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RuthlessBurgher
06-27-2012, 07:43 PM
I did not change the spelling of Goodell's name...it was actually spelled Goddell in the middle of the article...awesome.


Jun 27, 2012
Hines Ward says NFL players get what they agreed to in CBA

By Gary Mihoces, USA TODAY
Updated 2h 47m ago

Though he doesn't sanction the alleged bounty system by the New Orleans Saints, retired Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward says NFL players have the new collective bargaining agreement – which they ratified – to blame for Commissioner Roger Goodell being in charge of player discipline.

Ward told radio station WFNZ in Charlotte Tuesday that Steelers players, some targeted multiple times by Goodell for allegedly illegal hits, did not sign off on the CBA in large part because of Goodell's power to discipline players.

"So Roger Goodell, even though a lot of players don't like having him in charge, the NFLPA, we signed off on the collective bargaining agreement," said Ward.

"And it should be noted that we were the only team who voted against it, and that was a major factor because of how we are fined on our team. In order to go to the appeal committee, we had to go right back to Roger Goddell. So that was one of the big things that we voted no against because we just felt like it was going to be unfair.

"But to the rest of the teams that did vote for the CBA, he's in charge, and those are the rules, and that's what you have to abide by because that's what you signed up for."

Goodell suspended Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma for the 2012 season. Defensive end Will Smith was suspended four games. Defensive end Anthony Hargrove (now with the Green Bay Packers) got eight games, and linebacker Scott Fujita (now with the Cleveland Browns) got three.

Via the NFLPA, the players are appealing the suspensions. After a hearing before Goodell earlier this month, Vilma called the process a "sham" and said Goodell is the "judge, jury and executioner."

In his radio interview, Ward was asked if he thought the Saints were the only team involved in a bounty program.

"I think it went on through the league, but at the same time I think it's uncalled for," said Ward. "The teams such as the Saints – and it may have been that every team was doing it – but they're the ones who got put on tape in a playoff game, and of course, Brett Favre (Packers quarterback allegedly targeted). You don't need to have an extra incentive to go out and hurt somebody, the game is violent enough as it is. And then to go out there and be proud of collecting money for hurting somebody, take food off someone's table, that's uncalled for."


http://content.usatoday.com/communities/thehuddle/post/2012/06/hines-ward-says-nfl-players-get-what-they-agreed-to-in-cba/1?csp=34sports&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TP-TheHuddle+%28Sports+-+The+Huddle%29#.T-tvTCtYtNk

Crash
06-27-2012, 08:08 PM
Should have listened to the Steelers players who voted down the CBA.

Too little too late.

D Rock
06-27-2012, 10:14 PM
I didn't realize that the Steelers players were the only ones who voted against the CBA. That certainly explains a lot.

ikestops85
06-28-2012, 11:52 AM
Should have listened to the Steelers players who voted down the CBA.

Too little too late.

Did you just agree with HINES WARD? :wft

Crash
06-28-2012, 12:14 PM
I defend Hines more than most think on certain issues.

I just don't out up with his BS either.

Oviedo
06-28-2012, 12:25 PM
The players and their so-called union did exactly what always happens in labor disputes. They focused on the short term, what does it do for me and ignore the bigger picture. That is why management always has the upper hand. It's all about "me" for current union members. Of course, that is until they blow their millions of dollars and want to sue the NFL because they didn't ever realize that when playing football they were having physical contact.

No one paid attention to what the Steelers players were saying because they all had Steeler envy or hate and thought it was great that the mean, tough Steelers were getting punished. Now they can pay the price for nine more years. Suck it up.

grotonsteel
06-28-2012, 12:46 PM
The players and their so-called union did exactly what always happens in labor disputes. They focused on the short term, what does it do for me and ignore the bigger picture. That is why management always has the upper hand. It's all about "me" for current union members. Of course, that is until they blow their millions of dollars and want to sue the NFL because they didn't ever realize that when playing football they were having physical contact.

No one paid attention to what the Steelers players were saying because they all had Steeler envy or hate and thought it was great that the mean, tough Steelers were getting punished. Now they can pay the price for nine more years. Suck it up.

+1

I think D Smith of NFLPA is to be equally blamed.

Crash
06-28-2012, 01:38 PM
D Smith is incompetent. What the players saw in approving that clown as the head of the NFLPA I'll never know.

Oviedo
06-28-2012, 02:56 PM
D Smith is incompetent. What the players saw in approving that clown as the head of the NFLPA I'll never know.

I said that from Day 1. He was out primarily to enhance his rep as a labor leader which he will market somewhere else down the road for his own enrichment. The players got nothing that the owners wouldn't had given them in the first two weeks of negotiations if they didn't have an idiot like D. Smith across the table from them.

hawaiiansteel
06-28-2012, 03:37 PM
Hines Ward Says He Thinks Bounties Went On Throughout The League

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012 by Dave Bryan

Former Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward said last Friday on WFNZ Radio in Charlotte that he thinks bounty type systems went on throughout the league, but that he also thinks that players need to just deal with the discipline that Roger Goodell hands down now because of the power that they gave him when they ratified the new CBA last off-season.

When Ward was asked specifically on The Mack Attack Show if he thought bounties went on throughout the league, Ward replied, "I think it went on throughout the league, but at the same time it's uncalled for," said Ward. "The teams, such as the Saints, yes, it may have been that everybody was doing it, but they're the ones who got put on tape in the playoff game, and of course, Brett Favre. You don't want to add extra incentive to go out there to hurt somebody, our game is already violent as it is. And then to go out there and be proud about collecting money on trying take food off someone's table, that's uncalled for."

"So Roger Goodell, even though a lot of players don't really like him in charge, we as a NFLPA, we signed on to that new collective bargaining agreement," continued Ward.

"And to be noted, we were the only team to vote against it, because that was a major factor. we were getting highly fined on our team and in order to go to an appeals committee, we had to go right back to Roger Goddell. So that was one of the big things that we voted no against because we felt like it was going to be unfair.

"But to the rest of the teams that did vote on the CBA, he's in charge, and he makes the rules, and you have to abide by it, because that's what you signed on for."

Since the punishment to the Saints players was handed down by Goodell several weeks ago, several players around the league have spoken out to say that they wish that they hadn't ratified the CBA. Their reason is because of Goodell remaining in charge of player discipline. The Steelers were of course the only team to vote against ratifying the new CBA for that very reason.

Ward saying that he thinks that bounties went on throughout the league is not very surprising to me as many believe that the Baltimore Ravens had one on Ward and running back Rashard Mendenhall back in 2008. Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs announced for the world to hear when he was asked on a syndicated radio show that October if the Ravens had placed a bounty on Mendenhall, who sustained a season-ending shoulder injury during the week 4 game against the Ravens. "Definitely. The bounty was out on him and the bounty was out on [Ward] -- we just didn't get him between the whistles," said Suggs.

Suggs of course tried to clarify his radio interview admission later to the Baltimore Sun, but Ray Anderson, the NFL's executive vice president of football operations, declared at that time that the league was indeed looking into the Suggs comments. Anderson told ESPN.com, "That 'bounty' notion is completely against the rules. To the extent that someone is engaged in that activity, we will look into it and address it. Yes, we've seen the comments and we're trying to determine the completeness of the circumstances."

Nothing ever came out of the investigation though.

Ward was asked his thoughts on the Suggs declaration after it was made and he would only say at that time, "I am really not going to comment. But all I have to say to Mr. Suggs is there's a policy in the NFL [against bounties] he should read."

Goodell and Anderson had a golden opportunity to nip all of this bounty stuff in the bud back in 2008 with a hefty fine and a strong warning to the rest of the league, but he chose not to do so. Would it have stopped the Saints from doing what they allegedly went on to do? Who knows.

http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/hines_ward_says_he_thinks_bounties_went_on_through out_the_league/11104697

Crash
06-28-2012, 03:43 PM
Of course not, Goodell grew up loving the city of Baltimore. Which is why on the same week he suspended Ben, he paraded ex-con and accused murderer Ray Lewis onto the draft night stage like a show-pony and referred to him as "The great Ray Lewis".

hawaiiansteel
06-29-2012, 09:08 PM
Brees tells Letterman NFL is engaged in “smear campaign”

Posted by Michael David Smith on June 29, 2012

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/brees1-e1330719399239.jpg?w=250

If the NFL is at all worried about the potential for backlash from fans who think the league has been heavy-handed in the Saints bounty investigation, then the folks inside the league office probably weren’t laughing when they watched Thursday’s edition of Late Show With David Letterman.

Saints quarterback Drew Brees appeared on Thursday night’s show and bashed the league office for its handling of the case, accusing the NFL of caring more about paying lip service to player safety than about getting to the truth of what happened. And the truth, according to Brees, is that Saints players weren’t engaged in a pay-to-injure scheme, despite what the NFL may say.

“I mean, just the whole process itself and the investigation I feel like has been extremely unfair. Unfortunately, it seems like it’s been more of a media campaign than it is actually finding the truth to the matter,” Brees said. “Put forth the facts, the truth, and if indeed there was a pay-to-injure scheme, then people will get punished, and if there’s not, then let’s exonerate these men because, at this point, it seems like it’s a smear campaign. We’re dragging them through the mud. We’re ruining their reputations and careers with no true evidence.”

Those comments aren’t much different than the comments that Brees and other Saints players have made in other forums. But for Brees to go on what is normally a lighthearted comedy show and make those highly charged comments brings the message of the Saints players — their belief that the NFL botched its bounty investigation — to a new audience.

And that’s the audience the league really has to be careful about alienating. The hard-core football fans who follow all the NFL news all offseason long love football so much that they’re going to watch when the season starts no matter what actions the league office may take. It’s the more casual football fans, the ones who only hear what’s going on in the NFL during the offseason when they happen to catch it on a show like Letterman’s, that the league risks losing. And when one of the NFL’s best and most popular players is openly questioning the league’s integrity to that kind of audience, that’s just the kind of offseason distraction the NFL hates.

Brees’s appearance wasn’t all about slamming the Saints, and there were some laughs along the way. Letterman got off a good line, telling Brees that if he’s fed up in New Orleans he can get a job with the Jets, and Brees drew laughs with his response, saying the Jets have enough quarterbacks already. But the takeaway that most Letterman viewers will have from Brees’s appearance is that he’s a smart, thoughtful player who is mad as hell about how the NFL has treated his team and his teammates.

When Roger Goodell talks about the importance of “protecting the the shield,” he’s not talking about ripping the league in a public forum. But that’s exactly what Brees did. And many viewers likely concluded that Brees is exactly right.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/06/29/brees-tells-letterman-nfl-is-engaged-in-smear-campaign/