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hawaiiansteel
05-26-2011, 12:49 PM
Starkey: Harrison should quit complaining

By Joe Starkey, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, May 26, 2011


Apparently, there are at least two angry James Harrisons in the world.

One is a well-known Steelers linebacker with the Twitter handle @jharrison9292 and 46,156 followers. The other is a budding computer scientist, a self-described "geek, hacker, coder, developer and builder of many things" living in Oxford, England, going by the handle @jamesharrison with 361 followers.

Guess which one has a blog titled "Talk Unafraid — The (occasionally coherent) ramblings of a geek?"

That would be the second James Harrison, who looks nothing like a linebacker but very much like a character from "Revenge of the Nerds." He is a second-year student at the University of London (which, I believe, appears on Penn State's non-conference football schedule in 2012).

For all their differences, the two sound remarkably alike. Consider some recent tweets ...

Geek: "Whoever thought merging keyboard and mouse ports into a single PS/2 connection is an utter idiot."

Linebacker: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots."

Somebody — certainly not me — should tell @jharrison9292 that the people making the rules at the NFL include his team president, Art Rooney II.

That doesn't mean Rooney was totally in favor of the latest tweaks on head shots, but he was one of the owners who ratified them by a unanimous vote of 32-0.

Truly, the latest legislation isn't much more than an affirmation of last year's crackdown on launching and head hits — which happened to cost @jharrison9292 more money ($100,000) than any player in the league. The caveat is that teams now could be fined if their players exceed a yet-to-be determined threshold of flagrant fouls.

Ejections also are possible if officials deem a hit egregious enough.

I'm all for holding teams accountable. The Steelers flipped out last season, maybe in a good way, deeming the NFL's crackdown a personal affront and using it to fuel to their improbable run to the Super Bowl. It was them against the football world. Everybody from Harrison to Troy Polamalu to Hines Ward ripped the NFL.

But the key phrase above is to the Super Bowl. The Steelers got there, proof they could thrive in spite of whatever changes the league made. The rules did not and will not change the Steelers' personality. They will remain the most physical defense around.

Somebody — certainly not me — should tell @jharrison9292 to get over himself and adjust to the rules like everybody else. His constant whining, which included the ludicrous threat to retire last season, does nothing but make him look bad and turn himself and his team into a target.

The rule is clear: Don't be a missile. Don't launch yourself head-first into a defenseless player, and don't hit a defenseless player in the head.

If the worst that comes of it is players such as @jharrison9292 passing up the occasional video-game kill shot, so be it. The game will continue to provide us with heaping helpings of the violence we crave.

Was anyone complaining about a lack of physicality in last year's Steelers-Ravens playoff game? Of course not. As I sit here, I'm looking at a photograph from that day, showing @jharrison9292 burying Joe Flacco face-first in the turf with a perfectly legal hit (I'm also looking at a tweet from @jamesharrison that reads, "Sobriety is overrated. Massively").

A week earlier, the New York Jets played one of the finest defensive games you'll ever see. They blew up the New England Patriots' blocking schemes and made Tom Brady look like a rookie — and did so without launching themselves into players' skulls. They were Jets, not missiles.

Punishing defense is possible within the parameters of the new NFL. Maybe @jharrison9292 should take a harder look at himself and realize he was the only Steelers player who had multiple issues with hits on defenseless players last season.

Somebody — certainly not me — better tell this guy to clam up and play. This isn't the end of the world. The end of the world was predicted for last Saturday, you'll remember, and did not happen, which prompted a legendary tweet from our computer scientist, heretofore known as Jimmy the Geek:

"I wouldn't really mind if it was the end of the world. At least it'd be decisive."

He sounds angry.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1NTDWIxNQ (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_739000.html#ixzz1NTDWIxNQ)

Eich
05-26-2011, 04:01 PM
What a load of Crap !


The rule is clear: Don't be a missile. Don't launch yourself head-first into a defenseless player, and don't hit a defenseless player in the head.

Yeah - ask John Harbaugh how CLEAR the rule is. Everyone thinks the rules are clear until they are fined for doing something that is not clear. Harbaugh was all proud that HIS team adjusted to the rules and that Harrison needed to learn as well. And just after making his stupid statement, Harbaugh's own player was fined for a hit that he THOUGHT was clean.

Harrison's hit on Massaquoi was only to the head because Massaqoi lowered HIS head at the last second.

Goddell is on record saying that it will always be the fault of the defensive player, even in situations where the offensive player lowers his head at the last second.

ikestops85
05-26-2011, 04:29 PM
What a load of Crap !


The rule is clear: Don't be a missile. Don't launch yourself head-first into a defenseless player, and don't hit a defenseless player in the head.

Yeah - ask John Harbaugh how CLEAR the rule is. Everyone thinks the rules are clear until they are fined for doing something that is not clear. Harbaugh was all proud that HIS team adjusted to the rules and that Harrison needed to learn as well. And just after making his stupid statement, Harbaugh's own player was fined for a hit that he THOUGHT was clean.

Harrison's hit on Massaquoi was only to the head because Massaqoi lowered HIS head at the last second.

Goddell is on record saying that it will always be the fault of the defensive player, even in situations where the offensive player lowers his head at the last second.

:Agree

It's going to take the officials weeks of training to try and interpret these rules and come game time (if we have games) they will still be inconsistent. I really have some sympathy for the officials having to make sense out of this mess.

hawaiiansteel
05-26-2011, 04:47 PM
Harrison clarifies his position on rules changes and ‘idiots’

By Doug Farrar
Thu May 26

http://mit.zenfs.com/209/2011/05/harrison_mass2.jpg

The one problem with calling an entire group of people "idiots" and leaving it at that is that it tends to eliminate the more complex underpinnings of your argument. Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison(notes) must have discovered this when he threw that particular phrase at the NFL owners, executives and coaches who put together the rules that seem forwarded to one interest above all others: increasing player safety for the purpose of either reducing debilitating injuries or increasing the momentum for an 18-game season, depending on which side of the argument you believe.

So, in the interest of getting his entire argument out there, Harrison started a blog and specified his position. And when you read it (which you can do after the jump), it seems that Harrison does have some valid arguments. The rules changes put into place during the 2010 season were reactionary at best, and the implementation of those rules on a week-to-week basis had the same "ready, fire, aim!" feeling common to many of Roger Goodell's policies. Referees often seemed clueless as to the kinds of judgment calls they were supposed to make — and as much as I'm of the opinion that many NFL officials are fodder for high school games instead of the pros, they're also put in untenable positions by impulsive decisions that they then have to enforce. You do not want these guys making more judgment calls.

It's also easy to argue that certain players were targeted by Ray Anderson and a rules committee that seemed to enjoy its function a bit too much at times. Where I do not agree with Harrison is when he hypothesizes that this is some sort of anti-Steelers conspiracy — watch the way refs had a microscope on Detroit's Ndamukong Suh(notes) late in his rookie season, and it's pretty clear that the profiling had more to do with players who ran afoul of Anderson's idea of how football should be played. I do not believe that the NFL has a "poster child," but I do think there is profiling going on, and that it needs to stop if games are to be called evenly and fairly.

In any case, here's Harrison's point of view — it's quite a bit deeper than, "The rules guys are idiots," though it doesn't exclude that point from being correct as well.
It's been weighing heavy on my mind all day, so I figure I might as well just let it out. I want to make it clear that I am all for player safety. I don't disagree with all of the rule changes.

But come on…REALLY? Now you have to wait until a guy catches, or even worse, you have to let them catch the ball before you can even attempt to tackle him. Along with that, you cannot let any part of your helmet or facemask touch any part of them basically from the chest up. If you are following the letter of the rules exactly, now most tackles, if not ALL tackles can be flagged, fined and/or result in ejection from that game, or future game(s).

I understand the intent behind making the rules, but in their attempt to make the game safer, they are actually clouding what is allowable. Even the referees are confused. A close look will show you that the referees were calling things that were not even supposed to be called, and NOT calling things that were actually illegal.

The decision to call a penalty or impose a fine is seemingly, at least some of the time, dependent upon the uniform and the player. After my meeting this past fall with Roger Goodell, Ray Anderson, and Merton Hanks and some others, who I now have absolutely no respect for (to keep it PG), I definitely believe there is no equality in their enforcement of these rules.

These rules are targeting hard hitting players and defenses i.e. STEELERS. I guess the NFL needed a poster child for their campaign.

The quarterback rule clarification (Rule 12, Section 2, Article 13) is a great change. But that's just saying "Hey Steelers..by the way…Ben's nose getting broken last year really did not deserve a penalty."

I know there are hits out there that could go either way, but if it's me I already know which way they are going to go. I love this game, but I hate what they are trying to turn it into.

I wonder why the NFL is suddenly coming down so hard on player's safety issues. I can't help but think it's not actually for the safety of the players.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdo ... nfl-wp2193 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Harrison-clarifies-his-position-on-rules-changes?urn=nfl-wp2193)

focosteeler
05-26-2011, 04:59 PM
I'm just waiting for the colts or pats to lose a game on the last drive because their defense stopped the other team but hit 'illegally' so the other team got a first down. Then manning, brady and everyone else will start crying about how bad the rule is.

BradshawsHairdresser
05-26-2011, 06:37 PM
Wonder how Starkey would like it if the powers that be changed the rules of journalism so that it was nearly impossible for him to do his job? Betcha he would complain, too.

The more these guys write, the bigger tools they make themselves look like.

RuthlessBurgher
05-26-2011, 07:13 PM
Wonder how Starkey would like it if the powers that be changed the rules of journalism so that it was nearly impossible for him to do his job? Betcha he would complain, too.

The more these guys write, the bigger tools they make themselves look like.

Yeah, at first it's a $100 fine for a dangling participle. Okay. Then $500 for a split infinitive. Ugh. Suddenly, the powers that be go too far and just ban all adjectives. What? Adjectives are a critical part of being able to express the English language in written form. Writing without adjectives would be like football without tackling! :lol:

hawaiiansteel
05-27-2011, 03:52 AM
Cook: Harrison's remarks out of line

Friday, May 27, 2011
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall tweeted earlier this month that it's wrong to celebrate the death of another human being, even Osama bin Laden. That's OK. We live in America. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinions, even an NFL player.

Steelers linebacker James Harrison tweeted Wednesday that the people who make the rules in the NFL are "idiots" and said league officials are targeting the Steelers with their tougher player-safety rules. That's unacceptable. Forget freedom of speech in this case. Harrison, in essence, called his boss -- Steelers president Art Rooney II -- an "idiot" because Rooney voted for the rules changes. Beyond that, he violated the Mike Tomlin rule. "I'm not opposed to guys tweeting or facebooking or whatever they do," the coach has said. "Just don't tweet about my business."

I have no problem with Mendenhall's tweet.

I have a big problem with Harrison's.

For one thing, Harrison was wrong about the NFL targeting the Steelers. They weren't targeted last season when the St. Louis Rams led the league in penalties with 126 and the Steelers ranked 24th with 86, and the Oakland Raiders led in penalty yards with 1,161 and the Steelers were 25th with 716. The Steelers made it to the Super Bowl, which wouldn't have happened if the NFL had some sort of conspiracy against them. The Steelers also aren't being targeted now. The tougher rules are for the safety of all the players, including Harrison and his teammates. Sometimes, players need to be protected from themselves.

It also was incredibly arrogant on Harrison's part to suggest the new, more stringent rules are designed to take some of the toughness out of the Steelers' defense. He wasn't alone there. Teammate LaMarr Woodley tweeted, "lol im sorry that im not sorry we hit 2 hard." Like the Steelers are the only defense that hits hard? Try selling that opinion in Baltimore. Or New York. Or a lot of other NFL cities. Certainly, the Steelers' defense wasn't all that tough and intimidating against the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XLV, was it?

In a way, it's understandable why Harrison feels targeted by the NFL office. He was fined $100,000 last season for what the league determined were dirty hits, more than any player. But Harrison needs to look in the mirror once in awhile. Maybe the reason he was fined so much is that he didn't play by the rules. Of course, blaming commissioner Roger Goodell and discipline czars Ray Anderson and Merton Hanks -- "who I now have absolutely no respect for," Harrison blogged Thursday -- is so much easier than blaming himself.

"I guess the NFL needed a poster child for their campaign," Harrison said in that same blog. "I know there are hits out there that go either way, but if it's me I already know which way they are going to go."

Calling Goodell and the others "idiots" is going to help that situation?

That can't possibly help Harrison and the Steelers.

That's what I mean about him violating the Tomlin rule.

Harrison blogged that he is "all for player safety," but then said later, "I love this game, but I hate what they are trying to turn it into."

Is it just me or is that contradictory?

This is just another case of Harrison overreacting. He did it in October after he was fined $75,000 (later reduced to $50,000) for a hit on Cleveland Browns wide receiver Mohamed Massaquoi when he threatened to quit football. Like he was going to walk away from his $51.75 million contract? Harrison also did it at the Super Bowl when he used his media-day pulpit to mock Goodell. He came across sounding awfully foolish that day, especially when he was asked if he might not think differently about player safety if he's 50 and mentally disabled because of hits to his head that really weren't necessary for him to be known as a fierce player or for him to get that huge contract. "I'm not worried about that," Harrison replied. "It's part of the game. We signed up for this. It's not a touchy, feely game. I've said it many times. I'm willing to go through hell so my kids don't have to."

My guess is that Harrison doesn't feel so strongly about his principles that he will follow through with his retirement threat any time soon. That $51.75 million contract, remember? He will show up at Steelers headquarters, whenever the NFL lockout ends. He then will have two choices: Do a better job of adjusting to the new rules or continue to pay the big fines and, ultimately, be suspended.

Harrison is a tough character, as tough as any player in the NFL. But this is a fight he can't win. The league is too strong. The game is bigger than him, any player or any team.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11147/11 ... z1NWrijM74 (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11147/1149479-87-0.stm#ixzz1NWrijM74)

Discipline of Steel
05-27-2011, 06:52 AM
Cook: Harrison's remarks out of line

Friday, May 27, 2011
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall tweeted earlier this month that it's wrong to celebrate the death of another human being, even Osama bin Laden. That's OK. We live in America. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinions, even an NFL player.

Steelers linebacker James Harrison tweeted Wednesday that the people who make the rules in the NFL are "idiots" and said league officials are targeting the Steelers with their tougher player-safety rules. That's unacceptable. Forget freedom of speech in this case. Harrison, in essence, called his boss -- Steelers president Art Rooney II -- an "idiot" because Rooney voted for the rules changes. Beyond that, he violated the Mike Tomlin rule. "I'm not opposed to guys tweeting or facebooking or whatever they do," the coach has said. "Just don't tweet about my business."

I have no problem with Mendenhall's tweet.

I have a big problem with Harrison's.

For one thing, Harrison was wrong about the NFL targeting the Steelers. They weren't targeted last season when the St. Louis Rams led the league in penalties with 126 and the Steelers ranked 24th with 86, and the Oakland Raiders led in penalty yards with 1,161 and the Steelers were 25th with 716. The Steelers made it to the Super Bowl, which wouldn't have happened if the NFL had some sort of conspiracy against them. The Steelers also aren't being targeted now. The tougher rules are for the safety of all the players, including Harrison and his teammates. Sometimes, players need to be protected from themselves.

It also was incredibly arrogant on Harrison's part to suggest the new, more stringent rules are designed to take some of the toughness out of the Steelers' defense. He wasn't alone there. Teammate LaMarr Woodley tweeted, "lol im sorry that im not sorry we hit 2 hard." Like the Steelers are the only defense that hits hard? Try selling that opinion in Baltimore. Or New York. Or a lot of other NFL cities. Certainly, the Steelers' defense wasn't all that tough and intimidating against the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XLV, was it?

In a way, it's understandable why Harrison feels targeted by the NFL office. He was fined $100,000 last season for what the league determined were dirty hits, more than any player. But Harrison needs to look in the mirror once in awhile. Maybe the reason he was fined so much is that he didn't play by the rules. Of course, blaming commissioner Roger Goodell and discipline czars Ray Anderson and Merton Hanks -- "who I now have absolutely no respect for," Harrison blogged Thursday -- is so much easier than blaming himself.

"I guess the NFL needed a poster child for their campaign," Harrison said in that same blog. "I know there are hits out there that go either way, but if it's me I already know which way they are going to go."

Calling Goodell and the others "idiots" is going to help that situation?

That can't possibly help Harrison and the Steelers.

That's what I mean about him violating the Tomlin rule.

Harrison blogged that he is "all for player safety," but then said later, "I love this game, but I hate what they are trying to turn it into."

Is it just me or is that contradictory?

This is just another case of Harrison overreacting. He did it in October after he was fined $75,000 (later reduced to $50,000) for a hit on Cleveland Browns wide receiver Mohamed Massaquoi when he threatened to quit football. Like he was going to walk away from his $51.75 million contract? Harrison also did it at the Super Bowl when he used his media-day pulpit to mock Goodell. He came across sounding awfully foolish that day, especially when he was asked if he might not think differently about player safety if he's 50 and mentally disabled because of hits to his head that really weren't necessary for him to be known as a fierce player or for him to get that huge contract. "I'm not worried about that," Harrison replied. "It's part of the game. We signed up for this. It's not a touchy, feely game. I've said it many times. I'm willing to go through hell so my kids don't have to."

My guess is that Harrison doesn't feel so strongly about his principles that he will follow through with his retirement threat any time soon. That $51.75 million contract, remember? He will show up at Steelers headquarters, whenever the NFL lockout ends. He then will have two choices: Do a better job of adjusting to the new rules or continue to pay the big fines and, ultimately, be suspended.

Harrison is a tough character, as tough as any player in the NFL. But this is a fight he can't win. The league is too strong. The game is bigger than him, any player or any team.
Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11147/11 ... z1NWrijM74 (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11147/1149479-87-0.stm#ixzz1NWrijM74)

Lets also not forget that the league is bigger than Herr Goodell and the owners. Its the fans that this game belongs to and this tinkering with rules on how to tackle is emasculating it beyond what we want to see.

birtikidis
05-27-2011, 01:02 PM
He also made no mention of the unwarranted 6 game suspension of our qb. If there was ever team being targeted it was us. How much you think Harrison wold get fined if he broke Flacco's nose?

RuthlessBurgher
05-27-2011, 01:52 PM
He also made no mention of the unwarranted 6 game suspension of our qb. If there was ever team being targeted it was us. How much you think Harrison wold get fined if he broke Flacco's nose?

If Harrison is able to separate Flacco's unibrow into two distinct eyebrows, Flacco should pay him...

fordfixer
05-27-2011, 02:22 PM
Cook: Harrison's remarks out of line

Friday, May 27, 2011
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall tweeted earlier this month that it's wrong to celebrate the death of another human being, even Osama bin Laden. That's OK. We live in America. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinions, even an NFL player.

Steelers linebacker James Harrison tweeted Wednesday that the people who make the rules in the NFL are "idiots" and said league officials are targeting the Steelers with their tougher player-safety rules. That's unacceptable. Forget freedom of speech in this case. Harrison, in essence, called his boss -- Steelers president Art Rooney II -- an "idiot" because Rooney voted for the rules changes. Beyond that, he violated the Mike Tomlin rule. "I'm not opposed to guys tweeting or facebooking or whatever they do," the coach has said. "Just don't tweet about my business."

I have no problem with Mendenhall's tweet.

I have a big problem with Harrison's.

For one thing, Harrison was wrong about the NFL targeting the Steelers. They weren't targeted last season when the St. Louis Rams led the league in penalties with 126 and the Steelers ranked 24th with 86, and the Oakland Raiders led in penalty yards with 1,161 and the Steelers were 25th with 716. The Steelers made it to the Super Bowl, which wouldn't have happened if the NFL had some sort of conspiracy against them. The Steelers also aren't being targeted now. The tougher rules are for the safety of all the players, including Harrison and his teammates. Sometimes, players need to be protected from themselves.

It also was incredibly arrogant on Harrison's part to suggest the new, more stringent rules are designed to take some of the toughness out of the Steelers' defense. He wasn't alone there. Teammate LaMarr Woodley tweeted, "lol im sorry that im not sorry we hit 2 hard." Like the Steelers are the only defense that hits hard? Try selling that opinion in Baltimore. Or New York. Or a lot of other NFL cities. Certainly, the Steelers' defense wasn't all that tough and intimidating against the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XLV, was it?

In a way, it's understandable why Harrison feels targeted by the NFL office. He was fined $100,000 last season for what the league determined were dirty hits, more than any player. But Harrison needs to look in the mirror once in awhile. Maybe the reason he was fined so much is that he didn't play by the rules. Of course, blaming commissioner Roger Goodell and discipline czars Ray Anderson and Merton Hanks -- "who I now have absolutely no respect for," Harrison blogged Thursday -- is so much easier than blaming himself.

"I guess the NFL needed a poster child for their campaign," Harrison said in that same blog. "I know there are hits out there that go either way, but if it's me I already know which way they are going to go."

Calling Goodell and the others "idiots" is going to help that situation?

That can't possibly help Harrison and the Steelers.

That's what I mean about him violating the Tomlin rule.

Harrison blogged that he is "all for player safety," but then said later, "I love this game, but I hate what they are trying to turn it into."

Is it just me or is that contradictory?

This is just another case of Harrison overreacting. He did it in October after he was fined $75,000 (later reduced to $50,000) for a hit on Cleveland Browns wide receiver Mohamed Massaquoi when he threatened to quit football. Like he was going to walk away from his $51.75 million contract? Harrison also did it at the Super Bowl when he used his media-day pulpit to mock Goodell. He came across sounding awfully foolish that day, especially when he was asked if he might not think differently about player safety if he's 50 and mentally disabled because of hits to his head that really weren't necessary for him to be known as a fierce player or for him to get that huge contract. "I'm not worried about that," Harrison replied. "It's part of the game. We signed up for this. It's not a touchy, feely game. I've said it many times. I'm willing to go through hell so my kids don't have to."

My guess is that Harrison doesn't feel so strongly about his principles that he will follow through with his retirement threat any time soon. That $51.75 million contract, remember? He will show up at Steelers headquarters, whenever the NFL lockout ends. He then will have two choices: Do a better job of adjusting to the new rules or continue to pay the big fines and, ultimately, be suspended.

Harrison is a tough character, as tough as any player in the NFL. But this is a fight he can't win. The league is too strong. The game is bigger than him, any player or any team.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11147/11 ... z1NWrijM74 (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11147/1149479-87-0.stm#ixzz1NWrijM74)


Well if the shoe fits

hawaiiansteel
05-27-2011, 04:18 PM
Sapp on Steelers Harrison and Woodley: 'Maybe they need to leave the game'

By Nate Davis, USA TODAY
May 26, 2011


Deeming their outrage with the NFL's ongoing crackdown on illegal hits "a little misplaced," seven-time Pro Bowl DT Warren Sapp had some pointed advice for Steelers OLBs James Harrison and LaMarr Woodley on Wednesday.

http://i.usatoday.net/communitymanager/_photos/the-huddle/2011/05/03/sappx-inset-community.jpg

"The players in this game now, we must take care of each other -- that's the biggest thing," Sapp said on NFL Total Access on NFL Network.

Sapp, who has long been unapologetic for the blindside block (then legal, but later outlawed) that resulted in a season-ending pelvic injury to Packers LT Chad Clifton in 2002, nevertheless referenced experiences from his playing days when he says opponents looked out for their compatriots.

"We took care of each other," said Sapp, "and that's what this is all about -- taking care of the game, taking care of each other. And if James Harrison and LaMarr Woodley don't see this, then maybe they need to leave the game. Because the game's gonna be here a long time after you, and it's been here a long time before you. So either get on the train or get off."

Harrison tweeted in reaction to the latest safety rules: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots."

Woodley chimed in with his own thoughts on a SIRIUS NFL Radio interview:

"You know, I think it's so stupid, man. I mean -- it's football. I mean, this is what you signed up for. ... You knew it was gonna be an aggressive game, there's a chance of you getting hurt and, like, having serious injuries. So that's what you signed up for. I think having all the fines and the penalties, it's stupid because it's taking away from the game."

http://content.usatoday.com/communities ... the-game/1 (http://content.usatoday.com/communities/thehuddle/post/2011/05/warren-sapp-on-steelers-olbs-james-harrison-and-lamarr-woodley-maybe-they-need-to-leave-the-game/1)

RuthlessBurgher
05-27-2011, 04:23 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/news/2002/11/25/sapp_sherman/lg_sapphit_tv.jpghttp://sportsmed.starwave.com/i/magazine/new/clifton.jpghttp://packerrats.com/images/smilies/icon_buttkick.gif :Hater :owned

DukieBoy
05-27-2011, 11:06 PM
Wonder how Starkey would like it if the powers that be changed the rules of journalism so that it was nearly impossible for him to do his job? Betcha he would complain, too.

The more these guys write, the bigger tools they make themselves look like.

Yeah, at first it's a $100 fine for a dangling participle. Okay. Then $500 for a split infinitive. Ugh. Suddenly, the powers that be go too far and just ban all adjectives. What? Adjectives are a critical part of being able to express the English language in written form. Writing without adjectives would be like football without tackling! :lol:


Well, if all you got to dangle is a participle ...

birtikidis
05-28-2011, 02:41 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/news/2002/11/25/sapp_sherman/lg_sapphit_tv.jpghttp://sportsmed.starwave.com/i/magazine/new/clifton.jpghttp://packerrats.com/images/smilies/icon_buttkick.gif :Hater :owned
He also did that crap all the time to qb's after a turn over. Sapp was a great player and he was nasty. He played within the rules, which partly were changed because of him. For him to say anything on this topic is ridiculous. When Sapp played the games, the rules weren't changed on a weekly basis.

BradshawsHairdresser
05-28-2011, 02:50 PM
Think about who Loudmouth is getting his paycheck from these days...NFL Network. So really, should there be any surprise about the opinion he is expressing?

birtikidis
05-28-2011, 02:59 PM
Think about who Loudmouth is getting his paycheck from these days...NFL Network. So really, should there be any surprise about the opinion he is expressing?
yea, true. I'm not ripping him or anything. Like I said, he played in a league where the rules didn't change with each game. Hell of a luxury.
now if Rodney Harrison tried saying something...

RuthlessBurgher
05-28-2011, 04:04 PM
Think about who Loudmouth is getting his paycheck from these days...NFL Network. So really, should there be any surprise about the opinion he is expressing?
yea, true. I'm not ripping him or anything. Like I said, he played in a league where the rules didn't change with each game. Hell of a luxury.
now if Rodney Harrison tried saying something...

From last season:

http://www.nesn.com/2010/10/rodney-harrison-offers-injury-solutions-after-a-career-of-big-hits.html


Rodney Harrison Becomes Ironic Critic of Violent NFL Hits
by Matt Flores on Tue, Oct 19, 2010 at 1:06PM

Dear Rodney Harrison,

It’s always fun watching athletes make the awkward transition from player to in-studio analyst, and it's certainly been no different with you. You were once the biggest badass to step on the football field on Sundays; now you are speaking out against violence in the game?

On NBC’s Football Night in America, you spoke as "a player with over $300,000 in fines." You smirked when you said you put $50,000 aside before a season started, just for fines. Then you went on to offer solutions.

Do you really think the guy who just admitted to putting aside money to break the rules should have an impact on new safety rules?

You went on to say that players should be suspended instead of just the $5,000 fine, because the money doesn’t matter to them.

There was an overwhelmingly positive response to your comments the next day from the media, but one question remains: How would Harrison the player respond to Harrison the analyst?

I know you are now trying to say the politically correct thing, but don’t be a hypocrite.

When referring to your helmet-to-helmet collisions, you said they were "mostly an accident." You made a living by brutally smashing the opposition to pieces, and now that you are done, you think the game needs to be changed.

Several of these "accidents" led to you being voted the dirtiest player in the league by your peers in 2004 and 2006, and the coaches bestowed the dishonor on you in 2008.

You could make a case for yourself that you weren't a dirty player, that you were simply a hard-hitting safety who made players pay for coming over the middle. Still, the perception of you always said otherwise.

The NFL needs a clear stance on this issue because men are getting seriously injured every week.

The change of heart is appreciated, but no one believes it is sincere.

hawaiiansteel
05-29-2011, 03:45 PM
from Deebo's blog:



jharrison9292L - my thoughts

What’s Really Going On?

May 26, 2011


It’s been weighing heavy on my mind all day, so I figure I might as well just let it out. I want to make it clear that I am all for player safety. I don’t disagree with all of the rule changes.

But come on…REALLY? Now you have to wait until a guy catches, or even worse, you have to let them catch the ball before you can even attempt to tackle him. Along with that, you cannot let any part of your helmet or facemask touch any part of them basically from the chest up. If you are following the letter of the rules exactly, now most tackles, if not ALL tackles can be flagged, fined and/or result in ejection from that game, or future game(s).

I understand the intent behind making the rules, but in their attempt to make the game safer, they are actually clouding what is allowable. Even the referees are confused. A close look will show you that the referees were calling things that were not even supposed to be called, and NOT calling things that were actually illegal.

The decision to call a penalty or impose a fine is seemingly, at least some of the time, dependent upon the uniform and the player. After my meeting this past fall with Roger Goodell, Ray Anderson, and Merton Hanks and some others, who I now have absolutely no respect for (to keep it PG), I definitely believe there is no equality in their enforcement of these rules.

These rules are targeting hard hitting players and defenses i.e. STEELERS. I guess the NFL needed a poster child for their campaign.

The quarterback rule clarification (Rule 12, Section 2, Article 13) is a great change. But that’s just saying “Hey Steelers..by the way…Ben’s nose getting broken last year really did not deserve a penalty.”

I know there are hits out there that could go either way, but if it’s me I already know which way they are going to go. I love this game, but I hate what they are trying to turn it into.

I wonder why the NFL is suddenly coming down so hard on player’s safety issues. I can’t help but think it’s not actually for the safety of the players.

http://jharrison9292.wordpress.com/2011 ... -going-on/ (http://jharrison9292.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/whats-really-going-on/)

SanAntonioSteelerFan
05-29-2011, 04:49 PM
from Deebo's blog:



jharrison9292L - my thoughts

What’s Really Going On?

May 26, 2011
...

I wonder why the NFL is suddenly coming down so hard on player’s safety issues. I can’t help but think it’s not actually for the safety of the players.

http://jharrison9292.wordpress.com/2011 ... -going-on/ (http://jharrison9292.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/whats-really-going-on/)

Yes, James (sir!), I believe you are correct - IMO the main reasons are:

1) "Your honor, it's not our fault they're all brain dead, we tried so hard to protect them ..." and,

2) "We have to tap that virgin demographic of cute little housewives who like to see big strong men running around, but don't really want to see big hits ... there's more of them than hard core old-time football fans, we can throw the latter under the bus to open the new revenue stream". Hello SD, Indy ... good bye Pittsburgh/Baltimore.

And ... not only have they neutered defenses built like ours, but they've neutered Ben - his comparative advantage was that he wouldn't go down where other QBs would. Now, since no QB is going to be tackled much (the penalty for a fine/ejection/etc. is too high, the hits will be namby-pamby at most), Ben's amazing elusiveness and complete-the-pass-while-being-pummeled skills will be irrelevant and of historical interest only. Kind of like some secretary who's the fastest in the city at taking shorthand. What's "shorthand"?? And what's a "secretary"?

Oviedo
05-30-2011, 10:38 AM
Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.

ikestops85
05-31-2011, 11:15 AM
Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.

I'm glad our forefathers didn't think like that. If they had we would still be having our afternoon tea. 8)

I like that Harrison is standing up for what he thinks is right. More players should do that. The fans should also let their opinion be known. It's good for the NFL to have to justify their position. I think Harrison is pointing out that officials will be embarrassed because of the vagueness in the way the rules are written. In my opinion the NFL has dug themselves a very deep hole with this rule change and I think it will be modified within a year after they start playing football again.

and in keeping with my standard rant on this subject ... How in the hell can the NFL say it is interested in player safety and not mandate the use of safer equipment? Padding on top of equipment that has a very hard surface (i.e. helmets and shoulder pads) would take much of the shock out of the hit and be a lot safer for the players. Who cares if the players don't look 'cool' wearing it. Of course if they do that the teams would have to spend money instead of collecting it in the form of fines.

Oviedo
06-01-2011, 12:08 PM
Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.

I'm glad our forefathers didn't think like that. If they had we would still be having our afternoon tea. 8)

I like that Harrison is standing up for what he thinks is right. More players should do that. The fans should also let their opinion be known. It's good for the NFL to have to justify their position. I think Harrison is pointing out that officials will be embarrassed because of the vagueness in the way the rules are written. In my opinion the NFL has dug themselves a very deep hole with this rule change and I think it will be modified within a year after they start playing football again.

and in keeping with my standard rant on this subject ... How in the hell can the NFL say it is interested in player safety and not mandate the use of safer equipment? Padding on top of equipment that has a very hard surface (i.e. helmets and shoulder pads) would take much of the shock out of the hit and be a lot safer for the players. Who cares if the players don't look 'cool' wearing it. Of course if they do that the teams would have to spend money instead of collecting it in the form of fines.


OK :shock:

A football player wanting to take someone's head off without consequence and not wanting to adapt to rules is exactly like our forrfathers objecting to unfair taxation, the lack of voting rights and representation in government and the forced billeting of soldiers in private homes. I now see how they are exactly the same. Thanks for pointing that out so eloquently.

Perhaps Harrison should get all his buddies from the "not really a union" and seize NFL headquarters in a revolution. Problem is these rules are being emplaced to protect the other half of the players on offense so they may not participate and we will just brand them Tories or Loyalists.

There may even be some "traitors" on the defensive side of the ball like Ray Lewis, Clay Matthews and others who seem afraid to spout off and whine like James "Don Quixote" Harrison. We all know this only effects Harrison and no other player or team in the league. The reason it will effect him is because he won't keep his trap shut so he is daring them to do something. Not a smart team first approach.

hawaiiansteel
06-01-2011, 08:16 PM
Be happy, Harrison: NFL crackdown backs Steelers' 'nasty' rep

By Vic Carucci NFL.com
Senior Columnist
May 26, 2011


If I'm James Harrison or any other defensive player on the Pittsburgh Steelers, I'm not complaining about the fact the NFL is singling out me or my team for the flagrant hits we deliver.

I'm embracing it.

Hey, guys, the NFL has gone as far as to establish legislation -- calling for teams to be fined for players' repeated rule-breaking hits -- that for all practical purposes bears your name. And when anyone mentions the "Steelers rule," the first word that comes to mind is "nasty."

You don't just think about the ultra-aggressive manner in which Pittsburgh's defenders play. You think about the way they're coached. You picture coach Mike Tomlin and defensive coordinator D!ck LeBeau encouraging a playing style that puts a premium on intimidation -- so much so that the league now is holding them directly responsible for when their players draw flags and fines on multiple occasions.

This isn't meant to condone illegal or dangerous contact, such as the helmet-to-helmet variety. It's merely pointing out that, for as long as there has been football, there have been players and teams that have benefitted from having certain reputations. Invariably, badder is better.

That's why Harrison had it all wrong with this Twitter posting: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots." What he should have posted was: "Thank you!"

Harrison's teammate and fellow linebacker, LaMarr Woodley, seemed to better grasp the opportunity at hand with this tweet: "Thoughts on 'the steelers rule'??? lol I'm sorry that I'm not sorry we hit 2 hard."

If I'm these guys, I'm milking that outlaw reputation for all that it's worth, because it could be worth a lot. It just might prove to be the deciding factor in a victory, providing that critical edge at the most critical time of a game.

Think about it. Thanks to the league's obsession with reining in the Steelers' defense, opposing offenses have something extra to consider before the game even begins: Is it safe to wander into a particular part of the field? To reach up for a pass and expose too much of the body? To hang in the pocket for that extra second or two?

When opposing players are thinking too much about the consequences of their actions, they're less likely to make the plays they're supposed to make. It's like adding a 12th man to what already ranks as one of the best defenses in the NFL.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... -nasty-rep (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d82001b2f/article/be-happy-harrison-nfl-crackdown-backs-steelers-nasty-rep)

AngryAsian
06-02-2011, 10:20 AM
Be happy, Harrison: NFL crackdown backs Steelers' 'nasty' rep

By Vic Carucci NFL.com
Senior Columnist
May 26, 2011


If I'm James Harrison or any other defensive player on the Pittsburgh Steelers, I'm not complaining about the fact the NFL is singling out me or my team for the flagrant hits we deliver.

I'm embracing it.

Hey, guys, the NFL has gone as far as to establish legislation -- calling for teams to be fined for players' repeated rule-breaking hits -- that for all practical purposes bears your name. And when anyone mentions the "Steelers rule," the first word that comes to mind is "nasty."

You don't just think about the ultra-aggressive manner in which Pittsburgh's defenders play. You think about the way they're coached. You picture coach Mike Tomlin and defensive coordinator D!ck LeBeau encouraging a playing style that puts a premium on intimidation -- so much so that the league now is holding them directly responsible for when their players draw flags and fines on multiple occasions.

This isn't meant to condone illegal or dangerous contact, such as the helmet-to-helmet variety. It's merely pointing out that, for as long as there has been football, there have been players and teams that have benefitted from having certain reputations. Invariably, badder is better.

That's why Harrison had it all wrong with this Twitter posting: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots." What he should have posted was: "Thank you!"

Harrison's teammate and fellow linebacker, LaMarr Woodley, seemed to better grasp the opportunity at hand with this tweet: "Thoughts on 'the steelers rule'??? lol I'm sorry that I'm not sorry we hit 2 hard."

If I'm these guys, I'm milking that outlaw reputation for all that it's worth, because it could be worth a lot. It just might prove to be the deciding factor in a victory, providing that critical edge at the most critical time of a game.

Think about it. Thanks to the league's obsession with reining in the Steelers' defense, opposing offenses have something extra to consider before the game even begins: Is it safe to wander into a particular part of the field? To reach up for a pass and expose too much of the body? To hang in the pocket for that extra second or two?

When opposing players are thinking too much about the consequences of their actions, they're less likely to make the plays they're supposed to make. It's like adding a 12th man to what already ranks as one of the best defenses in the NFL.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... -nasty-rep (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d82001b2f/article/be-happy-harrison-nfl-crackdown-backs-steelers-nasty-rep)


Sounds pretty logical to me.

Oviedo
06-02-2011, 01:54 PM
Be happy, Harrison: NFL crackdown backs Steelers' 'nasty' rep

By Vic Carucci NFL.com
Senior Columnist
May 26, 2011


If I'm James Harrison or any other defensive player on the Pittsburgh Steelers, I'm not complaining about the fact the NFL is singling out me or my team for the flagrant hits we deliver.

I'm embracing it.

Hey, guys, the NFL has gone as far as to establish legislation -- calling for teams to be fined for players' repeated rule-breaking hits -- that for all practical purposes bears your name. And when anyone mentions the "Steelers rule," the first word that comes to mind is "nasty."

You don't just think about the ultra-aggressive manner in which Pittsburgh's defenders play. You think about the way they're coached. You picture coach Mike Tomlin and defensive coordinator D!ck LeBeau encouraging a playing style that puts a premium on intimidation -- so much so that the league now is holding them directly responsible for when their players draw flags and fines on multiple occasions.

This isn't meant to condone illegal or dangerous contact, such as the helmet-to-helmet variety. It's merely pointing out that, for as long as there has been football, there have been players and teams that have benefitted from having certain reputations. Invariably, badder is better.

That's why Harrison had it all wrong with this Twitter posting: "I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots." What he should have posted was: "Thank you!"

Harrison's teammate and fellow linebacker, LaMarr Woodley, seemed to better grasp the opportunity at hand with this tweet: "Thoughts on 'the steelers rule'??? lol I'm sorry that I'm not sorry we hit 2 hard."

If I'm these guys, I'm milking that outlaw reputation for all that it's worth, because it could be worth a lot. It just might prove to be the deciding factor in a victory, providing that critical edge at the most critical time of a game.

Think about it. Thanks to the league's obsession with reining in the Steelers' defense, opposing offenses have something extra to consider before the game even begins: Is it safe to wander into a particular part of the field? To reach up for a pass and expose too much of the body? To hang in the pocket for that extra second or two?

When opposing players are thinking too much about the consequences of their actions, they're less likely to make the plays they're supposed to make. It's like adding a 12th man to what already ranks as one of the best defenses in the NFL.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... -nasty-rep (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d82001b2f/article/be-happy-harrison-nfl-crackdown-backs-steelers-nasty-rep)


Sounds pretty logical to me.

Also means that a player can take a "dive" or overly dramatize a hit and they have a better chance of getting a penalty flag thrown.

hawaiiansteel
06-02-2011, 02:19 PM
Also means that a player can take a "dive" or overly dramatize a hit and they have a better chance of getting a penalty flag thrown.

pretty soon the NFL will be like that other "futbol" game...

http://talkingship.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Soccer-Dive.jpg

Captain Lemming
06-02-2011, 11:40 PM
Harrison just needs to shut up and quit the bitching. He is not helping himself or anyone else on the team. The problem has always been these rule changes are subjective to enforce so all he is doing is putting a target on his back and on his teamamtes.

The NFL officials are like anyone else and don't like to be embarassed. The system is designed for them to win and Harrison to lose, so get with the program no matter how stupid we think it is. Harrison is not helping. Sometimes keeping a low profile and letting these things die a death of their own are better and forcing it into the limelight and making it a issue.

The most money post in this thread.

When Harrison said he wasn't going to change his play after the FIRST fine HE put himself in the bulls-eye. Some calls were definitely questionable contest them fine, but the constant whining is a war he cannot win.

feltdizz
06-05-2011, 11:15 AM
http://dailymenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/buster-posey-injury1.jpg


Umpire Joe West, the president of the World Umpires Association who was feet away from the impact that sidelined Posey, assures it's only part of the game -- "just as much as apple pie."

"I can't tell you I would change anything, It's one of those things that's part of baseball, just as much as apple pie. You can't change the rules because it's been that way forever."

West said a key part of the play had been missed in the aftermath.

"What they're failing to look at is that (Posey) dropped the ball before the guy got there," West said. "That's why he was in a vulnerable position. That's why he was trying to find the ball. If he had caught the ball, he could have got his hands up and he could have defended himself. He could have absorbed the blow with both arms and his glove.

"It's like a receiver going over the middle in football. If he bobbles the ball a couple of times, the linebacker is going to kill him."

Maybe the NFL needs to be more like the MLB afterall... :stirpot

birtikidis
06-05-2011, 01:16 PM
Also means that a player can take a "dive" or overly dramatize a hit and they have a better chance of getting a penalty flag thrown.

pretty soon the NFL will be like that other "futbol" game...

http://talkingship.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Soccer-Dive.jpg
Hey at least Ray Lewis can fit in... He dives on all the time like that.

RuthlessBurgher
06-06-2011, 12:06 PM
http://dailymenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/buster-posey-injury1.jpg


Umpire Joe West, the president of the World Umpires Association who was feet away from the impact that sidelined Posey, assures it's only part of the game -- "just as much as apple pie."

"I can't tell you I would change anything, It's one of those things that's part of baseball, just as much as apple pie. You can't change the rules because it's been that way forever."

West said a key part of the play had been missed in the aftermath.

"What they're failing to look at is that (Posey) dropped the ball before the guy got there," West said. "That's why he was in a vulnerable position. That's why he was trying to find the ball. If he had caught the ball, he could have got his hands up and he could have defended himself. He could have absorbed the blow with both arms and his glove.

"It's like a receiver going over the middle in football. If he bobbles the ball a couple of times, the linebacker is going to kill him."

Maybe the NFL needs to be more like the MLB afterall... :stirpot

When is the last time you had a slice of apple pie at a baseball game?

hawaiiansteel
06-06-2011, 09:57 PM
Are the Steelers being "targeted" by the NFL?

Of course they are--and it's bad for football.

by Matt Bowen
JUNE 05, 2011


Let’s get right to the point on this Sunday afternoon: the NFL is targeting the Pittsburgh Steelers defense. That is going to happen when you consistently finish off wide receivers and play with an intimidating style when the football is in the air.

And the new proposed rule changes for illegal hits are bad for NFL football—especially defenses that play with “controlled violence.”

http://cdn.cloudfiles.mosso.com/c1910342/media_center/images/rendered/blog/wysiwyg/Ryan-Clark-2944.jpg

Ryan Clark and the rest of the Steelers defense will come to hit on Sundays.

I understand that Steelers chairman Dan Rooney has tried to slow down the idea that his club is the reason for the proposed rule that would impose fines (and possible lost draft picks) to an organization for repeated illegal hits.

But we should all see what is going on here with the league office and their threats to clean up Sunday afternoons as it applies to Pittsburgh. Use them as a model—or example—of what not to do with your headgear and shoulder pads on game day.

However, the Steelers style of play is the exact reason I look at them as a coach’s dream.

Beyond the X’s and Os of coordinator Dick LeBeau (that are still copied throughout the league) and the talent, I see a unit that plays with an attitude. That shows up on tape in every film room across the NFL and it forces offensive players to think twice about going across the middle of the field.

You are going to get hit when you play the Steelers. Harrison, Woodley, Clark, Polamalu, etc. Just a few of the names on this defense that come to the stadium ready to play physical football.

I’m not trying to stand behind cheap shots and intentional hits that are aimed to hurt an opposing player. Instead, this is about good, clean football. But with that comes some helmet-to-helmet contact and big hits that the league is trying to shut down. And there is no real way to fix that with the speed of the game.

But forcing a rule change because of the style of a defense isn’t the right way to do it. Don’t force a team to pullback when they are about to lower their pads on contact. Because it is part of the reason the Steelers are consistently one of the best units in the NFL.

Follow me on Twitter: MattBowen41

http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Are ... e-NFL.html (http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Are-the-Steelers-being-targeted-by-the-NFL.html)

Oviedo
06-07-2011, 07:49 AM
Are the Steelers being "targeted" by the NFL?

Of course they are--and it's bad for football.

by Matt Bowen
JUNE 05, 2011


Let’s get right to the point on this Sunday afternoon: the NFL is targeting the Pittsburgh Steelers defense. That is going to happen when you consistently finish off wide receivers and play with an intimidating style when the football is in the air.

And the new proposed rule changes for illegal hits are bad for NFL football—especially defenses that play with “controlled violence.”

http://cdn.cloudfiles.mosso.com/c1910342/media_center/images/rendered/blog/wysiwyg/Ryan-Clark-2944.jpg

Ryan Clark and the rest of the Steelers defense will come to hit on Sundays.

I understand that Steelers chairman Dan Rooney has tried to slow down the idea that his club is the reason for the proposed rule that would impose fines (and possible lost draft picks) to an organization for repeated illegal hits.

But we should all see what is going on here with the league office and their threats to clean up Sunday afternoons as it applies to Pittsburgh. Use them as a model—or example—of what not to do with your headgear and shoulder pads on game day.

However, the Steelers style of play is the exact reason I look at them as a coach’s dream.

Beyond the X’s and Os of coordinator bad word LeBeau (that are still copied throughout the league) and the talent, I see a unit that plays with an attitude. That shows up on tape in every film room across the NFL and it forces offensive players to think twice about going across the middle of the field.

You are going to get hit when you play the Steelers. Harrison, Woodley, Clark, Polamalu, etc. Just a few of the names on this defense that come to the stadium ready to play physical football.

I’m not trying to stand behind cheap shots and intentional hits that are aimed to hurt an opposing player. Instead, this is about good, clean football. But with that comes some helmet-to-helmet contact and big hits that the league is trying to shut down. And there is no real way to fix that with the speed of the game.

But forcing a rule change because of the style of a defense isn’t the right way to do it. Don’t force a team to pullback when they are about to lower their pads on contact. Because it is part of the reason the Steelers are consistently one of the best units in the NFL.

Follow me on Twitter: MattBowen41

http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Are ... e-NFL.html (http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Are-the-Steelers-being-targeted-by-the-NFL.html)

Of course we are but why give them the satisfaction by complaining. Adjust, move on and beat them at their own game.