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fordfixer
05-23-2011, 08:10 PM
Ray Lewis thinks crime will increase with no NFL season

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdo ... nfl-wp2110 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Ray-Lewis-thinks-crime-will-increase-if-NFL-has-?urn=nfl-wp2110)
By Shane Bacon
Sun May 22

For all the craziness that is associated with Ray Lewis(notes), the man sure does seem to speak the truth on big issues. The latest one? How the lockout might affect our society as a whole, and what it might do to the nation's crime rate.

No, he isn't just talking about the players. Ray thinks if the lockout continues and there is no NFL season, crime will increase because people will be so distraught without one of their favorite pastimes.

This all came out from his ESPN interview, and here was exactly what Ray said.

"Do this research if we don't have a season -- watch how much evil, which we call crime, watch how much crime picks up, if you take away our game. [...]

"There's too many people that live through us, people live through us," he said. "Yeah, walk in the streets, the way I walk the streets, and I'm not talking about the people you see all the time."

The man has a point. Football fans will have to find other things to do without their favorite game being played if the NFL does decide to go with this lockout, and Lewis is just pointing out facts about this. If any sport or big event was dumped, it would force people to look for other things to do, and I think that's the point Lewis is making here.

Just add it to the growing list of reasons why the NFL lockout would be a bad thing.

The Man of Steel
05-23-2011, 08:27 PM
So Ray Ray thinks that just because he stabbed some people to death that that somehow makes him some kind of expert on human behavior now? I think not there Mr. Psychopath.

birtikidis
05-23-2011, 09:14 PM
He's right. Im' sure he'll get bored and stab someone over the next few months. walah! crime just increased

hawaiiansteel
05-23-2011, 10:09 PM
Ray Ray should know, he is an expert when it comes to crime...

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_nXPfVU2dDOw/SlUlieCdh_I/AAAAAAAAAvU/dsYzEqBaV14/s400/ray+lewis.jpg

Notleadpoisoned
05-24-2011, 08:32 AM
With that kind of forensic brilliance it sounds like ole Ray Ray might just have a promising career in law enforcement after he retires. That is, assuming the standard criminal background check gets overlooked somewhere in the hiring process.

BradshawsHairdresser
05-24-2011, 08:54 AM
He's right. Im' sure he'll get bored and stab someone over the next few months. walah! crime just increased

:lol: :lol: :lol:
Exactly what I was thinking. If Ray-Ray isn't occupied playing football, his crime rate is bound to go up.

feltdizz
05-24-2011, 09:10 AM
I thought Ray was saying crime would go up among NFL players...

Oviedo
05-24-2011, 12:38 PM
Lewis might be conspiring to kill someone again. Goodell and the NFL management should hire more security.

fordfixer
05-24-2011, 08:25 PM
Ray Lewis comments misconstrued by the media: Fan’s take

By Pete Lieber,
http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=A ... cn-8528995 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AndU9YE1o4TaQj2Oob0PvsRDubYF?slug=ycn-8528995)

Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis(notes) has never been one to pull punches. If you ask him a question, you're going to get an answer, and often, you'll get a little more than you were looking for in that answer. During an interview with ESPN's Sal Paolantonio, Lewis was asked, as one of the more influential NFL players, his opinion on the lockout. After pointedly admitting that both sides need to "let go of pride," Lewis went on to explain what he feels would come out of there being no football in 2011:

"Do this research if we don't have a season—watch how much evil, which we call crime, watch how much crime picks up, if you take our game away."
One exciting matchup to watch this wildcard weekend is the Ravens' Ray Lewis vs. the Chiefs' Jamaal Charles.
Wikimedia Commons

Lewis goes on to talk about how many people "live through our game." Paolantonio, perhaps sensing how these comments would be taken, led him down a straighter path by saying, "livelihoods?" That's a key question in this interview. Lewis' response was an emphatic, "yes!"

Ray Lewis was not making a commentary on how NFL players, given the time and freedom to navigate the world outside of football without NFL obligations, would turn to a life of crime. Enough of them dabble in some illegalities while NFL business is in full swing. If you're a punk, you're a punk. The time of year and labor conditions in your industry don't change that.

In watching the interview, I had no problem discerning where I think Lewis was heading with his comments. There are a number of writers and analysts out there who had a more difficult time with it. They construed Lewis' comments as presenting an NFL that has an overly enthusiastic sense of itself and its effect on society. They believed Lewis meant that criminals take the day off to be in front of a TV from 1p.m. EST till around midnight when the day's games are over. There may have been some inference to that, but I don't believe that's what Lewis was getting at.

Sports Illustrated's revered columnist Peter King wrote, "It's a nice headline, but I'm not buying it. I suppose it could happen, but unless we get burglars and thieves saying they did it because the NFL wasn't on TV on fall Sundays this year, I'm not buying what Lewis is selling."

Philadelphia Daily News columnist John Smallwood said, "I don't mean to come down on Lewis - well, actually I do - but this is just another example of an athlete taking the importance of his game way too seriously."

Although I would agree with both King and Smallwood that the NFL has an overblown sense of itself (my God, I mean, have you followed this lockout?), I believe Lewis' main point concerned the thousands of economically unstable people whose livelihoods will be affected by a lockout moving into the season. How many ushers, ticket-takers, concession workers, scalpers, t-shirt sellers do you think will be out of work considering some NFL teams are already cutting salaries on employees already making less than $40,000 a year in full-time positions? Most of the people we're talking about here don't have other means of income, or use the small income from these side jobs to stretch the ends like bungee chords to make them meet. They come from urban areas where jobs aren't exactly popping out of the sewers.

When Lewis said, "there's nothing else to do," referring to those he feels will escalate crime, I believe he was saying that the ancillary damage that isn't talked about on ESPN will have a deep effect on people who can't afford to lose that money, no matter how little the guy from the concession pouring your watered down Coors Lite for $9 is getting paid. Where do those people turn, in those kinds of numbers, without work in a country that currently has no work? Many of them may feel they have no choice but to turn to crime. It doesn't excuse it, but it's a reality most of us don't and couldn't understand.

Ray Lewis may or may not be right. He knows the neighborhoods whose folks work those concessions, sell those unlicensed t-shirts, scalp tickets. He knows the old man from around the corner who is thrilled to have a job taking your ticket and showing you to your seat on Sundays. He has a better understanding of what may draw a person into crime than any sportswriter. As we all know, he's danced in those circles himself. I wouldn't be too quick to read between the cloudy lines of what an athlete says, especially without taking a look at it from all the angles.

hawaiiansteel
05-25-2011, 02:39 AM
so let me get this straight...according to Ray Lewis, people basically have two choices on Sundays:

either watch NFL football or go out and commit a crime? :wft

RuthlessBurgher
05-25-2011, 01:09 PM
so let me get this straight...according to Ray Lewis, people basically have two choices on Sundays:

either watch NFL football or go out and commit a crime? :wft

Ripping off the righteous folks while they are in church. Mwoo-ha-ha!!!

:ratsuck

fordfixer
06-18-2011, 01:50 AM
Fri Jun 17 01:09pm EDT
Research group calls out Ray Lewis’ lockout/crime correlation

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdo ... nfl-wp2710 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Research-group-calls-out-Ray-Lewis-8217-lockou;_ylt=Al7M9YKyCIr_QFWOLjSOTZhDubYF?urn=nfl-wp2710)

So … remember when Ray Lewis insisted that the longer the lockout went on, the more crime there would be? Turns out, there's no historical precedent for such a statement, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's PolitiFact group.

In a recent ESPN interview, Lewis said that "if we don't have a season -- watch how much evil, which we call crime, watch how much crime picks up, if you take away our game." Lewis' contention was that the lockout affected the fans as much or more than the players and owners.

"There's too many people that live through us, people live through us," he said. "Yeah, walk in the streets, the way I walk the streets, and I'm not talking about the people you see all the time."

The AJC accepted Lewis' invitation to do that research, contacted the Northeastern's Sport in Society center and was told that "there is very little evidence supporting Lewis' claim that crime will increase the longer the work stoppage lasts."

The AJC cited a similar crime study.

The Baltimore Sun also looked at crime in 1982 and found an increase during the strike in only one category: homicides.

The Sun tried some other methods to tackle Lewis' claim. The newspaper's Crime Beat blog looked at crime data last season when the Ravens had their bye (off) week. The Sun found there was slightly more crime during the bye week.

The Sun looked at crime in Baltimore the four weeks before the season started and the first four weeks of the season. There was the same number of crimes. The Sun also examined the crime rate there at the end of the Ravens' season and what happened afterward. What did it find? There was less crime after the season ended in early January.
(year after year)
The Sun stressed several times that its findings were unscientific.

The AJC then went to look at increases in crime during bye weeks, assuming that the no football/higher crime equation would fit a much shorter time frame. No real evidence was presented that would lead in one direction or another.

One criminologist we interviewed had a different take. Northeastern University professor James A. Fox heard Lewis' comments and did a study. He looked at key FBI data from the last three years available, 2006 through 2008, focusing on the week before the Super Bowl because there were no games that week and there was intense interest in football around that time of the year. Fox, who was referred to us by the FBI, found no increase in crime the week there was no football.

"I took the Ray Lewis(notes) challenge and I don't see any evidence of [a crime increase]," said Fox, the author of several books on crime who also writes a crime and punishment blog for the Boston Globe.

As far as player crime … well, aside from Kenny Britt(notes) and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, there hasn't been a huge increase during this offseason, and the closer both sides get to a settlement, the more most players will be putting their collective noses to the grindstone, leaving them too busy to get in trouble.

At least, that's one theory we hope will stick.