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hawaiiansteel
07-15-2011, 11:31 PM
Will Steelers take action? Harrison should keep in mind he's not a player in his 20's with a ton of job security

Wed, Jul 13th, 2011 by DePaoli


Has James Harrison finally gone too far? According to two highly connected individuals I spoke with in the past hour, early indications are that the Steelers are likely going to take some sort of action against Harrison, as the league pretty much won't have a basis to take action due to free speech.

Will it be a hefty fine or a suspension?

While indicating that the Steelers will release the 33 year old linebacker is going a bit too far right now (little chance of happening), I'm told a suspension of at least one to two games from the team is a possibility.

Steelers President Art Rooney II who is the midst of the NFL Labor negotiations today, released a statement just after 12:00 p.m.

“I have not yet seen the article in Men’s Journal nor have I spoken to James Harrison about his comments. We will discuss the situation at the appropriate time, when permitted once the labor situation is resolved.”

Harrison went overboard with his Goodell comments and they were out of line. That is just taking it too far. Meanwhile, his comments about his teammates were just unacceptable.

James Harrison is a type of person that the Rooney's surely don't relate to, most notably how he treats women and just his overall demeanor.

However, the Steelers knew Harrison was this type of person when they gave him a $51 million dollar contract in 2008.

This situation is must different than Rashard Mendenhall's comments a few months ago about Osama Bin Laden, when people believed the Steelers might actually cut him when the lockout ends....... that was never a consideration from the Steelers.

The Steelers did not support Mendenhall's comments by any means but they felt he was uneducated on the subject as he was 13 at the time.

It is still hard seeing the Steelers making a shocking move and cutting ties with Harrison but Harrison should keep in mind that he's a 33 year old linebacker with back issues and a contract that gets pricey starting in 2012.

While he has a reasonable salary in 2011 ($3.66 million + $900,000 bonus at start of new year), he is due $5.315 million in 2012, $6.32 million in 2013 and $7.325 million in 2014.

He's not a young player in his 20's just hitting his prime who has a ton of long-term job security with the team.

In regards to his comments about Ben, I kind of feel bad for Ben in how he can never seem to earn the respect for "his play on the field" from some of his teammates.

He may not be well liked off the field but there's no denying that he brings it every Sunday and is among the games best quarterbacks and competitors.

There continues to be a feeling around the team that there's a few defensive stars who feel this team could succeed without Roethlisberger and Harrison appears to be one of them.

What should irk some of Harrison teammates is that they came to Harrison's defense at every second last season, yet he throws some of them under the bus.

http://insidepittsburghsports.com/story ... son/40179/ (http://insidepittsburghsports.com/story/early-indications-are-steelers-will-take-some-sort-of-action-against-harrison/40179/)

hawaiiansteel
07-16-2011, 02:31 AM
Harrison must pay for his stupidity

Thu Jul 14, 2011.
Mike Bires mbires@timesonline.com

http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/timesonline.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/26/82657cd3-30ed-5a90-8a15-6928579d5328/4e1fba188caea.image.jpg

Times photo by LUCY SCHALY

Steelers beat Browns 28-10 at Heinz Field Sunday afternoon. A snarling James Harrison leaves the field after his hit on former college teammate Joshua Cribbs.


?James Harrison is one of the most accomplished athletes to ever play for the Steelers.

He’s one of the highest-paid players in franchise history.

He’s also one of the dumbest players to ever wear a Steelers uniform.

How else to explain his comments in the August editions of Men’s Journal magazine?

Surely by now, you’ve seen some of his most flammable quotes. He used the words “crook” and “devil” to describe NFL commissioner Roger Goodell. He used an anti-gay slur in bashing Goodell.

“If that man was on fire and I had to piss to put him out, I wouldn’t do it,” Harrison also said of Goodell. “I hate him and will never respect him.”

In the interview with Men’s Journal while training in Arizona, Harrison also ripped two of his teammates. He criticized Ben Roethlisberger for throwing two interceptions in the Super Bowl XLV loss to Green Bay and called Rashard Mendenhall a “fumble machine” for his fourth-quarter turnover in the 31-25 loss to the Packers.

Wednesday after excerpts of the Men’s Journal story became public, Harrison immediately went into damage control mode. He called Roethlisberger to say his comments were taken out of context.

I doubt that Harrison was misquoted or that his words were taken out of context. He used that excuse last year during a stretch when he was fined four times by the NFL for $100,000 due to hard hits deemed by flagrant by the league. You may remember his “I try to hurt people” quote.

The interview with Men’s Journal was not spur of the moment. It was planned well in advance, and Harrison should have been smart enough to avoid saying anything controversial. But he just popped off without thinking of the consequences of his quotes.

“My rep is James Harrison, mean son of a bitch who loves hitting the hell out of people,” said Harrison, who was photographed for the story while holding two guns — an FN Five-Seven pistol and a Smith & Wesson 460V revolver — across his chest.

Of course, this is the same James Harrison who was arrested and charged with simple assault and criminal mischief stemming from a domestic altercation with his girlfriend in March of 2008.

In the last 24 hours, a few Steelers have used social networking to downplay Harrison’s remarks. Safety Ryan Clark wrote on his Twitter account that “He’s just James!”
Clark also tweeted that “Nobody has to leave. We will all be in Pittsburgh. Brothers disagree, brothers fight, call each other names. You’re still family! ALWAYS!”
So even though Clark believes the Steelers won’t cut Harrison, he must be wondering what team president Art Rooney II is thinking.

Because of the ongoing NFL lockout, the Steelers can’t comment on Harrison’s quotes. But Rooney did issue a statement that read “I have not yet seen the article in Men’s Journal nor have I spoken to James Harrison about his comments. We will discuss the situation at the appropriate time, when permitted once the labor situation is resolved.”

The guess here is that Harrison, who’s due to make $3.666 million this season, will be fined by the Steelers and possibly by the league. He could be even he suspended for a game without pay.

On one hand, it’s easy to say Harrison is just exercising the freedom of speech given to all Americans. On the other hand, he’s an employee of the Pittsburgh Steelers and must conduct himself accordingly.

Harrison is obviously a great football player. But he’s embarrassed the franchise in the past and he’s done so again.

His comments in Men’s Journal are inexcusable. For that, he must he held accountable and pay the consequences for his stupidity.

http://www.timesonline.com/sports/steel ... 6c0e6.html (http://www.timesonline.com/sports/steelers/harrison-must-pay-for-his-stupidity/article_fd171cb0-c996-5251-b4fd-4052e076c0e6.html)

hawaiiansteel
07-16-2011, 02:37 AM
Steelers might have to act on Harrison

by Eric Edholm - Senior editor
Posted July 13, 2011


As far as I am concerned, James Harrison can tug on Superman's cap — or in this case, Roger Goodell's Gucci suit — all he wants.

He can spit into the wind with reckless abandon when it comes to his fines and the Patriots and all of that. The result might just be more fines, and Harrison already has PayPalled a hefty chunk of his salary to the league, so why not some more? I suspect he really doesn't care about that part of it as much as most people think.

But calling out his teammates? That is an absolute line-crosser.

The Steelers, historically, are known for their restraint and even-keeled approach to business and football. It's the Rooney Way: Treat team issues like they are family matters. That deft touch has served them almost universally well.

But if you kick the family hornet's nest, as Harrison has, throwing verbal grenades at teammates Ben Roethlisberger and Rashard Mendenhall for their Super Bowl shortcomings, well you are subject to serious scorn. Inside and outside the organization.

As a reminder, the one time Harrison was painfully quiet — when his team needed some of his infamous thunder — was the last time we saw him on the field: in Super Bowl XLV. He had one tackle (a sack, but a gift sack at that) in the game and generally played quite poorly, I thought.

If you are going to call out Roethlisberger and Mendenhall for their turnovers, Harrison has to throw himself under the bus as well. Even that might not be a saving grace.

So far the Steelers, not surprisingly, have reacted with a measured, patient approach. Here's the initial statement of Steelers president Art Rooney II: "I have not yet seen the article in Men's Journal nor have I spoken to James Harrison about his comments. We will discuss the situation at the appropriate time, when permitted once the labor situation is resolved."

They'll say more, clearly, and probably most of it will come out after the new CBA is ratified. But you have to think Mike Tomlin is sitting at home and is steamed right now. He already is going to have to deal with Hines Ward and his DUI charge when football starts, and now this?

A reminder to those who haven't checked the schedule lately: The Steelers play the Ravens in Week One. A reminder to those who have not paid attention to the NFL the past five years: This is the best, and maybe the most important (sorry Jets and Patriots fans), rivalry going in football.

Maybe no Ward for that game. And if I am Tomlin, maybe no Harrison either.

Yes, you seriously have to think about dealing seriously with your most feared defender. Trading or releasing him might be too severe a measure; after all, they took that patient approach with Roethlisberger following his incredible indiscretions last year, and it worked out for the best. The Steelers were in support of the league's decision to suspend Roethlisberger, a penalty that lasted four games into the ’10 season.

Perhaps Harrison never will see the light if it's Goodell and 280 Park Avenue who discipline. Maybe it's going to take someone named Rooney or Tomlin applying the heat for him to realize that there are some lines that don't need to be crossed.

In a way, I understand Harrison's struggle. The NFL is not only a copycat league, it's a gingerbread cookie-cutter outfit. They like things neat and clean, all parties involved. James Harrison is anything but cookie cutter. He's not like most of us. And I am all for difference. He'll just never be able to be the kind of different he wants to be.

But he also has to realize his environment. Lesser players would be cut for calling out their teammates. You and I railing on our bosses in public would get us canned within the hour. Harrison likely will be a Steeler despite this. But he might need some time alone with his thoughts. It remains a privilege, not a right — as this lockout most assuredly has reminded us — to play in the NFL. He needs to know this.

I am sure part of the Men's Journal interview was because of some lockout-induced steam blowing; we all probably have silently sounded off at some point since March 11. But that's the point: Most of us have felt the sting, but we have not turned our ire towards our teammates. If we have, we deserve to pay for it. Plain and simple.

Harrison's comments about his teammates were the most egregious. What he said about the NFL, Goodell and the Patriots? No different than what others have said. Posing with guns is just plain idiotic, and that will be what the league uses as evidence in case it chooses to suspend him. But the comments about the teammates are the most troublesome if you are the Steelers. You have to keep it in the family, even if you do secretly think Ben is not Peyton Manning or that Mendenhall is a chronic fumbler.

I think a team suspension of two games — the Seahawks come to Pittsburgh in Week Two — will be enough of a message from the club to their caustic-tongued linebacker. But if he says more, then all bets are off. He's had plenty of warning before.

http://www.profootballweekly.com/2011/0 ... n-harrison (http://www.profootballweekly.com/2011/07/13/steelers-might-have-to-act-on-harrison)

SidSmythe
07-16-2011, 11:37 AM
No way do they suspend him ... our first game is against Baltimore. Unless Worilds has a freakish training camp!!

pittpete
07-16-2011, 12:14 PM
Wasnt he unemployed when he made those statements?
How can you fine or suspend someone when they arent your employee?

hawaiiansteel
07-16-2011, 01:33 PM
Has Harrison lost teammates with his words? Opinions vary

NFL.com Wire Reports
Published: July 14, 2011


James Harrison's caustic comments about NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, two Pittsburgh Steelers teammates and others in a recent interview created anger, confusion and split opinions about the effects the linebacker's words will have.

Former NFL safety Rodney Harrison believes James Harrison will lose respect in the locker room after calling out fellow Steelers, but Men's Journal writer Paul Solotaroff, who authored the controversial article, disputes that notion, claiming the linebacker's teammates love him despite his penchant for speaking out of turn.

"I talked to (Steelers linebacker James) Farrior and (he) said, 'Listen, we thought the dude was straight crazy. We thought the guy had severe emotional problems,' " Solotaroff said on "The Dan Patrick Show" on Thursday. "And I'm not sure James has amended his opinion of Mr. Harrison, but he loves him, and so does everybody on that defense. They love this guy to pieces."

Steelers linebacker Lawrence Timmons echoed that sentiment during an interview on TSN Radio in Toronto.

"James is a guy that's misunderstood," Timmons said, via SportsRadioInterviews.com. "A lot of people think he's a bad person, but he just sometimes says some things that he shouldn't. I'm pretty sure he doesn't feel this way, he probably just got kind of mixed up with his words. But he's a great guy."

Solotaroff later appeared on NFL.com's "Dave Dameshek Football Program," where he spoke at length about his interview with Harrison. Solotaroff empathized with the linebacker's frustration at being made "the billboard villain for above-the-neck violence in the NFL," being fined a total of $100,000 last season.

"James is speaking for thousands when he issues those remarks," Solotaroff said. " ... I got to James in May of this year (for the interview), so let's count backwards. He'd had about eight months to seethe and stew about having been made the poster boy of the NFL concussion syndrome.

"James Harrison didn't invent helmet-on-helmet hits. He didn't perfect them; he's about 50 years behind the curve there. ... He just happened to have two crushing hits on a day that writers around the country called 'Black and Blue Sunday' last October when 11 guys were knocked out cold on the same day."

As for Harrison's comments criticizing Ben Roethlisberger for interceptions he threw in February's Super Bowl loss, Solotaroff made it clear the linebacker isn't the only Pittsburgh defender frustrated by the quarterback's sometimes-reckless style of play.

"I can say with some authority that there isn't a guy on that defense that's got a poster of Ben Roethlisberger on his bedroom wall," Solotaroff said.

ESPN reported that Harrison called Roethlisberger on Wednesday morning and explained his comments. Roethlisberger told ESPN that Harrison said Solotaroff twisted his words, and it wasn't his intention to criticize the quarterback.

Roethlisberger said he's taking Harrison at his word and that their relationship is "fine," but Solotaroff defended his reporting.

"Everything's cool between us, so I have told James that whatever he needs to do to get right with Ben is good by me," Solotaroff told Dameshek. "And, you know, James has three years left on that very lucrative deal. I think he fully intends to see it out. I'm not sure he intends to play another minute after those three years are up. But, three years, he has to share a sideline and locker room with Big Ben."

Harrison also called Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall a "fumble machine" for his fourth-quarter turnover in the Super Bowl loss. Mendenhall responded Wednesday on Twitter that he didn't have a problem with what Harrison said "because I know him." However, Mendenhall also included a link to his stats from last season, which show he didn't have a pattern of fumbling.

Rodney Harrison, a 15-year NFL veteran who last played in 2008, believes James Harrison hurt his persona in Pittsburgh with the negative public remarks about teammates.

"I think he loses respect in that locker room because guys look at him and say, 'He's a defensive leader, he's a guy that we're supposed to trust,' " Rodney Harrison told Patrick. "But all of a sudden, he's going behind their backs, talking in an interview about his quarterback and his running back.

"If you've got something to say, say it to those guys' faces, but don't go behind your guys' back. How can I trust you, how can I line up next to you if you're stabbing me in the back? I think it's a deep-rooted, internal feeling that he has. Somebody really needs to check on him. Maybe those hits to the head are really affecting him now."

NFL Network analyst and former player Warren Sapp shared Rodney Harrison's view about publicly ripping teammates.

"There are certain (lines) you just don't cross in a locker room," Sapp said on "NFL Total Access" on Wednesday. "There are three people in your organization you just don't cross -- your coach, your kicker and your quarterback."

But James Harrison's shots didn't stop with teammates. He described Houston Texans linebacker Brian Cushing, who served a four-game suspension last year for violating the league's policy on performance-enhancing drugs, as "juiced out of his mind."

When contacted Wednesday, Cushing's only response to Harrison's comments, according to the Houston Chronicle, was "I'll pray for him."

But Cushing's agent, Drew Rosenhaus, didn't hold back when asked about it.

"I thought (James Harrison's) comments were way out of line," Rosenhaus said Thursday on WQAM-AM in Miami, according to ProFootballTalk.com. "He doesn't know the first thing about Brian Cushing or Brian Cushing's situation. And to me, that's an awful thing to do to talk about people that you don't know, and that you don't know the first thing about them or their situation."

Most of Harrison's venom, though, was directed at Goodell, whom the linebacker called an anti-gay slur, "stupid," "puppet" and "dictator." Harrison also said: "If that man was on fire and I had to piss to put him out, I wouldn't do it. I hate him and will never respect him."

Solotaroff admitted to Dameshek that Harrison's homophobic remark was ill-advised.

"Obviously, the F-word was really unfortunate, and had he not said it on tape, I would've had a real moral quandary whether or not to put it in the piece," Solotaroff said. "But James didn't say it as a homophobic slur. He said it as an angry kid in the schoolyard. And you know the day they outlaw juvenility, then maybe you can really fine this guy, but I don't know, the guy was regressing, he was behaving like someone a lot younger than he is. But he's mad, and people who are mad say things they don't fully mean or understand in the moment of saying them."

Woodley said "there's a lot of animosity toward Goodell" because of the uptick in fines for flagrant hits.

"The fines, they were ill-advised and came out of nowhere, and it wasn't fair," Woodley said. "This is quite a bit of chunk of change -- you're talking about 20 to 75 grand taken out of your checks. A lot of guys may have kids, three or four mortgages. That hurts."

Harrison's agent, Bill Parise, defended his client, telling the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that the comments to Men's Journal were made out of "bravado."

"I think people have to be careful not to read that and think those statements are anything more than expressions of feelings, particularly in regard to the commissioner," Parise said. "The commissioner fined James $100,000 last year. What do you want him to say, he's my best friend? James is a tough individual, and that's the type of language he uses."

Parise wouldn't allow the Post-Gazette to talk to Harrison, opting instead to explain his client's comments.

"I don't think we should get caught up in his cultural language," Parise said. "I think people will read that for what it is and move on. I don't think anyone truly believes James thinks the commissioner is the devil."

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told the Post-Gazette, "We are not commenting on any aspect of the story."

Whether or not Harrison will be punished for his comments -- specifically those lobbed at Goodell -- is a big question, but Solotaroff believes the lingering lockout will cloud the reactions of the league as well as the Steelers' organization.

"It's a fascinating legal question," Solotaroff told Dameshek. "James is not an employee of the National Football League at this moment, he's not an employee of the Pittsburgh Steelers. You know, to the extent that you can be locked out and fined or disciplined, I think there are some lawyers that would be very interested in looking at that carefully."

Said Rodney Harrison: "I think somebody from the Pittsburgh organization needs to sit this guy down and say, 'Shut up and play football. Play football better.' "

Solotaroff said his sources indicate the Steelers might not even be capable, or willing for that matter, to rein in James Harrison.

Solotaroff told Patrick: "I talked to a bunch of Steelers, and I said, 'Look, James is a guy who flies from the hip. Surely there have been internal problems with James,' and a couple of them said, 'Ya, but nobody messes with James, even the coaches. We're all afraid of him.' "

Solotaroff believes Harrison's exceptional play on the field -- he's a two-time All-Pro with 45 sacks in the last four seasons -- will keep him employed with the Steelers. If not, he shouldn't have a problem finding a paycheck.

"Here's a guy who never comes off the field, who played the entire 2010 season with two ruptured disks, couldn't push off his right leg, had no strength, very little explosion, and had 10 sacks and finished third in the Defensive Player of the Year voting," Solotaroff told Dameshek. "If they want to cut bait with James, there's this portly fellow in New York -- Ah, what's his name? Oh yeah, Rex Ryan -- who would be able to find a place for him at right outside linebacker. James is going to land on his feet."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... _headlines (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d820c5df6/article/james-harrison-interview-produces-split-opinions-about-lb?module=HP_headlines)

hawaiiansteel
07-17-2011, 07:33 PM
Originally Published: July 15, 2011

Quotes: James Harrison vs. Greg Lloyd

By Thomas Neumann

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2011/0715/pg2_harrison_lloyd_576.jpg

ESPN.com Illustration


Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison caused a stir this week when an article in Men's Journal magazine revealed several controversial quotes by the four-time Pro Bowl selection.

We at Page 2 couldn't help but hearken back to the 1990s, when the words of another Steelers linebacker, Greg Lloyd, were ruffling feathers around the NFL.

The similarities between Harrison and Lloyd are uncanny. Both were targeted for fines by the commissioner's office. Both were arguably the most feared player in the league in their prime. Both were extremely intense and unafraid to call out their teammates. Both were incredibly quotable.

With that in mind, we present a quiz. See if you can distinguish which of the following quotes are from Harrison and which are from Lloyd. Good luck!


1. "When you hit a dude hard, you feel it, too, and the Steelers go at play-to-die speeds. But if, God forbid, I wind up having brain damage, so be it. That's something I'll have to deal with down the road."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


2. "We're no more than cattle. When you come into this business, you have to realize, 'I'm just a piece of meat. As long as I get the job done, I'm here. But when I can't get it done anymore, it's like -- next guy.'"

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


3. "If I wanted to hurt a quarterback and knock him out of the game, I'd go for his knees. When you hit him high, that's just football."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


4. "If a guy has a choice of hitting me high or low, hit me in the head and I'll pay your fine. Just don't hit me in the knee, 'cause that's life-threatening. How'm I going to feed my family if I can't run?"

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


5. "You can't be a nice guy on the field. You have to play like you're chasing somebody who robbed your house and is running down the street with your television set."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


6. "This isn't one of those games -- unlike the commissioner and all those SOBs want it to be -- to put on PBS so all the little kids can watch it, and they can show it in the classroom. It's not a game like that. It's a violent damn game. It's a game that players play with anger, frustration and emotion. And's that how I play the game. If people don't like it, so be it."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


7. "If you want to be the best, don't let there be any discrepancy about being the best. If we have to bite, we'll bite. If we have to spit, we'll spit. If we have to scratch, we'll do that."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


8. "Superman ain't got nothing on me. Kryptonite? C'mon now. You're never going to hear me say that somebody is tougher than me. Because I don't believe somebody else could be tougher than me."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


9. "Who is Joe Namath? This is a guy who, if he played in the league today, I'd probably just go hit him late and see what he did, just for the hell of it. Joe Namath can go to hell."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


10. "I can do 100 things right, but when I do one thing wrong, everybody jumps on me. It's like I've got '666' etched in my scalp."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd


Bonus: "I didn't mean to offend anybody but Kellen Winslow. I would just like to say it was a poor choice of words in the comment I made toward Winslow. If I offended anybody, I apologize for that."

a) James Harrison
b) Greg Lloyd



Answer key: 1, a; 2, b; 3, b; 4, a; 5, b; 6, b; 7, b; 8, a; 9, b; 10, b; Bonus, Trick question -- Former Steelers linebacker Joey Porter offered that quote in 2006, and we couldn't resist revisiting it

Rating guide:
0-2 correct answers: Come on, hoss. Pick up the intensity!
3-4 correct answers: Now that's how football should be played.
5-6 correct answers: Personal foul: 15-yard penalty and automatic first down.
7-8 correct answers: Stern written warning from commissioner's office.
9-11 correct answers: $75,000 fine for helmet-to-helmet hit.

http://espn.go.com/espn/page2/story/_/i ... greg-lloyd (http://espn.go.com/espn/page2/story/_/id/6772876/pittsburgh-steelers-linebacker-quotes-james-harrison-greg-lloyd)

Ozey74
07-17-2011, 07:45 PM
Every team needs a loose cannon type of player on D. If he Ben & Mendenhall are now cool with the situation, then so am I.

:tt2

RuthlessBurgher
07-17-2011, 09:54 PM
"Who is Joe Namath? This is a guy who, if he played in the league today, I'd probably just go hit him late and see what he did, just for the hell of it. Joe Namath can go to hell."

My favorite Lloyd quote of all time.

I remember commenting to my father how much Harrison reminded me of Lloyd way back when he was trying to make the team the first couple of times (and failing) because of the similar size, similar temperament, similar ability to karate chop the ball away to force fumbles, similar intensity, similar scowls...everything. I always wondered why he kept getting cut...even if he wasn't the sharpest crayon in the box in terms of understanding the complex defensive scheme, he was still an animal on special teams, which we could always use. Of course, I had no idea how much of a pain in the @$$ he was back then, being essentially uncoachable.

hawaiiansteel
07-18-2011, 03:08 AM
Steelers should put for sale sign on Harrison

Posted: Saturday, July 16, 2011

http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/timesonline.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/98/0980ddbf-8f89-54dd-84c7-812940621a56/4e225afd04067.image.jpg

This Aug. 28, 2008 file photo shows Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison during preseason action against the Carolina Panthers in Pittsburgh.


Anybody interested in a slightly used outside linebacker?

Warning: He comes with a lot of baggage.

When the NFL gets back to business, Steelers operations director Kevin Colbert should be calling his counterparts to see if anyone is willing to take James Harrison off his hands.

Harrison is still a good player, but he's becoming more trouble than he's worth.

He sounded off in a magazine interview, hurling insults at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and teammates Ben Roethlisberger and Rashard Mendenhall.

Harrison is 33 and has been around the NFL for 10 years. He's been through the media crunch of three Super Bowls.

He's old enough and experienced enough to know better.

So why was he posing for pictures holding guns? Why was he aiming a gay slur at Goodell? Why was he suggesting racism was the reason for an imagined NFL conspiracy against the Steelers?

It's all bad judgment, and it's not the first time Harrison has shown that tendency.
Goodell can deal with the comments about him and the league. The Steelers should be concerned about the disparaging remarks Harrison made about teammates.
When players think of the offensive and defensive groups separately, it's a wedge that can ruin a team.

After the article first came out, Harrison's agent said it was just "James being James."
That's precisely the problem.

http://www.timesonline.com/columnists/s ... e9e72.html (http://www.timesonline.com/columnists/sports/john_mehno/steelers-should-put-for-sale-sign-on-harrison/article_3b8b145f-66fa-5bd8-a599-9bff0fce9e72.html)

AzStillers1989
07-18-2011, 04:03 AM
You have got to be kidding me....




Mad Dog Harrison aint goin' anywhere.




:Beer :tt2

by the way... does anyone remember the 1st amendment of our constitution?

I understand business is business these days in the NFL and a bad name or reputation could hurt the organization in some mitch bade way, but I am here to support the best players available for this Steelers team, and James Harrison is a beast. His years available are coming down but his value is still very high....

This all will pass and praises for the man will be felt for how he plays on field once we are holding that Lombardi trophy come next February 2012...


:Steel

feltdizz
07-18-2011, 08:34 AM
I wish people would stop screaming about the 1st amendment everytime a person gets criticized for their words. Harrison isn't in jail...

Free speech gives people the freedom to criticize Harrison....

RuthlessBurgher
07-18-2011, 10:21 AM
The second amendment gives him the right to bear arms (although he chose silverback arms instead). :wink:

http://tshirtgroove.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/the-second-amendment-tshirt.jpg

kindlecatsb'ng
07-18-2011, 10:23 AM
Solotaroff told Patrick: "I talked to a bunch of Steelers, and I said, 'Look, James is a guy who flies from the hip. Surely there have been internal problems with James,' and a couple of them said, 'Ya, but nobody messes with James, even the coaches. We're all afraid of him.' "


This quote totally cracked me up.

Go James! Only in B & G.

Kindle

hawaiiansteel
07-18-2011, 05:33 PM
Vrabel: NFLPA* would have problem with a fine for James Harrison

Posted by Gregg Rosenthal on July 18, 2011


We’ve been asked on various radio shows what we think will happen to James Harrison in the wake of his statements last week.

Florio thinks players should be exempt from punishment for what happens during the lockout, but my guess was that the Steelers would try to handle it in-house, possibly with a fine. If that happened, the NFLPA* may have a problem with it.

New Ohio State linebackers coach Mike Vrabel, who has been very involved with the lockout, spoke to our friend Tom Curran on WEEI about the issue, saying the NFLPA* would have “an issue” with Harrison being fined.

“I think there are things that you should be able to do and say – more importantly say,” Vrabel said. “[Harrison's comments are] not conduct detrimental to any team other than if Mike Tomlin had an issue with the way [Harrison] was referring to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

“Roger’s got big shoulders. Roger understands. I would say to Roger or anybody else that had a problem with it, I would say what Bill Belichick said to us: To [those who] much is given, much is expected. And Roger is given a lot in form of compensation and being in the situation that he’s in so there’s a lot expected of him. And if that means taking the higher road and calling James and trying to figure out how to get this thing settled between them or whatever issue they have going on.”

On this issue, we more or less agree with Vrabel. We suspect Goodell would have already nipped this issue in the bud if he was allowed to talk to Harrison, and that talk probably wouldn’t have ended in serious punishment.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... ison-fine/

Sugar
07-18-2011, 08:03 PM
This whole PC business about punishing people for holding/stating an opinion is just crazy. This is such an intolerant society, we only accept people when they say what the collective thinks they should. :HeadBanger

No way should Harrison even be considered for any form of punishment. If I were Tomlin, I might give him a "Dude- did you have to go there" type comment. That's about it.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
07-18-2011, 11:41 PM
The second amendment gives him the right to bear arms (although he chose silverback arms instead). :wink:

http://tshirtgroove.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/the-second-amendment-tshirt.jpg

I'm sorry, this is one of the funniest things I have read/seen in a long time.

I had to clean the Diet Sprite, in my mouth at the time I read this, off my keyboard before I typed this.

:lol:

AzStillers1989
07-19-2011, 03:08 AM
The second amendment gives him the right to bear arms (although he chose silverback arms instead). :wink:

http://tshirtgroove.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/the-second-amendment-tshirt.jpg

Sweet haha

AzStillers1989
07-19-2011, 03:11 AM
..
Free speech gives people the freedom to criticize Harrison....
I agree with you 100% percent.



btw , noone was screaming





LETS GO BUCS !!!!!!!!!! (ok, maybe that time haha)

:Beer

hawaiiansteel
07-19-2011, 08:16 PM
Harris: Weakened Harrison still better than most

By John Harris, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Tuesday, July 19, 2011

http://files.pittsburghlive.com/photos/2011-07-18/0719stharrison-a.jpg

Eighty percent of something is better than 100 percent of nothing.

Or, in the case of Pro Bowl linebacker James Harrison, it's better for the Steelers to have Harrison at less than full strength than to not have him at all after two off-season back surgeries.

"He's probably 80-85 percent right now,'' agent Bill Parise said Monday. "As far as his health goes, he's pain-free. There's no reason why he couldn't do everything from Day One. He's 20 percent better than anybody in the NFL, so he's fine.

"I expect that you are seeing one of the best linebackers to play the game and I think the first day he steps on the field he will be that same linebacker. There's no reason to believe he will not be that good and probably better than last year.''

So, which is it?

Is Harrison, at 80 or 85 percent, looking good physically when the Steelers finally report to St. Vincent College for training camp sometime in the near future?

Or, should we be concerned with the 15-20 percent that Harrison is missing physically, according to Parise, who has become Harrison's official spokesperson after last week's inflammatory interview in the magazine "Men's Journal,'' where he ripped into everyone from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger to commissioner Roger Goodell. Harrison declined interview requests directed towards his health.

I fall somewhere in the middle.

Everything considered, Harrison, 33, is ahead of where you'd expect someone who had two back surgeries would be.

"He had no options. The only thing he could do was have it fixed,'' said Parise, who added that Harrison would be "sitting in a chair'' and "absolutely not working out'' if he had bypassed back surgery.

On the other hand, we don't know how Harrison's back will respond once the hitting starts, or if it's strong enough to absorb the pounding.

To be sure, Harrison has made a miraculous recovery since undergoing separate back surgeries, or discetomies, on Feb. 21 and March 2. Harrison underwent two delicate medical procedures within a span of 10 days and -- with help from noted Arizona-based trainer Ian Danney -- has recovered to the point that he should be able to participate in training camp.

"He certainly is a lot better than he was last year,'' Parise said. "The only soreness he has is muscular soreness from working out. His legs are no longer numb.''

That means Harrison played at less than 80 percent in Super Bowl XLV against the Packers. He recorded just one tackle in the game.

However, everyone assumed Harrison was having shoulder, not back, surgery. Should we also assume that his shoulder is fine following two back surgeries? Or was his shoulder merely the lesser of two evils?

Harrison missed part of training camp last summer because of shoulder discomfort. Parise said Harrison's back troubled him throughout the season.

"It's a wear and tear injury. He's got a lot of miles,'' Malachy McHugh, director of research for the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said regarding Harrison's multiple back surgeries.

McHugh specializes in treating athletes with injuries similar to Harrison's. He compared Harrison's back surgery with repairing a car.

"You can't change the shock absorbers on a human like you can on your car,'' McHugh said. "You manage the symptoms during the season and deal with it in the offseason. He's not going to be optimal. But there's no 33-year-old linebacker that's optimal, anyway.''

Parise believes the uncertainty of the lockout will convince the Steelers to go easier on players like Harrison.

"I think you're going to see changes in training camps this year,'' Parise said. "I think you'll see a lot of veterans doing less than you have in the past. The coaching staff and training people will do what they think is best.''

By all accounts, Harrison should be ready for training camp. Even if he's only 80-85 percent, the Steelers will be glad to have him.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1SalbwqSo (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/s_747337.html#ixzz1SalbwqSo)

fordfixer
07-20-2011, 02:41 AM
Tue Jul 19 11:41am EDT
‘Lockout law’ should bring personal conduct policy under review
http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdo ... nfl-wp3533 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/-8216-Lockout-law-8217-should-bring-personal-?urn=nfl-wp3533)
By Doug Farrar

‘Lockout law’ should bring personal conduct policy under review
http://l.yimg.com/a/p/sp/editorial_image/27/2755db051bdbd3356e654c086d26cc64/woah.jpg
The recent comments made about NFL commissioner by Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison(notes) brought one issue into sharp focus: When the NFLPA re-certifies, a new CBA is put in place, and football resumes, will players be held responsible by the league for words and actions said and done during a work stoppage in which the league was not paying its players and not providing benefits? Many believe that when the roster of the multi-arrest Tampa Bay Buccaneers, or Tennessee Titans receiver Kenny Britt(notes) (who seems incapable of staying out of one kind of trouble or another, as you can see below from his recent fun time at a Britney Spears show), come back to the league, all applicable punishments should be proffered, including fines and suspensions.
http://l.yimg.com/a/p/sp/editorial_image/85/8510d5a286e7df17ef6e8055c91771b5/lockout_law_should_bring_personal_conduct_policy_u nder_review.jpg
‘Lockout law’ should bring personal conduct policy under review

There are a few problems with that theory. When the league locked the players out in March of 2011, all player benefits lapsed — not just medical insurance and care, but little things like drug rehab and personal counseling. And while we're not saying that people should be in possession of Dr. Drew's cell number just to keep them from screwing up, it's also true that the NFL abandoned its responsibilities to all players under the work stoppage, and some of those players were locked out with confusing personal situations and limited (at best) supervision and mentorship. Not an excuse when you're a 30-year-old multimillionaire with a wife and three kids. But when you're a 22-year-old kid fresh out of a rookie season, with too much time on your hands, things tend to get weird if your head isn't on straight.

This is in no way excusing the actions of those players who did get into trouble in this unusual offseason, but it does beg the question: When an employer abandons all responsibility to its employees for any reason, how much can that employer hold its employees responsible for words and actions during that time of abandonment? If there's no pay and no benefits, how can there be retroactive jurisdiction? That's something the two sides will have to negotiate as the labor talks (hopefully) wrap up this week, but I'd encourage the NFL to think of those players as new employees, and their infractions as those committed in college — you weren't paying, playing or helping those kids in any way, shape or form, so where do you get off applying discipline after the fact?

‘Lockout law’ should bring personal conduct policy under review

The question, as asked on Tuesday morning's Mike and Mike show, also allowed Atlanta Falcons receiver Roddy White(notes) to opine on the problems with the personnel conduct policy in general. It's important to note that White has been a model citizen during his NFL career, the closest he's come to the law was when his cousin was arrested in a home invasion and White went off on the Atlanta Journal-Constitution for tying the story back to him.

"He's not a guy who gets acclimated with the players and things like that, which is what you need to do as a commissioner," White told Mike Greenberg and Mike Golic. "Just talk to the players a little bit more and I think people [will be able to] see eye-to-eye with him. He doesn't interact with us, so we try and stay as far away from him as possible. Some guys just don't agree with the book. A lot of times, we have to … the [punishments] should be standard. Like, if you get a DUI, it's a two-game suspension. Not, 'Oh, I'm gonna think about it,' and it's a four-game suspension. I think it should be a book of rules that everybody sees, and you get whatever you get — that's whatever the games [lost] are."

Greenberg asked if some of the negative feelings about Goodell come from the personal conduct policy: "Yeah, because it's always like he wears his feelings on his shoulders. It's how he feels about the situation, and how you're getting penalized for it. That's how a lot of players feel about him. They think it's not fair. And plus, it's like a dictatorship. Whatever he says, that's just the end of it — there's nobody else you can talk to. A lot of players feel that there should be another way. [NFLPA head] De Smith should have something to say within that penalty. Especially with the fines that James Harrison got — he can appeal them all he wants, but there's nothing anyone else can say, and it is what it is."

We can only hope that after the CBA is dealt with, and Goodell's legacy is refined following several missteps during the process, there will be an environment in which Goodell feels compelled to deal with the players as partners instead of subordinates, and the disconnects that lead to anger among the players can be put to rest. Harrison went way over the line with his comments, but those comments have valid points behind them, and they didn't come from nowhere.

hawaiiansteel
07-20-2011, 06:50 PM
James Harrison is a Madman and We Wouldn't Have It Any Other Way

Why those vilifying the Steelers' unhinged linebacker are missing the point.

BY SEAN CONBOY

http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Best-of-the-Burgh-Blogs/Pulling-No-Punches/July-2011/James-Harrison-is-a-Madman-and-We-Wouldnt-Have-It-Any-Other-Way/Harrison-Role-Model.jpg

Greased up like a truck-stop stripper and holding akimbo handguns across his chest, Steelers linebacker James Harrison made a visual and verbal nincompoop of himself in this month's Men's Journal. In his tirade against Commissar Goodell, the New England Patriots and even his own teammates, Harrison somehow made amateur conspiracy theorist Rashard Mendenhall seem comparatively sane.

The kerfuffle kicked off a week-long marathon of rosary-clutching and revisionist history from an understandably punch-drunk fanbase. First it was the Super Bowl hangover, then Mendenhall's goofball Truther philosophizing and Hines’ failings with the DUI-decimal system, and now Harrison is sabotaging his own team?

This has been a summer of unprecedented numb-nuttery, that much is certain. But those who say that the moral fabric of the Steelers is tearing need to grab a mirror. Or a history book. Harrison's verbal barrage is media kindling, and nothing more. Unlike any other sport, overall team chemistry doesn't exist in the NFL. The idea of it makes for stirring NFL Films montages, but in reality, football locker rooms are segmented into small clusters of friends—the offensive linemen, the tight ends, the defensive backs.

Ask any player who his best friend on the team is and 9 out of 10 will say a player of their same position. Several defensive players have told me that they don't even watch the game when the offense is on the field.

The guiding hand of the Steelers was never Harrison, or even Roethlisberger. The leadership and personality of the team starts at the top with head coach and Wikiquote generator Mike Tomlin, and it ends with guys like Farrior and Polamalu.

If you’re still feeling queasy about an internal rift, remember that the Steelers won a Super Bowl in 2005 when their defensive leader, Joey Porter, and their offensive leader, Roethlisberger, wouldn’t have peed on the other guy if he was on fire.

If the Internet had existed in the 1970s, several members of the Steel Curtain would have Photoshop’ed pictures of Terry Bradshaw chewing straw and riding a donkey around Station Square and Tweeted them to the world. Folk hero Jack Lambert would routinely threaten rookie running backs with disembowelment at training camp.

What do you think you’re watching on Sundays, anyway?

Harrison should undoubtedly be ashamed of calling Goodell a homophobic slur, but just as reprehensible are the media opportunists who have jumped at the opportunity crucify him when they’re just as culpable for the deification of jock culture. Walk into any locker room in professional sports and you’ll hear the F-word tossed around freely. Yet the mainstream media is all too eager to engineer puff pieces and cooked-up redemption stories about the very same athletes they see the uncut side of every single day.

Writers play dumb and deaf, and sell the fans the stories they want to hear. It’s dishonest, but inevitable given the media’s co-opting in the Sports Industrial Complex. So when a player is an unabashed animal and says as much right to our faces, “I am mean, I am a beast,” we recoil. How can this be? This is not my beautiful house. This is not my beautiful linebacker.

The visual of an armed Harrison in the Men’s Journal article wasn’t too far from the truth. Harrison is a hired gun; a hitman. Sometimes hired guns also happen to be giant sons-a-bitches. Often the best ones are—like Greg Lloyd, Kevin Greene, Ernie Holmes, Joe Greene, Lawrence Taylor, and other cement heads.

And what of Jack Splat? We mythologize Lambert, a solid man off the field, no doubt. But why is he a legend? Because he wore a t-shirt under his pads that warned, "I am a F****** Maniac." Because he snarled like an animal and said despicable things about opponents' wives and mothers. We love him because he was so intoxicatingly terrifying, so primal and real. He, like Harrison, was honest about his brutality.

http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Best-of-the-Burgh-Blogs/Pulling-No-Punches/July-2011/James-Harrison-is-a-Madman-and-We-Wouldnt-Have-It-Any-Other-Way/Lambert-Teeth.jpg

So much of what Harrison has said about the state of the NFL today is a carbon copy of what Lambert warned us of in the ‘70s:

"Yes, I get satisfaction out of hitting a guy and seeing him lie there a while."

"I believe the game is designed to reward the ones who hit the hardest. If you can't take it, you shouldn't play."

Those quotes are from Lambert, but are an echo of Harrison’s diatribes.

Only now we’re supposed to feign horror when Harrison admits to getting a cathartic rush from knocking an opponent senseless, because neurological science has finally caught up with the dirty little secret we knew all along. The house lights have come up on the peep show, and here we all are: the beasts and the voyeurs. So what now?

Harrison is everything we say we want in a football player when we’re on the bar stool or in the recliner: He didn’t merely play all of last season with a herniated disk in his back, a debilitating injury that required him to get a discectomy after the Super Bowl. He played every single series last season. The majority of NFL players would been laid up, but Harrison was laying out quarterbacks, fighting through spasms and seizures without saying a word about it.

And for what? Why, at age 32, would he risk the rest of his abbreviated career? For you? For your message board egoism? No. He played because he knows nothing else. He doesn’t know where else to put his seething anger.

If you can’t accept that moral ambiguity, ask yourself this: What kind of person does it take to do what Harrison does? What kind of mad multimillionaire launches head-first into a 200-pound man at top speed, knowing full well that the price is a hot knife tearing through the tendons of his back?

In the sea of decontextualized nonsense that is quoted in the Men’s Journal profile, Harrison said the most disturbingly honest thing I’ve heard out of the mouth of an NFL player in a long time. “When you hit a dude hard, you feel it, too, and the Steelers go at play-to-die speeds. But if, God forbid, I wind up having brain damage, so be it.”

That’s the NFL as Coca-Cola, Sprint and Roger Goodell never want you to see it, and the most heartbreakingly honest admission from a Steelers player since the late Dwight White told Time magazine, "There's no question that I'm schizoid. I might be three or four people. I know I can be evil."

As long as Harrison keeps his idiocy and his firearms confined to print and not aimed at a police helicopter, the Steelers will be happy he's the mean, mad a$$hole in black-and-gold and not any other color. And if you think the Rooneys should take the moral high ground and ship Harrison out of town because of some long-lost phantasm called “The Steeler Way,” Google "Ernie Holmes manhunt" for a history lesson.

http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Best- ... Other-Way/ (http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Best-of-the-Burgh-Blogs/Pulling-No-Punches/July-2011/James-Harrison-is-a-Madman-and-We-Wouldnt-Have-It-Any-Other-Way/)

feltdizz
07-21-2011, 09:05 AM
:tt2 :tt2 :Clap :Clap :Clap :Cheers :tt2 :tt1

Great article... he sums it up perfectly.

All the talk about Lambert being this role model who wouldn't throw his QB under the bus is laughable. How many INT's did Bradshaw throw in those SB's? How many were on our side of the field? How many were in our red zone?

The only reason we didn't hear Lambert bash Bradshaw after SB's is because those 70's teams never lost a SB.

RuthlessBurgher
07-21-2011, 09:16 AM
Ask any player who his best friend on the team is and 9 out of 10 will say a player of their same position. Several defensive players have told me that they don't even watch the game when the offense is on the field.

Well, you spend most of your time watching tape in position-specific meeting rooms, so this is not surprising, but there are certainly examples of this not being the case. I never hear about Ben out socializing with the other QB's Leftwich, Batch, or Dixon...he's usually with DE Brett Keisel or OT Willie Colon. When Matt Spaeth was drunk and peeing in the bushes, was it fellow TE's Heath Miller or David Johnson there to stick up for him? No, it was kicker Jeff Reed who faced off against Pittsburgh's finest.

flippy
07-21-2011, 10:04 AM
Ask any player who his best friend on the team is and 9 out of 10 will say a player of their same position. Several defensive players have told me that they don't even watch the game when the offense is on the field.

Well, you spend most of your time watching tape in position-specific meeting rooms, so this is not surprising, but there are certainly examples of this not being the case. I never hear about Ben out socializing with the other QB's Leftwich, Batch, or Dixon...he's usually with DE Brett Keisel or OT Willie Colon. When Matt Spaeth was drunk and peeing in the bushes, was it fellow TE's Heath Miller or David Johnson there to stick up for him? No, it was kicker Jeff Reed who faced off against Pittsburgh's finest.

I remember a bunch of defensive players showing up to watch Hines dance.

Doug Legursky and Ward showed up to shave Keisel's beard.

Farrior trains with DBs and WRs in the offseason.

These Steelers are always mixed up outside of their positions.

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
07-21-2011, 10:59 AM
Said Rodney Harrison: "I think somebody from the Pittsburgh organization needs to sit this guy down and say, 'Shut up and play football. Play football better.' "

Why don't you do it Rodney?

The guy was by far the dirtiest player in the game when he played - always going after knees. How this guy got a job to talk football and is being taken seriously is beyond me.

feltdizz
07-21-2011, 12:57 PM
Ask any player who his best friend on the team is and 9 out of 10 will say a player of their same position. Several defensive players have told me that they don't even watch the game when the offense is on the field.

Well, you spend most of your time watching tape in position-specific meeting rooms, so this is not surprising, but there are certainly examples of this not being the case. I never hear about Ben out socializing with the other QB's Leftwich, Batch, or Dixon...he's usually with DE Brett Keisel or OT Willie Colon. When Matt Spaeth was drunk and peeing in the bushes, was it fellow TE's Heath Miller or David Johnson there to stick up for him? No, it was kicker Jeff Reed who faced off against Pittsburgh's finest.


If I's Jeff Reed I'm hanging out with whoever pee's in public when drunk...

Sugar
07-21-2011, 02:10 PM
Said Rodney Harrison: "I think somebody from the Pittsburgh organization needs to sit this guy down and say, 'Shut up and play football. Play football better.' "

Why don't you do it Rodney?

The guy was by far the dirtiest player in the game when he played - always going after knees. How this guy got a job to talk football and is being taken seriously is beyond me.

No kidding, the actually dirty player is lecturing the perceived dirty player. Besides, I don't know who the somebody is that is going to "sit this guy down." I'm sure that Farrior or Troy might be able to have a conversation with him over Starbucks or something, but I don't think any team mate is going to "sit him down." :lol:

flippy
07-21-2011, 04:28 PM
Said Rodney Harrison: "I think somebody from the Pittsburgh organization needs to sit this guy down and say, 'Shut up and play football. Play football better.' "

Why don't you do it Rodney?

The guy was by far the dirtiest player in the game when he played - always going after knees. How this guy got a job to talk football and is being taken seriously is beyond me.

No kidding, the actually dirty player is lecturing the perceived dirty player. Besides, I don't know who the somebody is that is going to "sit this guy down." I'm sure that Farrior or Troy might be able to have a conversation with him over Starbucks or something, but I don't think any team mate is going to "sit him down." :lol:

Or the rogue Dick "I disregard what the Commish thinks" Lebeau can sit him down and rile him up even more. He can tell him to hit harder and talk even more so people think he's crazy and fear him even more.

Heck, Tomlin probably suggested he call out Ben and Mendy for all we know.

No matter the team and no matter the coach, you always get some guys that go a little overboard and sometimes, I suspect it's by design.

Rooney probably has to pretend like he's upset with James, but I bet he isn't.

There may be a puppet master in all this and that could also be why players on the team don't seem to have a problem with him.

Other than some comments by guys like Farrior playing up the James is a little crazy angle which in reality helps the perception that James is a bad mofo.

Remember it was Farrior that always seemed to manage getting Porter riled up and running his yap more than he would have on his own. I think Farrior is nudging James along as well again.

Tomlin's a smart guy and I think he wants a little adversity in the locker room. It's another one of his jedi mind tricks at play.

Steelgal
07-21-2011, 05:32 PM
Considering our first game of the season is against the Rats at their place, I highly doubt the Harrison gets suspended for that game by the team. I don't thing a suspension is warranted anyway, but to do it for that specific game seems very unlikely.

I just think the media hasn't had a lot to talk about due to the lockout. I'm mean how many times can you go over the same ole crap about the lockout? Plus ESPN & NLFN love to stir up controversy, unless of course it's regarding the Pats. Most of the coverage with Harrison revolved around his name-calling of Fraudell and not about his comments regarding the Pats and their SBs. A coincidence???? I think not :roll:

RuthlessBurgher
07-21-2011, 06:03 PM
Said Rodney Harrison: "I think somebody from the Pittsburgh organization needs to sit this guy down and say, 'Shut up and play football. Play football better.' "

Why don't you do it Rodney?

The guy was by far the dirtiest player in the game when he played - always going after knees. How this guy got a job to talk football and is being taken seriously is beyond me.

No kidding, the actually dirty player is lecturing the perceived dirty player. Besides, I don't know who the somebody is that is going to "sit this guy down." I'm sure that Farrior or Troy might be able to have a conversation with him over Starbucks or something, but I don't think any team mate is going to "sit him down." :lol:

Or the rogue bad word "I disregard what the Commish thinks" Lebeau can sit him down and rile him up even more. He can tell him to hit harder and talk even more so people think he's crazy and fear him even more.

Heck, Tomlin probably suggested he call out Ben and Mendy for all we know.

No matter the team and no matter the coach, you always get some guys that go a little overboard and sometimes, I suspect it's by design.

Rooney probably has to pretend like he's upset with James, but I bet he isn't.

There may be a puppet master in all this and that could also be why players on the team don't seem to have a problem with him.

Other than some comments by guys like Farrior playing up the James is a little crazy angle which in reality helps the perception that James is a bad mofo.

Remember it was Farrior that always seemed to manage getting Porter riled up and running his yap more than he would have on his own. I think Farrior is nudging James along as well again.

Tomlin's a smart guy and I think he wants a little adversity in the locker room. It's another one of his jedi mind tricks at play.

http://i630.photobucket.com/albums/uu26/R0V3r_2009/jedimindtricks-480x384.jpg

Discipline of Steel
07-21-2011, 08:05 PM
I really doubt they do anything but talk to him privately.

hawaiiansteel
07-29-2011, 02:27 AM
Tomlin, Steelers putting Harrison's comments in the past

Thu, Jul 28th, 2011
By Dale Grdnic


LATROBE, Pa. -- While his Pittsburgh Steelers teammates did not have any issues with outspoken outside linebacker James Harrison after his comments in a recent interview with Men's Journal, head coach Mike Tomlin labeled those concerning NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell as inappropriate.

Tomlin, who spoke to the media after his conditioning evaluation (not a test) Thursday during the first training camp day at Saint Vincent College, noted that nothing was discussed concerning disciplinary action against Harrison. However, he added that there was a lot going on right now. And everyone was multi-tasking, so he didn't rule it out.

But he clearly didn't like what Harrison said.

"I think it was inappropriate,'' Tomlin said. "Whether it's detrimental to the development of our team, that remains to be seen. But it was inappropriate. We've had several conversations regarding it, and I'll leave that between he and I. (But) what he said regarding the Commissioner was inappropriate.

"We have a unique group of guys who are uniquely close, so I imagine that it didn't register as big a blip on the radar as you might imagine. Those guys love and respect James. They know how he is, and they take some of the things he says with a grain of salt, to be quite honest with you.''

Harrison called Goodell stupid, a puppet, a dictator and also used a gay slur to describe him. Harrison basically said that if Goodell was on fire, he wouldn't pee on him to put him out. Harrison also called Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall a fumble machine and chastised quarterback Ben Roethlisberger for his two interceptions, one that was returned for a touchdown.

Harrison later apologized to his teammates and backed off his other comments a bit, saying that his words were twisted. Harrison was unavailable for comment Thursday, as the Steelers arrived for the opening of training camp.

As usual, safety Ryan Clark talked to the media and was asked about Harrison.

"He was honest, but you have to realize who you're talking to,'' Clark said. "As much as I like to laugh and smile and talk with you guys, you're not my friends. And you all don't consider me a friend. So, things can be taken out of context and chopped up and cut up to make a story sensational.

"You like to sensationalize things to make things more interesting, and that's what I think happened. He spent a lot of time with that guy, and it came back to bite him. But if you know anything about James, he's not really worried about you all anyway or worried about the perception that people have of him.

"He's going to play good football, and he's a great teammate,'' Clark added. "I wouldn't want to go to war with anybody else. He made the apologies that he felt he had to make and to the people he had to make them to. And we're ready to play football. That's over.''

Steelers defensive captain James Farrior also believed the issue was moot.

"I think James apologized for some of the comments he made,'' Farrior said. "We're going to be business as usual. He's the best teammate you could have in your locker room. I'm sure it's something James probably said to their faces (Roethlisberger and Mendenhall). He's never had a problem speaking his mind.''

Tomlin wasn't as forthcoming with his opinion about wideout Hines Ward's offseason trouble, a DUI arrest in Atlanta earlier this month. Tomlin wouldn't even say if he spoke to Ward about it.

"I've spoken to a lot of our guys about their individual situations, and I fully intend to leave that between them and myself,'' Tomlin said.

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