PDA

View Full Version : Starkey: Steelers are the new outlaws of the NFL



hawaiiansteel
07-14-2011, 06:09 PM
Starkey: Steelers outlaws of the NFL

By Joe Starkey, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, July 14, 2011

http://files.pittsburghlive.com/photos/2011-07-13/0714HarrisonCAP-b.jpg

James Harrison
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review


Next time you hear somebody say, "The Steelers wouldn't sign a guy like that" or "The Steelers wouldn't draft a guy like that" intimating that the Steelers stay away from bad apples and controversial types feel free to laugh heartily in that person's face. For several hours.

While the Steelers might not take on other people's lightning rods, they do an excellent job of manufacturing their own James Harrison being the latest example with his incendiary comments in the August issue of Men's Journal.

Truth is, this franchise has become the modern-day version of the 1970s Oakland Raiders. Outlaws of the NFL. Some might view that as an insult (especially if they grew up in these parts hating those Raiders), others as a compliment.

It is undeniably true.

Now, the Steelers clearly remain the NFL's model team in the most important category: winning. They do that better than anyone. But those still pointing to this franchise as some kind of moral beacon? They're flat-out delusional.

It was just a year ago that coach Mike Tomlin uttered the following: "I think it's well known that we're very, very conscious of how we do business, that we're very highly concerned about our image, perception, how we conduct ourselves, our standards of conduct. I think it's above and beyond that of our peers. We embrace that."

Wow, is that funny.

I'm not sure a professional sports franchise has ever undergone an image transplant quite like the Steelers during these past few years.

To wit ...

The star quarterback (Ben Roethlisberger) has twice been accused of sexual assault. Though never convicted, or even arrested, he was suspended for four games at the start of the 2010 season for violating the NFL's Personal Conduct Policy.

The biggest celebrity on the team (receiver Hines Ward), fresh off winning "Dancing With the Stars," was arrested for DUI last weekend.

The former star receiver (Santonio Holmes), a consistent source of trouble, was finally dumped last spring after inviting a fan, via Twitter, to "kill urself." Some lauded the Steelers for this move, ignoring the fact that Holmes was given roughly 632 chances before they finally cut ties.

The starting tailback/conversationalist/structural engineer (Rashard Mendenhall) made national headlines when, in the wake of Osama bin Laden's death, he questioned in a tweet whether airplanes really could take down skyscrapers.

The entire team rebelled against the NFL last season, spitting in the face of rules adjustments allegedly designed to reduce catastrophic injuries and ripping commissioner Roger Goodell on multiple occasions. Ward called the NFL "hypocrites." Even the softest-spoken player of all, safety Troy Polamalu, has taken his shots from time to time, once labeling the NFL a "pansy league."

The other safety (Ryan Clark) is the closest thing the NFL has to old Raiders menace Jack "The Assassin" Tatum, destroying pass catchers and prompting the league to alter its rules. He's not shy about blasting Goodell, either.

Finally, and most recently, there is Harrison, photographed brandishing his guns in a Men's Journal article titled "Confessions of an NFL Hit Man." I'm guessing that won't double as the cover of the team's media guide. In the story, Harrison calls Goodell a "crook" and a "devil." He also rips Roethlisberger and Mendenhall, giving the Steelers the feel of another '70s Oakland team the dysfunctional but highly successful Athletics.

What to make of all of this?

Well, if I'm the Steelers, I'm not getting rid of Harrison. He's too good. But it's interesting that his remarks have surfaced when longtime NFL receiver Plaxico Burress, just out of prison, is looking for a team.

Don't expect the Steelers to inquire.

They would never sign a guy like that.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1S711GtL5 (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_746651.html#ixzz1S711GtL5)

BradshawsHairdresser
07-14-2011, 07:33 PM
Starkey: Steelers outlaws of the NFL

By Joe Starkey, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, July 14, 2011

http://files.pittsburghlive.com/photos/2011-07-13/0714HarrisonCAP-b.jpg

James Harrison
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review


Next time you hear somebody say, "The Steelers wouldn't sign a guy like that" or "The Steelers wouldn't draft a guy like that" intimating that the Steelers stay away from bad apples and controversial types feel free to laugh heartily in that person's face. For several hours.

While the Steelers might not take on other people's lightning rods, they do an excellent job of manufacturing their own James Harrison being the latest example with his incendiary comments in the August issue of Men's Journal.

Truth is, this franchise has become the modern-day version of the 1970s Oakland Raiders. Outlaws of the NFL. Some might view that as an insult (especially if they grew up in these parts hating those Raiders), others as a compliment.

It is undeniably true.

Now, the Steelers clearly remain the NFL's model team in the most important category: winning. They do that better than anyone. But those still pointing to this franchise as some kind of moral beacon? They're flat-out delusional.

It was just a year ago that coach Mike Tomlin uttered the following: "I think it's well known that we're very, very conscious of how we do business, that we're very highly concerned about our image, perception, how we conduct ourselves, our standards of conduct. I think it's above and beyond that of our peers. We embrace that."

Wow, is that funny.

I'm not sure a professional sports franchise has ever undergone an image transplant quite like the Steelers during these past few years.

To wit ...

The star quarterback (Ben Roethlisberger) has twice been accused of sexual assault. Though never convicted, or even arrested, he was suspended for four games at the start of the 2010 season for violating the NFL's Personal Conduct Policy.

The biggest celebrity on the team (receiver Hines Ward), fresh off winning "Dancing With the Stars," was arrested for DUI last weekend.

The former star receiver (Santonio Holmes), a consistent source of trouble, was finally dumped last spring after inviting a fan, via Twitter, to "kill urself." Some lauded the Steelers for this move, ignoring the fact that Holmes was given roughly 632 chances before they finally cut ties.

The starting tailback/conversationalist/structural engineer (Rashard Mendenhall) made national headlines when, in the wake of Osama bin Laden's death, he questioned in a tweet whether airplanes really could take down skyscrapers.

The entire team rebelled against the NFL last season, spitting in the face of rules adjustments allegedly designed to reduce catastrophic injuries and ripping commissioner Roger Goodell on multiple occasions. Ward called the NFL "hypocrites." Even the softest-spoken player of all, safety Troy Polamalu, has taken his shots from time to time, once labeling the NFL a "pansy league."

The other safety (Ryan Clark) is the closest thing the NFL has to old Raiders menace Jack "The Assassin" Tatum, destroying pass catchers and prompting the league to alter its rules. He's not shy about blasting Goodell, either.

Finally, and most recently, there is Harrison, photographed brandishing his guns in a Men's Journal article titled "Confessions of an NFL Hit Man." I'm guessing that won't double as the cover of the team's media guide. In the story, Harrison calls Goodell a "crook" and a "devil." He also rips Roethlisberger and Mendenhall, giving the Steelers the feel of another '70s Oakland team the dysfunctional but highly successful Athletics.

What to make of all of this?

Well, if I'm the Steelers, I'm not getting rid of Harrison. He's too good. But it's interesting that his remarks have surfaced when longtime NFL receiver Plaxico Burress, just out of prison, is looking for a team.

Don't expect the Steelers to inquire.

They would never sign a guy like that.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1S711GtL5 (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_746651.html#ixzz1S711GtL5)

Sad to say, but it's all too true. Starkey has done a good job with this article.

SteelTorch
07-14-2011, 08:24 PM
The entire team rebelled against the NFL last season, spitting in the face of rules adjustments allegedly designed to reduce catastrophic injuries and ripping commissioner Roger Goodell on multiple occasions. Ward called the NFL "hypocrites." Even the softest-spoken player of all, safety Troy Polamalu, has taken his shots from time to time, once labeling the NFL a "pansy league."

You mean rules designed to protect CERTAIN players while disregarding others. Rules that brought fines and punishments that were delivered with no sense of consistency or fairness. Above all, rules designed to set the stage for Goodell to impose his precious 18 game season.

I'm guessing that never occurred to Starkey's brilliant mind.

hawaiiansteel
07-14-2011, 09:00 PM
Bad news Steelers: Meet the NFL's newest outlaw team

By Mike Freeman
CBSSports.com National Columnist
July 14, 2011


Their running back, Rashard Mendenhall, went to Twitter and defended Osama bin Laden, simultaneously morphing into a 9-11 truther.

Their wide receiver, Hines Ward, a possible Hall of Famer, recently failed a series of sobriety tests while driving in Georgia, police said. According to reports, Ward's Aston Martin hit a curb and Ward himself smelled of alcohol. He was arrested for driving under the influence.

Their linebacker, James Harrison, in a recent magazine interview, called the NFL commissioner a gay slur, a crook and a devil, while adding for good measure that Texans linebacker Brian Cushing was juiced out of his mind. He also called two former Patriots clowns and ripped his own teammates.

Then there's their quarterback, Ben Roethlisberger, formerly accused of sexual assault. It led to numerous embarrassing moments for Roethlisberger and his team, but none more than at the NFL Draft. When it was time for the Steelers to make their selection fans began chanting: "She said no."

Introducing the new Pittsburgh Steelers, the latest bad boy team in a long line of NFL bad boy teams.

The Steelers may not eclipse the ultimate group of misfits, the Cincinnati Bengals, who have at various points led the league in handcuff fittings. The San Diego Union-Tribune reported that the Bengals led the NFL in arrests between 2000 and 2010 with 31. It's the only thing Cincinnati has been able to win. In that same time period, Minnesota had 30 and Jacksonville, Denver and Kansas City each had 25.

No, the Steelers don't have large arrest numbers, but the image of arguably the most proud, respected and accomplished franchise in all of sports is taking a major beating nonetheless.

Beating isn't the word. The image of the Steelers is transforming right before our eyes, and frankly it's truly sad. While franchises like the Bengals have been a joke, the Steelers have been the league's granite, the Rooney family seen as one of the cornerstones of the modern-era football team. There have, of course, been controversies involving the Steelers but nothing like the recent spate of incidents.

What's happening to Pittsburgh isn't just bad for them, it reverberates around the sport, sending waves throughout the NFL that aren't felt when teams like the Jaguars or Carolina Panthers have numerous players arrested.

"It's not good for us when a team like the Steelers have these issues," said one high-ranking team official, who asked not to be identified. "Right or wrong they're seen as one of the more wholesome teams in the NFL off the field. When that's not the case, it hurts our league."

Multiple NFL sources tell me Steelers owner Art Rooney II is waiting for more information on the arrest of Ward before rendering judgment. However, these same league sources say Rooney is infuriated with Harrison.

While I doubt the Steelers would ever consider releasing Harrison, many in the organization, I'm told, are tiring of Harrison's act. The fact is, however, Harrison is so talented there's no way in hell Pittsburgh will ever let him go. Not to mention there are probably Steelers players -- and many around the league -- who agree with his statements regarding Goodell.

The Steelers do have a large quantity of good guys. Troy Polamalu is one of the most virtuous tough guys in sports. But their dive into bad boy-ism cannot be ignored or minimized.

And it has been building for some time. Kicker Jeff Reed was arrested for public intoxication in 2009. Tight end Jonathan Dekker was arrested for obstruction of justice. Santonio Holmes had numerous problems while a Steeler. Wide receiver Cedric Wilson had a domestic violence charge and was cut. Harrison was arrested in 2008 for domestic violence (the charges were later dropped).

In 2007, Najeh Davenport was charged with domestic violence, and later cleared by a jury. Linebacker Richard Seigler was arrested for being a pimp. Incredibly, he was released by the Steelers as the police were on their way to the team facility to arrest him.

The Steelers are crossing their fingers and hoping things stay quiet for some time. They're not alone. The league doesn't want to see a grand franchise like Pittsburgh sink into the muck of arrests and scandals.

Yet that seems to be where the franchise is headed, if it's not already there. And that's sad.

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/story/1531 ... h_Steelers (http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/story/15318563/bad-news-steelers-meet-the-nfls-newest-outlaw-team?source=rss_teams_Pittsburgh_Steelers)

DrCalculus
07-15-2011, 01:27 AM
Both of these tools completely miss the point that unlike the Bengals (and the Raiders before them), Steelers ownership has tried to deal with players when these situations have arisen:

1) They traded Holmes for virtually nothing when his act wore thin
2) They were instrumental in Ben being suspended 4 games
3) They cut Cedrick Wilson
4) They cut Jeff Reed after his continued boorish behavior towards fans
5) Stiegler? Really? That counts as an example? And Dekker? Did either of these guys ever make it past the first week of camp?
6) Davenport was acquitted of charges, as was Holmes. So now an accusation makes you guilty?
7) Mendenhall is guilty of nothing more serious than not thinking about the words he chose before clicking enter.


The glaring example of poor judgement being overlooked was Harrison's altercation with his gf over their son. That was kind of pooh-poohed by Dan Rooney and looked bad.

But in every other instance that they've been faced with, ownership has moved to deal with the situation quickly and make certain that the player in question knows that crap isn't tolerated.

And then they don't go out and sign 2-time drunk driver Cedric Benson, or give yet one more chance to 8-time arrested PacMan Jones, or draft crap like Kenrick Ellis, etc.

Just because the media tries these guys in the court of public opinion and decides they are criminals doesn't make it so. When a crazy drunken gf calls the police on you because you tried to get her to calm the f down and had to put your hands on her to restrain her from smacking you, that doesn't make you a criminal. When the cops give you a hard time because you walked outside the lines of the sidewalk because the crowd was too big, that doesn't make you a thug. When you say what 75% of the other players in the league are thinking about Goodell, that doesn't make you a rule breaker.

Now, getting behind the wheel under the influence...yeah, stupid move Ward. I'm on board with that one.

frankthetank1
07-15-2011, 07:59 AM
as much as i hated what harrison and mendy said they didnt commit any crime. speaking your mind doesnt make you an outlaw.

feltdizz
07-15-2011, 08:24 AM
as much as i hated what harrison and mendy said they didnt commit any crime. speaking your mind doesnt make you an outlaw.

In today's society it does...

you can kill your baby, lie about it and get off....

but call someone a gay slur and people will question your mental state.

Oviedo
07-15-2011, 09:43 AM
As the song says we can probably be more accurately described as "renegades" as opposed to "outlaws"

Thats not necessarily a bad thing as long as we get it done on the field versus words spewing from the mouths of players off the field.

RuthlessBurgher
07-15-2011, 10:14 AM
As the song says we can probably be more accurately described as "renegades" as opposed to "outlaws"

Thats not necessarily a bad thing as long as we get it done on the field versus words spewing from the mouths of players off the field.

Unfortunately for our renegades, the hangman is coming down from the gallows and we don't have very long. :wink:

hawaiiansteel
07-16-2011, 01:45 PM
Harrison's comments latest black eye for Steelers

Friday, July 15, 2011
By Gerry Dulac, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/images/200711/20071110pd_steelers1106a_330.jpg


It has been a tough five days for the Steelers.

First, their star wide receiver, Hines Ward, basking in a feel-good embrace after his popular "Dancing With The Stars" victory, is arrested in Atlanta for driving under the influence. Two months after he could execute a samba with dance partner Kym Johnson, police said he was so impaired he couldn't even walk a straight line.

Then, four-time Pro Bowl linebacker James Harrison, who made headlines last year for the heavy fines he was handed for illegal hits, brings even more notoriety to the franchise with comments in a national magazine that were insulting and degrading to commissioner Roger Goodell and no doubt embarrassing to the Rooney family.

James Harrison's statement posted Thursday night on his Facebook page:
"I'll start by offering my apologies for some of the words that I said during the four days in May that Men's Journal was invited to my house to discuss what the NFL has recently been portraying as their attempts at 'player safety' rules and regulations, and to cover my everyday workout routine.

"I did make comments about my teammates when I was talking about the emotional Super Bowl loss, but the handful of words that were used and heavily publicized yesterday were pulled out of a long conversation and the context was lost. Obviously, I would never say that it was all Ben's or Rashard's fault that we lost the Super Bowl. That would be ridiculous. Both Ben and Rashard are great players and great teammates. Clearly the entire team bears responsibility for the loss, me included. It was a team effort and a team loss. My teammates know me well, and hopefully understand the things I said were not meant to accuse them of the loss. We all have discussed several things that went wrong in the Super Bowl since that day. What I do apologize for and take full responsibility for is for speaking in such a candid manner to someone outside the team.

"I also need to make clear that the comment about Roger Goodell was not intended to be derogatory against gay people in any way. It was careless use of a slang word and I apologize to all who were offended by the remark. I am not a homophobic bigot, and I would never advocate intolerance of gay people.

"As far as the photo that was shown on air yesterday, collecting guns is a hobby of mine, and I advocate the responsible use of firearms. I believe in the right to bear arms. I like to go to the shooting range. I like to hunt. I like to fish. I could just as easily have posed with my fishing poles but it obviously wouldn't be an interesting picture for the magazine. I am not promoting gun violence by posing for that photo. There are also other photos in the magazine story that were not shown on air yesterday -- including me with my sons, with my mom and as a kid.

"Unfortunately, the above items and other comments have detracted from the original purpose of the story -- a position I have been advocating for some time now. If player safety is the NFL's main concern, as they say it is, they are not going about it in an effective manner. There's nothing about extending the season or issuing exorbitant fines on defensive players that makes any shift toward the prevention of injury to players.

"I believe that the league may have been feeling increasing pressure about injuries and concussions last year, and that they panicked and put rules in place that weren't fully thought out. I'm not advocating more flags and fines, I'm just saying that the current rules are not completely fair, and I don't believe in the way that the league is handling their position as overseer of the NFL and the well-being of its players.

"As far as the character and reputation hits I may suffer as a result of my comments in the article, I'll take those hits and more if it brings increased attention to the re-examination and installation of rules and regulations that would create a REAL impact on player safety."

Another black eye for the Steelers, maybe the most respected franchise in professional sports?

A year after they have tried to move on from an alleged sexual-assault incident involving quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, the Steelers' national reputation has taken another hit because of Harrison -- a player who knows all about delivering hard hits. His much-circulated comments have created a stir around the league, sent Twitter abuzz with opinion and cast the Steelers in a not-so-flattering light, even though Harrison's verbal attack on Goodell and his teammates does not represent or reflect the feelings of the organization.

"We should abide by the rules, but at the same time we're all human," Steelers inside linebacker Lawrence Timmons said in an interview on Sporting News Radio in Toronto. "We shouldn't drive drunk, I understand that totally. And we shouldn't make certain derogatory comments, either. But we are human, and we make mistakes sometimes."

Early Thursday night, Harrison issued an apology on his Facebook page that he said will be "my only response" to the article in Men's Journal magazine.

"I did make comments about my teammates when I was talking about the emotional Super Bowl loss, but the handful of words that were used and heavily publicized yesterday were pulled out of a long conversation and the context was lost," Harrison said in the statement. "Obviously, I would never say that it was all Ben's or Rashard's fault that we lost the Super Bowl. That would be ridiculous. Both Ben and Rashard are great players and great teammates.

"Clearly the entire team bears responsibility for the loss, me included. It was a team effort and a team loss. My teammates know me well, and hopefully understand the things I said were not meant to accuse them of the loss. We all have discussed several things that went wrong in the Super Bowl since that day. What I do apologize for and take full responsibility for is for speaking in such a candid manner to someone outside the team."

Harrison also apologized for his use of anti-gay slur to describe Goodell, who fined him $100,000 for his repeated late hits in 2010.

"I also need to make clear that the comment about Roger Goodell was not intended to be derogatory against gay people in any way," Harrison said. "It was careless use of a slang word, and I apologize to all who were offended by the remark. I am not a homophobic bigot, and I would never advocate intolerance of gay people."

The Harrison controversy is the latest in a series involving Steelers players. Consider:

Roethlisberger was accused twice of sexual assault, one a civil case in Lake Tahoe, Nev., and the other in Milledgeville, Ga., in the past two years. The Nevada case remains in the courts, but Roethlisberger was never charged in Georgia. He was suspended for four games at the start of the 2010 season, though, for violating the league's personal conduct policy.

Super Bowl XLIII MVP Santonio Holmes, a former No. 1 pick, was released last spring for multiple incidents and legal issues during his brief tenure with the team.

Kicker Jeff Reed had several publicized incidents that were alcohol-related, the latest coming last summer when he jumped out of his car and assumed a fighting stance with police officers on the North Shore. After a bad start to the 2010 season, he was released.

Harrison has been a repeat lightning-rod for controversy, going back to when he skipped an invitation to the White House because he said he doesn't like to fly. He was also involved in a domestic dispute with his girlfriend in 2008, less than 10 days after former teammate Cedric Wilson was charged with assaulting his former girlfriend. Wilson was released; Harrison was not. The charges were later dropped against Harrison.

Those incidents have combined to probably tarnish the image of the Steelers, a team that has been owned by the Rooney family for 78 years. The most recent has likely tarnished the image of Harrison, a four-time Pro Bowler who was the NFL defensive player of the year in 2008.

"As far as the character and reputation hits I may suffer as a result of my comments in the article, I'll take those hits and more if it brings increased attention to the re-examination and installation of rules and regulations that would create a REAL impact on player safety," Harrison said in his statement.

Make no mistake, he has taken some hits.

Former Washington Redskins' Pro Bowl linebacker LaVar Arrington said in a Washington Post blog that Harrison's comments went way over the line and make him "a horrible example to the people who look up to him."

Chicago Bears defensive end Ervin Baldwin wrote on Twitter, "Man just seen James Harrison comments. dude is a goon."

Timmons, though, thinks his teammate is being unjustly depicted.

"James is a guy that's misunderstood," Timmons said, according to a transcript of his radio interview. "A lot of people think he's a bad person, but he just sometimes says some things that he shouldn't. I'm pretty sure he doesn't feel this way, he probably just got kind of mixed up with his words. But he's a great guy.

"He's a great father, he does a lot in our community, he's a Pittsburgh Steeler, we accept him, and I have nothing but the best things to say about him."

Gerry Dulac: gdulac@post-gazette.com.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11196/11 ... z1SHdu6f00 (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11196/1160567-66.stm#ixzz1SHdu6f00)

steelcurtain44
07-18-2011, 08:48 AM
This is really old news. The Steelers way back in the 70s were call by their own coach, Chuck Noll, as part of the criminal element. Hell Fats shot at policeman. Lamber was in a bar fight every week, and all the Steelers defense did was complain that quarterbacks should wear skirts. Greene gets fined for punching a Broncos player in the stomach. And those were just offensive players.

What about Belton Delton, Lloyd who last we heard was putting a gun in his son's mouth. What about Woodson with Delton in homewood, drag racing. What about Eric Green, Bam Morris? I could go on and on.

My point is simply that the Steelers have never been the model team as far as players go. They have always been blue collar, Men of Steel, who while they do have the Steelers' Nation, which is world wide, have always been viewed as bullies and villains, by anyone who doesn't like them. We have always been the Raiders of the East Coast, and always will be. You put in the Steelers' uniform, and you know you have to be badder than the rest. Case closed.

Oviedo
07-18-2011, 09:11 AM
This is really old news. The Steelers way back in the 70s were call by their own coach, Chuck Noll, as part of the criminal element. Hell Fats shot at policeman. Lamber was in a bar fight every week, and all the Steelers defense did was complain that quarterbacks should wear skirts. Greene gets fined for punching a Broncos player in the stomach. And those were just offensive players.

What about Belton Delton, Lloyd who last we heard was putting a gun in his son's mouth. What about Woodson with Delton in homewood, drag racing. What about Eric Green, Bam Morris? I could go on and on.

My point is simply that the Steelers have never been the model team as far as players go. They have always been blue collar, Men of Steel, who while they do have the Steelers' Nation, which is world wide, have always been viewed as bullies and villains, by anyone who doesn't like them. We have always been the Raiders of the East Coast, and always will be. You put in the Steelers' uniform, and you know you have to be badder than the rest. Case closed.

The difference is we now live in a world of 24/7 media where every person in the world has a phone with a camera or can call, email or tweet everything they see instantaneously to a ever growing media monster that needs to feed itself by consuming massive volumes of data and spewing editorized info (there is a difference between data and info). Look at the riots after Vancouver lost the Stanley Cup. They were instantaneously on YouTube and even now the idiots that filmed themsleves are having their own media materials used against them by the local police.

This requires everyone to be more aware and therefore more careful but unfortunately you can't eliminate human flaws so there will always be someone stumbling. The key is make sure you think first and act later. Like I always say" "You have the freedom to choose what you do, but you rarely get to choose and control the consequences of those choices. Therefore think first."