PDA

View Full Version : Possible last minute roadblock to CBA?



Oviedo
07-19-2011, 06:15 PM
Another negative complication due to D. Smith's insistence that he take all this into the courts. Stupid strategy from the git go!!!


The NFL will have to satisfy the 10 named plaintiffs in Brady vs. NFL antitrust case in order to complete the deal for its new collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association.

As named plaintiffs, players including Tom Brady, Peyton Manning, Drew Brees, Logan Mankins and Vincent Jackson would be entitled to compensation as part of any settlement.

ESPN NFL Insider John Clayton says that all of the action in the NFL labor negotiations is in New York because of the Brady lawsuit. The timeline is still in place for an agreement on Thursday.

None, though, were expected to derail any possible deal with their demands.

One high-ranking NFLPA executive told ESPN senior NFL analyst Chris Mortensen: "Any media reports of a last-minute power play by players are misleading and erroneous. There are unresolved issues and we remain focused on resolving them."

Yahoo! Sports has reported that Jackson's agents have requested that the wide receiver become an unrestricted free agent when the lockout was over or receive $10 million. The Boston Globe said that both Manning and Brees were seeking to avoid the use of a franchise tag, which would make Manning an unrestricted free agent, and give Brees the same status after the 2011 season.

Manning, Jackson and Mankins all received franchise tags before the NFL locked out its players in March.

A league source confirmed to ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter the demands made by Jackson's agents, but Mankins and his agent, Frank Bauer, have not given their damages or repayment number to the NFL Players Association or its attorneys yet, according to the source.

One league source told Schefter that he doubted Jackson, in particular, would hold up a settlement, however.

"Is Vincent Jackson going to hold up the NFL season for 1,900 players, the clubs and the fans? Too smart a guy for that," the source told Schefter.

Sources told ESPN.com's John Clayton that neither Jackson nor Mankins have been contacted recently about a settlement to the Brady lawsuit. However, the NFLPA is drawing up a draft of the settlement to review Tuesday, a player source told Schefter.

Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe, apparently reacting to reports that some of the plaintiffs in the Brady lawsuit were stalling negotiations with their demands, voiced his displeasure Tuesday afternoon on Twitter.

"Sigh, and once again greed is the operative byword. 'Congrats Brees, Manning, Mankins, and Jackson for being 'that guy'. #d-----bags," he wrote.

If any of the plaintiffs were unhappy with settlement terms, they could object and opt out of the class action. That would not derail a settlement and would not, in itself, stop a new collective bargaining agreement.

But both the NFL owners and players have been working on a "global solution" that would include settling all legal issues surrounding their labor battle. And if the antitrust case is not settled, that could be a deal-breaker.

According to ESPN legal analyst Roger Cossack, if any of the named plaintiffs opt out, the antitrust suit would remain alive in federal court.

"The question then would be who would finance the suit?" Cossack said. "Who would pay the legal fees for Mankins and Jackson? Unless you're Bill Gates, you don't want to get into an antitrust case with the NFL.

There is precedent for plaintiffs in the Brady lawsuit to demand free agency. As part of the Reggie White antitrust lawsuit vs. the NFL in 1993 that instituted free agency, the plaintiffs were granted a lifetime exemption from the franchise tag.

One potential roadblock to a settlement was cleared Tuesday when Hall of Fame defensive end Carl Eller, a lead spokesman for retirees during the labor process, said retired players won't stand in the way of an agreement.

Eller and lawyers for the retired players joined the negotiations in New York for about seven hours Tuesday. After leaving the negotiations, Eller headed to a meeting with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

"They want to get these games going, and they want to have a season. That's their focus," said Eller, who believes a deal to end the lockout will come this week.

He said "there's still a lot more to be done" when it comes to benefits for former players, but that could be resolved after the main dispute is settled.

Eller's comments come one day after a source told ESPN that as part of the pending deal, the NFL and its players have agreed to increase benefits for retired players by nearly $1 billion over the life of the agreement. That includes creating a "legacy fund" that will increase by $620 million over the 10-year span, the source said.

The newly created fund is designed to help retired players deal with the injuries and troubles that come after football and would be financed by siphoning off a chunk of total league revenues.

Also on Tuesday, lawyers for the NFL and for the players suing the league submitted a joint request to the court, asking for an extra week to file written arguments "to allow them to focus on the continuing mediation." Tuesday's filing notes that "the parties have also been meeting regularly since April 11, 2011, in an effort to resolve their disputes."

The court-appointed mediator, U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan, also was at the session Tuesday at a New York law firm, his second consecutive day overseeing negotiations in New York. The sides were trying to close a deal to resolve the NFL's first work stoppage since 1987.

Members of the NFLPA's executive committee and representatives of every team were heading to Washington by Wednesday in preparation for a possible vote.

Players' association spokesman George Atallah said the players would be gathering "with the hope they have something to look at, and with the hope we can move forward on this."

A player representative confirmed that players will vote on the proposed CBA Wednesday, assuming both sides address the unresolved issues beforehand.

The NFL sent a memo to all 32 teams Monday instructing key executives to attend Thursday's owners meeting in Atlanta, sources told Schefter. Each team will have two representatives (the owner and one executive) in the room to vote on a CBA, if one is agreed to by players and owners. However, each team also will bring other front-office personnel to learn about the rules of a potential new CBA.

If the owners ratify a new CBA Thursday, players can begin arriving at facilities Friday and team activities can begin as early as Monday.

Jackson and Mankins both sat out several games last season in contract disputes with their teams. Both were restricted free agents -- a result of the NFL's going from a salary-cap system to an uncapped year in 2010.

Jackson's original five-year contract expired after the 2009 season. Unhappy that he didn't get a long-term deal, Jackson refused to sign a $3.27 million one-year tender in 2010.

He sat out the first seven games, then reported and served a three-game suspension on the roster exempt list. The 6-foot-5 Jackson was on the active roster for the final six games to accrue a season toward unrestricted free agency. But because Jackson hadn't signed the tender by June 15, prior to the 2010 season, the Chargers slashed their offer to 110 percent of his 2009 salary, or $583,000. Due to the games he missed, he made less than $300,000 in 2010.

Mankins and the Patriots were at odds last summer, when the guard said he hoped to be traded because of the slow pace of negotiations on a contract extension.

Mankins refused to sign his $3.26 million tender. That led to an extended standoff, with Mankins not reporting until the eighth game of the season. The Patriots sliced his tender to $1.54 million, which was prorated over the final nine games of the season.

Information from ESPN senior NFL analyst Chris Mortensen, ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter, ESPN.com senior NFL writer John Clayton, ESPNBoston.com Patriots writer Mike Reiss and The Associated Press was used in this report.

hawaiiansteel
07-19-2011, 08:01 PM
Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe, apparently reacting to reports that some of the plaintiffs in the Brady lawsuit were stalling negotiations with their demands, voiced his displeasure Tuesday afternoon on Twitter.

"Sigh, and once again greed is the operative byword. 'Congrats Brees, Manning, Mankins, and Jackson for being 'that guy'. #d-----bags," he wrote.



Chris Kluwe is quickly becoming my favorite non-Steeler football player:

http://larrybrownsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/chris-kluwe-board2.jpg
http://imgsrv.957theblaze.com/image/kqyk/UserFiles/Image/Spence/chris-kluwe-cartoon.jpg

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
07-21-2011, 10:46 AM
If I'm the owners I tell the players "This is a player issue. Owners are in agreement, 1900 players are in agreement, 10 players are not. Ball is in your court."

Do you really think that those 10 players are willing to take the PR hit both from without and within as the 10 players who directly cost everyone a season?

Oviedo
07-21-2011, 10:53 AM
If I'm the owners I tell the players "This is a player issue. Owners are in agreement, 1900 players are in agreement, 10 players are not. Ball is in your court."

Do you really think that those 10 players are willing to take the PR hit both from without and within as the 10 players who directly cost everyone a season?


:Agree

What happened to just voting and letting democracy run its course?

Ooops, I forgot that radical labor has its roots in Marxism and Communism so a democratic vote would not appease the labor elites who manipulate the process. :wink:

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
07-21-2011, 11:18 AM
If I'm the owners I tell the players "This is a player issue. Owners are in agreement, 1900 players are in agreement, 10 players are not. Ball is in your court."

Do you really think that those 10 players are willing to take the PR hit both from without and within as the 10 players who directly cost everyone a season?


:Agree

What happened to just voting and letting democracy run its course?

Ooops, I forgot that radical labor has its roots in Marxism and Communism so a democratic vote would not appease the labor elites who manipulate the process. :wink:

This is different than just whether or not the two sides agree. There is still an antitrust lawsuit pending. If this is not withdrawn then everything can still possibly blow up - regardless of whether or not the two sides have settled the CBA. The owners won't want to agree to anything that gives these players the only remaining hammer. If the whole point of this was to facilitate a way to get them back on the field then the CBA accomplishes that.

Withdraw the suit and agree to never re-file it, or accept the wrath of every other player in the league and the fans - every ounce of blame focused directly on these ten players.

RuthlessBurgher
07-21-2011, 12:33 PM
If I'm the owners I tell the players "This is a player issue. Owners are in agreement, 1900 players are in agreement, 10 players are not. Ball is in your court."

Do you really think that those 10 players are willing to take the PR hit both from without and within as the 10 players who directly cost everyone a season?


:Agree

What happened to just voting and letting democracy run its course?

Ooops, I forgot that radical labor has its roots in Marxism and Communism so a democratic vote would not appease the labor elites who manipulate the process. :wink:

:wft

You are seriously pulling the communism card when you have been crying about the evil players attempting to turn football's economic structure into baseball's economic structure?

Hate to break the news to you, but football's revenue sharing is rooted in communism, while baseball's haves and have nots is rooted in capitalism.

feltdizz
07-21-2011, 01:10 PM
If I'm the owners I tell the players "This is a player issue. Owners are in agreement, 1900 players are in agreement, 10 players are not. Ball is in your court."

Do you really think that those 10 players are willing to take the PR hit both from without and within as the 10 players who directly cost everyone a season?


:Agree

What happened to just voting and letting democracy run its course?

Ooops, I forgot that radical labor has its roots in Marxism and Communism so a democratic vote would not appease the labor elites who manipulate the process. :wink:

:wft

You are seriously pulling the communism card when you have been crying about the evil players attempting to turn football's economic structure into baseball's economic structure?

Hate to break the news to you, but football's revenue sharing is rooted in communism, while baseball's haves and have nots is rooted in capitalism.
oops :wink:

hawaiiansteel
07-23-2011, 01:39 AM
No deal is imminent in ending NFL's lockout

By Scott Brown, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Saturday, July 23, 2011


Willie Colon missed last season because of an injury and is poised to sign a lucrative contract as an unrestricted free agent.

If anyone is eager for the NFL to resume business, it is Colon.

Yet the Steelers right tackle applauds the stand players made Thursday night, when they had a chance to end the four-month-old lockout but declined to vote on a collective bargaining agreement the owners had ratified hours earlier.

"I support everything our players union is doing," Colon said Friday. "It looks like we got put up against the ropes a little bit, and we're trying to fight back so we can get the fair deal."

There is an apparent difference of opinion over "fair" between players and owners. That has led to a staredown and kept practice facilities closed, even though owners had hoped to open them today.

It seems unlikely the lockout will end before Monday, as the players who have yet to recertify as a union have insisted they won't rush into an agreement. Among unresolved issues are an antitrust lawsuit and the league's personal conduct policy and drug testing.

"It feels like it was shoved down (the executive committee's) throats," Colon said, "instead of presenting (it) so they could look it over, get our side together and get things figured out. This is a 10-year deal. It's not something we can talk about next year. At this point, it looks like (the lockout) may drag out a little longer."

Players and owners have agreed on how to share revenue from a $9-billion-a-year enterprise, but they have been unable to close the deal despite earlier signs that one would be in place by now.

The sides are expected to continue talks this weekend, but the NFLPA executive committee hadn't scheduled a vote as of last night. The executive committee must approve the CBA before owners lift the lockout and a final vote goes to all of the players.

The owners approved the 10-year CBA by a 31-0 vote, with one abstention. They also set a timeline in which players would be allowed to work out voluntarily at team facilities before reporting to training camps Wednesday.

Some players, including Steelers free safety and union representative Ryan Clark, accused the owners of trying to dupe or hurry them into agreeing to the deal that would end the NFL's first work stoppage since 1987.

The players are intent on reading the fine print of the CBA before signing off on it.

"I have confidence in our guys to do the right thing," Steelers inside linebacker James Farrior said.

The NFL and NFLPA were relatively quiet yesterday. NFL general managers met in Atlanta to review aspects of the new CBA.

NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith attended the funeral of Myra Kraft, the wife of New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft.

"Player leadership is discussing the most recent written proposal with the NFL, which includes a settlement agreement, deal terms and the right process for addressing recertification," NFLPA president Kevin Mawae said in a statement. "There will not be any further NFLPA statements out of respect for the Kraft family while they mourn the loss of Myra Kraft."

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1StcvO7tK (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_748121.html#ixzz1StcvO7tK)

BURGH86STEEL
07-23-2011, 08:10 AM
If I'm the owners I tell the players "This is a player issue. Owners are in agreement, 1900 players are in agreement, 10 players are not. Ball is in your court."

Do you really think that those 10 players are willing to take the PR hit both from without and within as the 10 players who directly cost everyone a season?


:Agree

What happened to just voting and letting democracy run its course?

Ooops, I forgot that radical labor has its roots in Marxism and Communism so a democratic vote would not appease the labor elites who manipulate the process. :wink:

:wft

You are seriously pulling the communism card when you have been crying about the evil players attempting to turn football's economic structure into baseball's economic structure?

Hate to break the news to you, but football's revenue sharing is rooted in communism, while baseball's haves and have nots is rooted in capitalism.

True.

BURGH86STEEL
07-23-2011, 08:17 AM
No deal is imminent in ending NFL's lockout

By Scott Brown, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Saturday, July 23, 2011


Willie Colon missed last season because of an injury and is poised to sign a lucrative contract as an unrestricted free agent.

If anyone is eager for the NFL to resume business, it is Colon.

Yet the Steelers right tackle applauds the stand players made Thursday night, when they had a chance to end the four-month-old lockout but declined to vote on a collective bargaining agreement the owners had ratified hours earlier.

"I support everything our players union is doing," Colon said Friday. "It looks like we got put up against the ropes a little bit, and we're trying to fight back so we can get the fair deal."

There is an apparent difference of opinion over "fair" between players and owners. That has led to a staredown and kept practice facilities closed, even though owners had hoped to open them today.

It seems unlikely the lockout will end before Monday, as the players who have yet to recertify as a union have insisted they won't rush into an agreement. Among unresolved issues are an antitrust lawsuit and the league's personal conduct policy and drug testing.

"It feels like it was shoved down (the executive committee's) throats," Colon said, "instead of presenting (it) so they could look it over, get our side together and get things figured out. This is a 10-year deal. It's not something we can talk about next year. At this point, it looks like (the lockout) may drag out a little longer."

Players and owners have agreed on how to share revenue from a $9-billion-a-year enterprise, but they have been unable to close the deal despite earlier signs that one would be in place by now.

The sides are expected to continue talks this weekend, but the NFLPA executive committee hadn't scheduled a vote as of last night. The executive committee must approve the CBA before owners lift the lockout and a final vote goes to all of the players.

The owners approved the 10-year CBA by a 31-0 vote, with one abstention. They also set a timeline in which players would be allowed to work out voluntarily at team facilities before reporting to training camps Wednesday.

Some players, including Steelers free safety and union representative Ryan Clark, accused the owners of trying to dupe or hurry them into agreeing to the deal that would end the NFL's first work stoppage since 1987.

The players are intent on reading the fine print of the CBA before signing off on it.

"I have confidence in our guys to do the right thing," Steelers inside linebacker James Farrior said.

The NFL and NFLPA were relatively quiet yesterday. NFL general managers met in Atlanta to review aspects of the new CBA.

NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith attended the funeral of Myra Kraft, the wife of New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft.

"Player leadership is discussing the most recent written proposal with the NFL, which includes a settlement agreement, deal terms and the right process for addressing recertification," NFLPA president Kevin Mawae said in a statement. "There will not be any further NFLPA statements out of respect for the Kraft family while they mourn the loss of Myra Kraft."

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1StcvO7tK (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_748121.html#ixzz1StcvO7tK)

It seems like the owners are attempting to pull a fast one on the players. They used the media to attempt to put pressure on the players. The owners could had waited till the players had a chance to review everything before making an announcement. It's only logical that the players and their representatives review the deal before agreeing.

RuthlessBurgher
07-23-2011, 11:55 AM
It seems like the owners are attempting to pull a fast one on the players. They used the media to attempt to put pressure on the players. The owners could had waited till the players had a chance to review everything before making an announcement. It's only logical that the players and their representatives review the deal before agreeing.

It certainly does make sense for the players and their representatives review the deal before agreeing. The owners reviewed the deal on Wednesday and voted Thursday. The players have been reviewing the deal for 3 days now. What gives? Something else has to be up at this point.