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fordfixer
05-07-2011, 08:48 AM
Player resentment for Goodell grows

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=A ... ows_050411 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AmgdcnOCWg7q62Hjkd0wsdxDubYF?slug=ms-silver_players_hatred_for_goodell_grows_050411)


By Michael Silver, Yahoo! SportsMay 4, 3:19 pm EDT




Years from now, when I look back on the 2011 NFL draft, I’m guessing that Cam Newton’s(notes) broad smile, Thomas Dimitroff’s bold gamble and Larry Fitzgerald’s(notes) plush open-air living room will likely be among the enduring images.

Most of all, however, I’ll remember the continuous and cacophonous beatings Roger Goodell took atop the Radio City Music Hall stage.

It’s no fun being the NFL commissioner during a work stoppage, and I’m not surprised that many fans embraced the opportunity to take out their frustrations on the easiest and most available target during last Thursday night’s first round. Far more striking were the reactions of numerous players with whom I’ve communicated in recent days and who derived a sadistic pleasure in seeing Goodell squirm.


Thanks to the magic of text-messaging technology, I got a real-time sense of that sentiment during the first round. Said one Pro Bowl player in response to Goodell being booed: “As he should. He’s trying to [expletive] us.”

“Will any one of these [draft picks] nut up and ignore the handshake?” asked a veteran player for an AFC North team. “How about him taking a moment of silence in order to stop the boos? I’m all for paying respect to tornado victims, but what do you think his intent was there?”

When Goodell later appeared onstage with a group of U.S. soldiers, a player for an AFC West team said, “So that’s the only way he can get them to stop booing? Shameless.”



While Goodell-bashing may be cathartic for players and fans, I don’t think it’s good for football. For all my criticism of the owners during this labor stare down, I’ve remained relatively positive about Goodell’s role – partly because I’m convinced he’s not driving the bus, and partly because I’ve spoken to the man and looked him in the eye and believe he sincerely wants a deal.

Yet I’ve had a very, very hard time finding a player who shares those views, and however this lockout and the accompanying legal maneuverings are resolved, I’m convinced that the commissioner will have a very real problem with the vast majority of the men who wear “The Shield” of which he speaks so reverently.

“A lot of the players hated him even before this went down, and now they really hate him,” one prominent player for an NFC East team told me last Friday. “He’s not smooth, charming or witty. He never seems honest when he talks to you. And he’s a dope. They should change his name to Roger Goon-dell.”

That’s one nickname you won’t see mentioned on a future NFL Network “Top 10” production.

I’d dismiss this player as an outlier – if I hadn’t heard similar opinions from so many others. Over the past few weeks, Goodell has been called a “joke” and a “fraud” by the Baltimore Ravens’ Derrick Mason(notes) and the Seattle Seahawks’ Chester Pitts(notes), respectively, and I’ve heard plenty of unprintable insults from other players, too.

And while until a week or so ago I would have thought it crazy, I’m not going to throw something out there that might be worth pondering: Is it possible that, either by his choice or the will of his employers, the fallout from this labor nightmare will cost Goodell his job?

“Zero chance,” one owner insisted Wednesday.

The owner said there is near-unanimous support for the commissioner among the people running the 32 franchises and that Goodell has been “absolutely great” before and during the labor crisis.

“He’s showing the level of comportment and intelligent discourse that you’d expect of someone in his position, and his responses have been specific and thoughtful,” the owner said. “I can’t say that for [NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith]. We feel like Roger is representing our interests and trying hard to get a deal for the good of the game.”

Even if Goodell survives the current labor crisis, however, his standing among the rank and file has clearly taken a massive hit. From glad-handing in locker rooms to meting out discipline, Goodell’s post-settlement interactions with players figure to be awkward at best, and perhaps downright incendiary, for the foreseeable future.

“You think any vet will shake his hand when he’s at a game next year?” asked the AFC North player. “I hope he’s gone.”

While personally fond of Goodell, Cleveland Browns linebacker Scott Fujita(notes), a member of the decertified NFLPA’s executive committee, agrees that Goodell’s reputation with players has been compromised.

“Does he have a problem with getting the players’ respect? Absolutely,” Fujita says. “No matter what happens, it might be tough for him to ever get that back. However this is resolved, I can’t say every player, but the overwhelming majority will continue to have a problem with him. And that’s too bad.”

Like me, Fujita believes that much of the players’ anger toward Goodell is misplaced and that the commissioner, as the “face of the lockout,” is a natural and convenient foil. Yet while Fujita may believe that the Goodell-bashing is a tad over-the-top, he doesn’t view it as unjustified, either.

“He’s just in a really unenviable position of having to build consensus among the owners,” Fujita says. “I don’t know that anybody can do that right now. He’s the mouthpiece of the owners, and that’s why he’s getting that type of reaction. I do feel bad for him.

“Ideally, he’s someone who can build consensus among the owners and convince them to do what’s best for the game. I expected him to be that guy who can push those buttons and get them to move, but I’m afraid he might not be. I don’t know that he’ll be able to do that, and that’s disappointing.”

One thing that’s not helping Goodell is his image as a tough, no-nonsense executive, which began with his strengthening of the personal-conduct policy shortly after he succeeded Paul Tagliabue in 2006 and continued with his high-profile suspensions of players like Michael Vick(notes), Pacman Jones and Ben Roethlisberger(notes). In those contexts, Goodell was clearly The Sheriff. In this one, he’s a hired gun doing the bidding of the very wealthy people who technically employ him, and it’s hard for players and fans to appreciate the distinction.

Unlike the robotic, careful Taglibaue, Goodell has been refreshingly candid and edgy from the start of his reign, and his efforts to be inclusive of players and fans have been rightfully well received. However, on the big issues like labor, Tagliabue had a gift for appearing as though he were firmly in charge of the league, even when he nominally wasn’t. Goodell, as Fujita suggests, hasn’t yet come close to mastering that trick.

Goodell has also caused plenty of players to regard him as a hypocrite. Many, like Fujita, have questioned what they perceive to be a double standard when it comes to the application of the personal-conduct policy. For example, then-Raiders coach Tom Cable received no discipline from the league after a 2009 training-camp argument with defensive assistant Randy Hanson during which Hanson sustained a broken jaw (Hanson was never interviewed by Goodell or anyone from his office).

“People believe he’s been disingenuous when it comes to certain things,” Fujita says. “Every issue’s handled differently. He’s talking tough when it comes to player conduct and cracking down on big hits, but then you have things like the Tom Cable situation …”

Last summer, Goodell went on a training-camp tour and met with players to discuss the impending expiration of the collective bargaining agreement and labor issues in general. Grilled by Fujita and others, Goodell provided few satisfactory answers and, said witnesses, experienced a measure of hostility and humiliation.

In March, after negotiations broke down – and, upon the expiration of the CBA, the NFLPA decertified, the players filed an antitrust lawsuit against the league and the owners locked out the players – Goodell became the owners’ most visible public advocate. He wrote a letter to each player summarizing the league’s most recent offer and urging players to “encourage your union to return to the bargaining table.”

Pitts, the Seahawks’ NFLPA player rep, said in response, “I’ve told my guys to take the letter and set it on fire. We’re not that stupid.”


Players have bristled at subsequent comments by Goodell, including his assertion to San Diego Chargers season-ticket holders that the average-career-length of NFL players is longer than 3.5 years, as is commonly believed.

“He’s lost all credibility with us,” the AFC North player said last Thursday. “Especially with those comments about how the average career really isn’t three years. And telling us the last deal on the table had ” lifetime health insurance. Really? It had lifetime COBRA. He’s basically saying he’s betting we’ll never be employed again after football.”

It’s not particularly noteworthy that a high-stakes labor dispute would trigger heated rhetoric on both sides, and it’s fair to say that many or all of the 32 owners are as embittered toward Smith as some of the 1,800-plus NFL players are toward Goodell. The owner to whom I spoke insisted that Goodell’s efforts to establish a better working relationship with Smith – and to keep the lines of communication going even as the matter plays out in the courts – have not been reciprocated.

“Roger is trying to do business, and De is like a psycho girlfriend who doesn’t know what he wants, doesn’t understand what he’s involved in and [who] you can’t reason with,” the owner said. “With psycho girlfriends, at least you can move on eventually. But Roger is stuck with him right now.”

Two observations: 1. The next time I need to come up with a biting analogy, instead of going for a bike ride to clear my head or consulting with one of my journalistic peers, I should probably call this owner and ask for assistance; 2. plenty of seemingly reasonable people with erratically behaving romantic partners get sullied by association, and right now this appears to be a scenario in which there are no winners.

Labor peace would obviously go a long way toward restoring Goodell’s positive aura. If the lawsuit is settled and a new CBA is achieved before the scheduled start of the regular season – or, at the very least, if the owners lose their appeal of U.S. District Court Judge Susan Nelson’s decision ending the lockout and football continues while the antitrust lawsuit drags on, without any games being missed – I believe Goodell can and will recover.

“I think if everything gets resolved and the games are played on time, fans will be forgiving and will forget very quickly,” Fujita says. “As for his job security with the people who employ him – that depends on the deal that is reached and their opinion of it.”

The owner to whom I spoke conceded that if the lockout continues into September or October, it’s possible some owners will begin to turn on Goodell. For now, he has their unequivocal support – and the privilege of being the most glaring symbol of player and fan discontent.

“He’s the face of this whole problem, the face of the league that locked out the players,” Fujita says. “He is just the face who’s trying to shut down the game and take away our livelihood – and that pisses guys off. It’s as simple as that.”

Once there’s a deal, will the Goodell-bashing simply go away?

Or, more dramatically, will he?

BradshawsHairdresser
05-07-2011, 09:51 AM
Once there’s a deal, will the Goodell-bashing simply go away?

Or, more dramatically, will he?

Please, please, please, please, please, please, please....

Oviedo
05-07-2011, 04:21 PM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

SteelCrazy
05-07-2011, 04:57 PM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

Although Demarcus Smith decertified the union it wasn't his decision alone. He has advisers like any President in power. They all agree on what to do, he just calls the shots from that point on. It's hardly a one man show.

feltdizz
05-07-2011, 05:19 PM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

Projection... placing your anger at DeMarcus Smith when it should be directed at Goodell and the 32 Owners who opted out and locked the players out. :stirpot

:2c

Djfan
05-07-2011, 06:16 PM
Never mind the lock out. He has proven to me that he is an idiot in areas like the Europe love, the arbitrary and inconsistent fines, the wussification of the defense, the sweep under the carpet that the cheators got for their scam, the ignoring of the bad refing job, the change of the AFC and NFC trophies (and all that tradition), the moving of the Pro Bowl from Hawaii, the crap on NFLN, etc.

This guy is bad publicity for the NFL. If the ownership doesn't see that, they live in the worst kind of bubble possible.

flippy
05-08-2011, 12:08 AM
Goodell is a puppet.

It's good for the players, the owners, and the league if Goodell gets the blame. He can be replaced. And the league can move on. Everyone comes out of the mess clean except Goodell. But that's what they're paying him for. To protect the shield of the NFL.

Goodell is standing in front of the shield taking all the arrows. And the league will be better for it in the end. And Goodell knew what he was getting into when he took the job and he's taking in a lot of cash to take the arrows.

And even though he'll be the fall guy, he'll get the deal done the owners want and he'll be able to show how valuable he is to his next employer that wants to use him.

fordfixer
05-08-2011, 02:02 AM
Fan resentment for Goodell is still about the same

Discipline of Steel
05-08-2011, 06:58 PM
I agree with djfan, Goodell has had multiple offenses during his career and the worst is wussification of the defense. Not everybody wants to watch offenses march up and down the field and it hits the Steelers particularly hard because we are known for the best defense year in and year out. His treatment of James Harrison, a league star, has been very poor. In my opinion, it looked like he was picking on him with the lockout and other financial motives in the background. No one could be worse for football than Roger Goodell. Wish Jack Lambert would speak up and embarrass him, Id throw a party. Hows that for fan sentiment?

Sugar
05-08-2011, 09:39 PM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

Projection... placing your anger at DeMarcus Smith when it should be directed at Goodell and the 32 Owners who opted out and locked the players out. :stirpot

:2c

I don't know who Demarcus Smith is, but DeMaurice Smith is the NFLPA Executive Director. Just sayin...

Oviedo
05-09-2011, 07:58 AM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

Projection... placing your anger at DeMarcus Smith when it should be directed at Goodell and the 32 Owners who opted out and locked the players out. :stirpot

:2c

I don't know who Demarcus Smith is, but DeMaurice Smith is the NFLPA Executive Director. Just sayin...

Yep!!! He is the scumbag who is trying to destroy the NFL through the court system and turn it into MLB. Thanks for clarifying which stupid name he actually has.

Discipline of Steel
05-09-2011, 10:29 AM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

Projection... placing your anger at DeMarcus Smith when it should be directed at Goodell and the 32 Owners who opted out and locked the players out. :stirpot

:2c

I don't know who Demarcus Smith is, but DeMaurice Smith is the NFLPA Executive Director. Just sayin...

Yep!!! He is the scumbag who is trying to destroy the NFL through the court system and turn it into MLB. Thanks for clarifying which stupid name he actually has.

Doesnt let Goodell off the hook. He is horrible for fans, Defenses, and the Steelers and thats all I need to know. They are trying to spin the player resentment around the lockout issue when Im sure many are still peeved about the 'middle of the night' changes in rules and enforcement and the 'i am God' mentality.

Oviedo
05-09-2011, 10:46 AM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

Projection... placing your anger at DeMarcus Smith when it should be directed at Goodell and the 32 Owners who opted out and locked the players out. :stirpot

:2c

I don't know who Demarcus Smith is, but DeMaurice Smith is the NFLPA Executive Director. Just sayin...

Yep!!! He is the scumbag who is trying to destroy the NFL through the court system and turn it into MLB. Thanks for clarifying which stupid name he actually has.

Doesnt let Goodell off the hook. He is horrible for fans, Defenses, and the Steelers and thats all I need to know. They are trying to spin the player resentment around the lockout issue when Im sure many are still peeved about the 'middle of the night' changes in rules and enforcement and the 'i am God' mentality.

I can't stand Goodell but I have little doubt that he has more interest in the long term viability of the NFL than Demarius Smith does. Pittsburgh fans of all fans in the nation should recognize the destructive effects of players dictating the terms of how the sports business is run.

aggiebones
05-09-2011, 10:50 AM
I never understood the hate for Goodell on this issue. He's a puppet, correct?

He gathers the paper and maybe organizes them and then asks the owner what he should say and do.

feltdizz
05-09-2011, 10:52 AM
The player will hate Goodell even more as it becomes more clear that Demarcus Smith and their union leadership has screwed them and the owners will win this dispute over the long term. It's called projection where you place your anger on something or someone to avoid having to direct towards where it should be...Demarcus Smith who walked away from mediation and decertified the union.

Projection... placing your anger at DeMarcus Smith when it should be directed at Goodell and the 32 Owners who opted out and locked the players out. :stirpot

:2c

I don't know who Demarcus Smith is, but DeMaurice Smith is the NFLPA Executive Director. Just sayin...

him too :stirpot

feltdizz
05-09-2011, 10:54 AM
I never understood the hate for Goodell on this issue. He's a puppet, correct?

He gathers the paper and maybe organizes them and then asks the owner what he should say and do.

few realize he is just the face of the 32 owners... they need him to be a villain all by himself.

hawaiiansteel
05-19-2011, 02:33 AM
Locked-out players line up for cash loans

Special to FOX Sports The Daily

Updated May 17, 2011
By Chris Corbellini and Jason Schwartz


As the NFL work stoppage continues with no end in sight, some cash-strapped players are taking out high-risk, high-interest loans to get them through the lean times — some as big as $250,000 with interest rates as high as 30 percent.

Players make their entire salary during the regular season, and many rely on offseason workout bonuses to get them through the spring and summer. With opening day — and their next payday — uncertain, some are turning to lenders like AGR Sports Funding, a Virginia-based firm that specializes in lending to professional athletes.

Jason Yorker, owner of AGR, likes to think of himself as a lifeline for NFL players. When cash gets tight, they can turn to him to borrow, as he puts it, “a couple extra hundred thousand dollars here and there.”

To explain the 30 percent interest rate he charges, Yorker said that, unlike other lenders, he doesn’t care much about his clients’s credit scores or whether they have any assets to back up the loan. If he thinks a player’s good for it, he can get them the cash in just a couple of weeks. Since the beginning of the lockout March 12, Yorker said, business has been booming.

“You’d be surprised at some of the names of people that have been reaching out to us,” said Yorker — declining to name names — adding that they even include Pro Bowl players.

Over the past six weeks or so, according to Yorker, he’s issued 25 NFL players loans, ranging from $30,000 to $250,000. Last year at this time, he’d made just three loans. Of the current batch, 10 went to veterans and 15 to incoming rookies. The demand from just-drafted prospects left out in the cold by the lockout has been “off the charts,” he said.

Leon McKenzie, president of Sure Sports Lending, a Florida outfit, said the number of players coming to see him is increasing, as well.

“There does seem to be more people looking,” he said, adding that his interest rates typically run from six to 15 percent.

Considering that NFL players have yet to miss a game check, it’s somewhat curious that some veterans, as well as rookies, are looking for these loans. But Yorker said he’s been hearing from several players who’ve found themselves in need of quick cash after missing out on offseason workout bonuses.

“Believe it or not, some guys are dependent on that,” he said.

Chad Lewis, a three-time Pro Bowl tight end over a nine-year career in the NFL, indicated that many NFL players are notoriously free-spending and bad at managing their money.

“Most players aren’t making what a rock star makes,” Lewis said. “But if their lifestyle is gonna approach that of a rock star, then their money will run out very quickly.”

The minimum NFL salary is roughly $320,000, with the average approaching $2 million per season.

Hall of Famer Deion Sanders told The Daily he tries to educate young players.

“One of the things I do is try to go back and grab these young guys and say, ‘Understand, there’s going to be a famine,’” Sanders said. “They say, ‘What do you mean by a famine?’”

Now, added Sanders, “Some of those guys are crying broke.”

“You tell these guys to manage their money better, but it doesn’t happen,” said agent Rick Smith of Priority Sports and Entertainment. “So they take out bridge loans to get them through it.”

The former union has opened a savings war chest, funded over the past two years by the players themselves, to help ease the monetary burden. The first payments began April 15, and according to NFL.com, up to $60,000 will be available per player. That’s close to what an average player would make during the offseason, but the concern is how to make those dollars stretch.

“That’s basically to cover their insurance,” Smith said. “It’s their own money being kicked back to them, to be able to pay for their health insurance.”

Another reason players are borrowing now — before even missing a major payday — is that they may be afraid credit will dry up if the lockout continues into the NFL season, said Darren Heitner, an agent and the author of sportsagentblog.com. After all, if interest rates are this high now, what will they be like when players start to miss game checks and lenders know they are even less likely to be repaid?

To financial planners, these high-interest loans represent a troubling trend.

“I get so frustrated when I hear stories like that,” said Ted Reid, a senior vice president and wealth adviser for Morgan Stanley, who’s been helping athletes invest their money for 25 years.

“I’ve heard ranges way above the 15 percent level, but even 15 percent, that’s absolutely ridiculous.”

Reid said that if players need cash, they ought to be taking out home equity loans or other, asset-backed lines of credit, with interest rates from 2-4 percent. Or they should start selling things off: “If you’re borrowing at 30 percent, it’s time to start liquidating your assets,” he said.

But Yorker said he’s offering players a square deal. The interest is high because, more often than not, he’s not asking his clients to back their loans up with anything.

“You ask any of my clients if they’ve ever felt that I took advantage of them, they’ll tell you straight up, I’m a lifesaver. When nobody would give them any money, I gave them money,” Yorker said.

“They thank me and we’re friends. We continue to be friends after that. If they ever need money, they know they can come to me.”

http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/nfl- ... tes-051511 (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/nfl-lockout-leads-to-players-taking-out-cash-loans-with-huge-interest-rates-051511)

Oviedo
05-19-2011, 08:07 AM
Locked-out players line up for cash loans

Special to FOX Sports The Daily

Updated May 17, 2011
By Chris Corbellini and Jason Schwartz


As the NFL work stoppage continues with no end in sight, some cash-strapped players are taking out high-risk, high-interest loans to get them through the lean times — some as big as $250,000 with interest rates as high as 30 percent.

Players make their entire salary during the regular season, and many rely on offseason workout bonuses to get them through the spring and summer. With opening day — and their next payday — uncertain, some are turning to lenders like AGR Sports Funding, a Virginia-based firm that specializes in lending to professional athletes.

Jason Yorker, owner of AGR, likes to think of himself as a lifeline for NFL players. When cash gets tight, they can turn to him to borrow, as he puts it, “a couple extra hundred thousand dollars here and there.”

To explain the 30 percent interest rate he charges, Yorker said that, unlike other lenders, he doesn’t care much about his clients’s credit scores or whether they have any assets to back up the loan. If he thinks a player’s good for it, he can get them the cash in just a couple of weeks. Since the beginning of the lockout March 12, Yorker said, business has been booming.

“You’d be surprised at some of the names of people that have been reaching out to us,” said Yorker — declining to name names — adding that they even include Pro Bowl players.

Over the past six weeks or so, according to Yorker, he’s issued 25 NFL players loans, ranging from $30,000 to $250,000. Last year at this time, he’d made just three loans. Of the current batch, 10 went to veterans and 15 to incoming rookies. The demand from just-drafted prospects left out in the cold by the lockout has been “off the charts,” he said.

Leon McKenzie, president of Sure Sports Lending, a Florida outfit, said the number of players coming to see him is increasing, as well.

“There does seem to be more people looking,” he said, adding that his interest rates typically run from six to 15 percent.

Considering that NFL players have yet to miss a game check, it’s somewhat curious that some veterans, as well as rookies, are looking for these loans. But Yorker said he’s been hearing from several players who’ve found themselves in need of quick cash after missing out on offseason workout bonuses.

“Believe it or not, some guys are dependent on that,” he said.

Chad Lewis, a three-time Pro Bowl tight end over a nine-year career in the NFL, indicated that many NFL players are notoriously free-spending and bad at managing their money.

“Most players aren’t making what a rock star makes,” Lewis said. “But if their lifestyle is gonna approach that of a rock star, then their money will run out very quickly.”

The minimum NFL salary is roughly $320,000, with the average approaching $2 million per season.

Hall of Famer Deion Sanders told The Daily he tries to educate young players.

“One of the things I do is try to go back and grab these young guys and say, ‘Understand, there’s going to be a famine,’” Sanders said. “They say, ‘What do you mean by a famine?’”

Now, added Sanders, “Some of those guys are crying broke.”

“You tell these guys to manage their money better, but it doesn’t happen,” said agent Rick Smith of Priority Sports and Entertainment. “So they take out bridge loans to get them through it.”

The former union has opened a savings war chest, funded over the past two years by the players themselves, to help ease the monetary burden. The first payments began April 15, and according to NFL.com, up to $60,000 will be available per player. That’s close to what an average player would make during the offseason, but the concern is how to make those dollars stretch.

“That’s basically to cover their insurance,” Smith said. “It’s their own money being kicked back to them, to be able to pay for their health insurance.”

Another reason players are borrowing now — before even missing a major payday — is that they may be afraid credit will dry up if the lockout continues into the NFL season, said Darren Heitner, an agent and the author of sportsagentblog.com. After all, if interest rates are this high now, what will they be like when players start to miss game checks and lenders know they are even less likely to be repaid?

To financial planners, these high-interest loans represent a troubling trend.

“I get so frustrated when I hear stories like that,” said Ted Reid, a senior vice president and wealth adviser for Morgan Stanley, who’s been helping athletes invest their money for 25 years.

“I’ve heard ranges way above the 15 percent level, but even 15 percent, that’s absolutely ridiculous.”

Reid said that if players need cash, they ought to be taking out home equity loans or other, asset-backed lines of credit, with interest rates from 2-4 percent. Or they should start selling things off: “If you’re borrowing at 30 percent, it’s time to start liquidating your assets,” he said.

But Yorker said he’s offering players a square deal. The interest is high because, more often than not, he’s not asking his clients to back their loans up with anything.

“You ask any of my clients if they’ve ever felt that I took advantage of them, they’ll tell you straight up, I’m a lifesaver. When nobody would give them any money, I gave them money,” Yorker said.

“They thank me and we’re friends. We continue to be friends after that. If they ever need money, they know they can come to me.”

http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/nfl- ... tes-051511 (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/nfl-lockout-leads-to-players-taking-out-cash-loans-with-huge-interest-rates-051511)

If the players are really "suffering" tell your "not really a union" negotiating team to agree to the owners latest offer and it's over. Facilities open, free agency goes on and the players get paid salaries far greater than the average fan who supports them. It is realy easy. :stirpot

ikestops85
05-19-2011, 12:00 PM
Locked-out players line up for cash loans

Special to FOX Sports The Daily

Updated May 17, 2011
By Chris Corbellini and Jason Schwartz


As the NFL work stoppage continues with no end in sight, some cash-strapped players are taking out high-risk, high-interest loans to get them through the lean times — some as big as $250,000 with interest rates as high as 30 percent.

http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/nfl- ... tes-051511 (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/nfl-lockout-leads-to-players-taking-out-cash-loans-with-huge-interest-rates-051511)

I think the mob would give you better rates right now.

RuthlessBurgher
05-19-2011, 12:13 PM
Deion Sanders is offering these kids advice about how to spend their money. Seriously?


Hall of Famer Deion Sanders told The Daily he tries to educate young players.

“One of the things I do is try to go back and grab these young guys and say, ‘Understand, there’s going to be a famine,’” Sanders said. “They say, ‘What do you mean by a famine?’”

Now, added Sanders, “Some of those guys are crying broke.”

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2008/0414/pg2_a_sanders_400.jpg

feltdizz
05-19-2011, 12:55 PM
Deion Sanders is offering these kids advice about how to spend their money. Seriously?


Hall of Famer Deion Sanders told The Daily he tries to educate young players.

“One of the things I do is try to go back and grab these young guys and say, ‘Understand, there’s going to be a famine,’” Sanders said. “They say, ‘What do you mean by a famine?’”

Now, added Sanders, “Some of those guys are crying broke.”

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2008/0414/pg2_a_sanders_400.jpg

:lol:

I still love Deion as a commentator.

hawaiiansteel
05-26-2011, 01:02 PM
NFL coaches with players in lockout battle

By Associated Press
Thursday, May 26, 2011


MINNEAPOLIS — NFL coaches are teaming up with the players in their legal fight to end the owner-imposed lockout.

The NFL Coaches Association filed a brief with the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday expressing support for the players and saying that the lockout is putting their jobs in jeopardy.

"Owners and fans increasingly demand immediate success, and coaches whose teams cannot fulfill such severe expectations face likely dismissal, which means the uprooting of families, economic dislocation, and a significantly less promising career path," lawyers for the NFLCA wrote.

No individual coaches were identified in the brief, which said that the eight new coaches hired this year face particularly daunting odds of success if the lockout is not lifted soon. The NFL grants new coaches two extra summer minicamps to get players familiar with the new staff, and the elimination of those camps puts them at a competitive disadvantage heading into the season.

"To meet management's expectations, coaches need adequate time in the offseason to prepare their players for the season ahead," the filing said. "The lockout has already interfered with the coaches' offseason plans for their players, and each day lost in preparing for the season further diminishes coaches' opportunities to prove themselves and advance their career."

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said the league was not surprised by the filing.

"The Coaches Association offices with the Players Association in Washington," Aiello wrote in an email to The Associated Press. "So this comes as no surprise."

The 8th Circuit has set a June 3 hearing to hear arguments on whether the lockout is legal. A federal judge in St. Paul, Minn., initially ruled that the lockout was illegal, but the 8th Circuit put a stay on that ruling pending the appeal.

Some coaches across the league are facing a reduction in wages and benefits during the lockout, including those employed by the Buffalo Bills, who have suspended pension payments and cut wages for all employees while the lockout is in effect.

"These income reductions are occurring amid the burdens of mortgage payments, tuition, and other life costs that do not wait for the NFL to end its lockout," the filing said.

Coaches have already lost several minicamps and the ability to institute their valued offseason workout programs, both of which get many players together starting in mid-May to prepare themselves physically and mentally for the upcoming season. Coaches rely on those programs to get on the same page with their players, institute new playbooks or tweaks to their existing schemes and make sure that players are ready for the rigors of training camp that await in August.

All of that has been put on hold during the labor dispute over how to divvy up $9 billion in revenue. Mediation has been unsuccessful while each side waits to be handed some kind of leverage through the courts, meaning no minicamps, organized team activities or group workouts in front of coaches.

"Preparation is a coach's currency, and coaches rely heavily on the offseason to prepare their players for the season," the NFLCA said. "If the NFL's lockout denies coaches the necessary time with players, coaches will be significantly more limited in their ability to prepare their teams and to prove their value as coaches."

The NFLCA said no amount of financial damages could compensate for the time lost this offseason, so they asked the 8th Circuit to uphold Judge Susan Richard Nelson's injunction of the lockout to allow the players and coaches to get back to work.

"Failure at an early stage of one's career, however, can falter career aspirations for many subsequent years," the filing said. "A lockout will significantly impinge on coaches' opportunities to prove themselves and will increase the likelihood that they will suffer failure they can neither avoid nor overcome."

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1NTHNo7Vu (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_738987.html#ixzz1NTHNo7Vu)

grotonsteel
05-26-2011, 02:05 PM
Never mind the lock out. He has proven to me that he is an idiot in areas like the Europe love, the arbitrary and inconsistent fines, the wussification of the defense, the sweep under the carpet that the cheators got for their scam, the ignoring of the bad refing job, the change of the AFC and NFC trophies (and all that tradition), the moving of the Pro Bowl from Hawaii, the crap on NFLN, etc.

This guy is bad publicity for the NFL. If the ownership doesn't see that, they live in the worst kind of bubble possible.

:Agree

hawaiiansteel
05-27-2011, 10:03 PM
Goodell says season-ticket holders want 18-game season

Posted by Michael David Smith on May 27, 2011


Although expanding the regular season to 18 games has faded into the background as NFL owners and players have found other issues to fight about, Commissioner Roger Goodell has confirmed that he still thinks that’s the direction the NFL should go in.

And Goodell says season-ticket holders agree with him.

“We do think it is attractive to season-ticket holders,” Goodell said on a conference call with Titans season-ticket holders. “I hear that all of the time from our season-ticket holders. We have not abandoned our position on that. We do think it is the right thing for the game. It improves the quality of what we do, and it improves the value for you as season-ticket holders. . . . We do think it is a benefit for everybody, but we want to do it the right way, and we want to do it responsibly. That includes the players’ perspective.’’

The players’ perspective is already clear: They don’t want an 18-game regular season. And polls have shown most fans don’t want an 18-game regular season.

Goodell may have more success, however, in appealing directly to season-ticket holders, who don’t like having to buy tickets to two meaningless games when they buy their tickets to eight meaningful games. In speaking to that particular segment of the NFL fan base, and in emphasizing the reduction in preseason games, Goodell may get a sympathetic ear.

Of course, even without expanding the regular season, the NFL is free to reduce the number of preseason games, and teams are free to stop forcing fans to buy preseason tickets with their season-ticket packages. That’s something fans could support.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... me-season/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/05/27/goodell-says-season-ticket-holders-want-18-game-season/)

RuthlessBurgher
05-28-2011, 11:10 AM
Goodell says season-ticket holders want 18-game season

Posted by Michael David Smith on May 27, 2011


Although expanding the regular season to 18 games has faded into the background as NFL owners and players have found other issues to fight about, Commissioner Roger Goodell has confirmed that he still thinks that’s the direction the NFL should go in.

And Goodell says season-ticket holders agree with him.

“We do think it is attractive to season-ticket holders,” Goodell said on a conference call with Titans season-ticket holders. “I hear that all of the time from our season-ticket holders. We have not abandoned our position on that. We do think it is the right thing for the game. It improves the quality of what we do, and it improves the value for you as season-ticket holders. . . . We do think it is a benefit for everybody, but we want to do it the right way, and we want to do it responsibly. That includes the players’ perspective.’’

The players’ perspective is already clear: They don’t want an 18-game regular season. And polls have shown most fans don’t want an 18-game regular season.

Goodell may have more success, however, in appealing directly to season-ticket holders, who don’t like having to buy tickets to two meaningless games when they buy their tickets to eight meaningful games. In speaking to that particular segment of the NFL fan base, and in emphasizing the reduction in preseason games, Goodell may get a sympathetic ear.

Of course, even without expanding the regular season, the NFL is free to reduce the number of preseason games, and teams are free to stop forcing fans to buy preseason tickets with their season-ticket packages. That’s something fans could support.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... me-season/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/05/27/goodell-says-season-ticket-holders-want-18-game-season/)

It's not that we don't like having to buy two preseason tickets. It's that we don't like having to pay REGULAR SEASON PRICES for those games, you jackwagon. If they can RAISE PRICES for playoff games when the stakes are higher (the divisional playoff tickets are about $25 more than regular season tickets, and the AFC Championship tickets are about $45 more than regular season tickets, then they can LOWER PRICES for preseason games when stakes are lower.

The 4 preseason games help coaches to determine what players he will keep at the bottom of his roster (with only 2 preseason games to evaluate new talent, coaches may opt to hold onto more vets like Tyrone Carter instead of promising rookies like Stevenson Sylvester). Coaches know this, fans know this, how does the NFL offices not know this?

hawaiiansteel
06-03-2011, 02:52 AM
Ward says taking violence out of football an impossible task

NFL.com
Published: June 1, 2011

http://www.unlockedsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/hines-ward.jpg

Hines Ward isn't taking the NFL's new rules on flagrant hits as personally as other Pittsburgh Steelers, but he said in a recent interview with WCNN-AM in Atlanta that the guidelines clash with the physical nature of the sport.

"I understand where they're coming from, but at the same time, you can't protect football," said the wide receiver, who has taken and doled out his fair share of hits during a decorated 13-year NFL career. "It's a violent sport. If you want to protect it, we need to play flag football.”

All 32 owners voted at last week's NFL Spring Meeting in Indianapolis to punish teams if their players commit multiple flagrant hits that result in fines.

The punishment will be financial, although league vice president Adolpho Birch said that he didn't rule out NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell applying further sanctions such as stripping teams of draft choices.

Citing the "notion of club accountability," Birch said details such as the amount of the fines against teams, or how many player fines would trigger punishment, haven't been determined.

Steelers linebacker James Harrison, whom the NFL fined $100,000 for flagrant hits last season, spoke out on the new guidelines that have become known around the league as the "Steelers Rule."

"I'm absolutely sure now after this last rule change that the people making the rules at the NFL are idiots," Harrison tweeted last Tuesday.

Ward wasn't nearly as incendiary in his comments, but he made it clear that he didn't agree with the rules, either.

"That's just something that the owners are going to have to deal with," Ward said. "It's still football. I mean, I understand they're trying to bring safety to the game, but you can't bring safety to a game that's a violent sport already."

Ward said it's impossible to truly protect players from the impacts of the game when you factor in the size and speed of the participants involved.

"When you have two grown men traveling at 20 mph on a head-on collision, guess what? Something in your body is going to hurt," he said. "So regardless of what you do, it's still a physical ballgame. But what are you going to do when a runner is continuing to try to run over a guy? Are you going to just wait until one guy can't tackle him before you go in there and assist somebody?"

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... sible-task (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8201f0ad/article/ward-says-taking-violence-out-of-football-an-impossible-task)