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hawaiiansteel
10-29-2011, 01:29 PM
Yes, the Steelers are a pass-first team

Posted by Gregg Rosenthal on October 29, 2011

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/e-sanders-b-roeth.jpg?w=250

There is no identity crisis with this Steelers team.

Perhaps they talk about “establishing the run” or building the offense around Rashard Mendenhall, but their play-calling tells a different story.

Ed Bouchette of the Pittsbugh Post-Gazette breaks down the numbers. The Steelers are an average running team in every respect. They excel when Ben Roethlisberger throws it deep, which he is doing with increasing numbers.

The Steelers throw the ball 67.5% of the time. Roethlisberger is on pace to break his own Steelers passing yardage record.

“I think [offensive coordinator] Bruce Arians is doing a great job of understanding the talent that he has,” receiver Emmanuel Sanders said. “He’s putting in practices, he’s putting in plays that go toward our strengths as receivers. Mike [Wallace] is a burner, A.B. [Antonio Brown] is a playmaker, I’m a playmaker. He’s putting in plays that are paying off.”

The Steelers are a passing team. Heck, the Patriots have rushed for more yards than the Steelers for four straight seasons.

It sounds insane, but Hines Ward’s injury this week may work to Pittsburgh’s advantage. No team gives up big plays like the Patriots, who just cut Leigh Bodden and will be without rookie cornerback Ras-I Dowling.

Pittsburgh is at its most explosive when Sanders, Brown, and Wallace are on the field together. Bruce Arians knows it.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... irst-team/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/10/29/yes-the-steelers-are-a-pass-first-team/)

Pahn711
10-29-2011, 03:14 PM
Posted by Gregg Rosenthal
It sounds insane, but Hines Ward’s injury this week may work to Pittsburgh’s advantage.

Pittsburgh is at its most explosive when Sanders, Brown, and Wallace are on the field together. Bruce Arians knows it.


:roll: Not having the team's most experienced and best-blocking receiver, and offensive team captain is NOT an advantage any way you shake it. What a dumb comment by Rosenthal. If we wanted Sanders, Brown and Wallace on the field it would usually mean a 4 wide passing formation anyways, which means we could have them PLUS Ward.

Sugar
10-29-2011, 03:43 PM
Yes, the Steelers are a pass-first team

Posted by Gregg Rosenthal on October 29, 2011

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/e-sanders-b-roeth.jpg?w=250

“I think [offensive coordinator] Bruce Arians is doing a great job of understanding the talent that he has,” receiver Emmanuel Sanders said. “He’s putting in practices, he’s putting in plays that go toward our strengths as receivers. Mike [Wallace] is a burner, A.B. [Antonio Brown] is a playmaker, I’m a playmaker. He’s putting in plays that are paying off.”

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... irst-team/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/10/29/yes-the-steelers-are-a-pass-first-team/)

Whoa- wait a minute! I don't think it's OK on this board to give Bruce Arians credit for anything positive. Everyone knows he doesn't know how to play to the teams strengths but just RUTFM. :roll:

SteelAbility
10-29-2011, 09:50 PM
It's more like the Steelers are can't-run team.

hawaiiansteel
10-30-2011, 03:06 AM
Wallace has favorable matchup with slumping Pats secondary

Posted: Friday October 28, 2011
by Peter King

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/si/2011/writers/peter_king/10/28/week-8/mike-wallace-298.jpg

Mike Wallace has pulled in 36 receptions for 730 yards and five TDs for the Steelers this season.

Interesting matchup at Heinz Field Sunday in the afternoon game of the day in the NFL, and I don't just mean the Steelers and Patriots. I mean the Steelers ascending wide receiver, Mike Wallace, versus the Patriots' descending cornerback, Devin McCourty.

McCourty was one of my two All-Pro corners last year, finally filling the void left by Asante Samuel when he left for Philadelphia in free agency in 2008. He was a durable shutdown corner; according to ProFootballFocus, quarterbacks had a paltry 61.1 rating throwing against McCourty in 2010 -- that's like playing against Kyle Boller every week. But that passer rating has skied to 123.6 this year. He may think he's the same confident player he was last year, but he's not playing like it.

It's not only Wallace who McCourty and the Patriots will have to worry about Sunday. A 2010 sixth-round pick from Central Michigan, Antonio Brown, gives Ben Roethlisberger a second deep threat opposite Wallace. Together, they're averaging 18 yards per catch. Suddenly, the Steelers aren't your father's Steelers. They're a team happier to throw it deep than to let Rashard Mendenhall bang it into the line.

What I've noticed watching the first half of this season is Ben Roethlisberger is not just playing scorched-earth football. He's happy to have the sub-4.4 Wallace and Brown take the top off the defense and let them run under his high-arcing rainbows. Roethlisberger is working hard to master the touch pass and the back-shoulder pass to his speed guys. I asked Wallace about that, and he bit aggressively, like he was waiting to talk about it.

"I catch 100 balls a day, and they're all with a purpose,'' Wallace said. "I'm working on the precision of my routes every day and getting better. We're getting to the point where we really know each other, and I can read what he wants me to do on a route. It's not like he has to say in the huddle, 'Mike, if the DB's gonna overrun the route here, just hold up and I'll throw it short.' I know when to adjust what I'm doing. That doesn't just happen. We throw every day. We grind it.''

That's what has made Wallace such a dangerous player. He' made enough deep plays to have an AFC-best 20.3-yards-per-catch average. But as Roethlisberger will tell you, he's not a one-trick pony. He's looked like the complete receiver he itches to be this season. And these are the games when the great ones show up big. Even if McCourty is slumping, Wallace has to know the Patriots corner and fellow starter Kyle Arrington will show Pittsburgh different cover designs Sunday -- bumping one snap, playing seven yards off the next. And everything in between.

One more thing about Wallace. I remember watching him in Steeler camp in 2010, and he and a couple of the young receivers were the last players left on the field, 20 minutes after practice broke. I've admired his drive and asked him about it when we spoke.

"I don't play football just to play,'' he said. "I want to be remembered for a long time after I'm gone.''

Well, then, these are the kinds of settings -- with Bill Belichick and Tom Brady on the other sideline -- where great players show up. I'd be surprised if Wallace didn't come up big against New England.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/w ... z1cErOnCnE (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/peter_king/10/28/week-8/index.html#ixzz1cErOnCnE)

feltdizz
10-30-2011, 11:08 AM
It's more like the Steelers are can't-run team.

with Mendenhall... for some reason the OL blocks for Redman and Moore. :stirpot

Pahn711
10-30-2011, 11:57 AM
It's more like the Steelers are can't-run team.

with Mendenhall... for some reason the OL blocks for Redman and Moore. :stirpot

That certainly appears to be the case, but Arians has argued that situations have dictated the success for Redman and Moore more than anything else. They tend to get the ball late in games when teams are more worried about the pass (since we haven't been successful on the ground) and in shotgun/third down and short situations. The major exception to that would be the Titans game, but Mendenhall didn't play in that one so its hard to say whether he would have had success or not.

I'm not really trying to defend Mendy, but I am trying to keep an open mind about it.

hawaiiansteel
10-30-2011, 06:49 PM
does anyone know what the all-time record is for the most passing attempts by a Pittsburgh Steelers QB in a half and in a single game?

Ben's 32 passing attempts in the first half had to be close...