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steeler_fan_in_t.o.
01-25-2012, 03:12 PM
Well, this is a sure signal that not all think of the commish the same way that Steelers fans do.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... line_stack (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d826501f0/article/nfl-teams-extend-goodells-contract-through-2018-season?module=HP11_headline_stack)


NFL teams extend Goodell's contract through 2018 season

The NFL clubs have agreed to a new contract with Commissioner Roger Goodell that extends his term through the 2018 season, the league confirmed Wednesday.

The announcement was made by Atlanta Falcons Owner and Chairman Arthur M. Blank, who serves as chairman of the NFL Compensation Committee.

NFL clubs unanimously approved a resolution at a December 14 league meeting in Dallas that said, "The commissioner has performed his duties in an exemplary fashion since his election in 2006 and the membership has determined that the interests of the NFL would be best served by a continuation of the commissioner's employment beyond the terms of his current employment contract."

The resolution authorized the Compensation Committee to complete negotiations on a new contract, the third of Goodell's tenure as commissioner. His original five-year contract was extended in 2009. The new contract continues until March 31, 2019.

Other members of the Compensation Committee are Tom Benson (New Orleans), Pat Bowlen (Denver), Robert Kraft (New England), Jerry Richardson (Carolina) and Stephen Ross (Miami).

"I speak on behalf of 32 NFL club owners in saying we are fortunate to have Roger Goodell as our commissioner," Blank said. "Since becoming commissioner in 2006, the NFL -- already the leader in professional sports -- has gotten even stronger. As evidenced by this contract extension, we have great confidence in Roger's vision and leadership of the NFL. Our clubs, players and fans could not ask for a better CEO."

Goodell, 52, has focused his priorities on successfully growing the NFL's popularity and leadership role by strengthening the game and all 32 NFL franchises through innovation.

Fan interest in the NFL has soared under Goodell's leadership, including the largest television audiences in league history, 23 of the 25 highest-rated programs of the current television season, enormous growth in online and social media engagement, and other measures of success and popularity.

"It is a privilege for me to serve the NFL," Goodell said. "It is the only place I have ever wanted to work. I am grateful for the contributions and counsel of NFL owners in managing our league, the talented staff that supports us, and the players and coaches that perform their magic on the field. It is truly a team effort. I am eagerly looking ahead to the challenge of building on our momentum and doing all we can to improve our game for the fans and everyone that is part of our league."

In his first six seasons as commissioner, Goodell has addressed a wide range of issues to improve the NFL, including player health and safety; the medical needs and pensions of retired players; personal conduct; labor and revenue sharing; stadium construction; media innovation; and international development.
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His leadership helped secure a landmark 10-year collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association in 2011, the longest in the history of professional sports. That was followed by long-term extensions of the NFL's television contracts. The nine-year agreements with CBS, FOX , and NBC are the longest ever for NFL broadcast television contracts and continue the NFL's tradition of being the only sports league that shows all of its regular-season and playoff games on free, over-the-air television.

Goodell has also helped create new playing rules, policies and programs to make the game better and safer. This includes $100 million committed to medical research during the 10-year term of the new CBA. Goodell's leadership on health and safety has had a significant positive impact on all levels of football and other sports.

During his tenure, Commissioner Goodell also has strengthened the league's anti-steroids policy, launched innovative media initiatives and a new series of international regular-season games, improved the NFL's news media access policies to better serve fan interest, and revamped and enhanced the league's programs to support and assist players and former players in their lives off the field.

flippy
01-25-2012, 03:31 PM
Of course the owners love him. He got the CBA and latest network contracts done.

At the end of the day, he's making them money. Is he killing the sport long term - seems that way to me. But he's lining the owners pockets over the short term. And fast money usually trumps all else.

feltdizz
01-25-2012, 03:52 PM
Of course the owners love him. He got the CBA and latest network contracts done.

At the end of the day, he's making them money. Is he killing the sport long term - seems that way to me. But he's lining the owners pockets over the short term. And fast money usually trumps all else.

Goodell is doing what the owners tell him to do.

RuthlessBurgher
01-25-2012, 04:13 PM
His leadership helped secure a landmark 10-year collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association in 2011, the longest in the history of professional sports. That was followed by long-term extensions of the NFL's television contracts. The nine-year agreements with CBS, FOX , and NBC are the longest ever for NFL broadcast television contracts and continue the NFL's tradition of being the only sports league that shows all of its regular-season and playoff games on free, over-the-air television.

Since when is the NFL Network free, over-the-air television? Those Thursday night games aren't on any of the networks...

feltdizz
01-25-2012, 04:37 PM
His leadership helped secure a landmark 10-year collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association in 2011, the longest in the history of professional sports. That was followed by long-term extensions of the NFL's television contracts. The nine-year agreements with CBS, FOX , and NBC are the longest ever for NFL broadcast television contracts and continue the NFL's tradition of being the only sports league that shows all of its regular-season and playoff games on free, over-the-air television.

Since when is the NFL Network free, over-the-air television? Those Thursday night games aren't on any of the networks...

When we played the Panthers 2 years ago on NFLN the game was also on the local channel in Charlotte. I bet that's how they can get away with saying this.

Jigawatts
01-25-2012, 04:38 PM
His leadership helped secure a landmark 10-year collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association in 2011, the longest in the history of professional sports. That was followed by long-term extensions of the NFL's television contracts. The nine-year agreements with CBS, FOX , and NBC are the longest ever for NFL broadcast television contracts and continue the NFL's tradition of being the only sports league that shows all of its regular-season and playoff games on free, over-the-air television.

Since when is the NFL Network free, over-the-air television? Those Thursday night games aren't on any of the networks...


I'm not certain about other areas, but 'round here the NFL usually simulcasts the
"local team" on a local OTA network.

ColumbusSteelerFan
01-25-2012, 04:41 PM
His leadership helped secure a landmark 10-year collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association in 2011, the longest in the history of professional sports. That was followed by long-term extensions of the NFL's television contracts. The nine-year agreements with CBS, FOX , and NBC are the longest ever for NFL broadcast television contracts and continue the NFL's tradition of being the only sports league that shows all of its regular-season and playoff games on free, over-the-air television.

Since when is the NFL Network free, over-the-air television? Those Thursday night games aren't on any of the networks...


I'm not certain about other areas, but 'round here the NFL usually simulcasts the
"local team" on a local OTA network.


If I'm not mistaken, none of the Monday Night Football games were broadcast locally as they were only on ESPN. Correct?

Jigawatts
01-25-2012, 04:48 PM
His leadership helped secure a landmark 10-year collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association in 2011, the longest in the history of professional sports. That was followed by long-term extensions of the NFL's television contracts. The nine-year agreements with CBS, FOX , and NBC are the longest ever for NFL broadcast television contracts and continue the NFL's tradition of being the only sports league that shows all of its regular-season and playoff games on free, over-the-air television.

Since when is the NFL Network free, over-the-air television? Those Thursday night games aren't on any of the networks...


I'm not certain about other areas, but 'round here the NFL usually simulcasts the
"local team" on a local OTA network.


If I'm not mistaken, none of the Monday Night Football games were broadcast locally as they were only on ESPN. Correct?

I'm not sure about ESPN. Luckily I have Directv and never had to worry about watching
on OTA or going somewhere to watch the games. I'll probably have to get back to you
in September or October about this one. :lol:

Oh, ... eff Roger Goodell. :twisted:

ikestops85
01-25-2012, 05:01 PM
http://www.threadbombing.com/data/media/64/awhellnahobama-1.jpg (http://www.threadbombing.com/details.php?image_id=3193)

fezziwig
01-25-2012, 05:46 PM
He reminds me of the head hunters that corporation put in place. They do a lot of cutting here and there that shows a quick response and profit but after a while, they find out they need the employees, departments for the long haul.

JDSteeler
01-25-2012, 10:17 PM
I just puked, and projectile-diarreahed all over myself!!!!

Thanks for telling me...

JD

RuthlessBurgher
01-26-2012, 11:21 AM
I just puked, and projectile-diarreahed all over myself!!!!

Thanks for telling me...

JD

http://images.icanhascheezburger.com/completestore/2009/4/23/128849693703522089.jpg

:lol:

flippy
01-26-2012, 11:43 AM
I can see JD frothing projectile diarrhea from the mouth like a crazed dog....

RuthlessBurgher
01-26-2012, 01:27 PM
I can see JD frothing projectile diarrhea from the mouth like a crazed dog....

http://brainshavings.com/images/info-meter.png

hawaiiansteel
02-05-2012, 03:41 PM
Updated: February 5, 2012

Roger Goodell let down by Pro Bowl

ESPN.com news services


The quality of play in this season's Pro Bowl has drawn criticism from fans, former players and at least one player who played in the game. On Sunday, commissioner Roger Goodell said you can add his name to the list of detractors.

In an appearance on ESPN Radio's "Mike and Mike in the Morning" on Sunday, Goodell said the league must address the quality of the game and even said he would consider eliminating the all-star game if it can't be improved upon.

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell comments on why he thinks the league's rule changes have been good for the game, the new policies regarding head injuries, Los Angeles, the future of the Pro Bowl and more.

"I really didn't think that was the kind of football that we want to be demonstrating for our fans," Goodell said. "And you heard it from the fans. The fans were actively booing in the stands. They didn't like what they were seeing."

Goodell said something has to change.

"We're either going to have to improve the quality of what we're doing in the Pro Bowl or consider other changes or even considering eliminating the game if that's the kind of quality game we're going to provide," Goodell said.

Goodell said he talked to NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith about changes they need to make for the game.

"I know players love to be in Hawaii but we have to start with the quality of what we're doing," Goodell said. "If the fans are responding negatively to what we're doing, we better listen. And that was my message."

NFLPA spokesman George Atallah said Sunday via his Twitter account that the players don't want to lose the Pro Bowl from the annual schedule.

"The Pro Bowl is an important tradition; one that we as players want to keep," he wrote.

If the fans are responding negatively to what we're doing, we better listen.

-- Roger Goodell

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, who was named the NFL's MVP on Saturday, said this week that some of his NFC teammates "embarrassed themselves" with the effort they gave in the game.

"I was just surprised that some of the guys either didn't want to play or when they were in there didn't put any effort into it," Rodgers said.

The AFC routed the NFC 59-41 in a game that drew boos at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu for its lack of early intensity. Rodgers, who started and played the first quarter for the NFC, didn't name specific players.

New England Patriots guard Logan Mankins, a four-time Pro Bowl selection who didn't play in the this year's game because his team is playing in the Super Bowl, said Wednesday that he doubts there's a realistic way to ramp up competitiveness.

"I don't know how you fix it," Mankins said. "You're going to give a little effort, but you're not going to get out of control. Some guys are free agents over there. You get hurt in a Pro Bowl and it's going to affect that contract with another team. Who would want to get hurt in a Pro Bowl and not be able to play the next season?"

http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/75428 ... sideration (http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/7542806/nfl-commissioner-roger-goodell-says-ceasing-pro-bowl-consideration)

RuthlessBurgher
02-06-2012, 02:40 PM
Roger Goodell let down by Pro Bowl

:wft He's the one that is actively trying to turn every NFL game into a Pro Bowl type of pansified game (i.e. a hollow shell of what hard-hitting football used to be).

mazze
02-06-2012, 02:53 PM
This really shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone. The NFL is a business and they're making more money now than ever before.

fordfixer
02-07-2012, 12:29 AM
NO NO NO When I said that Goodell should be extended I meant like this
http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ0IB4pawMmkHqPtzUWIdtFAVCEPdgJ5 bk-0vwUZjiZcr7H-ONUFg
Until he changed football back the way it was :HeadBanger :HeadBanger :HeadBanger

hawaiiansteel
02-07-2012, 02:12 AM
Goodell great for NFL, even if Steelers, their fans disagree

Tuesday, February 07, 2012
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


It was about 90 minutes after Super Bowl XLIII, a game that always will be remembered here because of the Steelers' fabulous comeback against the Arizona Cardinals. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell was at a private party, his tie off, his sleeves rolled up and a cold adult beverage in his hand. Earlier that evening, he had handed the Lombardi Trophy to Steelers owner Dan Rooney, the man who pushed hardest for him to become commissioner in August 2006. Goodell was feeling pretty good about himself and his league.

Imagine how Goodell felt Sunday night after Super Bowl XLVI at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.

It was another terrific game, the New York Giants' 21-17 victory against the New England Patriots going down to the final play. Goodell, a noted perfectionist, wasn't pleased with the classless middle-finger salute in the halftime show by one of the featured singers, whose name is not worth mentioning. But everything else was good.

No, everything else was great.

Everything about Goodell's $10 billion-a-year NFL is great, actually.

Well, almost everything.

We'll get to the concussion issue in a moment.

Goodell has enemies in this town, mostly because he has had the audacity to fine linebacker James Harrison and other Steelers for illegal and dangerous helmet-to-helmet hits. But his legacy as one of sports great leaders has been secured. He has taken the powerful NFL -- carefully constructed by previous commissioners Paul Tagliabue and Pete Rozelle, not to mention brilliant owners such as the Rooneys -- and made it bigger, stronger and better.

In the summer, Goodell negotiated a new, unprecedented collective bargaining agreement with the players that assures a decade of labor peace. In December, with television ratings soaring, he signed off on a nine-year deal with the networks that will mean $6 billion a year in revenue for the NFL and its players. Even more money will roll in once the league gets a bigger global presence, a Goodell vision.

And you want to know why the NFL owners recently extended Goodell's contract through the 2018 season?

That's right, Pittsburgh, you have Goodell for at least seven more seasons.

Deal with it.

It's fair to say the Steelers didn't celebrate Goodell's extension. Harrison called him a "crook" and a "devil" in a magazine interview in August, later apologizing for the name-calling. Harrison and other Steelers long have complained that Goodell is power hungry and has too much say in the discipline for both on- and off-field discretions. They voted against the new CBA, the only one of the 32 teams to do so.

"Being associated with the NFL is a privilege. It's not a right," Goodell said a month ago on the CBS show "60 minutes." "When you're here, you have to meet that bar.

"I take my responsibilities very seriously. I want to make the league better. To do that, you can't make everybody happy ...

"I have to make sure the integrity of the game is protected at all costs."

Many Goodell critics are offended when he talks about integrity. They were happy the Giants beat the Patriots Sunday night because of "Spygate." In 2007, Goodell fined Patriots coach Bill Belichick $500,000 and the team $250,000 and made it forfeit a No. 1 draft choice after the Patriots were caught taping hand signals of opposing coaches. Goodell then burned the evidence.

I agree with Goodell, who said the taping had "a limited effect -- if any -- on the outcome of any game." I also agreed with him when he said he didn't "think it taints [the Patriots'] accomplishments."

Not everyone does.

"Told you, cheaters never win!!!!!!!!!" Harrison tweeted Sunday night.

Talk about classless.

Harrison also has feuded with Goodell over the concussion issue. He was fined $100,000 by the NFL in the '10 season for illegal hits and suspended for a game in '11 for his cheap shot on Cleveland Browns quarterback Colt McCoy. Harrison is willing to risk long-term brain damage to make a lucrative living, saying famously he gladly will "go through hell so my kids don't have to." Not all players feel that way, though. They know former players are coming forward with serious health issues because of concussions. Two new lawsuits were filed Friday against the NFL, claiming the league knew the dangers of head injuries but refused to do anything to protect the players. Former Pitt star and NFL Hall of Famer Tony Dorsett brought star power to a previous lawsuit last week by adding his name as a plaintiff.

The NFL has denied any wrongdoing.

Clearly, concussions are the greatest challenge facing Goodell. There might not be a solution. Players are bigger, stronger and faster, and their collisions are brutal. One day, the NFL could ask players to sign waivers acknowledging the risks of the game and agreeing not to sue the league. Goodell said that's not in the immediate plans. The league and the players have committed $100 million to fund concussion research. They also will devote $1 billion to improve the pensions and medical benefits for retired players.

"We will not quit," Goodell said Friday at his annual State of the NFL address at the Super Bowl. "We're going to do what we possibly can to help our retired, current and future players."

That includes Harrison, not that he has much interest in the help.

Harrison said he was disappointed the Steelers lost to the Green Bay Packers in another wonderful Super Bowl -- Super Bowl XLV -- for all of the obvious reasons. But he said he also was disappointed he didn't get to whisper a message in Goodell's ear on the podium at the Lombardi presentation.

"Why don't you quit and do something else, like start your own league in flag football?"

That's a horrible idea.

The NFL and its players need Goodell to keep doing what he's doing.

He has been great for the league.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/12038/12 ... z1lfbst5CF (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/12038/1208549-87-0.stm#ixzz1lfbst5CF)

Chadman
02-07-2012, 02:23 AM
Pro Bowl-

Chadman says "Scrap the Pro Bowl" game. There's no need for it outside of yet another money-spinner. It adds nothing to the game, particularly when all the players really do is turn up, and half don't even 'deserve' to be there.

Why not just have a televised awards night? Maybe announce the Hall of Fame inductees, a Team of the Year (position by position awards), all the personal awards like MVP etc on one awards ceremony, televise it, and be done? The Pro Bowl game doesn't bring in new supporters.

Roger Goodell-

Chadman says "Goodell might not be as bad as we WANT him to be". Ok, so he's downgrading the violence of the game. This may have gotten out of hand- TO A DEGREE. this might be very un-Steelerlike to say this, but maybe...just maybe...James Harrison IS a headhunter? Chadman has friends that watch the NFL- non-Steeler fans, and they all believe he's reckless & out of control. Ok- that's probably too far, but they certainly don't view Harrison as the victim the way we do. Maybe if we take off the Black & Gold glasses- we might see that too? Here's the thing- the Steelers were visably not as physical this season, but other teams seem to still be hitting hard. Is it a double standard? Is the NFL REALLY out to 'get' the Steelers? Chadman highly doubts it. Maybe the Steelers need to try & fit the tougher versions of NFL rules better?

That being said- in a sport where the owners make billions & the players make millions- there is no room for part-time employees refereeing the game. All the Referee's need to be full-time NFL employees in order to achieve some level of consistancy in the calling of a game. If Goodell can install this- that'd be a tick in his favour.

Also, on the same Mike & Mike show that Goodell said he was upset by the Pro Bowl- Deacon Jones made a point that Chadman has made earlier- maybe player safety would be improved with...better safety equipment? He suggested that the modern NFL helmet is not doing the job it is designed for if players are still suffering head injuries. Chadman agrees. Instead of changing the games rules dramatically, the NFL should look into finding a way to get helmets that protect the players better, and also don't act as a weapon on the field. You do that- there is much less need for the harsh safety rules being implemented under Goodell.

RuthlessBurgher
02-07-2012, 11:30 AM
Why not just have a televised awards night?

They did this for the first time this past weekend (the night before the Super Bowl). I guess it didn't get broadcast down under.

http://www.nfl.com/honors