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hawaiiansteel
05-12-2012, 11:42 PM
Steelers players reaction to Todd Haley’s playbook shows how weak Arians playbook was

May 11th, 2012

http://www2.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/Pittsburgh+Steelers+v+Kansas+City+Chiefs+gZ8Yd8iTm zrm.jpg

Todd Haley has handed out the Steelers new playbook. From the reaction of the players it is nothing like the playbook Bruce Arians has put out in the past. Ben Roethlisberger compared it to learning “Rosetta Stone”. That is expected when a new coordinator comes in. You get his playbook rather than the one you were using.

There were two comments though that stood out to me with the players talking about the new playbook. One was from Ben Roethlisberger and the other from Emmanuel Sanders.

Roethlisberger when asked about the similarities in the playbook:

“The similarities would be on a shorter list. Off the top of my head, from what I’ve seen so far, there’s a 90 percent change.”

Emmanuel Sanders tweet about the depth of the playbook:

This new playbook is something serious!!!!! Bout to go old-school and make some flashcards.

Both liken the playbook to a completely new world. It makes this playbook seem more in depth and brand new. A playbook from a new coach should be new but not 90% new. If the Steelers had a good playbook before it would be 50-60% new. The overall scheme may change some but the plays even with new terminology should not be that different. It should not be that out of the ordinary. These two guys saying it is tells us even more about Bruce Arians.

Fans have been complaining for years about how predictable Bruce Arians was with the Steelers scheme. We all knew what type of play was coming when the Steelers would line up on offense. So did our opponents. They knew where the ball was going before the ball was even snapped. It showed in our offense. It showed in Roethlisberger’s grimace when he would get hit. We have all of these weapons and yet we can not score points. This makes sense as to why now.

People questioned the offensive line. They questioned Ben Roethlisberger. They questioned the wide receivers. The main question they asked was why does Ben hold on to the ball so long and take hits? Yes the offensive line was inconsistent. Yes Ben likes to be a hero. No the receivers did not get open. Now we understand though that the receivers may have not been able to get open because Arians playbook was so easy to figure out that it took more time for them to get open. If the defense knew what was coming they could roll the coverage to the play. If no one is open Ben had to hold the ball so he got hit more. So even though you can put some blame on the players most of it should go to Arians.

There were so many times when I sat on the couch and said that guy missed his hot read. Ben should have hit him right off the bat. The blitz was coming. Now seeing how much these guys think Haley’s playbook is so in depth it makes me wander if they did miss their hot read or not. Was there even a true hot read? Or, was a bubble screen Arians way of having a hot read?

How easy and how much lack of depth was there in Arians playbook? Roethlisberger is looking for his position coach to not throw to much at him at one time in the new playbook. That is fine this early but the fact that he needs to really take it slow shows how little was actually in Arians playbook. Sanders wanting to get flash cards to learn the plays says even more. Sanders is a film room junkie. While injured he eluded to making his friends angry because he would watch the live game like he was watching film. He is a student of the game. For him to be this taken a back by the playbook says we needed a new playbook.

So while these guys may take some time to get used to the new playbook it will help them in the end. They are going from a predictable offense which seemed to be pretty vanilla to and offense run by Haley that will play to their strengths. They will get better routes. They will read coverages and they will find holes in the defense. That will give them the ability to get open faster. It will make the line look better. It will get the ball out of Roethlisberger’s hands faster so he gets hit less. Thus we will score more points. The pressure can be taken off of the defense a little bit. They can get some rest. It will make the entire team better.

So even if it takes all summer to learn. It seems like Haley’s new playbook is going to be worth it. This offense will be better under Haley.

http://bleedblackandgold.com/blog/2012/05/11/steelers-players-reaction-to-todd-haleys-playbook-shows-how-weak-arians-playbook-was/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+BleedBlackAndGold+%28Bleed+Bl ack+and+Gold%29

BURGH86STEEL
05-13-2012, 01:03 AM
For some, predictability has been an issue since Cowher was head coach. People will eventually suggest that Haley's offense is predictable. I suppose Haley's offense was predictable in the SB 40 when Harrison picked off a game changing pass. In any event, I believe all offenses and defenses function with some level of predictability. I don't believe offenses and defenses deviated much from the way they do things on a week to week basis. I believe it's too difficult to deviate much and have the players maintain a level of comfort within the systems they've learned and practice.

Now I don't know what constitutes and NFL play book. It seems that the language may be the most difficult of an aspect of an offense/playbook to learn. I suspect the language of the offense was what Ben and Saunders were referring.

This doesn't suggest anything one way or another about Bruce Arians. Not sure why someone felt the need to take a shot at BA when he's gone??? Fans need to be careful assuming Haley is a coaching god. Making statements to the effect that Haley's going to do this or that before he's had a chance to coach these players makes no sense.

Djfan
05-13-2012, 01:23 AM
Burgh,

I think it's just as simple as the fact that BA was so lame that anything different will be better. If Haley can run this O without the announcers saying things like "Ben draws plays in the sand" or "the defense seems to know what is coming" or "Why did they rutm four times in a row?" then Haley is better.

No one is calling him God. Improvement would be enough. That shouldn't be hard.

Jigawatts
05-13-2012, 08:01 AM
I think there's certain levels of predictability. It's one thing for an NFL defense to figure out what your doing, but when an idiot fan like me can sit on his couch and call out the plays, COME ON MAN.

feltdizz
05-13-2012, 09:31 AM
It doesn't make much sense to praise the new OC before we actually see this O in action.

What's really cool is being able to watch BA in Indy with Luck to see if he really is predictable.

BURGH86STEEL
05-13-2012, 10:18 AM
Burgh,

I think it's just as simple as the fact that BA was so lame that anything different will be better. If Haley can run this O without the announcers saying things like "Ben draws plays in the sand" or "the defense seems to know what is coming" or "Why did they rutm four times in a row?" then Haley is better.

No one is calling him God. Improvement would be enough. That shouldn't be hard.



It's possible that the offense will be worse in some aspects.

I believe there will be times that Ben will continue to play sandlot football and attempt to extend plays under Haley. Ben's penchant for holding onto the ball so long at times is a big why reason he's had to extend plays throughout his career. Outside of scoring, not sure how much better the offense can improve. For the increase in scoring to happen, Ben will need to pass for more TD's. Ben throwing for 30+ TD's seems to be a difficult proposition regardless of the OC. Time will tell if Haley can get Ben to become a more consistent QB.

Flasteel
05-13-2012, 10:32 AM
This sounds a little odd to me. One of the things I thought BA did well was pare down the offensive playbook with the help of Roethlisberger. If I remember correctly, the playbook when Arians took over, was a huge mish-mash of plays and terminology from the past several OC's. They supposedly "cleaned" everything up and kept many of the plays Roethlisberger was comfortable with. I'm not sure if they stripped it down to the bone or just eliminated too many plays and formations that Haley relies on, but this type of huge change seems like something you would normally want to avoid doing.

I agree with the sentiment that more and different does not necessarily equal better.

I also agree with DJ, that improvement shouldn't be too difficult either.

Djfan
05-13-2012, 11:49 AM
It's possible that the offense will be worse in some aspects.

I believe there will be times that Ben will continue to play sandlot football and attempt to extend plays under Haley. Ben's penchant for holding onto the ball so long at times is a big why reason he's had to extend plays throughout his career. Outside of scoring, not sure how much better the offense can improve. For the increase in scoring to happen, Ben will need to pass for more TD's. Ben throwing for 30+ TD's seems to be a difficult proposition regardless of the OC. Time will tell if Haley can get Ben to become a more consistent QB.

Fair response. I agree with much of it, but I want to add that Ben held onto the ball too long for another common reason - The play calling was bad and he had to make something out of nothing.

The offense can improve by having a line that can open homes and protect the QB, along with having plays that exploit the weakness of the defense. BA seemed to never care about that. You could call his first play of every game the Tuesday before. Even these little changes would be good.

D Rock
05-13-2012, 12:20 PM
This sounds a little odd to me. One of the things I thought BA did well was pare down the offensive playbook with the help of Roethlisberger. If I remember correctly, the playbook when Arians took over, was a huge mish-mash of plays and terminology from the past several OC's. They supposedly "cleaned" everything up and kept many of the plays Roethlisberger was comfortable with. I'm not sure if they stripped it down to the bone or just eliminated too many plays and formations that Haley relies on, but this type of huge change seems like something you would normally want to avoid doing.

I agree with the sentiment that more and different does not necessarily equal better.

I also agree with DJ, that improvement shouldn't be too difficult either.

Didn't the team also hire from within for all of those successive OCs? I'd say that was the real problem with the playbook was that it was always modified and never just redone.

What do you do when you want your home to look a bit different but you have bad wiring and plumbing? Just change the colors of the walls? Nope...you rip it all down and start fresh and do it right and the way you want it.

Flasteel
05-13-2012, 12:37 PM
Didn't the team also hire from within for all of those successive OCs? I'd say that was the real problem with the playbook was that it was always modified and never just redone.

Kind of reminds me of the problems involved with inbreeding. :D

birtikidis
05-13-2012, 01:00 PM
I guesss removing all those bubble screens changed more than half the play book. Who'd a known

SteelCrazy
05-13-2012, 01:01 PM
Arians was/is predictable. It wont change in Indy. So far, Haley hasnt accomplished anything in Pitt and he is simply unknown until game 1 is over. After hearing all the talk from players about how hard it is I expect a lot of confusion and little success in game 1. GO DEFENSE! :razz:

Oviedo
05-13-2012, 03:38 PM
Arians was/is predictable. It wont change in Indy. So far, Haley hasnt accomplished anything in Pitt and he is simply unknown until game 1 is over. After hearing all the talk from players about how hard it is I expect a lot of confusion and little success in game 1. GO DEFENSE! :razz:

Not sure it will even be before the end of game one that we will read what a idiot Haley is. How he is a terrible OC. How the offense sucks.

Flasteel
05-13-2012, 03:43 PM
Not sure it will even be before the end of game one that we will read what a idiot Haley is. How he is a terrible OC. How the offense sucks.

Yes Ovi, just as we can all expect a rant about LeBeau and the decline of the Steelers' defense from you. There will always be malcontents. :D

Snatch98
05-13-2012, 04:31 PM
Arians was/is predictable. It wont change in Indy. So far, Haley hasnt accomplished anything in Pitt and he is simply unknown until game 1 is over. After hearing all the talk from players about how hard it is I expect a lot of confusion and little success in game 1. GO DEFENSE! :razz:

They'll have a full offseason to absorb the playbook. They're paid millions of dollars to UNDERSTAND the playbook and it's ridiculous to assume there is going to be "a lot of confusion".

SteelCrazy
05-13-2012, 06:48 PM
They'll have a full offseason to absorb the playbook. They're paid millions of dollars to UNDERSTAND the playbook and it's ridiculous to assume there is going to be "a lot of confusion".

In theory you're correct, but these guys that are paid millions of dollars to understand the playbook are still human. I dont think players will be running around like boobs, but there will be a player or two out of position and I think it'll take them a while to get into a flow.

Snatch98
05-13-2012, 07:40 PM
In theory you're correct, but these guys that are paid millions of dollars to understand the playbook are still human. I dont think players will be running around like boobs, but there will be a player or two out of position and I think it'll take them a while to get into a flow.

I still think you're wrong. If you and I were paid Millions of dollars to play football for one of the best organization in professional sports we are going to learn that playbook. We're also talking about some of the best prospects IN the NFL on our roster. I'm not at all worried about the Haley offense and if Tomlin, Rooney and the other elements thought it was going to be a problem they would have slow played the process. I have high hopes until proven otherwise that our offense with this most recent draft and the maturation of others is going to hit another gear. It should be the offense we've hoped for so get on my bandwagon and enjoy the excitement. If I'm wrong and the others that are equally excited are wrong we'll come back to the board to bitch and moan about it lol. Until then I'm going to be flying high until September, hopefully we're all flying extra high by then.

hawaiiansteel
05-13-2012, 07:49 PM
So far, Haley hasnt accomplished anything in Pitt and he is simply unknown until game 1 is over. After hearing all the talk from players about how hard it is I expect a lot of confusion and little success in game 1.

Mehno: Is Tomlin making a mistake?

Posted: Saturday, May 12, 2012
by John Mehno

Is Mike Tomlin repeating one of the legendary mistakes in Steelers history?

Tomlin hired Todd Haley as offensive coordinator in February, a big change after five years of Bruce Arians. Haley is the first coordinator in 13 years hired from outside the organization.

Tomlin is also requiring the team to learn Haley's terminology.

This is no small matter. Imagine trying to give someone directions if left was now right and vice versa. How easily could you do simple math problems if the value of six was now seven? Could you make change quickly if dimes were now called quarters?

That's what happens when new systems are installed. The simple solution is to have the new coach adapt to what the players have been using.

Chuck Noll hired Joe Walton as his offensive coordinator in 1990 and decided the Steelers would learn Walton's language.

The players, led by Bubby Brister, rebelled, and things were never quite right. Noll retired after the 1991 season.

There's always a sentiment for showing highly paid players who's the boss, but why have 25 people adapt when it would be easier to have one coach make the switch?
Change is always difficult, made even tougher when people aren't speaking the same language.

http://www.timesonline.com/sports/lo...3828ef79e.html (http://www.timesonline.com/sports/local_sports/mehno-is-tomlin-making-a-mistake/article_e789a748-470f-550c-a704-01e3828ef79e.html)

BURGH86STEEL
05-13-2012, 08:26 PM
I still think you're wrong. If you and I were paid Millions of dollars to play football for one of the best organization in professional sports we are going to learn that playbook. We're also talking about some of the best prospects IN the NFL on our roster. I'm not at all worried about the Haley offense and if Tomlin, Rooney and the other elements thought it was going to be a problem they would have slow played the process. I have high hopes until proven otherwise that our offense with this most recent draft and the maturation of others is going to hit another gear. It should be the offense we've hoped for so get on my bandwagon and enjoy the excitement. If I'm wrong and the others that are equally excited are wrong we'll come back to the board to bitch and moan about it lol. Until then I'm going to be flying high until September, hopefully we're all flying extra high by then.

Here is an example of one play call I found "Flip right, double-X, Jet, 36 counter, naked waggle, X-7, X-quarter." If Haley's terminology is anything similar, it may take a couple of years for players to become comfortable in the offense.

Discipline of Steel
05-13-2012, 08:55 PM
"Flip right, double-X, Jet, 36 counter, naked waggle, X-7, X-quarter."


PASS PLAY
Flip right, double-X, Jet...FORMATION
36 counter...BLOCKING SCHEME
naked waggle...QB MOTION
X-7, X-quarter...PASS ROUTES

Hey, i think im getting it already! shouldnt be too tough for the professionals ;-)

D Rock
05-13-2012, 09:22 PM
PASS PLAY
Flip right, double-X, Jet...FORMATION
36 counter...BLOCKING SCHEME
naked waggle...QB MOTION
X-7, X-quarter...PASS ROUTES

Hey, i think im getting it already! shouldnt be too tough for the professionals ;-)





I would think it would be the hardest for Ben because he has to know what everyone is doing on every play. Good thing he's a college graduate now.

papillon
05-13-2012, 10:07 PM
PASS PLAY
Flip right, double-X, Jet...FORMATION
36 counter...BLOCKING SCHEME
naked waggle...QB MOTION
X-7, X-quarter...PASS ROUTES

Hey, i think im getting it already! shouldnt be too tough for the professionals ;-)


And, you didn't have to "unlearn" anything, you simply took your football knowledge and applied to the play call, the Steeler players are going to have to "translate" what they know (BA's system) into what they don't know (TH's system). The same as learning a language, if you don't know German you have to translate it into English and until you do that enough, so that it is second nature it takes time to process German. It will take the players time to process Todd Haley speak into something they know. Can they do it? Of course. Will it be second nature by September? Only time will tell.

Pappy

Northern_Blitz
05-14-2012, 10:05 AM
I generally don't like early bye weeks, but I think it will be good for the players and coaches to be able to put the O in the garage for a week to go over everything after having three real games.

RuthlessBurgher
05-14-2012, 10:26 AM
Arians was/is predictable. It wont change in Indy. So far, Haley hasnt accomplished anything in Pitt and he is simply unknown until game 1 is over. After hearing all the talk from players about how hard it is I expect a lot of confusion and little success in game 1. GO DEFENSE! :razz:

Luckily, in week 1, we get to play against an offense lead by a QB who hasn't played in over a year due to multiple neck surgeries and is now in an all new system with all new players (other than Jacob Tamme, and Brandon Stokley, if he even makes the team).

Then, in week 2, we get a team who replaced an incompetant O.C. with a former H.C. just like us (in their case, Brian Schottenheimer for Tony Sparano).

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
05-14-2012, 11:06 AM
Blah, blah, blah.

If we do better on offense then the playbook is better, if we don't then it is worse. Everything in between is just idle chit chat to kill time until we have something real to talk about.

feltdizz
05-14-2012, 11:07 AM
Blah, blah, blah.

If we do better on offense then the playbook is better, if we don't then it is worse. Everything in between is just idle chit chat to kill time until we have something real to talk about.

we know this...

Sugar
05-14-2012, 11:17 AM
I'm not seeing how two players reactions to Haley's playbook says a single thing about Arians'. It's simply doesn't follow logically.

Oviedo
05-14-2012, 11:30 AM
Blah, blah, blah.

If we do better on offense then the playbook is better, if we don't then it is worse. Everything in between is just idle chit chat to kill time until we have something real to talk about.

Duh....

Got some stimulating discussion to contribute?

D Rock
05-14-2012, 12:15 PM
And, you didn't have to "unlearn" anything, you simply took your football knowledge and applied to the play call, the Steeler players are going to have to "translate" what they know (BA's system) into what they don't know (TH's system). The same as learning a language, if you don't know German you have to translate it into English and until you do that enough, so that it is second nature it takes time to process German. It will take the players time to process Todd Haley speak into something they know. Can they do it? Of course. Will it be second nature by September? Only time will tell.

Pappy

I disagree to an extent...

A language needs translating because words have meanings which need other words to understand.

Football plays can be drawn on paper and routes and blocking schemes can physically be executed. Just forget the old system and learn the plays fresh - don't try to make everything into a translation from the old system, because you don't need to use the old system to understand the new system. I think this is much easier than learning a new language.

papillon
05-14-2012, 12:28 PM
Luckily, in week 1, we get to play against an offense lead by a QB who hasn't played in over a year due to multiple neck surgeries and is now in an all new system with all new players (other than Jacob Tamme, and Brandon Stokley, if he even makes the team).

Then, in week 2, we get a team who replaced an incompetant O.C. with a former H.C. just like us (in their case, Brian Schottenheimer for Tony Sparano).

My guess is that Peyton Manning isn't learning much new, he will be instrumental in the installation of the offense and terminology that he is familiar with. The Broncos only have a small opening with Manning and won't want to have him learn a new system, they'll have the others learn what he knows. At least, if I were the Broncos, I would want Manning up to speed as quickly as possible.

Pappy

RuthlessBurgher
05-14-2012, 12:33 PM
My guess is that Peyton Manning isn't learning much new, he will be instrumental in the installation of the offense and terminology that he is familiar with. The Broncos only have a small opening with Manning and won't want to have him learn a new system, they'll have the others learn what he knows. At least, if I were the Broncos, I would want Manning up to speed as quickly as possible.

Pappy

That's a heck of a mock draft you have in your sig, Pap! You pretty much nailed it! :p

You can update Paulson and Frederick to "signed" status as well.

http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/Steelers-Agree-To-Terms-With-Seventh-Round-Picks-Paulson-and-Frederick/48d8845d-6e4c-4766-b48a-546472b19c7c

fordfixer
05-14-2012, 01:45 PM
Blah, blah, blah.

If we do better on offense then the playbook is better, if we don't then it is worse. Everything in between is just idle chit chat to kill time until we have something real to talk about.
Thanks. Now back to the idle chit chat:p

fordfixer
05-14-2012, 02:03 PM
[QUOTE=papillon;509111]And, you didn't have to "unlearn" anything, you simply took your football knowledge and applied to the play call, the Steeler players are going to have to "translate" what they know (BA's system) into what they don't know (TH's system). The same as learning a language, if you don't know German you have to translate it into English and until you do that enough, so that it is second nature it takes time to process German. It will take the players time to process Todd Haley speak into something they know. Can they do it? Of course. Will it be second nature by September? Only time will

Danke, guter Beitrag. Herr Papillon

RuthlessBurgher
05-14-2012, 03:45 PM
Danke, guter Beitrag. Herr Papillon

I must say I grow weary of these monkeyshines. Did you hear that? That was the sound of my Walther. Pointed right at your testicles.

Why do you have your Walther pointed at my testicles?

Because you've just given yourself away, Captain. You're no more German than that scotch.

:eek:

fordfixer
05-14-2012, 05:55 PM
I must say I grow weary of these monkeyshines. Did you hear that? That was the sound of my Walther. Pointed right at your testicles. Why do you have your Walther pointed at my testicles? Because you've just given yourself away, Captain. You're no more German than that scotch. :eek:



You got me, but I did watch Hoagn's Heroes as a boy:D Now please slowly realease the hammer on your Walther

hawaiiansteel
05-17-2012, 11:07 PM
Transition Is Hard, but the Pittsburgh Steelers Won't Miss Bruce Arians in 2012

By Andrea Hangst (AFC North Lead Blogger) on May 16, 2012


Just because Ben Roethlisberger gave Bruce Arians his continued support doesn't mean the Steelers should have kept him around.

Change is inevitable in the NFL, even for a team like the Pittsburgh Steelers that doesn't see much of it.

This has been a tumultuous offseason for the Steelers. Not only did they cut many of their veteran starters in order to get under the salary cap, the team chose to move on from long-time offensive coordinator Bruce Arians, hiring Todd Haley in his place.

While the removal of Arians had many Steelers fans sighing with relief, it's not so cut-and-dry for the players who have been relying on a familiar system since 2007, when Arians was promoted to offensive coordinator after serving as wide receivers coach.

It's especially rough for quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, who is still admittedly confused by both Haley's new playbook and Haley's plans for the offense as a whole.

http://cdn.bleacherreport.net/images_root/article/media_slots/photos/000/430/845/143821727_crop_340x234.jpg?1337201244

Todd Haley's coaching philosophy differs from Arians', but that doesn't mean the end product will be extremely different

Though Roethlisberger still has yet to grasp what Haley has planned—and the team has yet to really work through any of his plays or terminology on the practice field—there's little to worry about. The Steelers will ultimately be better off with Haley as their offensive coordinator than they were with Arians.

Arians fit the Steelers for a time. But the Steelers are now a different team with different needs. Arians did a good job boosting their passing game and developing Roethlisberger into the player he is now, but it's time to evolve.

Under Arians, the Steelers offense became predictable. First-down runs, bubble screens to nowhere and stalled red zone drives became more and more common and didn't fit in with the Steelers' increasingly strong passing game.

Haley's approach is less rigid than Arians'. He's been known for both his strong running offenses (in Kansas City) as much as for his big-play passing games (with the Arizona Cardinals) and crafts his plays to best fit the talent he has available.

This means that the Steelers may run the ball the same amount they did under Arians, but just in different circumstances, to different ends. The same goes for the passing game, which, according to Roethlisberger, will include increased focus on the no-huddle and overall ramping up the speed of the game.

The one major change to expect in the Steelers offense under Haley is the running backs' involvement in the passing game. Dave Bryan of SteelersDepot.com took a look at just how often Haley used running backs in the passing game as compared to Arians, and it's very clear Haley wants backs to catch more passes than Arians did.

You could see the setup for this change in the Steelers' approach to last month's draft when they selected hybrid back/receiver Chris Rainey in the fifth round. Rainey has many traits in common with a Haley product from Kansas City, Dexter McCluster, and will likely be used in a similar manner.

The bottom line is that Arians relied on the strength of his play-calling to lead the Steelers offense rather than lend more weight to the strength of the Steelers offensive roster.

Haley will take the latter approach, meaning that the passing game will continue to be a major focal point of the team's offense this year—it's just too good to reign in—but he will also try to use perhaps all five of the Steelers running backs to their full effectiveness as well.

No, the Steelers offense wasn't broke, but that doesn't mean it didn't need fixing, or changing or ratcheting up. Haley's presence on the coaching staff will require everyone to make a transition, and it's happening whether the players are comfortable with it or not.

The ultimate success or failure of the change will have to wait until the season starts. However, I don't believe the Steelers made a bad decision by moving away from Arians nor by hiring Haley. This was just the shot in the arm Pittsburgh's offense needed.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1185842-transition-is-hard-but-the-pittsburgh-steelers-wont-miss-bruce-arians-in-2012

hawaiiansteel
06-05-2012, 02:46 PM
Chris Adamski(BuzzsawPGH) via twitter:

Interesting quote, somewhat out of nowhere, from #Steelers T Marcus Gilbert:

"I think this playbook is a lot better than last year's."

http://twtkr.olleh.com/BuzzsawPGH

hawaiiansteel
06-08-2012, 09:26 PM
check out the quote in red below from Isaac Redman, that tells you about everything you need to know about Arians' run designs in his playbook. I could have told you most of the time what run play was coming...


Isaac Redman Talks about the Advantages of Pittsburgh’s New Offense, his Grasp on the System and his Chance to Start at RB

June 8, 2012 by Brad Gagnon

The Pittsburgh Steelers offense is going through plenty of changes this offseason. Not only do the Steelers have to learn a whole new offensive under new coordinator Todd Haley, but there’s also uncertainty regarding who’ll be the No. 1 back to start the season with Rashard Mendenhall recovering from a torn ACL.

Steelers running back Isaac Redman joined Jim Colony on 93.7 The Fan in Pittsburgh to talk about his chances of starting in place of Rashard Mendenhall, his goals for preparing for 2012, his grasp on the new offense and how the changes could help the team.

On the opportunity he has to gain a major role with Rashard Mendenhall hurt:

“I’m just gonna take it like I’ve done with every opportunity I’ve got — try to make the best of it. If he comes back, then he comes back. If he’s the guy, then he’s the guy. We’re all in this room trying to win a championship so whatever it takes. Right now, I’m just working hard and trying to prepare myself to be the No. 1 back.”

On what he’s working on to prepare for 2012:

“I think I’m gonna come in a little lighter, try to be a little faster. [He's asked if that's it] That’s it. Everything else I’m pretty much … I’ve been very good on blitz pick-up. I’m a student of the game and coaches told me that’s what kept me around, because I’m a fast learner. I’m one of the few guys that’s picking this offense up pretty fast and I just want to be a little faster, and with the speed will come power.”

On if he feels he’s completely ready to go in the new offense:

“No, not by any means. It’s still early but I’m starting to be able to break the huddle and not do as much thinking as I was when we first started. And that’s a big key, being able to break the huddle and not have to think about what you’re doing and already know what you’re doing that you can go out and play fast.”

On if being forced to learn an offense forces everyone to concentrate harder:

“It does. It’s gonna take everybody to go home, watch film, go home and stay in the play book. As far as — last year a lot of guys probably just took it for granted, ‘I know this, I know that,’ and maybe not as crisp as we could’ve been, especially in the red zone last year. So now every single one of us is gonna have to be in our playbook knowing exactly what we need to do and exactly where we need to be."

"And also, you gotta look at it, the other teams that we play, especially in our conference, they were used to us running the same plays and kinda had our playbook down and kinda knew what we were running."

"Now, they got a whole new offense that they have to prepare for.”

http://sportsradiointerviews.com/201...o-start-at-rb/ (http://sportsradiointerviews.com/2012/06/08/ike-redman-talks-about-the-advantages-of-pittsburghs-new-offense-his-grasp-on-the-system-and-his-chance-to-start-at-rb/)

SteelAbility
06-08-2012, 09:43 PM
PASS PLAY
Flip right, double-X, Jet...FORMATION
36 counter...BLOCKING SCHEME
naked waggle...QB MOTION
X-7, X-quarter...PASS ROUTES

Hey, i think im getting it already! shouldnt be too tough for the professionals ;-)




Very well done ... in NON REAL TIME. ;-)

hawaiiansteel
06-21-2012, 05:27 PM
Ask The Steelers: Chris Rainey

Teresa Varley - Steelers.com
June 20, 2012

Steelers.com brings you the Ask the Steelers feature. Fans submitted the questions that were asked. Please understand that we receive an incredible number of questions for each player, with many of the questions being similar, and not all of the questions can be answered. We selected as many as possible, and took your questions to the current subject to get your answers.

Rookie running back Chris Rainey

Dan Myers, Rochester, New York: What was it like waiting to be drafted, where were you, how was the wait?
Rainey: It was a fun feeling because you had been watching all your life, waiting for the moment to be in that situation. I was at home with the Pouncey twins, with family members, just hanging out, eating and waiting.

Pat Martin: What was your first reaction when you were drafted by the Steelers?
Rainey: The phone rang and I didn’t know who it was. It was a Pennsylvania number, but I didn’t know if it was the Steelers or the Eagles. I saw the next pick, but then I went outside and I didn’t even see the pick when they took me. I was on the phone, answered and it was Coach (Mike) Tomlin. I was blessed and happy. Both of the twins called me, I had a phone in both ears at the same time. It was a blessing. I just have to take advantage of it now and be a part of this team.

Rob Saunders, Gainesville, Florida: Who did you first talk to when you were drafted, what was that conversation like?
Rainey: I talked to Coach Tomlin first. I just remember the coaches telling me things, what to expect, joking around. That is about it.

Matt Zimmerman, Landover, Maryland: How great is it to come to a team where you have a close friend in Maurkice Pouncey and other former Gators?
Rainey: It’s real nice to have people you already know on the team. It makes you more comfortable. Plus it’s a great program. Everybody is nice here. They are humble. It’s a good program all around.

Roy Brown, Greensburg, Pennsylvania: You got a look at Todd Haley’s offense already. What do you think of it, is it tough?
Rainey: It’s going to be great. I know this style of offense. I have asked some of the other players if they like it and they do. They think it’s better than the one they used to have here.

Butch Grey, Fort Worth, Texas: Now that you have seen what the Steelers offense is like, what areas do you think you need to work on the most?
Rainey: I want to be a great player at everything I do, work hard at everything. I need to work on every aspect of my game.

Steve Kneier, New Orleans, Louisiana: What did the team tell you about your role this season and in the future?
Rainey: They didn’t say anything yet, just be ready, do your job and stay focused.

Tim Anderson: How important are special teams?
Rainey: Special teams are number one in my book. I have been doing it all my life. It’s always been important, always been number one.

Eric Reynolds, Florida: What makes you a great returner?
Rainey: I would say vision, making guys miss, things like that.

Timothy Steele, Bradenton, Florida: What is your main goal now?
Rainey: Be a part of this team and contribute in the games and help the team win.

http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/Ask-The-Steelers-Chris-Rainey/90d67697-5ef1-4ef1-bcf3-a0c9e401760a

hawaiiansteel
07-15-2012, 10:01 PM
Reggie Wayne likes Bruce Arians: “He’s not going to BS you”

Posted by Michael David Smith on July 15, 2012

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/brucearianscolts-e1342400896912.jpg?w=250

New Colts offensive coordinator Bruce Arians has made a good impression on veteran receiver Reggie Wayne by not taking it easy on him.

Instead, Wayne says, Arians has impressed Wayne by getting on his case and calling him out in meetings if necessary, posting lists of mistakes players have made in practices and sparing no one.

“He’s not going to BS you,” Wayne told the Indianapolis Star. “I’ve been on there quite a few times. You know when meetings start, he’s going to put that paper up. And sometimes you’ll be afraid to look up and see how many times your number’s on there. He doesn’t care who you are. He’ll put your number up there and he’s going to correct you.”

Arians says his practice of listing players’ mistakes isn’t about embarrassing players, it’s about giving them a sense of ownership over the offense.

“It’s not my offense, it’s theirs,” Arians said. “They have to be accountable to each other. If it’s one of those young guys on that sheet a lot in September and October, you need to check into what he’s doing off the field and get him straightened out. We are collective and one guy can tear it all apart.”

Wayne is one veteran who likes to see a coach who’s going to hold him, and his teammates, accountable.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/07/15/reggie-wayne-likes-bruce-arians-hes-not-going-to-bs-you/

hawaiiansteel
07-16-2012, 02:59 AM
Indianapolis Colts Coach Chuck Pagano: 'We Hit a Home Run' with Bruce Arians

by Neal Coolong on Jul 15, 2012

http://cdn3.sbnation.com/entry_photo_images/4669919/130154253_extra_large.jpg

Indianapolis Star writer Mike Chappell has an in-depth feature geared around new Colts offensive coordinator, and former Steelers offensive coordinator, Bruce Arians.

The impression left with Chappell is Arians is looking for accountability. Not just with him, but within his offensive players.

He also writes about the process used by head coach Chuck Pagano in hiring Arians, and everything suggests Pagano and the Colts are excited to have him.

Particularly WR Reggie Wayne, who conducted a bit of a background check on his new boss.

Per Chappelle, Wayne called a few Steelers players to hear what Arians was like. His research to this point is exactly what he was told.

"Everything they said, I'm seeing with him. Everything," Wayne said. "He's not going to sugarcoat anything. He's going to try to correct you and make you the best you can be. If you're a veteran guy, you've got to understand that and take the good with the bad.

"I appreciate that. I can handle that. I'm glad he's here."

Judging by the Steelers' propensity to throw the ball in two of the last three seasons (in 2010, they ran the ball the most, and went to the Super Bowl. They missed the playoffs in 2009 and lost in the first round in 2011), it would figure Wayne would be excited.

Chappelle also writes Arians is expected to oversee "an offense that leans on a power running game and passing attack that is diverse and tight-end heavy."

The tight end part is believable. However, it seems the most logical reason Arians was brought in was due to his track record with quarterbacks. Arians was with Peyton Manning and Tim Couch, both No. 1 overall picks, in their rookie seasons, and oversaw Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger starting in his fourth season.

Andrew Luck is Arians' third quarterback taken No. 1 overall, and fourth consecutive job in which he worked with a quarterback taken in the first 11 picks.

Considering the Colts took a quarterback and two highly rated tight ends (Coby Fleener and Dwayne Allen) in the 2012 NFL Draft, and don't have a proven feature running back older than 25, except receiving-adept Mewelde Moore, the concept of power running may not exactly be in their plans.

Manning, after all, threw 575 passes his rookie year, the highest in the league in 1998.

http://www.behindthesteelcurtain.com/2012/7/15/3160504/indianapolis-colts-bruce-arians-pittsburgh-steelers-andrew-luck-ben-roethlisberger#storyjump

Slapstick
07-16-2012, 07:07 AM
Arians was with Peyton Manning and Tim Couch, both No. 1 overall picks, in their rookie seasons, and oversaw Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger starting in his fourth season.

Arians was not with Tim Couch in his rookie season...he was still in Indy for Peyton's 2nd season....

ikestops85
07-16-2012, 03:47 PM
I hope Reggie Wayne is ready to catch 20 - 30 bubble screens this year. :D

hawaiiansteel
07-22-2012, 02:20 AM
Haley’s chapter begins Wednesday

By Alan Robinson
Published: Saturday, July 21, 2012


Summer is the perfect time for a good read, yet nobody seems to be getting one on new Steelers offensive coordinator Todd Haley.

A Bill Parcells protégé known for adapting his play-calling to his personnel and being an innovative play caller, he is also a volatile sideline presence who inspires loyalty from some players but irritates others.

He is certainly not Bruce Arians, who was not-so-gently shoved out the door in January despite quarterback Ben Roethlisberger’s unwavering support. But, according to those who know Haley best, he also isn’t a control freak who implements change just to show he’s the boss.

While the Steelers generally shy away from coaches with colorful pasts, Haley has that and more, as evidenced by his well-publicized clashes with players and an abrupt departure as the Kansas City Chiefs’ coach last year in which he reportedly suspected team offices and his cell phone were bugged.

Now, Haley’s assimilation into the Steelers’ way of life is the latest Mystery of Pittsburgh, a shadowy yet intriguing riddle that will begin to be solved when the Steelers — coming off successive 12-4 seasons — open camp Wednesday in Latrobe. It figures to be a can’t-miss page turner.

“I’ve heard a lot of Todd stories — some good, some bad,” said former Steelers star guard Alan Faneca, who played in Arizona after Haley was the offensive coordinator there. “He’s definitely a hard worker and demands a lot. He can be very excitable during practice. But sometimes change is good, to get people out of their comfort zone.”

That’s already happened with Roethlisberger, who thrived in a Ben-friendly Arians offense that permitted him to improvise at will. Upon first glance at Haley’s playbook, Roethlisberger jokingly called it a Rosetta Stone course in a brand new language.

“That (change) has a way of keeping guys on their toes and keeping their focus, understanding what their goal is, and that’s to win Super Bowls,” Haley said during minicamp last month. “Win one this year — that’s our goal.”

Haley, 45, is the first outsider in 13 years to run the offense. But he’s no stranger to Pittsburgh or the Steelers; as a youngster in Upper St. Clair, he broke down game film with father Dick Haley, the former Steelers personnel chief who played a major role in some of the best drafts in NFL history in the 1970s.

Football not first love

Todd Haley’s story isn’t the sit-on-dad’s-knee-and-become-a-football genius tale of Patriots coach Bill Belichick. In his teens, Haley shifted his emphasis to golf, playing in high school and at Florida and Miami in college.

The PGA, not the NFL, appeared to be his calling.

“But there never was a time he wasn’t into football,” said Dick Haley, who at 75 remains plugged into the NFL. “Because of some back problems, he got diverted into golf, but he always wanted to know about the players, about football. How many kids wouldn’t want to after rooming next to Joe Greene at training camp?”

The elder Haley left the Steelers to become the Jets’ personnel director in 1991 and, four years later, Todd was hired in the scouting department. Within two years, he was on Parcells’ coaching staff.

“Todd is bright, demanding, persistent, and he came along pretty well,” Parcells said.

Parcells didn’t care Haley hadn’t played football.

“I know guys who didn’t play and did very well in coaching, and others who played that don’t have a clue what to do,” Parcells, a two-time Super Bowl-winning coach, said.

Haley was promoted to wide receivers coach in 1999 before switching to the Bears in 2001, only to rejoin Parcells in Dallas in 2004.

Haley’s profile rose with his next job as the Arizona Cardinals’ offensive coordinator from 2007-08. With quarterback Kurt Warner headlining an imaginative offense highlighted by former Pitt receiver Larry Fitzgerald’s big plays, the Cardinals were second in passing and third in scoring in 2008. They went 9-7 during the season, but scored at least 30 points during three consecutive playoff wins and rallied from a 13-point deficit to nearly upset the Steelers in the Super Bowl.

That deep throw to Fitzgerald that nearly sent the Steelers home a loser from Tampa? Haley’s play call.

Haley was subsequently hired as the Chiefs coach by general manager Scott Pioli, the former Patriots executive who worked for the Jets when Haley did. But while Haley went from 4-12 in his first season in 2009 to 10-6 in 2010, finishing third in the coach of the year voting, he was fired with his injury-ruined team reeling with a 5-8 record on Dec. 12.

Stormy days in K.C.

Haley is derecho-like — always going straight ahead, in full-go mode, and in Kansas City, storm clouds often loomed on the horizon.

Chan Gailey, retained from Herm Edwards’ staff to be the offensive coordinator, didn’t make it through training camp. Larry Johnson, the two-time former 1,700-yard rusher, questioned Haley’s coaching credentials in a Twitter message and was cut in 2009. And tight end Tony Moeaki was lost to a season-ending knee injury in the final 2011 exhibition game, when many NFL regulars rest.

“The quarterback (Matt Cassel) was real average. … It didn’t surprise me what happened in Kansas City. I didn’t have any real confidence in the whole thing,” Dick Haley said.

After Todd Haley departed, the Kansas City Star published a devastating article in which a number of former team employees revealed what they called an intimidating, secretive and stifling work environment. According to the Star, Haley himself suspected bugging at the practice complex.

“I don’t know what happened in Kansas City. I don’t think it’s relevant in Pittsburgh,” Parcells said. “But he probably learned a lot there.”

Tutoring Big Ben

Given Haley’s sideline spats with Warner, Anquan Boldin, Terrell Owens and Cassel, his relationship with Roethlisberger should prove intriguing. Haley once said, “If you’re sensitive, (the NFL) is not the best place to be.”

“You accept people for what they are and get past the sensitivity level, if there is any,” Parcells said. “Both guys are smart enough to say, ‘Hey, we’ve got to make it work.’ ”

Torry Holt, a NFL Network analyst and former Rams star receiver, can’t wait to see how this plays out.

“Coach Haley has a strong personality. Ben has a strong personality. I’m sure Todd wants him to hone in on this or hone in on that, and Ben will try,” Holt said. “But out there on the football field, your instincts kick in and your competitive nature kicks in, and you kind of resort back to what you’ve always done.”

Haley’s take on Roethlisberger? “He’s a guy that’s been a really good player, and we’re going to try to keep that going and get even better,” he said.

Haley believes an offense must be physical, smart and disciplined, and his system resembles that of his former boss, Arizona coach Ken Whisenhunt, a Steelers assistant from 2001-06.

“Todd Haley represents the best of both worlds,” NFL Network analyst Jamie Dukes said. “With Kurt Warner, he threw it 45 times a game and didn’t blink. In Kansas City, he ran it 45 times a game. He’s got those three young wide receivers there in Pittsburgh, and Ben knows how to put the ball in the air. Todd will make the adjustments, and rather quickly.”

While Haley is an assistant again after being a head coach, his father insists he has never been happier now that he’s back home in Pittsburgh with his wife Chrissy and five children.

“He’s loving every second of this,” the elder Haley said. “He couldn’t be more excited.”

Dad Haley also realizes there is intense pressure to succeed as a high-profile coach in your hometown, even if former head coach Bill Cowher made it work.

“I don’t question he’ll do well. (But) there’s a lot of pressure to live up to what’s gone on there for a long time,” Dick Haley said. “And he’d better be good because there’s a lot of pressure on him right now.”

http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/...p-nfl-ben-didn (http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/2195481-85/haley-steelers-coach-todd-former-parcells-camp-nfl-ben-didn)

NorthCoast
07-22-2012, 08:18 AM
Something is not adding up here. The recent comments from Starks after his signing suggest that the playbook should not look all that unfamiliar as it is "50-60%" of the offense Whiz used to run. Only the names have changed.

So who is fooling who here?

NorthCoast
07-22-2012, 08:36 AM
Haley’s chapter begins Wednesday


Torry Holt, a NFL Network analyst and former Rams star receiver, can’t wait to see how this plays out.

“Coach Haley has a strong personality. Ben has a strong personality. I’m sure Todd wants him to hone in on this or hone in on that, and Ben will try,” Holt said. “But out there on the football field, your instincts kick in and your competitive nature kicks in, and you kind of resort back to what you’ve always done.”


http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/...p-nfl-ben-didn (http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/2195481-85/haley-steelers-coach-todd-former-parcells-camp-nfl-ben-didn)

This statement speaks volumes. Haley/Ben's success will depend on whether Haley believes Ben's instincts are good. If Haley has a lot of second-guessing of Ben when the play breaks down, I predict the relationship won't last. If Haley can manage to see what Ben saw on a given play, then the relationship at least has a chance to succeed. For Ben's part, he needs to become more of a student of the game, and rely less on "instincts". That's the problem with people that have an opinion or vision, they usually think their's is correct and everyone else is not. Hopefully they will both have the vision of shared success, not whether an individual play was good or bad.

hawaiiansteel
07-24-2012, 01:41 AM
The Future of the Pittsburgh Steelers Rests in the Hands of the Explosive OC Todd Haley

Published: 19th Jul 2012
by David Abeyta

http://rantsports.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/pittsburgh-steelers/files/2012/07/Altered-Todd-Haley-Week-1-Article.jpg

“…I don’t ever put any pressure on my line because just as many of my sacks are my fault as they are anybody’s.” Well, some things never change. For a guy that’s been sacked so much, Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger sounds like he’s keeping a good attitude coming into the new season under new offensive coordinator, Todd Haley. Haley has had an interesting career in the NFL, thus far, working as a wide receivers coach for multiple ball clubs before serving as offensive coordinator for the Arizona Cardinals under Ken Whisenhunt. Perhaps most notably, though, he became the fiery head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs for just under 3 years, before getting the boot. Now that he’s in Pittsburgh, will the Steelers benefit from his expertise?

My answer is a conditional “no”. Haley’s nature goes against what the Steelers are about. Roethlisberger is a cool, calm, and collected individual. The receiving core has been used to their former offensive coordinator, Bruce Arians, and his laid-back style of coaching. Go from that, to a yelling, in-your-face feisty personality constantly throwing out cuss words and telling you how much you suck. Someone’s going to get offended, boys.

Now, let’s be fair, Haley’s past has shown that he can be a good NFL coach. In Arizona, the Cardinals went to the Super Bowl during the year he was offensive coordinator. Then, despite the terrible 4-win outing he had during his 1st year with the Chiefs, he led Kansas City to a 10-win season that surpassed all expectations (which ended with the Chiefs getting their lids blown off by the Baltimore Ravens). Then; the final year in Kansas City came about, it was clear the Chiefs organization was tired of Haley, a freak-like string of injuries doomed Haley’s chances for redemption, and Haley was fired after suffering an embarrassing loss to the New York Jets.

As in Kansas City, Haley’s aggressiveness can work to, either, help or hurt. If Haley is the same guy in Pittsburgh as he was when he cussed out former Chiefs quarterback Brodie Croyle and mocked players like wide receiver Dwayne Bowe, his tenure in Pittsburgh may be a short-lived one. However, if Haley can keep his temper down, focus on the football, and really get to know the offense, Pittsburgh may just have another Super Bowl trophy in their near-future. And that, undoubtedly, would be a welcome event as Steelers fans are, no doubt, ready to get the disgusting taste of the playoff loss they suffered at the hands of Tim Tebow and the Denver Broncos out of their mouths. Here’s hoping Haley is the mouthwash that can make it happen.

http://www.rantsports.com/pittsburgh-steelers/2012/07/19/the-future-of-the-pittsburgh-steelers-rests-in-the-hands-of-the-explosive-oc-todd-haley/

hawaiiansteel
07-29-2012, 09:01 PM
Steelers camp report: Haley’s offense looks promising

By Alan Robinson
Published: Sunday, July 29, 2012

http://triblive.com/csp/mediapool/sites/dt.common.streams.StreamServer.cls?STREAMOID=M3ibC BN0c9RIJUJ024HZR8$daE2N3K4ZzOUsqbU5sYszkz4tJocQwb$ XqJuqsb1TWCsjLu883Ygn4B49Lvm9bPe2QeMKQdVeZmXF$9l$4 uCZ8QDXhaHEp3rvzXRJFdy0KqPHLoMevcTLo3h8xh70Y6N_U_C ryOsw6FTOdKL_jpQ-&CONTENTTYPE=image/jpeg

Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger runs during the Steelers' practice on Thursday, July 26, 2012, at St. Vincent

Will the quarterback be reined in or restricted? Will the Steelers run the ball better? Did they throw out everything Bruce Arians put in? Most of all, how will Ben and his new boss get along?

Todd Haley’s hiring as the Steelers’ offensive coordinator five months ago generated surprise and a great number of questions. Only now are they getting answered.

First, Haley’s personality — term it an edgy intensity, with a slice of sideline combustibility — seemed to be quite the departure from the lower-key Bruce Arians, Ben Roethlisberger’s longtime friend, mentor and golfing buddy.

Now that training camp has begun, it’s becoming apparent that there will be much in Haley’s offense that made him such a successful coordinator with the Arizona Cardinals. Namely, lots of quick-release, high-percentage passes mixed in with enough running to keep an offense guessing, plus short throws to the running backs. The entire system appears to be designed to keep Roethlisberger on his feet, throwing with a steady rhythm and away from pass rushers.

Maybe there won’t be quite as many deep throws — especially if Mike Wallace’s holdout extends into the season — but Roethlisberger must have noticed that Kurt Warner threw for 57 touchdowns and 8,000 yards in two seasons of Haleyball in 2007-08.

And that supposed complexity and radical reshaping of what the Steelers did under the Ben-friendly Arians offense? Antonio Brown said Haley’s offense is simpler for the receivers because there are fewer reads and in-route adjustments. And cornerback Ike Taylor is suggesting this might be the best Steelers offense he’s seen.

Tight end Lawrence Pope played the last five seasons under Haley with the Cardinals and Chiefs, so he pretty much knows what’s coming — a system that puts an emphasis on quickness and precision.

“You can expect a pretty good offense,” Pope said. “I don’t want to speak (in detail) about what we’ve got going on, but I’m pretty sure we’re going to be a good team. ... Todd has a great passion for the game. I’ve seen him on very nice days, and I’ve seen him when he’s mad. I love the guy. He’s a great, great competitor.”

3 QUESTIONS: JERRICHO COTCHERY

As a former Jets player, what will it be like in New York with media darlings Tim Tebow and Mark Sanchez on the same team? “I know Tebow has a huge following. But Brett Favre? You’re talking Brett Favre. His following was something I hadn’t seen up there in New York. People showed up two, three hours before practice, just sitting there and the sun cooking them. They’re kind of built for that type of atmosphere because they’ve had so many guys in the past that attracted those kinds of (media) crowds.”

Did he consider the now-retired Hines Ward to be a dirty player before joining the Steelers last season? “I’ve always admired the way he played the game. Defensive players don’t like to get hit. They want to be the ones doing all the hitting, they want to deliver all the blows. Once you start dishing out all the hits on them, it’s like, ‘Wait a minute, wait a minute, I’m the one who’s supposed to be doing it. This guy’s dirty.’ A lot of those guys who were screaming dirty, screaming foul, they would love for him to be on one of their offenses.”

Jets coach Rex Ryan has a reputation of being a master motivator. Did any of his tricks not work? “I never saw anything that didn’t work as far as speech-wise. I think he’s a great motivator. There’s one thing about him, he can get guys ready to play. And I think that’s a good thing.”

CAMP BATTLE

If fans want to watch any of the position battles in person, this will be the only uninterrupted week of training camp. Camp will be interrupted by games starting next week, and the Steelers break camp two days in advance of their Aug. 19 game against the Colts.

The most intriguing competition is developing at left cornerback, where Keenan Lewis believes he will start but neither Curtis Brown nor Cortez Allen — drafted a round apart last year — can be counted out. Coach Mike Tomlin and defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau had high praise for both in the spring.

PLAYER TO WATCH

First-round draft pick David DeCastro was easily the most-watched player during the first contact drills of camp Saturday and understandably so. It’s a big deal when any offensive guard is compared to Alan Faneca, one of the best of his generation, as DeCastro has been. It was a given he would start immediately, and DeCastro clearly appears to have the physical makeup, personality and proper mental perspective to grasp the nuances of the job and start as a rookie.

Still, the Steelers believed another first-round guard was certain to have a Pro Bowl-caliber career — John Rienstra, the No. 9 overall pick in 1986. He turned out to be a major flop despite possessing exceptional strength and a work ethic that impressed even Chuck Noll.

There has been nothing to suggest that DeCastro will undergo the struggles that Rienstra did, especially with his confidence, but that 1986 draft offers a cautionary tale that no player is a lock and that DeCastro still must win a job that is his to lose.

http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/2287868-85/steelers-camp-offense-haley-decastro-player-seen-start-alan-arians

RuthlessBurgher
07-30-2012, 01:17 PM
Tight end Lawrence Pope played the last five seasons under Haley with the Cardinals and Chiefs, so he pretty much knows what’s coming — a system that puts an emphasis on quickness and precision.

Pope is a Leo, not a Larry.

phillyesq
07-31-2012, 09:15 AM
Good read on the way the offense has operated early in camp:

http://pit.scout.com/2/1206898.html

I don't think the Steelers will be a ground and pound team this year, but I think you will see a balanced offense. I think right now Haley is working on instilling a new mindset for the offense.

steelfin
07-31-2012, 11:44 AM
Good read on the way the offense has operated early in camp:

http://pit.scout.com/2/1206898.html

I don't think the Steelers will be a ground and pound team this year, but I think you will see a balanced offense. I think right now Haley is working on instilling a new mindset for the offense.

Crash's dream come true...

I want the offensive to have a physical presence and the ability to run, but our best skill players are the QB and receivers....

Time will tell...

Djfan
07-31-2012, 12:11 PM
Crash's dream come true...

I want the offensive to have a physical presence and the ability to run, but our best skill players are the QB and receivers....

Time will tell...

No issue with that, but a legit running game will REALLY open up this strength.

Slapstick
07-31-2012, 01:30 PM
I don't know why people argue about it...

This says it all, right here:


The Pittsburgh Steelers (http://pit.scout.com/) have run the ball 44 percent of the time or less only four times in franchise history
:
* After they did it in 1991, they fired Chuck Noll.

* After they did it in 2003, they changed offensive coordinators.
* After they did it in 2009, they publically demanded an improved running game.

* And after the same coordinator did it again last year, he was fired.


1991 - 7-9
2003 - 6-10
2009 - 9-7 (no playoffs)
2011 - 12-4 (Yay!...but, one-and-done in the playoffs)

RuthlessBurgher
08-01-2012, 01:37 PM
Todd Haley bringing some old school back to Steelers O
Posted by Darin Gantt on August 1, 2012, 8:09 AM EDT

Todd Haley grew up working as a water boy at Steelers training camp, looking up to stars such as Joe Greene.

But as different as they are, they share a philosophy on how to improve the Steelers offense, according to Ed Bouchette of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

This offseason, the legendary defensive lineman revealed the unhappiness with the way former offensive coordinator Bruce Arians treated the run game.

“You have to practice it, that’s the thing,” Greene said. “There is always a weakness in a defense for the run, but you have to be able to look for it. You don’t just call the run because you get tired of throwing it or because someone wants you to.”

So when Haley came in to put his stamp on the offense, it’s no accident someone who grew up on the Steelers of the 70s (his father was a personnel man who helped build those teams) had a similar blueprint.

“If you can run it when they know you’re going to run it — successfully — and you can throw it when they know you’re going to throw it, you have a chance to be real good, and that’s what we’re working on.”

Haley’s brought the fullback back into the offense, and put a bigger emphasis on the run game in practice.

“I’m staying away from last year because I had my own set of encyclopedias going on somewhere else,” said Haley, who had his own problems in Kansas City. “But I think that’s the name of the game on offense is being able to get the yards you need on the ground when the defense knows your running, wherever that falls in the game, if it’s critical short-yardage, if it’s a four-minute situation.”

The Steelers aren’t necessarily going to reverse the ratio and suddenly go back to running 60 percent of the time. But if they can bring a sense of balance (after 539 pass attempts against just 434 runs last year), there’s an opportunity to open more things up for Ben Roethlisberger and a group of receivers that may or may not include Mike Wallace.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/08/01/todd-haley-bringing-some-old-school-back-to-steelers-o/

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/610x-5.jpg?w=250

hawaiiansteel
08-03-2012, 09:15 PM
Antonio Brown praises Todd Haley's coaching style and personality

August 2, 2012
By Dan Gigler / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://c4241337.r37.cf2.rackcdn.com/2012/214/744/antonio-brown-training-camp_420.jpg

While there has been much concern over how new offensive coordinator Todd Haley's schemes would be handled by the Steelers and whether or not Haley and quarterback Ben Roethlisberger would get along, wide receiver Antonio Brown is effusive in his praise for Haley's style.

"It's definitely a big difference," Brown said Wednesday.

"Todd's really a cool guy -- shaking guy's hands, communicating with guys, putting in that extra time for guys, visiting with guys. Bruce [Arians] wasn't really that type of guy -- he just went about his business.

"Todd is more team-oriented and more communicative with players and trying to work together with all the men, so he's getting to know everyone," Brown said

"That's something special to be a part of."

That flies in the face of the image of Haley's supposedly thorny personality and his clashes with star players and management while he was head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs.

"Not at all," Brown said. "He's a great guy. Definitely not what people made him out to be."

"You can't go off of what you hear about a person until you really get to meet him, and, since I met this guy, he's been first class. ... [Haley] asks me what I'm seeing on the field and [makes suggestions] -- 'look at this route, you can do this better.' When you have men like that who are willing to ... be on the same page as players it makes it better for you, and you're more willing to want to play hard for them."

"That's what we're establishing in camp. Establish our identity, get on the same page, know the way he thinks, build that relationship."

http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/sports/steelers/antonio-brown-praises-todd-haleys-coaching-style-and-personality-647249/#ixzz22WmeMpZh