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fordfixer
09-12-2012, 12:53 AM
Kovacevic: Old? Slow? Not Steelers’ problemAuthority Field at Mile High Sept. 9, 2012. Tribune Review

Chaz Palla

Read more: http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/2573376-85/slow-manning-steelers-polamalu-clark-defense-denver-hurries-isn-kovacevic#ixzz26ECOVMzo
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By Dejan Kovacevic

Published: Tuesday, September 11, 2012, 11:22 p.m.
Updated 56 minutes ago

One learns in life it isn’t all that bright to argue with 285-pound, thickly bearded, mountain-bred defensive ends. So I happily accept Brett Keisel’s word when he spoke the following late Sunday night in Denver: “We feel like we’re a better defense than that.”

He’s correct, of course.

It just might be that, by the time the Steelers march off Heinz Field this weekend, they’ll have mauled Mark Sanchez and the Jets, and the opening 31-19 loss will be as distant a memory as Rex Ryan’s former waistline.

It just might be, as Keisel added, “a matter of rectifying a few things.”

But let’s first rectify one description of the defense that shouldn’t be in the discussion.

OLD and SLOW.

It started with Warren Sapp’s jab a year ago, and it’s carried all the way into the predictable outcry this week. Someone on the Web or a talk show brings up the defense, and it’s a matter of seconds before it pops up anew.

OLD and SLOW.

It’s lazy analysis, to be kind, especially as it relates to Sunday.

Let me ask this: Who was the Steelers’ best player?

Answer: It was, by an almost shameful margin, 32-year-old Larry Foote. He had eight tackles, a sack, two hurries of Peyton Manning, a forced fumble, a pass defended, and probably helped little old ladies cross the street outside the stadium.

Fellow inside linebacker Lawrence Timmons?

Five tackles and ... well, he did make it onto the active roster.

Timmons is 26, and he’s YOUNG and FAST, though you wouldn’t know the latter from how easily the surgically rebuilt Manning sprinted away from him on that late scramble.

The linemen and outside backers totaled only five hurries on Manning. But again, that had little to do with OLD or SLOW.

Tomlin rotated his linemen liberally, giving extensive time to Cam Heyward, 23, and Steve McLendon, 26, in part to combat the thin air. And of the outside backers, LaMarr Woodley, 27, had no sacks or hurries, and Chris Carter, 23, who’s VERY YOUNG and VERY FAST, was buried all night by Denver tight end Joel Dreessen.

The biggest factor, actually, was that Manning was brilliant in picking up blitzes and quick in moving the ball. But that would have been the case if the Steelers had gone with ALL ROOKIES who could ALL RUN LIKE USAIN BOLT.

Which takes us to the secondary, maybe the most maligned with that OLD and SLOW label.

Manning’s most frequent victim was Keenan Lewis, 26, who allowed Eric Decker seven catches. It was no way to make anyone forget William Gay, 27, whose offseason exit via free agency always should have raised more red flags than it did.

That was a case of OLD being better than NEW.

Ryan Mundy, 27, filled the spot of Ryan Clark, 32, for the game.

Ike Taylor, 32, was torched again by Demaryius Thomas, but he shuts down pretty much everyone else, YOUNG or OLD.

And Troy Polamalu?

Well, let’s face it: When people talk OLD and SLOW, aren’t they really talking about Troy?

Sorry, I’m not there yet.

Sure, Polamalu isn’t hitting the highlights anymore. You’ve seen a lot more Clark Kent than Superman for a couple years now, especially when hurt. Tomlin revealed Tuesday that Polamalu has a strained calf.

Still, look at his big gaffe in Denver e_SEmD he went underneath a block that led to Thomas’ 71-yard touchdown e_SEmD and it was mental. An OLD player is better equipped to make that play, even if he’s now SLOWER.

“I should have made a better decision,” Polamalu said.

Or he could have had help. Mundy got blown up, too. Maybe Clark wouldn’t have been. Never underestimate what Clark’s stability means to Polamalu.

Look, I’m not going to sugarcoat this. The defense was lousy. Three 80-yard touchdown drives in a row is embarrassing.

But let’s set aside the memes and consider real solutions Tomlin and Dick LeBeau should find for the Jets: If James Harrison isn’t ready, sit Carter for Jason Worilds, who put the only hard hit on Manning. Get help for Lewis, too, or drop him for Cortez Allen. And let’s see more of Heyward and McLendon.

The coaches should look in the mirror, too.

Manning outsmarts most opponents, but there had to be an extra sting in hearing Denver receiver Brandon Stokley say of the Steelers’ late defensive collapse: “I think they pretty much did the same thing all game.”

Hey, maybe it’s the strategies and adjustments that are OLD and SLOW.

Dejan Kovacevic is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at dkovacevic@tribweb.com.

Read more: http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/2573376-85/slow-manning-steelers-polamalu-clark-defense-denver-hurries-isn-kovacevic#ixzz26EBjcZlw
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Oviedo
09-12-2012, 08:51 AM
The problem was that Manning had zero pressure on him. Give one of the greatest QBs in NFL history all day to scan the field and make a throw and the outcome is a foregone conclusion. Our 3-4 falls apart if the QB isn't pressured. Its almost guaranteed.

BradshawsHairdresser
09-12-2012, 08:54 AM
The coaches should look in the mirror, too.

Manning outsmarts most opponents, but there had to be an extra sting in hearing Denver receiver Brandon Stokley say of the Steelers’ late defensive collapse: “I think they pretty much did the same thing all game.”

Hey, maybe it’s the strategies and adjustments that are OLD and SLOW.



Finally, a reporter calls out St. LeBeau...his strategies and adjustments are OLD and SLOW.

BURGH86STEEL
09-12-2012, 09:02 AM
The problem was that Manning had zero pressure on him. Give one of the greatest QBs in NFL history all day to scan the field and make a throw and the outcome is a foregone conclusion. Our 3-4 falls apart if the QB isn't pressured. Its almost guaranteed.

The defense had pressure on Manning at times. It's difficult to maintain consistent pressure on Manning because of the way he plays QB.

aggiebones
09-12-2012, 09:14 AM
I saw some new and interesting blitzes in the first half. But then they were picked up later and they just couldn't get to Manning or they missed him. Those blitzes would have rattled other quarterbacks, but Manning is a pretty decent quarterback still. It Was week 1 with several important numbers either out of the game or injured during the game. It happens, it won't happen all season.

D Rock
09-12-2012, 09:51 AM
The OLD tag doesn't really fit, especially Sunday night.

Problem with that game was the the SLOW tag fit more than ever. Even the FAST players played SLOW.

Oviedo
09-12-2012, 10:18 AM
Finally, a reporter calls out St. LeBeau...his strategies and adjustments are OLD and SLOW.

It's been there for awhile to anyone who wants to see it. It's just getting too hard to ignore because it happens more often the same way in the same situations. No adjustments. Put the template out there and trust Troy to do something spectacular.

Shoe
09-12-2012, 12:03 PM
I was just about to make a thread about THIS point. Why in the world were ALL our young prospects deactivated for this game?

Isaac Redman
Chris Carter
Cortez Allen
Ziggy Hood

Why would you deactivate all those guys for the season opener? I don't get it. They should be on the field!

Keyplay1
09-12-2012, 01:00 PM
I was just about to make a thread about THIS point. Why in the world were ALL our young prospects deactivated for this game?

Isaac Redman
Chris Carter
Cortez Allen
Ziggy Hood

Why would you deactivate all those guys for the season opener? I don't get it. They should be on the field!

Nice one!

Yeah, it was more like they activated the eight and deactivated the 45.

Oviedo
09-12-2012, 01:21 PM
I saw some new and interesting blitzes in the first half. But then they were picked up later and they just couldn't get to Manning or they missed him. Those blitzes would have rattled other quarterbacks, but Manning is a pretty decent quarterback still. It Was week 1 with several important numbers either out of the game or injured during the game. It happens, it won't happen all season.


Typical no adjustments response from the defense. Aggressive and attacking in the first half. Passive and scared in the second.

Slapstick
09-12-2012, 01:25 PM
Typical no adjustments response from the defense. Aggressive and attacking in the first half. Passive and scared in the second.

If this is the case, then the Steelers did make adjustments...just horrible ones...:confused:

ikestops85
09-12-2012, 04:16 PM
Typical no adjustments response from the defense. Aggressive and attacking in the first half. Passive and scared in the second.

I know ... I wish we had a defense like GB or NE or NO. They make all the correct adjustments.

steelz09
09-12-2012, 05:54 PM
The old and good players are slowing down.

The young and fast are simply not very good.

phillyesq
09-12-2012, 06:08 PM
Typical no adjustments response from the defense. Aggressive and attacking in the first half. Passive and scared in the second.

The Steelers still attempted to bring pressure in the second half. It was picked up.

hawaiiansteel
09-12-2012, 08:45 PM
OLD. SLOW. DONE.

Monday, September 10, 2012
by Mark Madden

http://content.clearchannel.com/cc-common/mlib/2094/09/2094_1347292368.jpg

Yinz hate Ben. I get it. Pick six, game over, tasteless jokes, etc. PREDICTABLE.

Ben Roethlisberger needed to come through late in the fourth quarter when the game was up for grabs. He didn’t. He knows it, and is no less disappointed than you.

But that’s one instance. Ben’s third-down precision was the offense’s saving grace. Ben's stats on third down were HUGE: 11/15 with two TDs and a QB rating of 139.4.

The Steelers’ defense had no saving grace. OLD. SLOW. DONE. Denver had THREE CONSECUTIVE 80-YARD TOUCHDOWN DRIVES.

Things started OK. The D had two sacks and a fumble recovery in the first quarter.

Once Denver went to the no-huddle, Peyton Manning made the Saran Wrap Curtain look ancient, tired and clueless. Dick LeBeau’s platoon prides itself on not giving up big plays. Congratulations. You shaved nine yards off Demaryius Thomas’ run to the house. He only went 71 yards, as opposed to 80 yards in last year’s playoff loss.

After that, Troy Polamalu played a mile or so off the line. NON-FACTOR.

It’s just one game, obviously. Denver’s a tough place to play and Manning is a tough quarterback to beat. If he’s lost anything, it’s hard to tell.

But despite the mostly close nature of last night’s loss, and despite injuries and illness hurting their chances, something felt wrong about the Steelers.

The offense was predictable: The Steelers ran on their first seven first- or second-down plays and passed on their first three third-down plays. Unless desperation necessitated, Roethlisberger primarily managed the game a la Mike Tomczak.

The Steelers drove 64 yards in 16 plays to open the second half, using a Shaun Suisham field goal to extend their lead to 13-7. The Broncos immediately went 80 yards in two plays, Thomas’ 71-yard catch-and-run providing a 14-13 edge.

The Steelers had the ball for 8:55, the Broncos 36 seconds. The Steelers got three points, the Broncos seven.

The Steelers played old-time, grind-it-out football. The Broncos, their play-calling firmly rooted in the present, MADE PLAYS. But Denver out-rushed Pittsburgh anyway. The Steelers had the ball for 35:05. But the Steelers' defense still looked exhausted. When the Broncos got their first possession of the second half, Denver's O and Pittsburgh's D (save one kneel-down) had been off the field for ALMOST AN HOUR.

Boom: Two plays, 80 yards, touchdown. At least chasing Thomas from behind was a familiar situation. Hey, Demaryius, wait for ME-E-E-E-E!

The New York Jets come to town next Sunday having scored 48 points on Buffalo, a team thought by many to be playoff-caliber. Suddenly, that’s a BIG TEST.

James Harrison and Ryan Clark didn’t play. Marcus Gilbert and Ramon Foster went down before halftime. That’s not supposed to matter. The standard is the standard.

http://www.1059thex.com/pages/supergenius.html?article=10404284#ixzz26IYLVUXE

Slapstick
09-13-2012, 06:30 AM
fat. Dumb. Boring.

Slapstick
09-13-2012, 06:32 AM
How strange...I typed that in all caps, but it comes out like that...

It really loses the intended effect...:confused: