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MaxAMillion
12-22-2011, 01:24 PM
Once again, the NFL is going to have to continue to do everything possible to show that they are fighting against concussions and hitting players above the shoulders. This is why Harrison is getting penalized and why hits against defenseless players draw fines.

If the league ever loses one of these lawsuits, the owners will be out hundreds of millions of dollars.



Ex-players sue NFL over concussionsEmail Print Comments983 ESPN.com news services

ATLANTA -- Jamal Lewis, Dorsey Levens and two other former NFL players say in a federal lawsuit that brain injuries have left them struggling with medical problems years after their playing days ended.




Concussions in Sports

What is a concussion? What are the various professional sports leagues doing to prevent and treat them? ESPN.com Topics has the breakdown on all concussion-related issues. Concussions »

Lewis and Levens, along with Fulton Kuykendall and Ryan Stewart, filed the lawsuit against the National Football League and FNL Properties LLC this week in U.S. District Court in Atlanta.

Lewis, 32, rushed for 10,607 yards in nine seasons (2000-09) with the Baltimore Ravens and Cleveland Browns. His 2,066 yards rushing in 2003 rank behind only Eric Dickerson's 2,105 in 1984 all-time among single-season rushing totals.

Levens, 41, rushed for 4,955 yards in 11 seasons (1994-2004) with the Green Bay Packers, New York Giants and Philadelphia Eagles.

Kuykendall, 58, played 11 NFL seasons (1975-85) as a linebacker for the Atlanta Falcons and San Francisco 49ers.

The 38-year-old Stewart, who co-hosts the "2 Live Stews" radio show in Atlanta with his brother Doug, is a regular contributor on the "ESPN First Take" debate desk. He played five seasons (1996-2000) as a defensive back for the Detroit Lions.

All four ex-players live in the Atlanta area.

The players maintain the NFL knew as early as the 1920s of the potential for concussions to harm its players. The men claim a range of medical problems stemming from their playing days, including memory loss, headaches and sleeplessness. They are seeking a jury trial and unspecified damages.

"The NFL has done everything in its power to hide the issue and mislead players concerning the risks associated with concussions," the players argue in the lawsuit.

The NFL responded that it has long made player safety a priority and continues to do so.

"Any allegation that the NFL intentionally sought to mislead players has no merit," the league said in a statement to The Associated Press on Thursday. "It stands in contrast to the league's actions to better protect players and advance the science and medical understanding of the management and treatment of concussions."

The court documents say the league concealed the dangers from coaches, trainers, players and the public until June 2010, when it publicly acknowledged the health threats and warned players and teams.

"While athletes in other professional sports who had suffered concussions were being effectively 'shut down' for long periods of time or full seasons, NFL protocol was to return players who had suffered concussions to the very game in which the injury occurred," the lawsuit states.

The lawsuit is the latest to be filed against the NFL this year by former players over concussions.

Earlier this month, 12 former football players, including former receiver Joe Horn, filed a lawsuit against the NFL about its concussion policies, saying there was widespread pregame use of an anti-inflammatory drug that could put someone with a head injury at increased risk.

In August, two separate lawsuits were filed against the league for its concussion-related policies:

A group of seven players, including former quarterback Jim McMahon, accused the league of training players to hit with their heads, failing to properly treat them for concussions and trying to conceal for decades any links between football and brain injuries.

Later in the month, another group of 18 former NFL players sued the league and helmet makers over head injuries suffered during their careers.

In July, 74 former players sued the NFL, claiming the league intentionally withheld knowledge of the damaging effects of concussions for 90 years.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

Leper Friend
12-22-2011, 02:04 PM
Just more dumb athletes who have no idea how to manage money and have no idea how the real world works. :roll: I can see this becoming a trend. Blame concussions. Chris Henry tried it even though he was a thug his whole life. Did concussions make Jamal Lewis deal coke in college too ?

The sad thing is that the NFL will probably give this some merit. More physical play will be outlawed. Let's face it , the NFL we once loved is dead.

Concussions are the most pc ,overated , injury in sports. These guys were'nt blaming the NFL for anything when they were making millions.And if this was legit , guess what ? You get compensated well for taking risks for your body. Don't cry about it later.

Oviedo
12-22-2011, 02:30 PM
Like I have been saying on this board for over a year. Goodell is not and never has been the problem with the rules changes. He is doing exactly what any CEO would do to protect his company. Former scumbag players are the problem and they will continue to be the problem.

The NFL has no choice but to put rules in the book that helps them fight these soon to be endless lawsuits. Ironic that those who played the game and profited by it will ultimately destroy it.

feltdizz
12-22-2011, 03:14 PM
Like I have been saying on this board for over a year. Goodell is not and never has been the problem with the rules changes. He is doing exactly what any CEO would do to protect his company. Former scumbag players are the problem and they will continue to be the problem.

The NFL has no choice but to put rules in the book that helps them fight these soon to be endless lawsuits. Ironic that those who played the game and profited by it will ultimately destroy it.

I agree with just about everything you are saying but we just saw the Browns put Colt McCoy back after a concussion and even admitted the doctor "didn't see the play"

When you have owners and coaches and players who will push to play to save their job you better believe some of those players will complain after they retire.

Football players know the risk but team doctors tend to take orders from the coaches and the FO.

Leper Friend
12-22-2011, 03:27 PM
Like I have been saying on this board for over a year. Goodell is not and never has been the problem with the rules changes. He is doing exactly what any CEO would do to protect his company. Former scumbag players are the problem and they will continue to be the problem.

The NFL has no choice but to put rules in the book that helps them fight these soon to be endless lawsuits. Ironic that those who played the game and profited by it will ultimately destroy it.

I agree with just about everything you are saying but we just saw the Browns put Colt McCoy back after a concussion and even admitted the doctor "didn't see the play"

When you have owners and coaches and players who will push to play to save their job you better believe some of those players will complain after they retire.

Football players know the risk but team doctors tend to take orders from the coaches and the FO.
Once again , they know what they signed up for.Playing through injury and pain to the best of their ability has always been part of the job.If you don't like , don't take the millions you are being paid.

The bottom line is , if these guys still had cash , there would be no lawsuit. Every one will be from some brain dead jock who can't save his money.

Leper Friend
12-22-2011, 03:33 PM
Like I have been saying on this board for over a year. Goodell is not and never has been the problem with the rules changes. He is doing exactly what any CEO would do to protect his company. Former scumbag players are the problem and they will continue to be the problem.

The NFL has no choice but to put rules in the book that helps them fight these soon to be endless lawsuits. Ironic that those who played the game and profited by it will ultimately destroy it.
I agree 1000 %. The only problem is the inconsistency in which they govern the new rule.

7 UP
12-22-2011, 03:36 PM
You know what the main thing is that no one ever brings up? Players played football for yeaaaaaaaaaaaars before ever playing a down in the NFL. Most NFL players play from pop warner, to middle school, to high school, through D1 college ball, on up to finally the NFL. Every one of these players have had plenty of hits before stepping on an NFL field. I have personally seen kids get concussions in games that involved 9 and 10 year olds. My varsity team had several kids with concussions this past season(my son being one of them).

My point is, that why is the NFL being held liable for head injuries. Brain drama began to occur long before these players got to the NFL. The hits you take in the NFL are clearly more intense than all other levels. But like I said, If you are having post career concussion symtoms, they are from many years of getting hit in the head, begining from when you began playing.

To be perfectly honest Im sick and tired of hearing about concussions. There are risks involved with playing a contact sport. One of those risks is that you may end up with a head injury. You know this going in. So if you cant handle the risk, then simply dont play. Players chose to play this sport despite the risk of injury. No one is forcing these guys to go out and get concussions.

Leper Friend
12-22-2011, 03:39 PM
To be perfectly honest Im sick and tired of hearing about concussions. There are risks involved with playing a contact sport. One of those risks is that you may end up with a head injury. You know this going in. So if you cant handle the risk, then simply dont play. Players chose to play this sport despite the risk of injury. No one is forcing these guys to go out and get concussions.
:Cheers

RuthlessBurgher
12-22-2011, 05:03 PM
Jamal Lewis and Dorsey Levens were running backs. There are no rules in place to protect running backs from helmet-to-helmet hits. Those hits are still perfectly legal.

fezziwig
12-22-2011, 08:23 PM
I feel bad for those that are truly injured and I don't care how much money you have, it doesn't make up for bad health.

Not to sound rough but, what did these guys think might possibly happened to them during the course of a football career ? They signed up for the sport and the money.

Why do construction workers make more money than say a salesperson at the mens store ? It's brutal work and you're out in the weather, lifting, getting injured and so on and not everyone can perform that type of work.

Why do the NFL players get the big bucks ? Pretty much the same answer from above.

Did these guys think they would be in a pillow fight ? I have twisted fingers, torn rotary cuffs, bad back, knees and I can go on. Should I sue my employer or the people that I worked on their houses or buildings ? They would tell me to pound salt.

With the money they earned and if they haven't set up a retirement for old age and sore knees then, that's their problem.

hawaiiansteel
12-23-2011, 02:23 AM
Another concussion lawsuit gets filed

Posted by Mike Florio on December 23, 2011

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/peppersrodgers-e1324619476734.jpg?w=250

So many concussion-inspired lawsuits have been filed against the NFL that it’s hard to remember how many have been filed. The latest features several recent big-name players, including former running back Jamal Lewis, former running back Dorsey Levens, and former defensive back Ryan Stewart, now one of the “Two Live Stews” of Atlanta sports-talk radio fame.

The claims repeat the contention that the NFL was aware of the risks associated with concussions since the 1920s, and that the league concealed those risks from the players. Though that seems to be a bit far-fetched, given that no one knew the long-term risks of concussions 90 years ago, Lewis, Levens, and Stewart may be able to cobble together evidence that the NFL dragged its feet on the issue of concussions through and until October 2009, at which time a shot across the bow from Congress prompted the NFL to revamp its procedures for allowing players who have suffered concussions to return to practice and/or games.

“Any allegation that the NFL intentionally sought to mislead players has no merit,” the league said in a statement released to the Associated Press on Thursday. “It stands in contrast to the league’s actions to better protect players and advance the science and medical understanding of the management and treatment of concussions.”

Though the allegation indeed contradicts the league’s current approach, there’s a donut hole that preceded the current rules. Through the pre-trial discovery process, the plaintiffs will have the ability to examine documents and question witnesses regarding what the NFL knew and when the NFL knew it regarding the health effects of concussions.

Though plenty of players surely would have played even if they’d known the risks, it’s theoretically possible that for a specific slice of time the NFL was aware of certain risks and failed to disclose those risks to the men who played the game. As long as each of those players can persuasively testify under oath that they would have walked away from the sport they love if they’d known the truth, they possibly are onto something.

That said, I doubt that many of the men who played pro football can truthfully testify that, if they’d known the extent of the risks during their playing careers, they would have chosen not to play pro football. The fact that not a single current players, now fully aware of the risks, has retired from the sport due to fear of concussions to come only bolsters that reality.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... ets-filed/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/12/23/another-concussion-lawsuit-gets-filed/)

RuthlessBurgher
12-23-2011, 10:35 AM
You have to sign some kind of medical waiver explaining the potential risks of the sport when you sign up for T-ball. I'm no lawyer, but I'd imagine that NFL players had to sign a pretty extensive legal document when they enter the league and sign their first contract, explaining the possible risks associated with playing professional football, absolving the league of liability should serious injury occur as a result of playing the game.