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hawaiiansteel
05-23-2012, 09:24 PM
Steelers’ Harrison: Goodell lawsuit ‘win-win’ for players

By Scott Brown - Tribune-Review
Published: Wednesday, May 23

It is more than four months before the start of the NFL season, but James Harrison appears to be in midseason form when it comes to tweaking his frequent foil.

The Steelers outside linebacker took a couple of subtle swipes at Roger Goodell on Wednesday, calling the defamation lawsuit that Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma brought against the NFL commissioner last week a “win-win” for the players.

“If (Vilma) loses, it shows Goodell does have too much power,” Harrison said following an offseason practice, “and if he wins, it opens up the floodgates.”

Goodell suspended Vilma for the 2012 season for the latter’s role in the New Orleans Saints’ bounty scandal. Goodell has drawn criticism, particularly from players, for not being more forthcoming about evidence he has against Vilma and others that were disciplined for their part in an illicit pay-for-play system.

“I don’t know what was said in (the Saints’) locker room,” said Steelers guard Willie Colon, who is close friends with New Orleans wide receiver Marques Colston. “To purposely go after a guy’s knee, head and leg, I think that’s uncalled for and totally disgusting. But to say guys are wrong after getting after another guy, that’s just the game of football. So I think there’s a fine line. If they crossed it in any way, then they should be handled accordingly. I know we don’t do football like that.”

Harrison, who has been at odds with Goodell since being fined $100,000 for multiple on-field infractions in 2010, said the Vilma case is another example of the commissioner having too much power.

No player has been more critical of Goodell and his crackdown on player misconduct than Harrison.

Harrison, who was suspended for a game last season for a helmet-to-helmet hit, said the players should have done more to check Goodell’s power in the Collective Bargaining Agreement they ratified last year.

The Steelers, Harrison was quick to point out, were the only team that didn’t vote in favor of the CBA. When asked if more players regret not doing the same, the five-time Pro Bowler said, “I would hope so.”

The NFL mandated at the owners meetings earlier this week that players start wearing thigh and knee pads in 2013. The league’s latest safety initiative was news to Harrison.

“I don’t know how many guys end their career on a thigh or a knee bruise,” Harrison said. “If they really want to do something, they should get rid of the high-low block. I thought that was illegal, but it isn’t (on running plays).

“If you ask me I think it’s more dangerous in the run game. When it comes down to it, the (NFL) competition committee doesn’t feel that way. Of course, a few of those guys that are on that (committee) their teams practice doing that so they wouldn’t feel that way.”

http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/1848370-85/harrison-goodell-players-vilma-steelers-nfl-win-power-game-guys?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+tribunereviewsteelers+(Steele rs+Stories)

Crash
05-23-2012, 09:36 PM
Yep. You can also hit a RB in the head with a helmet to helmet hit also.

So someone should ask Football Dad Goodell why the well-being of a WR means everything but the well-being of a RB means nothing.

Discipline of Steel
05-24-2012, 07:21 AM
Dont forget about guys on the OL and DL who crash helmets on every single play. In fact, the linemen are having most of the problems after football. (think Webby) This proves Goodell is off the mark and not getting the whole point...

Slapstick
05-24-2012, 08:10 AM
Dont forget about guys on the OL and DL who crash helmets on every single play. In fact, the linemen are having most of the problems after football. (think Webby) This proves Goodell is off the mark and not getting the whole point...

Goodell is only concerned about the big hits that are shown in the media cycle...Goodell is more about manipulating public perception than perserving player safety...

feltdizz
05-24-2012, 08:25 AM
What Slap said^^^

Pops8
05-24-2012, 08:35 AM
Goodell is only concerned about the big hits that are shown in the media cycle...Goodell is more about manipulating public perception than perserving player safety...

This.

Goodell is trying to keep a Walt Disney face on a Gladiator sport.

RuthlessBurgher
05-24-2012, 12:29 PM
This.

Goodell is trying to keep a Walt Disney face on a Gladiator sport.

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m47fvtexSJ1qk82m8o1_1280.jpg

Pops8
05-24-2012, 12:38 PM
@Rutless

:Cheers

RuthlessBurgher
05-24-2012, 01:31 PM
@Rutless

:Cheers

The fact that gold coins are also falling from the sky in that pic made it almost perfect. :p

Flasteel
05-24-2012, 05:08 PM
Dont forget about guys on the OL and DL who crash helmets on every single play. In fact, the linemen are having most of the problems after football. (think Webby) This proves Goodell is off the mark and not getting the whole point...

The helmets are the biggest problem with these concussions...not the way the game is played. Instead of screwing up the best sport in the world, they should maybe look at changing the material helmets are made of. Why not have a semi-malleable material that softens the blow, rather than a rock-hard shell on the outside?

Crash
05-24-2012, 05:13 PM
Mark Kelso and Steve Wallace did.

ikestops85
05-24-2012, 05:29 PM
The helmets are the biggest problem with these concussions...not the way the game is played. Instead of screwing up the best sport in the world, they should maybe look at changing the material helmets are made of. Why not have a semi-malleable material that softens the blow, rather than a rock-hard shell on the outside?

Exactly. All of this supposed emphasis on player safety and I haven't heard of one equipment change until now. Of course making thigh pads and knee pads mandatory aren't exactly a big step in lessening concussions. If we want to have less concussions then take the helmet and shoulder pads off and strap pillows on.

RuthlessBurgher
05-24-2012, 07:50 PM
Exactly. All of this supposed emphasis on player safety and I haven't heard of one equipment change until now. Of course making thigh pads and knee pads mandatory aren't exactly a big step in lessening concussions. If we want to have less concussions then take the helmet and shoulder pads off and strap pillows on.

Goodell's next uniform mandate:

http://junewow.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/sumo-suits.jpg

hawaiiansteel
05-24-2012, 09:30 PM
James Harrison is tired of Goodell, glad Vilma is suing him

Posted by Michael David Smith on May 24, 2012

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/jamesharrison.jpg?w=171

It should come as no surprise that Steelers linebacker James Harrison is pleased that Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma is suing NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

Harrison, who trashed Goodell in an interview last year only to apologize and say his comments were way out of line, seems to agree with Vilma’s contention that Goodell was way out of line in his public comments about the Saints’ bounty scandal. And Harrison thinks Vilma’s attempt to sue Goodell for defamation is a “win-win,” even if it is unsuccessful.

“If [Vilma] loses, it shows Goodell does have too much power,” Harrison told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, “and if he wins, it opens up the floodgates.”

Harrison said he believes the players shouldn’t have signed off on the new Collective Bargaining Agreement last year unless the commissioner’s powers had been curtailed. When the CBA was formally approved last summer, the players in Steelers camp voted 78-6 against it, making them the only team to oppose the new CBA.

Asked if he thinks players on other teams now regret agreeing to the CBA, Harrison answered, “I would hope so.”

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/05/24/james-harrison-is-tired-of-goodell-glad-vilma-is-suing-him/

RuthlessBurgher
05-25-2012, 10:08 AM
http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/jamesharrison.jpg?w=171

Imagine the photoshop possibilities if this were one of the Bradies (Quinn or Tom) making this pose...

But since it is James Harrison, and he could kill you faster than Chuck Norris on meth, no one would dare.

Sugar
05-25-2012, 11:32 AM
http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/jamesharrison.jpg?w=171

Imagine the photoshop possibilities if this were one of the Bradies (Quinn or Tom) making this pose...

But since it is James Harrison, and he could kill you faster than Chuck Norris on meth, no one would dare.

I'm sure that some low-forehead Clowns fan will try, God rest his poor soul. :nono

Pops8
05-25-2012, 11:35 AM
I'm sure that some low-forehead Clowns fan will try, God rest his poor soul. :nono



http://images.ibsys.com/2005/1226/5662485_320X240.jpg

Pops8
05-25-2012, 11:44 AM
The helmets are the biggest problem with these concussions...not the way the game is played. Instead of screwing up the best sport in the world, they should maybe look at changing the material helmets are made of. Why not have a semi-malleable material that softens the blow, rather than a rock-hard shell on the outside?

The inside of helmets is a forgiving material - either some type of foam or air filled. I suspect the theory is that the hard outer shell distributes the force. Of course, I would also guess the shell on the tackler's helmet does create more impact to the receivers head in a helmet to helmet collision. I do not claim to be an expert though.

Another issue is the brain sloshes around inside the skull no matter what you do. Think of an item in the car during a collision - the item continues moving forward until it hits the dashboard. The brain moves inside the skull in the same way. In helmet to helmet collision, the skull goes from full speed to backwards but hte brain doesn't - it flies forward to hit the skull resulting in concussions. In a shoulder to belt buckle tackle, there is some deceleration of hte head because the body bends. How much that matters? Again, I don't claim expertise.

Flasteel
05-25-2012, 12:20 PM
The inside of helmets is a forgiving material - either some type of foam or air filled. I suspect the theory is that the hard outer shell distributes the force. Of course, I would also guess the shell on the tackler's helmet does create more impact to the receivers head in a helmet to helmet collision. I do not claim to be an expert though.

Another issue is the brain sloshes around inside the skull no matter what you do. Think of an item in the car during a collision - the item continues moving forward until it hits the dashboard. The brain moves inside the skull in the same way. In helmet to helmet collision, the skull goes from full speed to backwards but hte brain doesn't - it flies forward to hit the skull resulting in concussions. In a shoulder to belt buckle tackle, there is some deceleration of hte head because the body bends. How much that matters? Again, I don't claim expertise.

I'm no expert either, but your point about the brain impacting the skull is completely accurate. However, I believe players would be far less likely to lead with the helmet if it's not made from hard plastic on the outside. I also think the force of the blow would be lessened with a softer and more shock-absorbant material.

Crash mentioned Steve Wallace and Mark Kelso and that's kind of what I'm talking about, only less ridiculous looking. I did a quick google search on that and it was called a ProCap. According to both players, it worked great and they have actually invested in a company which makes complete helmets based on this same concept. It's called the Gladiator helmet. Unfortunately, it also looks semi-retarded....especially the facemask. Another quick search revealed a helmet called the Bulwark. This one actually looks more like a regular football helmet and the technology is explained in the article below.

The articles I found were both 2 years old. I wonder why we haven't heard about something like this from Goodell. Anyone with an ounce of sense and a respect for the game would explore such options before they began changing fundemental rules.

The Bulwark
http://www.planetsteelers.com/forums/webkit-fake-url://16C05977-B186-4CDA-93C8-3513407694C1/imagejpeg
http://www.wired.com/playbook/2010/08/better-football-helmet/

The Gladiator
http://www.planetsteelers.com/forums/webkit-fake-url://FA9C4B89-A75C-40C1-A22E-8C5C88277456/imagejpeg
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_51/b4208044572350.htm

Pops8
05-25-2012, 12:32 PM
oh, I am sure there is room for helmet improvement. Those were some interesting articles by the way. Better technology and materials can certainly help.

But all said and done, the players still make the choice to step on the field.

hawaiiansteel
05-26-2012, 04:06 PM
Pittsburgh Steelers Linebacker James Harrison Continues to Be Outspoken Against Roger Goodell

May 25th, 2012
By Mark Mihalko

http://lh5.ggpht.com/-TsP8AQlPNiY/T8BKg1Yt9mI/AAAAAAAACCY/bLnwS65mqPE/Flickr-1518438197.jpg

Seeing Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison trending on twitter is usually a regular event on Sunday’s during the regular season or playoffs. However, when this happens in the offseason, it usually means he has started talking again and it probably has something to do with his displeasure with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

As Steelers fans know, Harrison has been extremely outspoken about the commissioner and his ever-changing punishment scale in the league. Harrison, who has been fined by the NFL on multiple occasions and even suspended for dangerous hits, has talked about Goodell’s quest to change defenses as if he is the commissioner’s personal poster child.

This offseason, Harrison has been taking to twitter to voice his opinion of the New Orleans Saints Bounty-Gate, and the suspensions that followed. On Wednesday, he continued that outspoken nature when he discussed Jonathan Vilma and his federal lawsuit against Goodell, going as far as stating that the players can only benefit from the outcome.

He may be true in his assessment. Goodell does seem to have too much power when it comes to suspensions, and is a one-man judge and jury when assigning punishment. In fact, if you look at the suspensions Goodell has handed down for items other the substance abuse issues, there is no outline or clear-cut method to his decision making. Ironically, it is both the fans and the players who question his motives and the ideals involved in his personal conduct policy.

For many, there has been an outcry asking why the Saints punishments were so much harsher than what the New England Patriots received for Spy-Gate, when their punishment stemmed from game-day cheating and creating a potential unfair advantage. Of course, Goodell outlined that the Saints that were involved lied about the bounties, but didn’t the Patriots destroy all evidence in Spy-Gate before the punishment was handed down? Who knows, maybe Vilma’s case, or Harrison’s outspokenness, or even a court ruling will help fans understand these suspensions, and the method behind the madness.

http://www.steelers101.com/2012/05/2...roger-goodell/

Crash
05-26-2012, 04:07 PM
All James did was give Dad Goodell more rope to hang him with. Goodell is a thin skinned twat who can't take criticism.

James gets flagged again? He'll get four games, if not more.

Crash
05-28-2012, 01:23 AM
Nick Fairley arrested again for the 2nd time in a month. This time for DUI after a previous arrest on drug charges.

I await Goodell's suspension for this pattern of behavior.

Slapstick
05-28-2012, 10:28 AM
Nick Fairley arrested again for the 2nd time in a month. This time for DUI after a previous arrest on drug charges.

I await Goodell's suspension for this pattern of behavior.

You may be waiting a long time...

Nobody knows who Nick Fairley is...

But, Goodell may throw you a game...

Crash
05-28-2012, 01:51 PM
You may be waiting a long time...

Nobody knows who Nick Fairley is

Irrelevant, he's been charged twice and he puts people's lives in danger. What's Goodell waiting for? For him to kill somebody?

Slapstick
05-28-2012, 03:25 PM
Irrelevant, he's been charged twice and he puts people's lives in danger. What's Goodell waiting for? For him to kill somebody?

If that is what it took to put Fairley on the front page? Yes...

Goodell isn't concerned with justice, fairness or equitable punishment...he is concerned with manipulating the public perception and the media as much as he can...

As long as John Q. Public has no general knowledge of Nick Fairley, Goodell couldn't care less...

Eich
05-28-2012, 05:43 PM
If that is what it took to put Fairley on the front page? Yes...

Goodell isn't concerned with justice, fairness or equitable punishment...he is concerned with manipulating the public perception and the media as much as he can...

As long as John Q. Public has no general knowledge of Nick Fairley, Goodell couldn't care less...

Exactly. The punishment is commensurate with the amount of bad press or the potential for future lawsuits against the NFL.

If Ben had been a no-name backup QB, he would've gotten little from the press and from Goodell.

RuthlessBurgher
05-29-2012, 10:37 AM
Irrelevant, he's been charged twice and he puts people's lives in danger. What's Goodell waiting for? For him to kill somebody?

I don't think anyone here disagrees with you on this point...we all tend think that Goodell's punishment methods are B.S.

Oviedo
05-29-2012, 11:24 AM
All James did was give Dad Goodell more rope to hang him with. Goodell is a thin skinned twat who can't take criticism.

James gets flagged again? He'll get four games, if not more.

:Agree Harrison needs to realize he accomplishes nothing by opening his mouth.

The beloved NFLPA and their fearless leader had a chance to fix this problem in the latest CBA and they caved. The players are now stuck with what they agreed to instead of having this fixed.

Crash
05-30-2012, 09:41 PM
The NFL is allegedly so image conscience, and yet they have a story on their website, that promotes the new (alleged) relationship between Gronk and that skank Kim Kardashian.

Nice.

Slapstick
05-31-2012, 06:09 AM
The NFL is allegedly so image conscience, and yet they have a story on their website, that promotes the new (alleged) relationship between Gronk and that skank Kim Kardashian.

Nice.

People know who Kim Kardashian is...

Oviedo
05-31-2012, 08:04 AM
The NFL is allegedly so image conscience, and yet they have a story on their website, that promotes the new (alleged) relationship between Gronk and that skank Kim Kardashian.

Nice.

From a marketing standpoint the fact that you just commented about a player's personal relationship with a woman simply shows how good the NFL is at keeping the brand in the fan's eyes even in May when really nothing football wise is going on. That is why it is the most popular sport in the country. The NFL Marketing Department thanks you!!!!!

feltdizz
05-31-2012, 08:42 AM
From a marketing standpoint the fact that you just commented about a player's personal relationship with a woman simply shows how good the NFL is at keeping the brand in the fan's eyes even in May when really nothing football wise is going on. That is why it is the most popular sport in the country. The NFL Marketing Department thanks you!!!!!

LOL... exactly.

Slapstick
05-31-2012, 08:50 AM
I'll take it one step further...

Kim Kardashian took the negative notoriety of a sex tape with Ray J and parleyed it into a series of TV shows and magazine covers...she was able to use the media to manipulate the public perception enough that her sex tape is now an afterthought...

Of course she's on the NFL.com homepage...Goodell wants to be like her!!!

Gus
05-31-2012, 09:55 AM
I'll take it one step further...

Kim Kardashian took the negative notoriety of a sex tape with Ray J and parleyed it into a series of TV shows and magazine covers...she was able to use the media to manipulate the public perception enough that her sex tape is now an afterthought...

Of course she's on the NFL.com homepage...Goodell wants to be like her!!!

I am proud to say, I never knew any more than there was something about a family named the Kardashians who have become popular for something I am unaware of (circus performers?). Now I know that one of them is named Kim. Never heard of Ray J. And, I definitely haven't a clue what any of these people look like.

The NFL doesn't have to do this stuff. I know all about the steelers while being blissfully unaware of this kooky tabloid stuff.

RuthlessBurgher
05-31-2012, 10:21 AM
I am proud to say, I never knew any more than there was something about a family named the Kardashians who have become popular for something I am unaware of (circus performers?). Now I know that one of them is named Kim. Never heard of Ray J. And, I definitely haven't a clue what any of these people look like.

The NFL doesn't have to do this stuff. I know all about the steelers while being blissfully unaware of this kooky tabloid stuff.

I know that Robert Kardashian was a lawyer in the O.J. Simpson trial. Why his family is somehow famous now, while the families of, say, Johnnie Cochrane or Marcia Clark are not...I'll never know (I've never heard of Ray J either). Maybe NFL.com promoting Gronkowski and a Kardashian daughter is a lame effort to grab attention of housewives who read all about this crap in People and US Weekly.

Crash
05-31-2012, 10:56 AM
People know who Kim Kardashian is...

Exactly, and the NFL promotes her now.

So much for "image".

Slapstick
05-31-2012, 11:18 AM
Exactly, and the NFL promotes her now.

So much for "image".

Her "image" is that of a famous person who has a TV show on the E! Network...

What's not to promote?

Actually, the NFL is using her to promote the NFL...

Crash
05-31-2012, 11:22 AM
Her "image" is that of a famous person who has a TV show on the E! Network...

No, her image is that of a gold-digging tramp who made a sex tape.

Just the type of wholesome atmosphere the NFL wants to portray.

Slapstick
05-31-2012, 11:30 AM
No, her image is that of a gold-digging tramp who made a sex tape.

Just the type of wholesome atmosphere the NFL wants to portray.

To you and I, that's her image...

To most other people, she's just another ubiquitous famous person...

When Gronk had his picture taken, shirtless, with the porn star wearing his jersey, NFL.com didn't have that on their home page...

Why? Because Bibi Jones is known only as a porn star...

Kardashian is known as a star, period...

Does she deserve it? Hell no! But, that changes nothing...

Slapstick
05-31-2012, 11:31 AM
Oh, and she was born rich, so she isn't a gold-digger...she doesn't need to be...

She is an attention whore, however...

Sugar
05-31-2012, 12:00 PM
No, her image is that of a gold-digging tramp who made a sex tape.

Just the type of wholesome atmosphere the NFL wants to portray.

I had no idea that Kim had a sex tape. I knew that she had dated Reggie Bush and the marriage fiasco was all over the place. I knew that she had a show on E!, but that's about it. They had Madonna do the halftime show at the SB too, and she did a porno book years ago. I don't think wholesome is the idea for the NFL.

RuthlessBurgher
05-31-2012, 12:37 PM
Exactly, and the NFL promotes her now.

So much for "image".

The only image that Goodell and the NFL cares about is the images of dead President's faces on the front of the currency they are bringing in. If someone brings attention that could potentially make them more money, then that is considered good for their "image" regardless of the whether or not the person in question is actually of solid moral standing (the NFL already has our demographic, but doesn't have the housewife demographic who follows these Kardashians, so if this possibly gets some housewives interested watching some NFL football this fall, that's more dollars in the owners pockets). On the other hand, if someone brings attention that could potentially make them lose money, then that is not considered good for their "image" regardless of the whether or not the person in question is actually of solid moral standing (regarding the housewife demographic, they got turned off by the Roethlisberger coverage; that harmed the NFL's bottom line regardless of the what actually happened with the D.A. in Milledgeville, so the Commissioner took action in an effort to not completely lose this demographic). I'm certainly not saying that it is right, but that is the league's office's primary motivation...dollars and cents.

Crash
05-31-2012, 12:43 PM
So he took action against Ben to not lose money, but then scheduled him on prime time TV 5 times in 10 weeks?

That doesn't make sense.

All he did if fans were "turned off" by the Roethlisberger coverage by shoving him down their throats on prime time TV was prove how little he actually cares what the fans think.

Slapstick
05-31-2012, 12:50 PM
So he took action against Ben to not lose money, but then scheduled him on prime time TV 5 times in 10 weeks?

That doesn't make sense.

Sure it does...Goodell can have it both ways...

He punishes Ben to make it look like he's a good guy and then the NFL schedules the Steelers for the max number of Prime Time games, knowing that people will tune in...

As I said, Kim Kardashian has a TV show that millions watch...take advantage of the public's propensity to want to watch that stuff...

feltdizz
05-31-2012, 12:56 PM
Oh, and she was born rich, so she isn't a gold-digger...she doesn't need to be...

She is an attention whore, however...

She wasn't born rich. The basketball player she divorced said "4 years ago you were folding clothes at the gap" The chick was also married to some other guy a few years before becoming famous and he said all she did was obsess about becoming rich and famous.

feltdizz
05-31-2012, 12:57 PM
Sure it does...Goodell can have it both ways...

He punishes Ben to make it look like he's a good guy and then the NFL schedules the Steelers for the max number of Prime Time games, knowing that people will tune in...

As I said, Kim Kardashian has a TV show that millions watch...take advantage of the public's propensity to want to watch that stuff...

exactly... not sure why Crash can't wrap his head around the obvious.

hawaiiansteel
06-09-2012, 12:29 AM
Colt McCoy doesn’t think James Harrison hit was a cheap shot

Posted by Michael David Smith on June 8, 2012

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/c-mccoyflying-e1324050563704.jpg?w=218

Steelers linebacker James Harrison was suspended for a game for the helmet-to-helmet that concussed Browns quarterback Colt McCoy last year, but McCoy has no hard feelings.

McCoy said on the Dan Patrick Show that he did not think Harrison’s hit was a cheap shot, and that Harrison was simply going after the quarterback aggressively, as he’s supposed to, while McCoy was scrambling.

“I’m outside the pocket,” McCoy said. “I’m trying to make a play.”

McCoy said he never heard from Harrison after the hit, but he isn’t bothered by that.

“He is an outstanding football player,” McCoy said of Harrison. “I think everyone will agree on that. He plays in our division, they’re a rival against us so I didn’t expect to hear from him.”

Although he doesn’t remember the hit, McCoy said he has watched it several times. And after seeing the replays, he’s not mad at Harrison. Which probably matters to Harrison not at all.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/06/08/colt-mccoy-doesnt-think-james-harrison-hit-was-a-cheap-shot/

Crash
06-09-2012, 12:35 AM
It wasn't even helmet to helmet.

fordfixer
06-09-2012, 09:01 AM
Colt McCoy doesn’t think James Harrison hit was a cheap shot

Posted by Michael David Smith on June 8, 2012

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/c-mccoyflying-e1324050563704.jpg?w=218

Steelers linebacker James Harrison was suspended for a game for the helmet-to-helmet that concussed Browns quarterback Colt McCoy last year, but McCoy has no hard feelings.

McCoy said on the Dan Patrick Show that he did not think Harrison’s hit was a cheap shot, and that Harrison was simply going after the quarterback aggressively, as he’s supposed to, while McCoy was scrambling.

“I’m outside the pocket,” McCoy said. “I’m trying to make a play.”

McCoy said he never heard from Harrison after the hit, but he isn’t bothered by that.

“He is an outstanding football player,” McCoy said of Harrison. “I think everyone will agree on that. He plays in our division, they’re a rival against us so I didn’t expect to hear from him.”

Although he doesn’t remember the hit, McCoy said he has watched it several times. And after seeing the replays, he’s not mad at Harrison. Which probably matters to Harrison not at all.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/06/08/colt-mccoy-doesnt-think-james-harrison-hit-was-a-cheap-shot/

Colt is trying real hard not to anger Mr. Harrison :D

Discipline of Steel
06-09-2012, 09:05 AM
Articles like this just make me smile.

hawaiiansteel
06-10-2012, 02:25 AM
It wasn't even helmet to helmet.

it was helmet to face mask...

http://gif.mocksession.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/DIRTY-HIT-HARRISON.gif

Crash
06-10-2012, 02:33 AM
The brunt of the hit was to the shoulder. As Mark Schelreth has said, these guys aren't turtles. Some head contact is going to occur.

Flasteel
06-10-2012, 11:06 AM
The brunt of the hit was to the shoulder. As Mark Schelreth has said, these guys aren't turtles. Some head contact is going to occur.

brunt n the main force or shock of a blow, attack, etc. (esp in the phrase [B]bear the brunt of)[of unknown origin]

hawaiiansteel
06-11-2012, 01:32 PM
James Harrison thanks Pittsburgh Steelers for Mid-American Conference affection

Published: Sunday, June 10, 2012
By Hugh Bernreuter

SAGINAW, MI — LaMarr Woodley and James Harrison compete every game, trying to beat each other.

It's why Harrison announced himself as "the linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers" to draw a smile and laugh from Woodley, who brought Harrison and more than a dozen NFL players to his fifth annual free football camp Saturday at Saginaw High.

"We tied last year, but this year I'm going to have more sacks," Woodley said. "It's a friendly competition, but we work to beat each other.

"It's nothing serious. I'm blessed to have him on my team. Here's a guy who was cut from the NFL but kept working, and now he's a Pro Bowler who's been in the Super Bowl. You have to respect that."

For Harrison, the competition is not just about pushing each other.

"It makes the team better," Harrison said. "Whether it's me or Wood getting the sack, it helps our team."

Both linebackers battled injuries in 2011, each finishing with nine sacks.

"James is an example of why the Steelers are successful," Woodley said. "They want football players. Forty times are great, but how many times are you going to run the 40 on a track with track shoes on? Let's see how you run in pads on grass.

"The Steelers are successful because they look for the best football players, not just the guys with the best 40 times."

That search has led the team repeatedly to the Mid-American Conference. There are six players from the MAC on the Steelers, including the 2012 Pittsburgh Steelers Most Valuable Player, former Central Michigan University receiver Antonio Brown.

The Steelers' roster also includes Ben Roethlisberger (Miami, Ohio), Shaun Suisham (Bowling Green), Charlie Batch (Eastern Michigan) and undrafted rookie linebacker Adrian Robinson (Temple).

"It's kind of funny but we'll trash talk with each other ... MAC trash talk," Harrison said. "The other guys will look at us like we're crazy. They give us stuff like, 'Why are you talking about the MAC. Isn't that like the basement of college football?'"

Beyond the trash talk, there is a great deal of respect for the MAC players, considering they are among the top players on the Steelers' team.

"The numbers I put up at Kent State, I would have been a second-round pick if I had played in the Big Ten or the SEC," Harrison said. "There's the idea that the competition is not the same, and let's be honest, it isn't.

"But talent is talent, and the Steelers have a history of finding it in places like the MAC."

It is not a new idea in Pittsburgh. Harrison is not the first linebacker from Kent State to play for the Steelers and, he readily admits, will never be the best.

"Jack Lambert is from Kent State, so I'll never even be the best Steelers' linebacker from Kent State," Harrison said. "I'd be happy to be No. 2, because there's nothing wrong with being No. 2 to Jack Lambert."

But Harrison does want to be the No. 1 linebacker in sacks for the Steelers. He has no problem with Woodley finishing No. 2.

"We push each other, and it's fun," Harrison said. "And it helps us win games. That's the most important thing about it."

http://www.mlive.com/sports/saginaw/...s_pittsbu.html (http://www.mlive.com/sports/saginaw/index.ssf/2012/06/james_harrison_credits_pittsbu.html)

hawaiiansteel
06-19-2012, 03:21 PM
Ryan Clark Tried To Warn Everyone About The Absolute Power Of Roger Goodell

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012 by Dave Bryan


The Pittsburgh Steelers as a team voted against ratifying the new CBA last summer and now it appears several players across the league wished they had done the same.

Jim Corbett of the USA Today reported on Monday that Kansas City Chiefs right tackle Eric Winston expressed deep regret to his medium that the NFLPA didn't do more to curb the disciplinary and appeal powers of commissioner Roger Goodell in light of the appeal hearings of the players involved in Bountygate.

"Obviously we don't want Roger Goodell having absolute power. In a lot of this process, it seems like he does," said Winston. "It's unfortunate. It seems like he's running amok with it and deciding to do what he wants and it really doesn't matter what the evidence says. Unfortunately, we don't have an alternative option to appeal to."

Winston is not alone as Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Roddy White took to Twitter with his disgust on Monday as well. White stated in his social media rant that he never wanted to sign that voting card and that he doesn't know why they are all complaining, because they did all of this to themselves. He stated that he blames the NFLPA for failing the players.

Steelers union player rep Ryan Clark must feel like a prophet of sorts as he warned about the power that Goodell would hold moving forward. Clark summed it up back in early August of last year why the Steelers as a team would likely vote against ratifying the CBA. "With Roger Goodell having total control over the fine process, that's a deal-breaker for us in this situation." Clark also added, "We feel like someone else should be on there," as he talked about the appeals and disciplinary process. "There should be some ... type of way -- actually someone who's not on the NFL payroll. A big issue, for us, especially, as a team, is Roger Goodell ... being judge, jury and appeals system."

Corbett also heard from Arizona Cardinals kicker Jay Feely, the team’s union rep, via a text to say that the issue wasn’t considered a deal-breaker at the time. "Yes, the players wish he didn’t have that power, but it wasn’t worth sacrificing CBA [over]," Feely said.

Perhaps it should have been, but it appears to be too late now. Other players and reps may have thought that Clark was over the top with his thinking at the time because of all of the discipline the Steelers as a team had received over the last few years. The NFLPA had a model case of the power that Goodell had right in front of them, but they, as a group, chose to ignore it.

I am not saying what the Saints players did is right as the evidence seems overwhelmingly against them. Regardless of what is real and what is false, I bet all involved wish there was a third party to rule on it and handle the discipline.

One thing is for certain. Whatever happens moving forward over these next 9 years, the NFLPA can't say that Clark and the Steelers didn't try to warn them.

http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/ryan_clark_tried_to_warn_everyone_about_the_absolu te_power_of_roger_goodell/11044709

Crash
06-19-2012, 03:26 PM
Oh well. I didn't see any players complaining when uncharged Ben was suspended. Should have stood up then.

Better yet, the NFLPA should have not approved the CBA until Goodell's power was reduced.

Only have themselves to blame now.

ikestops85
06-19-2012, 04:54 PM
Oh well. I didn't see any players complaining when uncharged Ben was suspended. Should have stood up then.

Better yet, the NFLPA should have not approved the CBA until Goodell's power was reduced.

Only have themselves to blame now.


Ummm, I think that's what Roddy White and others are saying. Yes they should have realized that but the guns weren't pointed at them ... only at a few Steelers. They know they have to pay the price now.

Crash
06-19-2012, 05:03 PM
http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/8073206/anthony-hargrove-green-bay-packers-not-my-voice-bounty-video

Discipline of Steel
06-20-2012, 06:34 AM
Honestly, has there ever been a commisioner in pro sports that is more universally disliked by the fans than this cornhole?

Oviedo
06-20-2012, 08:10 AM
Oh well. I didn't see any players complaining when uncharged Ben was suspended. Should have stood up then.

Better yet, the NFLPA should have not approved the CBA until Goodell's power was reduced.

Only have themselves to blame now.

The players just saw the money and that is all that mattered to them. They did not even consider the bigger picture. That is why management always comes out on top in these labor disputes because the unions will always cave on other issues if some money comes their way.

feltdizz
06-20-2012, 08:50 AM
Oh well. I didn't see any players complaining when uncharged Ben was suspended. Should have stood up then.

Better yet, the NFLPA should have not approved the CBA until Goodell's power was reduced.

Only have themselves to blame now.

yeah.. when Ben was suspended that was the perfect time for the players to rally together... LOL

Slapstick
06-20-2012, 01:31 PM
http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/ar...lling/11039732 (http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/peter_king_calls_nfls_bountygate_evidence_compelli ng/11039732)

Apparently, the NFL has a better case than some people believe...




Peter King calls NFL's Bountygate evidence "compelling" (http://www.planetsteelers.com/thisgivensunday/2012-articles/june/peter-king-calls-nfls-bountygate-evidence-qcompellingq.html)

Written by Shane Clemons on 18 June 2012.

Earlier in the day, the NFL gave 12 reporters the same Bountygate evidence presentation they gave the players. Early returns from the presentation are coming in, and it would seem that the NFL may have some ground to stand on.
SI's Peter King is one of the most respected sports journalists in the business, and he said via Twitter (https://twitter.com/SI_PeterKing/statuses/214832622956843009) the evidence is "explosive" and "compelling."

@SI_PeterKing (https://twitter.com/SI_PeterKing)The NFL's charges are explosive, compelling. Twelve reporters just heard the league's evidence. 18 Jun 12 (https://twitter.com/SI_PeterKing/statuses/214832622956843009)

That wasn't the only bomb King dropped to his Twitter followers after the presentation by the league.

@SI_PeterKing (https://twitter.com/SI_PeterKing)NFL just showed reporters evidence in Saints case, incl allegation of $35k bounty, not just $10k, to knock Favre out of '09 NFC title game.18 Jun 12 (https://twitter.com/SI_PeterKing/statuses/214831024297885696)

King, who was one of the reporters in the room (https://twitter.com/SI_PeterKing/status/214840831847317504), will likely have a more in-depth analysis of the evidence to come, but going off of his limited Twitter report, it seems safe to say that the NFL has not been blowing smoke about the Saints bounty system. The NFLPA and those accused of trying to knock players out of the game played a dangerous game in saying the NFL didn't have a case against them. It's starting to sound like the NFL will show their full hand soon, and it's not looking good for those involved.

RuthlessBurgher
06-20-2012, 01:43 PM
I would look forward to reading King's MMQB about it in more depth, but he is taking the next 4 weeks off (he lets NFL players and executives fill in for him in writing that weekly column for him during that month-long summer vacation). Oh well.

hawaiiansteel
06-25-2012, 07:23 PM
Fujita to Goodell at appeal hearing: “What the hell are you doing, Roger?”

Posted by Mike Florio on June 22, 2012

Lawyer Peter Ginsberg wasn’t the only one who had tough words for Commissioner Roger Goodell at Monday’s appeal hearing in the bounty case. Browns linebacker Scott Fujita was far more brief, and far more pointed.

“I saw [Goodell] in the [appeal] hearings and he offered to shake all of our hands,” Fujita told Dave Zirin of SiriusXM Radio’s Edge of Sports Radio, via SI.com. ”Some of the other players didn’t, but I went ahead and shook his hand, and I just said to him, ‘What the hell are you doing, Roger?‘”

How did the Commissioner respond?

“He had nothing to say,” Fujita said. ”His face sure turned red, though.”

So much for the draft-night man hugs.

Fujita also addressed the merits of the situation, echoing the notion that the Saints had a pay-for-performance system coupled with tough talk but no deliberate intent to injure.

“I know exactly what [happened] and what didn’t,” Fujita said. ”The problem with this whole thing is that it’s just an unfortunate situation where you have a defensive coordinator [Gregg Williams] who I like a lot, but said a lot of really vulgar, inappropriate, outlandish things. You couple that with some guys who occasionally throw in some money for big plays — which I have admitted to doing — and it becomes a perfect storm, and also it comes at a time politically when I think the league was looking for something like this.

“So, it’s unfortunate. It’s unfortunate that a lot of players have been dragged into it when the reality is it’s just a kind of loose, joking around, performance-type system of motivation coupled with some really, really inappropriate language that I’m sensitive to, but again, it is just language.”

Fujita apparently wants the NFL to focus on what the program was, and to clarify what it wasn’t.

“People said I was stupid for confessing to paying for big plays. I didn’t think of that as a big deal,” Fujita said. ”Is it against the rules? Technically, yeah, it’s against the rules, but that’s the way it was done when I was a young player and I’m not ashamed of that. If that’s what I’m going down for, let’s call it for what it is. The problem is that the league has billed this thing as being this super-organized pay-to-injure scheme, which it never was.

“Now, it turns out when the evidence is getting released that there is actually very little to nothing on anything pay-to-injure related, especially as it pertains to me. So, again, if it’s pay-for-performance, let’s call it what it is, and if I have to take my medicine for that, I’ll do that, and we’ll move on, but that’s not what the league has billed this as.”

Fujita explained that the issue is about more than the money he’ll lose during a three-game suspension.

“Another thing I have a hard time with is that a lot of people just say, ‘You only have a couple games [suspension]. Just be glad with what you got. Stop complaining and move on.’ It’s more than just a couple games,” Fujita said. ”My reputation is a lot more valuable to me than three game checks. So for someone to say ‘just take your medicine and move on,’ my response is no. If you’re accused of something you didn’t do, and they were going to not only ruin your reputation, but also take a lot of money away from you, you would not just lie down. So it’s troubling. It’s been hard for me. It’s been a stress at home. I’m lucky to have such a supportive family with young kids who don’t understand any of this kind of stuff so that brightens my day, but it has been very hard for me.”

The good news is that the discussion of the actual or perceived flaws in the NFL’s investigation could be prompting the league to focus on precisely why the players are being disciplined — for contributing to and participating in a pay-for-performance system that created an incentive to inflict injury on opponents (regardless of whether they actually did) and not for deliberately attempting to inflict injury in exchange for cash.

The bad news is that it’s too late to put the bounty toothpaste back in the tube. The Saints were painted as a marauding gang of Gilloolys in March; calling it what it really was in June will do nothing to change the perception that has been cemented into the public’s collective consciousness.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...u-doing-roger/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/06/22/fujita-to-goodell-at-appeal-hearing-what-the-hell-are-you-doing-roger/)

Sugar
06-26-2012, 03:48 PM
The players just saw the money and that is all that mattered to them. They did not even consider the bigger picture. That is why management always comes out on top in these labor disputes because the unions will always cave on other issues if some money comes their way.

I also believe that the whole 18-game season thing was a red herring. The league didn't really want it that bad, but put it out there so that when they gave it up the players would feel like they got something.

Oviedo
06-26-2012, 04:03 PM
I also believe that the whole 18-game season thing was a red herring. The league didn't really want it that bad, but put it out there so that when they gave it up the players would feel like they got something.

I agree. That's why management with a long term view of the business will always trump labor with their short term view.

Eich
06-26-2012, 04:17 PM
yeah.. when Ben was suspended that was the perfect time for the players to rally together... LOL

Exactly. It was a ****-storm of epic proportions. At the time, I think more than a few players thought that Ben needed to be knocked back to earth with some kind of punishment. Though it should have been handled by the team, not Goddell.

Crash
06-26-2012, 04:22 PM
yeah.. when Ben was suspended that was the perfect time for the players to rally together... LOL

For the right to have Goodell's judge and jury power reduced? It was the PERFECT TIME to do it.

Roger Goodell puts HIMSELF above the laws of this country.

IMO that's not right. And if you asked the players? They agree with me.

Crash
06-26-2012, 04:23 PM
Though it should have been handled by the team, not Goddell.

The team wanted to do just that. Adolph refused.

RuthlessBurgher
06-26-2012, 04:26 PM
For the right to have Goodell's judge and jury power reduced? It was the PERFECT TIME to do it.

Roger Goodell puts HIMSELF above the laws of this country.

IMO that's not right. And if you asked the players? They agree with me.

The players agree, the fans agree, we all agree. Except for the 32 rich guys whose votes count. Goodell makes them money, which is more important to most of those billionaires than the integrity of the game itself.

Crash
06-26-2012, 04:29 PM
I think ANY PERSON put in the same position will make the NFL money. It's the fans who make the league their money. Not Roger Goodell.

All Adolph can do with his overbearing conduct is F it up.

Slapstick
06-26-2012, 04:41 PM
For the right to have Goodell's judge and jury power reduced? It was the PERFECT TIME to do it.

Roger Goodell puts HIMSELF above the laws of this country.

IMO that's not right. And if you asked the players? They agree with me.

You may be right...

But, the players had the opportunity to do so and failed...

Now, that train has sailed and we are all stuck for about the next ten years...

Oviedo
06-26-2012, 05:00 PM
You may be right...

But, the players had the opportunity to do so and failed...

Now, that train has sailed and we are all stuck for about the next ten years...

The players and their wonderful union leadership blew it. They are getting exactly what they deserve.

Oviedo
06-26-2012, 05:02 PM
I think ANY PERSON put in the same position will make the NFL money. It's the fans who make the league their money. Not Roger Goodell.

All Adolph can do with his overbearing conduct is F it up.

TV revenue makes the league it's money not fans. TV is why the NFL is so popular because they developed a symbiotic relationship to constantly improve how the game looks and flows to accomodate TV.

phillyesq
06-26-2012, 05:05 PM
I think ANY PERSON put in the same position will make the NFL money. It's the fans who make the league their money. Not Roger Goodell.

All Adolph can do with his overbearing conduct is F it up.

I dislike Goodell as much as the next guy, but look at the NBA. During the Jordan era, the NBA was at the height of its popularity. Now, nobody cares. You can screw up even something as big and popular as the NFL.

phillyesq
06-26-2012, 05:06 PM
The players and their wonderful union leadership blew it. They are getting exactly what they deserve.

Exactly right.

Eich
06-27-2012, 12:38 PM
TV revenue makes the league it's money not fans. TV is why the NFL is so popular because they developed a symbiotic relationship to constantly improve how the game looks and flows to accomodate TV.

How does TV make revenue without fans?

It's ultimately the fans who are responsible for the NFL making the money it does. We watch the games on TV & buy the stuff that's advertised on TV. Advertisers aim their producs at us and are happy to pay for their time slots becase we buy the stuff.

We buy the NFL Sunday Ticket. We go to bars who pay for the NFL Sunday ticket. We buy the tickets to the games. We buy the overpriced concessions. We buy all the NFL-branded stuff. We participate in fantasy leagues. We generate the frenzy that funnels all the money to the league.