It’s not as if the long ball has vanished from the offense; Wallace caught an 82-yard touchdown pass only two weeks ago. But Roethlisberger is going downfield only once or twice a game — not the five or six times he did when Bruce Arians ran the offense.

Maybe that’s why Wallace sees cornerbacks creeping closer to the line of scrimmage, emboldened by the knowledge that the Steelers aren’t looking long.

Wallace believes it’s time to bring back the fear factor.

“Last year, we went deep so much that guys would back up all the time,” he said Thursday. “This year, we’ve been going (short) so much, guys I think are kind of forgetting who we are when it comes to deep balls. They’re forgetting we’re the best in the world. We need to remind them.”

This might be the week to go deep.

“There are definitely going to be opportunities — a lot of them,” receiver Antonio Brown said. “We’ve got to take advantage of them, capitalize on them.”

The Washington Redskins (3-4) rank last in the NFL in pass defense, allowing 328.4 yards per game and 7.71 yards per attempt. No doubt offensive coordinator Todd Haley is paying attention.

“I think he’s going to give us a couple of shots,” Wallace said.

The Redskins’ secondary, which starts cornerbacks DeAngelo Hall and Josh Wilson and safeties Reed Doughty and Madieu Williams, has allowed 16 touchdown passes. The most recent was an everyone-knew-it-was-coming Eli Manning to Victor Cruz 77-yard winner with 73 seconds left Sunday against the New York Giants.

“They’re OK. They’re decent,” Wallace said of the Redskins’ secondary. “DeAngelo is a perennial Pro Bowler guy. … I don’t feel like they have tremendous athletes over there, but they’re always in the right spots.”

Not much is going right for those defenders so far.

“We gave up 222 yards a game in the passing game last year. I think we were like 10th or 11th. We’re giving up 328 right now, which is crazy,” Redskins defensive coordinator Jim Haslett said.

Now that secondary must face Roethlisberger, who is enjoying one of his best seasons despite being without much of a running game until Jonathan Dwyer ran for 122 yards Sunday at Cincinnati. Roethlisberger threw for 278 yards but would have had more if his receivers hadn’t dropped a half-dozen passes, including three by Wallace.

“Like I’ve said all along, I’m not worried about the big plays,” Haley said. “I think, when they’re there, we’ll get them, and hopefully we’re at a high percentage of getting them.”

Sunday, perhaps? Brown (36 catches), tight end Heath Miller (31) and Wallace (29) all have more catches than any Redskins player; tight end Fred Davis, who’s out for the season with a torn left Achilles tendon, leads the way with 24.

“If we can get that production out of our running game, our pass game is going to come — I promise you,” Wallace said. “I think we can be one of the best offenses. But it’s not time to say that anymore — we have to go out and prove it. The talking is done.”

http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/2819944-85/game-wallace-redskins-think-steelers-yards-pass-deep-roethlisberger-sunday#ixzz2AQBiaEsa

Oviedo
10-26-2012, 02:38 PM
Perhaps it is as simple as Haley not knowing how hard Wallace will try to get the ball since his driving concern since the spring has been to do nothing to get hurt.;) Why waste a down?

hawaiiansteel
10-26-2012, 02:40 PM
Roethlisberger says he likes the dink-and-dunk offense

Posted by Mike Florio on October 26, 2012

As Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and Steelers offensive coordinator inch toward a confrontation that coach Mike Tomlin regards as inevitable, Roethlisberger is fashioning a tapestry of passive-aggressive sound bites aimed at needling Haley or building support from the fans, or both.

Over the weekend, Roethlisberger referred to Halley’s offense as a “dink-and-dunk” attack. Though the term widely is regarded in football circles as derisive, Ben now saws that he actually is a fan of dinking and dunking.

“That wasn’t meant in a negative way,” Roethlisberger said Thursday, via Jarrett Bell of USA Today. “Coach Haley and I had a laugh about it this morning. To dink and dunk, that’s moving the chains, and it will open up big plays. The Patriots dink and dunk, too.”

And when those big plays come, maybe Roethlisberger will refer to the offense as “chuck and duck.” In a positive way.

Here’s the reality. The Steelers got rid of offensive coordinator Bruce Arians in part because he and Roethlisberger were regarded as being too close, to the point where there was real concern that Arians was creating game plans with an eye toward showcasing the quarterback, which could have impacted the broader effort to win games. Right or wrong, Haley’s presence is aimed in part at enhancing the overall effort by not allowing Roethlisberger to get too reckless with the ball or his body.

The fact that Haley has yet to engage Roethlisberger via the media is a good sign. The Steelers knew that it would take time for Ben to buy in to the new approach, and they’re wisely tolerating his periodic public pissing and moaning about dinking and dunking or chucking and ducking or whatever he may publicly piss and/or moan about.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/10/26/roethlisberger-says-he-likes-the-dink-and-dunk-offense/

Oviedo
10-26-2012, 03:29 PM
Roethlisberger says he likes the dink-and-dunk offense

Posted by Mike Florio on October 26, 2012

As Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and Steelers offensive coordinator inch toward a confrontation that coach Mike Tomlin regards as inevitable, Roethlisberger is fashioning a tapestry of passive-aggressive sound bites aimed at needling Haley or building support from the fans, or both.

Over the weekend, Roethlisberger referred to Halley’s offense as a “dink-and-dunk” attack. Though the term widely is regarded in football circles as derisive, Ben now saws that he actually is a fan of dinking and dunking.

“That wasn’t meant in a negative way,” Roethlisberger said Thursday, via Jarrett Bell of USA Today. “Coach Haley and I had a laugh about it this morning. To dink and dunk, that’s moving the chains, and it will open up big plays. The Patriots dink and dunk, too.”

And when those big plays come, maybe Roethlisberger will refer to the offense as “chuck and duck.” In a positive way.

Here’s the reality. The Steelers got rid of offensive coordinator Bruce Arians in part because he and Roethlisberger were regarded as being too close, to the point where there was real concern that Arians was creating game plans with an eye toward showcasing the quarterback, which could have impacted the broader effort to win games. Right or wrong, Haley’s presence is aimed in part at enhancing the overall effort by not allowing Roethlisberger to get too reckless with the ball or his body.

The fact that Haley has yet to engage Roethlisberger via the media is a good sign. The Steelers knew that it would take time for Ben to buy in to the new approach, and they’re wisely tolerating his periodic public pissing and moaning about dinking and dunking or chucking and ducking or whatever he may publicly piss and/or moan about.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/10/26/roethlisberger-says-he-likes-the-dink-and-dunk-offense/

Sounds like "Much ado about nothing"