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hawaiiansteel
05-24-2011, 01:58 AM
Updated: May 23, 2011

Troy Polamalu: Players have cause

By Arash Markazi
ESPNLosAngeles.com


LOS ANGELES -- Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu doesn't know when the NFL lockout will end, but he does believe the players are representing the everyday person in their battle against the NFL.

"It's unfortunate right now. I think what the players are fighting for is something bigger," Polamalu said Sunday night. "A lot of people think it's millionaires versus billionaires and that's the huge argument. The fact is its people fighting against big business. The big business argument is 'I got the money and I got the power therefore I can tell you what to do.' That's life everywhere. I think this is a time when the football players are standing up and saying, 'No, no, no, the people have the power.'"

Polamalu, who was being honored Sunday at the annual Cedars Sinai Medical Center Sports Spectacular, has stayed productive during the lockout. The two-time Super Bowl champion and 2010 NFL defensive player of the year graduated from USC this month with a bachelor's in history.

"I've always said education is important, but I've never been able to speak about it without any authority," Polamalu said. "I can't tell a kid to go to college and school's the most important thing when I have no authority to speak without a diploma. It's like if I were to speak to anyone about being a father before I had children. Now, I feel very blessed and it's big fulfillment for myself. You can spend a lot of your life trying to achieve certain goals, but school is a huge part of that. If you fall short, it's a big disappointment."

The six-time Pro Bowl safety was surprised at how much media attention and recognition he got for an accomplishment he said he should have completed in 2004 before he was drafted by the Steelers in the first round.

"It might have felt better if I had completed it on time, but I didn't complete it on time," he said. "I just finished school. I should have finished school a long time ago. There shouldn't be so much press about me going back and finishing school when it's something I should have done in the first place."

Polamalu, who plans on using his degree to become a teacher after he retires from football, said he was on track to graduate on time eight years ago before he began training for the NFL draft.

"I had a full semester of units left my senior year while I was training for the combine," he said. "I dropped one class and then I dropped another class and I just said I can't do this. But thanks to the NFL owners and [NFL commissioner] Roger Goodell they've allowed me to finish my degree during this lockout."

Polamalu also believes the NCAA singled out his alma mater for punishment compared to the sanctions levied against other schools such as Ohio State. "The circumstances are tough to overcome. I think they are very unfair," Polamalu said. "I think if the [NCAA] just had guidelines that said this is your punishment for this and that and it was a universal way of looking at that that would be one thing, but they just pick and choose who they want to punish more than others, and I think that has been well documented."

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=6580041

Oviedo
05-24-2011, 08:00 AM
But the players have no problem taking life style changing millions from evil "Big Business."

I think Troy should propose to the "not really a union" that players accept the same pay as soldiers serving in Afghanistan to show their support of the "everyday person" and to honor real heroes.

BradshawsHairdresser
05-24-2011, 08:51 AM
Polamalu-- fighting big business? Utterly laughable. Correct me if I'm wrong, but hasn't he been right at their trough, getting his fill? He ceased to be a valid representative of the "everyday man" several million dollars ago.

And can't he see that now, he himself IS big business, too? Or maybe he's been donating all of that endorsement money to charity.
:lol: :lol:

Here's a suggestion for you Troy--why don't you work on your conditioning so you can stay healthy for more than half a season, instead of worrying so much about biting the hand that feeds you?

feltdizz
05-24-2011, 08:54 AM
Shut up and work Troy.. how dare you have an opinion. Work I say! Work! :roll:

Notleadpoisoned
05-24-2011, 08:57 AM
Bethlehem Steel was once considered "Big Business" too.

feltdizz
05-24-2011, 09:00 AM
But the players have no problem taking life style changing millions from evil "Big Business."

I think Troy should propose to the "not really a union" that players accept the same pay as soldiers serving in Afghanistan to show their support of the "everyday person" and to honor real heroes.

:roll: Troy should throw himself on a grenade to show real sacrifice. Using the military is weakest argument there is Ovie... please don't do that again. :wink:


...and Troy doesn't TAKE millions, he MAKES millions.

Afghanistan :lol: :lol: :lol:

feltdizz
05-24-2011, 09:02 AM
Bethlehem Steel was once considered "Big Business" too.

If the Chinese can make an NFL product at 1/10 the cost the NFL will cease to exist in 20 years just like Bethlehem Steel.

steelblood
05-24-2011, 09:11 AM
Big business is just a collection of individuals too. Sure some may have inherited their wealth, but many athletes hardly had to work for their god given ability. Some are born with good fortune, some aren't. That doesn't change that this is two groups of very fortunate individuals making huge money in a very bad economy. It's time to be reasonable.

Oviedo
05-24-2011, 09:18 AM
But the players have no problem taking life style changing millions from evil "Big Business."

I think Troy should propose to the "not really a union" that players accept the same pay as soldiers serving in Afghanistan to show their support of the "everyday person" and to honor real heroes.

:roll: Troy should throw himself on a grenade to show real sacrifice. Using the military is weakest argument there is Ovie... please don't do that again. :wink:


...and Troy doesn't TAKE millions, he MAKES millions.

Afghanistan :lol: :lol: :lol:

I promise you I earned the right after 20 years to reference the military to show the hypocrisy of a pampered millionaire who has been given everything because of athletic ability trying to associate himself with "everyday people."

feltdizz
05-24-2011, 09:20 AM
Big business is just a collection of individuals too. Sure some may have inherited their wealth, but many athletes hardly had to work for their god given ability. Some are born with good fortune, some aren't. That doesn't change that this is two groups of very fortunate individuals making huge money in a very bad economy. It's time to be reasonable.


:Agree but I have a feeling a deal won't get done.

Sugar
05-24-2011, 11:32 AM
I'm about as pro big business as anybody. A poor man never employed me. That said, the NFL is a monopoly that is working under a special set of rules. They don't remotely get the sympathy that I'd give big oil, big tobacco, big food, big beer, big technology or big anything else.

Eich
05-24-2011, 12:21 PM
Find me any big business that shares its revenues anywhere close to equally with its employees (and none of its expenses). It just doesn't happen. Owners decide what they want to pay. Employees decide if they want to work for them for that pay.

The NFL owners could come up with a "take it or leave it" deal and not negotiate at all. Eventually enough players would take it and things would move on. We might lose a few of the stars of today but eventually, new stars would emerge. There are plenty of hungry athletes that would love a shot in the NFL.

Djfan
05-24-2011, 12:21 PM
Polamalu, who plans on using his degree to become a teacher after he retires from football, ..

DON'T DO IT TROY!!!!!

It's not what you think it is. Trust me.

feltdizz
05-24-2011, 01:02 PM
But the players have no problem taking life style changing millions from evil "Big Business."

I think Troy should propose to the "not really a union" that players accept the same pay as soldiers serving in Afghanistan to show their support of the "everyday person" and to honor real heroes.

:roll: Troy should throw himself on a grenade to show real sacrifice. Using the military is weakest argument there is Ovie... please don't do that again. :wink:


...and Troy doesn't TAKE millions, he MAKES millions.

Afghanistan :lol: :lol: :lol:

I promise you I earned the right after 20 years to reference the military to show the hypocrisy of a pampered millionaire who has been given everything because of athletic ability trying to associate himself with "everyday people."

I didn't read where Troy was comparing himself to everyday people. He said it's football players vs. big business... never said cops, army, navy... never said he was a soldier. When did he associate himself with everyday people? The author may have interpreted it as such but I didn't read Troy's quotes and get that perception.

and who has been "given" everything? Sounds like jealousy to me.

RuthlessBurgher
05-24-2011, 01:10 PM
Polamalu, who plans on using his degree to become a teacher after he retires from football, ..

DON'T DO IT TROY!!!!!

It's not what you think it is. Trust me.

I think the troublemakers in the back of the classroom might be less likely to be a disruption for Mr. Polamalu compared to Mr. DJFan. :wink:

Djfan
05-24-2011, 02:19 PM
Polamalu, who plans on using his degree to become a teacher after he retires from football, ..

DON'T DO IT TROY!!!!!

It's not what you think it is. Trust me.

I think the troublemakers in the back of the classroom might be less likely to be a disruption for Mr. Polamalu compared to Mr. DJFan. :wink:


You trying to start sompin' Ruth?

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t45/Gertrude85/mr_t.jpg

BradshawsHairdresser
05-24-2011, 06:02 PM
I didn't read where Troy was comparing himself to everyday people.


Go back and read the first few lines of the story:


Troy Polamalu: Players have cause

By Arash Markazi
ESPNLosAngeles.com


LOS ANGELES -- Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu doesn't know when the NFL lockout will end, but he does believe the players are representing the everyday person in their battle against the NFL.

According to the writer, Troy believes he, and the other players, are "representing the everyday person." Pretty clear. Now the writer might be lying, or misrepresenting Troy, but that's what he said.

feltdizz
05-24-2011, 06:57 PM
I didn't read where Troy was comparing himself to everyday people.


Go back and read the first few lines of the story:


Troy Polamalu: Players have cause

By Arash Markazi
ESPNLosAngeles.com


LOS ANGELES -- Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu doesn't know when the NFL lockout will end, but he does believe the players are representing the everyday person in their battle against the NFL.

According to the writer, Troy believes he, and the other players, are "representing the everyday person." Pretty clear. Now the writer might be lying, or misrepresenting Troy, but that's what he said.


The author may have interpreted it as such but I didn't read Troy's quotes and get that perception.


That is why I wrote this in my post :wink:

To be honest I don't buy into either side when they say they are doing it for us... this isn't about us or ticket prices wouldn't rise every season for most teams.

fordfixer
05-24-2011, 07:27 PM
Polamalu, who plans on using his degree to become a teacher after he retires from football, ..

DON'T DO IT TROY!!!!!

It's not what you think it is. Trust me.


Troy wont be teaching to pay the bills

BradshawsHairdresser
05-24-2011, 07:45 PM
I didn't read where Troy was comparing himself to everyday people.


Go back and read the first few lines of the story:


Troy Polamalu: Players have cause

By Arash Markazi
ESPNLosAngeles.com


LOS ANGELES -- Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu doesn't know when the NFL lockout will end, but he does believe the players are representing the everyday person in their battle against the NFL.

According to the writer, Troy believes he, and the other players, are "representing the everyday person." Pretty clear. Now the writer might be lying, or misrepresenting Troy, but that's what he said.


The author may have interpreted it as such but I didn't read Troy's quotes and get that perception.


Dizz, I understand what you said...My point is, the author did NOT report that he was giving an "interpretation" of what Troy had said. He reported that Troy "does believe the players are representing the everyday person in their battle against the NFL." Now, that may indeed just be the author's own interpretation of whatever Troy said to him, but that's NOT what the article said. It was stated as a fact.

feltdizz
05-25-2011, 08:42 AM
I don't think a reporter giving his interpretation of Troy's answer is considered a fact. I didn't get the feeling Troy is fighting for the common man in that interview...

BradshawsHairdresser
05-25-2011, 08:48 AM
:HeadBanger :HeadBanger :HeadBanger

feltdizz
05-25-2011, 08:53 AM
:HeadBanger :HeadBanger :HeadBanger

Don't hurt yourself.... it's not that serious.

Djfan
05-25-2011, 12:45 PM
Polamalu, who plans on using his degree to become a teacher after he retires from football, ..

DON'T DO IT TROY!!!!!

It's not what you think it is. Trust me.


Troy wont be teaching to pay the bills


Good, since that is an impossibility.

_SteeL_CurtaiN_
05-25-2011, 02:02 PM
The NFL is a very different big business, the have anti trust exemptions and have not revealed their financial statements in full to the players. So the owners do not have to worry about their monopoly and can negotiate with the players without revealing the entire pie. Who here would enter into negotiations with a business that tried to do that? This is robber baron style shafting and one of the prime examples of why unions not only exist but atre still needed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/08/AR2011030805214.html

BURGH86STEEL
05-25-2011, 03:05 PM
But the players have no problem taking life style changing millions from evil "Big Business."

I think Troy should propose to the "not really a union" that players accept the same pay as soldiers serving in Afghanistan to show their support of the "everyday person" and to honor real heroes.

:roll: Troy should throw himself on a grenade to show real sacrifice. Using the military is weakest argument there is Ovie... please don't do that again. :wink:


...and Troy doesn't TAKE millions, he MAKES millions.

Afghanistan :lol: :lol: :lol:

I promise you I earned the right after 20 years to reference the military to show the hypocrisy of a pampered millionaire who has been given everything because of athletic ability trying to associate himself with "everyday people."

I didn't read where Troy was comparing himself to everyday people. He said it's football players vs. big business... never said cops, army, navy... never said he was a soldier. When did he associate himself with everyday people? The author may have interpreted it as such but I didn't read Troy's quotes and get that perception.

and who has been "given" everything? Sounds like jealousy to me.

I believe there are many athletes that work hard off the field to become the players they are on the field. They don't wake up one day and compete at the highest level.

BURGH86STEEL
05-25-2011, 03:13 PM
But the players have no problem taking life style changing millions from evil "Big Business."

I think Troy should propose to the "not really a union" that players accept the same pay as soldiers serving in Afghanistan to show their support of the "everyday person" and to honor real heroes.

It's a different dynamic & fight when the players are the business.

Sugar
05-25-2011, 06:35 PM
The NFL is a very different big business, the have anti trust exemptions and have not revealed their financial statements in full to the players. So the owners do not have to worry about their monopoly and can negotiate with the players without revealing the entire pie. Who here would enter into negotiations with a business that tried to do that? This is robber baron style shafting and one of the prime examples of why unions not only exist but atre still needed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/08/AR2011030805214.html

IMO, Unions are an anachronism for the most part. However, when a group like the NFL is able to get around the rules that other big businesses have to play by then it makes sense that a Union should be around and have leverage on them to keep them honest since they don't have competition to do that.

feltdizz
05-26-2011, 12:43 PM
The NFL is a very different big business, the have anti trust exemptions and have not revealed their financial statements in full to the players. So the owners do not have to worry about their monopoly and can negotiate with the players without revealing the entire pie. Who here would enter into negotiations with a business that tried to do that? This is robber baron style shafting and one of the prime examples of why unions not only exist but atre still needed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/08/AR2011030805214.html

IMO, Unions are an anachronism for the most part. However, when a group like the NFL is able to get around the rules that other big businesses have to play by then it makes sense that a Union should be around and have leverage on them to keep them honest since they don't have competition to do that.

nonsense... the NFL is just like the business down the street. Anyone who owns a business would know this. :stirpot

hawaiiansteel
05-26-2011, 04:55 PM
Drew Brees: Owners saw Gene Upshaw’s death as an opportunity

Posted by Michael David Smith on May 26, 2011

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/upshaw190.jpg?w=167

As one of the named plaintiffs in the players’ lawsuit against the owners, Saints quarterback Drew Brees has closely monitored the labor situation. And he traces the current problems to the day the former head of the NFL Players’ Association died.

But Brees doesn’t believe the problem is that Gene Upshaw’s death left the players without a leader. Instead, Brees says the owners perceived that the players were left without a leader, and they thought they could cash in on Upshaw’s passing.

“Ever since Gene Upshaw passed away — I’m just going to lay it all out there — the owners saw blood in the water,” Brees told Jim Trotter of SI.com. “They felt like, ‘This is our opportunity to take a significant piece of the [financial] pie back at all costs, a piece that we will never have to give back again. This is our chance, while they don’t have leadership, while they’re scrambling to find a new executive director. This is our time.’”

It’s incredibly distasteful to think about the owners celebrating the death of a Pro Football Hall of Famer who is one of the most significant figures in NFL history, but Brees believes that that’s how the owners viewed Upshaw’s death: A time when the players weren’t prepared to do anything other than accept what they were offered.

“Their philosophy was, We’re going to give you a very subpar deal, a slap-in-the-face deal, and hope that you’ll accept it because hopefully we’ve intimidated you enough into thinking that this is a take-it-or-leave-it deal, and you’re just going to succumb to the pressure,” Brees said. “Well, guess what. We’re a lot more informed and educated than in the past, and we’re much better businessmen than you think and we’re going to stand up for what is right and what is fair. Fifty-fifty is fair. It’s been fair for the last 20 years and I think the game has done pretty well over the last 20 years. I think franchise values have gone up at a pretty good rate over the last 20 years. So you can’t sit here and tell me that the system is broken.”

The players wanted to keep playing under the deal they negotiated under Upshaw’s leadership, and now that the owners have opted out of that deal, Brees says the players remain united.

“This fight was brought to us, and we feel like we were backed into a corner,” Brees said. “We’re trying to fight our way out of it.”

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... portunity/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/05/26/drew-brees-owners-saw-gene-upshaws-death-as-an-opportunity/)

_SteeL_CurtaiN_
05-27-2011, 05:20 PM
IMO, Unions are an anachronism for the most part.


I think coal miners and steel workers may disagree with this point considering the decline in federal regulation of safety standards.

http://wvgazette.com/News/201105261234

BradshawsHairdresser
05-27-2011, 11:05 PM
Troy Polamalu Wants to Lead a Revolution
by Cory J. Bonini, Managing Editor, KFFL.com

Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu recently provided an unintentionally humorous quote when speaking at the Cedars Sinai Medical Center Sports Spectacular, in Los Angeles.

"It's unfortunate right now. I think what the players are fighting for is something bigger," Polamalu said. "A lot of people think it's millionaires versus billionaires and that's the huge argument."

"The fact is its people fighting against big business. The big business argument is 'I got the money and I got the power therefore I can tell you what to do.' That's life everywhere. I think this is a time when the football players are standing up and saying, 'No, no, no, the people have the power.'"

I'm not taking a side in the labor dispute, but this statement is chock-full of fantasy - and not the kind that pays the bills around here. The NFL's model requires fans, players and owners to harmoniously come together to create the level of wealth involved. This balance has produced billions of dollars for the players and owners, including making a millionaire of Polamalu.

In the real world, if an employee doesn't like the company he/she works for, they always have the option to seek better employment elsewhere, just as Polamalu does. Taking down the big business that is the NFL isn't in his best interest, but I give him credit for his convictions, even if bred through unrealistic idealism.

In a perfect world the people have the power, but the actuality of the situation is that the only power you have as an employee is the right to walk away in search of something better.

The notion he is fighting for the common man is a joke. Nothing about Polamalu's career or annual earnings represents the everyday Joe, but I won't let that get in the way of a feel-good campaign.

He needs to realize that without the successful business the NFL has created, in part because of players like Polamalu, he wouldn't be earning the type of coin he does. See if the CFL or UFL can afford to pay you what you're earning. I know, maybe he will play for the sheer love of the game?

Saying the NFL's money and power allows them to call the shots is 100 percent accurate. That's life everywhere, as Polamalu said ... however, in a totally different sense.

I have a very hard time taking this seriously, coming from such a common man whose hair is insured for $1 million....


http://www.kffl.com/blogs/cb/troy-polam ... z1Nc2HFbXZ (http://www.kffl.com/blogs/cb/troy-polamalu/2011/05/#ixzz1Nc2HFbXZ)

Shawn
05-28-2011, 04:34 AM
I'm not sure Troy's salary has anything to do with his ability to represent the working man. I believe it to be relative and principles are principles. I also don't believe Troy to be "big business". We are talking about employee vs employer relationships. This just happens to be on a grander scale. While I'm not buying everything the players are selling, I do understand employees not wanting to be trampled. And, while I understand most here would play for free, I wouldn't be part of that crowd. How much is my body and mind worth to me? If I chose that career, I would want my due pay. And since the players are the league, they should be compensated and treated as such.

BradshawsHairdresser
05-28-2011, 02:39 PM
I'm not sure Troy's salary has anything to do with his ability to represent the working man.

Troy has very little in common with the working man. Think about it. He plays a game and earns millions of dollars a year doing so. I don't begrudge him the money, and I understand he has worked hard to get where he is at. Still, if he has done any kind of investing at all, he will never have to worry about making ends meet, never have to worry about retirement, never have to worry about putting his kids through school...he's in a far different situation than the average working man.


I believe it to be relative and principles are principles.

How many working men are going to be able to demand that they get 60% of the company's revenues? With any job I've had, if the workers had banded together and demanded that, we would have been laughed at and told we were perfectly free to find a better deal elsewhere.


I also don't believe Troy to be "big business".
When you can market your name (or in his case, your hair) for millions of dollars, I certainly wouldn't call it "little business."



We are talking about employee vs employer relationships. This just happens to be on a grander scale. While I'm not buying everything the players are selling, I do understand employees not wanting to be trampled.

We should all be "trampled" so badly as Troy Polamalu. Even under the owner's new proposal, I can't see how he's being "trampled."


And, while I understand most here would play for free, I wouldn't be part of that crowd. How much is my body and mind worth to me? If I chose that career, I would want my due pay.

I certainly would not play for free, nor would I expect Troy or anyone else to do so. But the players are not enslaved to the NFL (regardless of what Rashard Mendenhall or Adrian Peterson might say). They are free to take their talents elsewhere for whatever compensation they can get. If the players are so terribly unhappy with the NFL, why don't they band together and start up a new league? They certainly have the right to do so, and they should have a lot of capital to invest.


And since the players are the league, they should be compensated and treated as such.
The players are PART of the league. I understand that you can't have a league without players...but neither can you have one without owners.

Look, I'm not terribly sympathetic to either side...but I agree with the author. When Troy Polamalu tries to portray himself as taking up the cause of everyman, fighting the evil giant of Big Business...well....it's just laughable.

feltdizz
05-29-2011, 12:21 PM
Well this second story provides the evidence I didn't see in the first regarding the common man quote. While I disagree with Troy on that line I don't understand how people don't see the NFL is a real job.

Actors, Singers, entertainers... it looks fun but it's still work. These guys don't show up on Sunday, play a game, and then chill for 6 days. It's work, they just work a job that a chosen few can do.

Saying "they play a game for millions" sounds like jealousy. These guys work hard at their craft, employ trainers, nutritionist, etc and put in work like the rest of us. If they don't show up for film, practice, or meetings they get in trouble just like we do. Go down to Florida and tell Ike and Farrior they aren't working this off season and see what they say about it.

Fans keep saying these guys should be happy to have the jobs they have like they were just plucked off the street. When I was in college I was jealous of the football players and the perks they had. Bub I also spent a decent amount of time partying and relaxing while they were on the field sweating and gettiing pounded on in 100 degree weather. When I was creeping back from the girls dorm at 6am these guys were going to practice.

Don't let the hate and jealousy misguide your thought process. While Troy makes millions, his jersey sales top the league and his work generates 10 times what he makes. Teams aren't paying these guys at a loss... if a guy is making 5 mill a year it's because the business is making much more. So it really is him vs big business. Everyone complains about the players salaries but obviously someone or the industry as a whole is making much more.

People like to point out soldiers, fireman, policeman and such to point out those who make real sacrifices. These guys choose to do these things just like players do and when pay scales are cut or pensions and bargaining are stripped they complain too.

But football isn't important, it's just entertainment. That's true and all but you guys like it enough to post opinions in a forum so it must mean so it means something to you.

One last thing, it's much harder to play professional football then it is to be a fireman, soldier or policeman. I have no idea why people bring those professions up like no NFL players have ever done those things. We all make choices when it comes to our jobs but it doesn't mean we have to shut up and take whatever the boss throws our way if you know your worth something to the company. Sure they can fire you... but if they do the math and value your services they may listen and think twice about it.

Oviedo
05-30-2011, 09:13 AM
Don't let the hate and jealousy misguide your thought process. While Troy makes millions, his jersey sales top the league and his work generates 10 times what he makes. Teams aren't paying these guys at a loss... if a guy is making 5 mill a year it's because the business is making much more. So it really is him vs big business. Everyone complains about the players salaries but obviously someone or the industry as a whole is making much more.


The same logic should be applied to "billionaire owners" of the NFL or owners of any business. These men have typically taken huge risks throughout their lives to get the resources to own teams. They gambled and took financial or career plunges that others are typically too timid or afraid to take. But many want to classify them in another group because they have more than the players. Just like the players they have worked hard and earned it. But unlike the players they are into the NFL and the prosperity of the game we love for the long term not the short term.

I'll never agree with some who want to characterize this as a labor/worker's rights struggle and want to associate themselves with oppressed player "labor." My only goal is that 10 years from now we have a league that looks like the league we have now and isn't dominated by a few teams with the rest as schedule filler like we see in MLB. I just feel the owners defining the business and setting it up how they want it guarantees that more than the players dictating the outcome.

Sugar
05-30-2011, 10:54 AM
IMO, Unions are an anachronism for the most part.


I think coal miners and steel workers may disagree with this point considering the decline in federal regulation of safety standards.

http://wvgazette.com/News/201105261234

I really don't care what they think about it. It's still my opinion. They still have a remedy in the courts in a non-monopolized industry.

As for the NFL, it's been granted certain exemptions that change the rules a bit from normal types of business operations. They don't have competition to keep them honest so it's important that the players be able to do so.

feltdizz
05-30-2011, 12:54 PM
How would the NFL look like the MLB in 10 years? That is a horrible argument. The Steelers have been to 3 SB's in 6 years. Who is going to stockpile all the talent? Washington? The Pats? The Cowboys?

Football will never be like baseball because other the 32 teams get a chance in the postseason and it's one and done.

Will the Steelers become the Pirates? I seriously doubt it. The Pirates don't suck because of money, they suck because their owners are content with the revenue sharing and bobble head nights that turn a profit. Anyone screaming about the Pirates should look at theDetroit Lions. What's the difference?

Football will never be like the MLB because the MLB is boring. They play 300 games a year so the chances of sellouts every night isn't goin to happen. With 8 home games it's easier to fill stadiums every year. Each game counts so much and that is what makes the NFL so special.

Let's keep it real... how many times have the Browns and Bungles won our division over the last 15 years? Steeler fans should be the last ones screaming about the MLB.

RuthlessBurgher
05-31-2011, 09:09 AM
Don't let the hate and jealousy misguide your thought process. While Troy makes millions, his jersey sales top the league and his work generates 10 times what he makes. Teams aren't paying these guys at a loss... if a guy is making 5 mill a year it's because the business is making much more. So it really is him vs big business. Everyone complains about the players salaries but obviously someone or the industry as a whole is making much more.


The same logic should be applied to "billionaire owners" of the NFL or owners of any business. These men have typically taken huge risks throughout their lives to get the resources to own teams. They gambled and took financial or career plunges that others are typically too timid or afraid to take. But many want to classify them in another group because they have more than the players. Just like the players they have worked hard and earned it. But unlike the players they are into the NFL and the prosperity of the game we love for the long term not the short term.

I'll never agree with some who want to characterize this as a labor/worker's rights struggle and want to associate themselves with oppressed player "labor." My only goal is that 10 years from now we have a league that looks like the league we have now and isn't dominated by a few teams with the rest as schedule filler like we see in MLB. I just feel the owners defining the business and setting it up how they want it guarantees that more than the players dictating the outcome.

Or their Daddys or Grandpas took those risks, while the current crop just sat on their behinds and collected the inheritance.

Oviedo
05-31-2011, 04:05 PM
Don't let the hate and jealousy misguide your thought process. While Troy makes millions, his jersey sales top the league and his work generates 10 times what he makes. Teams aren't paying these guys at a loss... if a guy is making 5 mill a year it's because the business is making much more. So it really is him vs big business. Everyone complains about the players salaries but obviously someone or the industry as a whole is making much more.


The same logic should be applied to "billionaire owners" of the NFL or owners of any business. These men have typically taken huge risks throughout their lives to get the resources to own teams. They gambled and took financial or career plunges that others are typically too timid or afraid to take. But many want to classify them in another group because they have more than the players. Just like the players they have worked hard and earned it. But unlike the players they are into the NFL and the prosperity of the game we love for the long term not the short term.

I'll never agree with some who want to characterize this as a labor/worker's rights struggle and want to associate themselves with oppressed player "labor." My only goal is that 10 years from now we have a league that looks like the league we have now and isn't dominated by a few teams with the rest as schedule filler like we see in MLB. I just feel the owners defining the business and setting it up how they want it guarantees that more than the players dictating the outcome.

Or their Daddys or Grandpas took those risks, while the current crop just sat on their behinds and collected the inheritance.

Just like you and the rest of us wish had happened to us.

feltdizz
05-31-2011, 04:24 PM
Don't let the hate and jealousy misguide your thought process. While Troy makes millions, his jersey sales top the league and his work generates 10 times what he makes. Teams aren't paying these guys at a loss... if a guy is making 5 mill a year it's because the business is making much more. So it really is him vs big business. Everyone complains about the players salaries but obviously someone or the industry as a whole is making much more.


The same logic should be applied to "billionaire owners" of the NFL or owners of any business. These men have typically taken huge risks throughout their lives to get the resources to own teams. They gambled and took financial or career plunges that others are typically too timid or afraid to take. But many want to classify them in another group because they have more than the players. Just like the players they have worked hard and earned it. But unlike the players they are into the NFL and the prosperity of the game we love for the long term not the short term.

I'll never agree with some who want to characterize this as a labor/worker's rights struggle and want to associate themselves with oppressed player "labor." My only goal is that 10 years from now we have a league that looks like the league we have now and isn't dominated by a few teams with the rest as schedule filler like we see in MLB. I just feel the owners defining the business and setting it up how they want it guarantees that more than the players dictating the outcome.

Or their Daddys or Grandpas took those risks, while the current crop just sat on their behinds and collected the inheritance.

Just like you and the rest of us wish had happened to us.

True... but that doesn't make them hard workers who took big risk. It's just makes them lucky to be swimming in their daddy's nutsack.