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View Full Version : And it begins...players start to break ranks



Oviedo
04-20-2011, 02:29 PM
More and more of this is going to happen as potential free agents realize they are getting screwed the longer this goes on. Players need to get rid of DeMarcus Smith because he only cares about his reputation by "winning" this thing no matter how much it hurts the NFL and the players. He walked away from mediation for no reason whatsoever other than to decertify and go to court. Obviously they are elements of the players who were very unhappy about that.


Report: Players to file for intervention
Rift In Union?
Report: Breakaway group of NFL players close to signing with law firm to have own seat at mediation sessions

Report: Breakaway group of NFL players close to signing with law firm to have own seat at mediation sessions

There could be a rift opening in the NFL Players Association.

A group consisting of as many as 70 players is close to signing with a law firm in order to intervene in the Tom Brady antitrust case, the Sports Business Daily reported on its website Wednesday, citing unnamed sources. The group of players isn't contesting the earlier lawsuit but wants a place at the mediation table, according to the report, so they can explain their take on the labor dispute.


The lockout reached its 40th day Wednesday.

Whereas the plaintiffs in the earlier lawsuit filed by 10 players consisted of some of the biggest names in the NFL -- Brady, Drew Brees and Peyton Manning -- this new group is comprised of mid-tier players, according to the Sports Business Daily.

The new group of players, which the Sports Business Daily said could not yet be identified -- is reportedly unhappy that earlier mediation talks ended in Washington last month before the NFLPA filed for decertification.

Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Mike Vrabel, one of the plaintiffs in the Brady case, told ESPN's Ed Werder during a break in Wednesday's mediation session that he was unaware of the report but said everybody on the players side is unhappy with how the mediation ended in Washington.

Vrabel said that abandoning the cause in this way would be the wrong way to demonstrate dissatisfaction.

"We all have a seat at the table already. If they're unhappy, then we should get together and elect a new executive board."

Some things have to happen, however, before the intervention is filed, the Sports Business Daily reported. The law firm wants at least 75 players on board before filing the intervention and the firm has to resolve a minor conflict, which was not identified in the report. If these issues are solved, the new group of players could file by the end of this week.

It has been two weeks since U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson ordered the Brady class and the NFL back to the negotiating table. She is expected to decide soon on the players' request to lift the lockout, which is the NFL's first work stoppage since 1987. Her decision will almost certainly be appealed.

With appeals expected, there isn't a ton of time left when it comes to the 2011 season. The NFL released its regular season schedule Tuesday night, announcing that the season will open on Thursday, Sept. 8, with the Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers hosting the New Orleans Saints.

That's less than five months away, with free agency, trades and other roster decisions still up in the air while the lockout is in place.

The announcement of the schedule came with a big if, of course. The longer the labor strife drags through the court system, the more danger is posed to actual games being canceled.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

feltdizz
04-20-2011, 03:02 PM
More and more of this is going to happen as potential free agents realize they are getting screwed the longer this goes on. Players need to get rid of DeMarcus Smith because he only cares about his reputation by "winning" this thing no matter how much it hurts the NFL and the players. He walked away from mediation for no reason whatsoever other than to decertify and go to court. Obviously they are elements of the players who were very unhappy about that.


I'm sure there are a few owners who are unhappy with their negotiators as well. Rooney is one of them.

Oviedo
04-20-2011, 04:55 PM
Love it :Clap :Clap :Clap

Screw a union for millionaires.


Report: NFL players' unity in trouble
A breakaway group of NFL players are close to hiring a law firm to intervene in the antitrust lawsuit against the NFL, the Sports Business Daily reported Wednesday.

According to the report, as many as 70 mid-tier players want to be represented separately at mediation, which is being conducted between the NFL and the players in a federal courtroom in Minneapolis.

The motion, expected to be filed by the end of the week, would not contest the Brady v. NFL lawsuit, but would demand the other group of players have their own seat at the negotiations.

The law firm set to represent the group of players must first resolve a minor conflict of interest before moving forward, the report said.

U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson ordered the sides to resume mediation before a federal magistrate, and the new round of talks are now in their fourth day. Few details have come out about whether any progress has been made.

Nelson said two weeks ago that she would take a "couple of weeks" before ruling on the players' request for an injunction against the owners' lockout. The players argue the lockout, which went into effect March 11, is causing them irreparable harm.

An appeal to the Eighth Circuit is expected regardless of which way Nelson rules on the injunction.

The breakaway group of players is reportedly unhappy that the NFL Players Association walked out on federally-mediated talks in Washington, D.C., before decertifying the union and filing the antitrust lawsuit.

Oviedo
04-20-2011, 05:20 PM
Judge ordered mediation adjourned until May 16th. More players will now start to get antsy!!!!!

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... til-may-16 (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d81f5bd25/article/judge-adjourns-mediation-between-nfl-players-until-may-16)

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
04-20-2011, 07:14 PM
"We all have a seat at the table already. If they're unhappy, then we should get together and elect a new executive board."

Executive board of what Mr. Vrabel? Remember, there is no union anymore. :lol:

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
04-20-2011, 07:30 PM
No surprise here......here are some snippets from a post I made on March 20th. I know that I had made similar statements earlier but stopped looking when I found this one. I refer to the median player as Mr. 1,000 in this post......


They mention the $1.9M average salary, but the average is meaningless. What you need to know is the median salary.......

Half of the voters make more money, the other half make less..........

This player - and most players below him on the list - are hungry guys probably playing a lot of special teams, and not very secure in their long term football future. Keep in mind that the average football career is about three years and Mr. 1,000 knows this.......

Now tell that same guy that we are about to ask him to forgo 1/3 of his potential earning power...........

How long before the working class of the union rise up against the fat cats who have control over the bulk of the salary cap? (I wanted to put this into some sort of trade union speak :lol: )...............

To sum up a very long winded argument - Football is the one sport in which more than 50% of the players cannot have the combination of patience and determination to agree to a long work stoppage.

Chadman
04-20-2011, 07:47 PM
The longer it drags out, the less bargaining power the players will have...they'll run out of money first after all...

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
04-21-2011, 09:00 AM
The longer it drags out, the less bargaining power the players will have...they'll run out of money first after all...

The thing is that it is not about the players running out of money. It is about a fringe player's ability to earn an extra payday before he moves on to the next stage of his life.

In the NFL there are 53 "votes" on a roster plus 8 "votes" on the PS and say an extra one on IR. That is 62 votes of which only 24 (including P & PK) are starters. Out of this collection of backups, PS, injured, and those barely hanging on to starting jobs, how many feel secure enough in their NFL employment to say "yes, I am willing to forgo $800K this year - or $500K, or less (rookie min was $325K last year).

Remember, this rook who earned $325K plus a $40K signing bonus as a sixth rounder has as many union votes as Peyton Manning.

Dennis Dixon has as many votes as Ben.

And there are far more of those players who do not have their future already set and paid for than those who do.

feltdizz
04-21-2011, 09:02 AM
The longer it drags out, the less bargaining power the players will have...they'll run out of money first after all...

Honestly... I think both the owners and players will cave on a few things and that is what negotiating is all about. It sounds like some of the mid tier players want a seat at the table. I don't see it as a bad thing. The NFL isn't just Manning and Brady... the 3 to 5 year guys should be represented by 3 to 5 year guys.

The whole 9/11 thing... I don't think the NFL wants to miss out on that marketing sham.

I think a deal will get done because all parties lose if there isn't a season this year.

I would also like to know who the "anonymous source" is, why they need 75 players and what do they need to do before being able to gain representation?

RuthlessBurgher
04-21-2011, 12:07 PM
Making tight ends meet
By Rick Reilly
ESPN.com
Updated: April 20, 2011, 12:28 PM ET



You might be thinking: I'm on the owners' side in this lockout mess because NFL players are all spoiled, hat-backward millionaires who will no more miss a year's salary than they'll miss their eighth Lexus.



OK, but maybe you should meet …



… Brian Schaefering, Cleveland Browns defensive lineman.



He has a wife, three kids -- all 8 and under -- and a rented house. He doesn't have a shoe deal or a Lloyd's of London policy or a super agent willing to float him till this is over.



Yeah, he's got a safety net -- himself.



"I'll do anything," says Schaefering, 27. "If I have to work for UPS, I will. I got a family to feed. I've paved roads, fixed roofs, done landscaping. I'm not better'n anybody else. I don't want any handouts. I'd be happy with $12 an hour if I could get it."



You hear anything about Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones wanting to run a road paver lately?



"The problem is," Schaefering says, "who wants to hire a guy who may have to pack up and leave [for the NFL] a month or two into it?"



So Schaefering and his wife are cutting back. They slashed their cable and cell phone bills and chopped their weekly date nights considerably. They used to get a babysitter, then catch dinner and a movie. "Now, it's put the kids to bed and slap in a DVD."



You might be thinking: What the hell has he done with his money he has made so far in the NFL?



Well, he went undrafted in 2008, barely made the practice squad in '09 and finally started nine games for the Browns last season, making $395,000. He says he netted just over $200,000 after taxes. And he had plenty of bills to pay going into last year.



"I hear people joking around about this thing, but it's no joke," he says. "If this goes into the season, my wife might start panicking a little."



You might be thinking: What about these $60,000 checks that went out this week to the players from the NFLPA's lockout war chest? That should pay for a few babysitters, right?



True, but maybe you should meet …



… former Air Force star Chad Hall, Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver.



Hall, 24, isn't getting any $60,000. Since transforming himself from an F-16 mechanic into a modern-day "Invincible" with the Eagles, 5-foot-8 Hall hasn't exactly hit the Lotto. He was on the team for only 11 games, so he got the minimum salary, prorated. The most he'll get from the lockout fund is "about $10,000," he says.



Now, he's training friends' kids for whatever they want to pay him -- "I don't really charge a set fee" -- and trying to open a wings restaurant in Atlanta with his sister's boyfriend, Detroit Lions QB Matthew Stafford.



You think Seattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen will be asking "BBQ or teriyaki?" anytime soon?


"If we don't have a season, I'll be waiting tables and bartending there," he says. "Plus, my uncle says he has a plumbing job for me. Pays $15 an hour, so that's not bad."



You think Seattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen will be asking "BBQ or teriyaki?" anytime soon?



You might be thinking: I'm supposed to feel sorry for these guys? At least they had a year of making $400,000. Try making $40,000!"



I guess so, but maybe you should meet …



… University of Wisconsin All-American lineman John Moffitt.



Moffitt is a projected early- to middle-round draft choice, a can't-miss NFL starter who "will make plenty of Pro Bowls once he's signed," says his agent, Mike George.



The problem is, what if he never gets signed?



"I saw some Girl Scouts selling cookies the other day," Moffitt says. "Maybe I could try that?"



Moffitt's got no job and no endorsement deals -- "Nobody wants to see my face on anything," he says -- and "my parents stopped sending my allowance." So George is paying for training and living expenses until something breaks.



After that?



"Well, my dad paints houses in Guilford, Conn.," he says. "I think he'd maybe take me on doing that. But it's kind of hard right now. I hope it doesn't come to that."



You hear anything about any NFL owners hitting up their dads lately?



Plus, staying in top physical shape is a full-time job. "It's not like they can do that and work at Macy's at the same time," George says.



They might have to. Eagles lineman Winston Justice has opened a coffee shop. Teammate Owen Schmitt might student teach. Browns backup WR Rod Windsor is playing for the Arizona Rattlers of the Arena Football League, where some players are making as little as $400 per game. That barely covers the Advil.



And then there's this: ThePostGame.com recently reported that an estimated 180 NFL players might have signed for "lockout loans," at rates that can climb over 30 percent upon default, to make ends meet.



Not just dumb, desperate.



You might be thinking: So throw these guys a freaking telethon! I don't care. Tell them to stop bitching. The rest of us have real jobs!



I guess. But remember, the players aren't the ones bitching. Among the four big pro sports in this country, these guys picked the one that pays the least money, lasts the fewest years and wrecks the most bodies. They're fine with that.



It's the owners who have taken the football and gone home. It's the owners who want a billion dollars back from the deal they have now. It's the owners who want two more games from the players for nothing. And not a single owner is contemplating roofing at $12 an hour.



So, if you're still thinking you're on the owners' side in this?



Then you're not thinking at all.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Love the column, hate the column, got a better idea? Go here.

Rick Reilly is the 11-time National Sportswriter of the Year. He contributes essays and commentary to "SportsCenter" and ESPN/ABC golf and tennis coverage. He's also the host of "Homecoming," ESPN's unique, one-hour interview show set in the hometowns of legendary athletes. For more Rick, check out the archive.


Feel like taking a detour from sane sports? Try Rick's new book, "Sports from Hell."


http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=6388708

feltdizz
04-21-2011, 12:59 PM
I guess. But remember, the players aren't the ones bitching. Among the four big pro sports in this country, these guys picked the one that pays the least money, lasts the fewest years and wrecks the most bodies. They're fine with that.


It's the owners who have taken the football and gone home. It's the owners who want a billion dollars back from the deal they have now. It's the owners who want two more games from the players for nothing. And not a single owner is contemplating roofing at $12 an hour.

This right here...

but hey, in America we are trained to praise the owners and despise the workers.

CEO's compensation is 400X what it was 20 or 30 years ago... yet the average worker is the reason to blame for all the company losses.

pittpete
04-21-2011, 02:29 PM
and the lawyers get richer :roll:

feltdizz
04-21-2011, 03:43 PM
and the lawyers get richer :roll:

Everyone hates lawyers til they need one...

wait... I hated my lawyer when I needed him...

lying bastard.

flippy
04-21-2011, 04:02 PM
Maybe Mendy wasn't so far off as many of us thought when he mentioned it being like modern slavery.

In all seriousness, I feel for the fringe guys. And there's more of them then there are Tom Brady's and Peyton Mannings.

Oviedo
04-21-2011, 04:20 PM
Maybe Mendy wasn't so far off as many of us thought when he mentioned it being like modern slavery.

In all seriousness, I feel for the fringe guys. And there's more of them then there are Tom Brady's and Peyton Mannings.

It's not slavery when you have the total freedom to go and get any other job you want. If they feel like the NFL propogates the concept of slavery they should stand by their high morals and go to another profession.

They won't because they are money gubbing hypocrites. They are no more slaves than anyone of us who are in jobs that aren't great but necessary to support families and pay the bills. The rest of society is also making alot less.

papillon
04-24-2011, 08:22 AM
Professional sports stopped being "sport" a long time ago and is now nothing more than entertainment; the same as going to a movie, going bowling, going out to dinner, spending a weekend at the beach, etc. So, I don't care if the owners have to split the money 80% for the players and 20% for them or if the players get raked over the coals and they miss a season and watch salaries get cut drastically. When they play again, I'll watch and if they don't play, my expendable entertainment dollars and time will be spent doing other things.

If you want to watch a sporting event that is being played purely for sport and competition I suggest you find the local high school; it's lacrosse season and that's a great game to watch. In the fall you can get your football fix at the local high school, in the winter there's basketball (and other sports) and in the spring lacrosse, baseball and others.

Pappy

feltdizz
04-24-2011, 03:04 PM
The owners backed out of a deal they just made and the players are the money grubbing hypocrites? LOL.

Only in America can the owners demand tax payers fund the stadiums, make a deal then opt out, ask for another Billion off the top, lock the employees out and somehow get a few ignorant fans think the players are the greedy hypocrites.

The players are over the top in their analogy of being modern day slaves but I think most people are aware its done for sensationalism. When people say these guys can quit and get new jobs it definitely wouldn't be in the dame profession. What other professions owns your rights even if you retire and decide to come back in a few years? I can't think of many.

steelcurtain44
04-25-2011, 08:04 AM
Making tight ends meet
By Rick Reilly
ESPN.com
Updated: April 20, 2011, 12:28 PM ET



You might be thinking: I'm on the owners' side in this lockout mess because NFL players are all spoiled, hat-backward millionaires who will no more miss a year's salary than they'll miss their eighth Lexus.



OK, but maybe you should meet …



… Brian Schaefering, Cleveland Browns defensive lineman.



He has a wife, three kids -- all 8 and under -- and a rented house. He doesn't have a shoe deal or a Lloyd's of London policy or a super agent willing to float him till this is over.



Yeah, he's got a safety net -- himself.



"I'll do anything," says Schaefering, 27. "If I have to work for UPS, I will. I got a family to feed. I've paved roads, fixed roofs, done landscaping. I'm not better'n anybody else. I don't want any handouts. I'd be happy with $12 an hour if I could get it."



You hear anything about Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones wanting to run a road paver lately?



"The problem is," Schaefering says, "who wants to hire a guy who may have to pack up and leave [for the NFL] a month or two into it?"



So Schaefering and his wife are cutting back. They slashed their cable and cell phone bills and chopped their weekly date nights considerably. They used to get a babysitter, then catch dinner and a movie. "Now, it's put the kids to bed and slap in a DVD."



You might be thinking: What the hell has he done with his money he has made so far in the NFL?



Well, he went undrafted in 2008, barely made the practice squad in '09 and finally started nine games for the Browns last season, making $395,000. He says he netted just over $200,000 after taxes. And he had plenty of bills to pay going into last year.



"I hear people joking around about this thing, but it's no joke," he says. "If this goes into the season, my wife might start panicking a little."



You might be thinking: What about these $60,000 checks that went out this week to the players from the NFLPA's lockout war chest? That should pay for a few babysitters, right?



True, but maybe you should meet …



… former Air Force star Chad Hall, Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver.



Hall, 24, isn't getting any $60,000. Since transforming himself from an F-16 mechanic into a modern-day "Invincible" with the Eagles, 5-foot-8 Hall hasn't exactly hit the Lotto. He was on the team for only 11 games, so he got the minimum salary, prorated. The most he'll get from the lockout fund is "about $10,000," he says.



Now, he's training friends' kids for whatever they want to pay him -- "I don't really charge a set fee" -- and trying to open a wings restaurant in Atlanta with his sister's boyfriend, Detroit Lions QB Matthew Stafford.



You think Seattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen will be asking "BBQ or teriyaki?" anytime soon?


"If we don't have a season, I'll be waiting tables and bartending there," he says. "Plus, my uncle says he has a plumbing job for me. Pays $15 an hour, so that's not bad."



You think Seattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen will be asking "BBQ or teriyaki?" anytime soon?



You might be thinking: I'm supposed to feel sorry for these guys? At least they had a year of making $400,000. Try making $40,000!"



I guess so, but maybe you should meet …



… University of Wisconsin All-American lineman John Moffitt.



Moffitt is a projected early- to middle-round draft choice, a can't-miss NFL starter who "will make plenty of Pro Bowls once he's signed," says his agent, Mike George.



The problem is, what if he never gets signed?



"I saw some Girl Scouts selling cookies the other day," Moffitt says. "Maybe I could try that?"



Moffitt's got no job and no endorsement deals -- "Nobody wants to see my face on anything," he says -- and "my parents stopped sending my allowance." So George is paying for training and living expenses until something breaks.



After that?



"Well, my dad paints houses in Guilford, Conn.," he says. "I think he'd maybe take me on doing that. But it's kind of hard right now. I hope it doesn't come to that."



You hear anything about any NFL owners hitting up their dads lately?



Plus, staying in top physical shape is a full-time job. "It's not like they can do that and work at Macy's at the same time," George says.



They might have to. Eagles lineman Winston Justice has opened a coffee shop. Teammate Owen Schmitt might student teach. Browns backup WR Rod Windsor is playing for the Arizona Rattlers of the Arena Football League, where some players are making as little as $400 per game. That barely covers the Advil.



And then there's this: ThePostGame.com recently reported that an estimated 180 NFL players might have signed for "lockout loans," at rates that can climb over 30 percent upon default, to make ends meet.



Not just dumb, desperate.



You might be thinking: So throw these guys a freaking telethon! I don't care. Tell them to stop bitching. The rest of us have real jobs!



I guess. But remember, the players aren't the ones bitching. Among the four big pro sports in this country, these guys picked the one that pays the least money, lasts the fewest years and wrecks the most bodies. They're fine with that.



It's the owners who have taken the football and gone home. It's the owners who want a billion dollars back from the deal they have now. It's the owners who want two more games from the players for nothing. And not a single owner is contemplating roofing at $12 an hour.



So, if you're still thinking you're on the owners' side in this?



Then you're not thinking at all.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Love the column, hate the column, got a better idea? Go here.

Rick Reilly is the 11-time National Sportswriter of the Year. He contributes essays and commentary to "SportsCenter" and ESPN/ABC golf and tennis coverage. He's also the host of "Homecoming," ESPN's unique, one-hour interview show set in the hometowns of legendary athletes. For more Rick, check out the archive.


Feel like taking a detour from sane sports? Try Rick's new book, "Sports from Hell."


http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=6388708


I'm sorry, but I still can't feel for even the fringe players. Hell they all still make more than I do, and I've been working at one job or another all my life. I'll take that $10,000. That would help me out tremendously. $200,000.00 take home pay? WTF? are you kidding me? I don't care about the players or the owners bickering around hundreds of thousand dollars. I just want to see football come August.

feltdizz
04-25-2011, 11:39 AM
I'm sorry, but I still can't feel for even the fringe players. Hell they all still make more than I do, and I've been working at one job or another all my life. I'll take that $10,000. That would help me out tremendously. $200,000.00 take home pay? WTF? are you kidding me? I don't care about the players or the owners bickering around hundreds of thousand dollars. I just want to see football come August.

I hear you.... I felt the same way when they talked about the hardships of practice squad players. I think they make $2500 a week. That is still pretty good change compared to the average NFL fan.

However, they aren't comparing the players to you and I. They are comparing their hardship to the owners who are boo hooing and asking for another BILLION off the top.

Ghost
04-25-2011, 02:47 PM
I am firmly on the players side as all of the owners are legitimately billionaires who's position just doen't make that much sense - do a lot more work for less pay?

But it's a little much to ask to feel a ton of sympathy for a lot of these players. You were an F-16 mechanic and can't find a mechanic job?

Know what I WASN'T DOING at age 27 - having 3 kids under the age of 8. WTF? Invest in some condoms or the pill but don't blame the NFL for continually knocking up your wife when you knew you were a fringe player at best. Responsible people have children based on their ability to care for them.

Didn't these guys go to college? Doesn't everyone who goes have to look for a job at some point? Didn't all of you have to look for work?

Don't a lot of us go to jobs we don't like (or just tolerate) to pay our bills, a mortgage, have a car that runs, groceries, etc? You can look at lots of professions that people would love to be doing but the reality is that have to get real jobs to support themselves. Sounds like some of these players are just figuring it out. And hasn't the Union been telling players for over a year now to save money and prepare for the worst?

Oviedo
04-25-2011, 04:10 PM
I am firmly on the players side as all of the owners are legitimately billionaires who's position just doen't make that much sense - do a lot more work for less pay?

But it's a little much to ask to feel a ton of sympathy for a lot of these players. You were an F-16 mechanic and can't find a mechanic job?

Know what I WASN'T DOING at age 27 - having 3 kids under the age of 8. WTF? Invest in some condoms or the pill but don't blame the NFL for continually knocking up your wife when you knew you were a fringe player at best. Responsible people have children based on their ability to care for them.

Didn't these guys go to college? Doesn't everyone who goes have to look for a job at some point? Didn't all of you have to look for work?

Don't a lot of us go to jobs we don't like (or just tolerate) to pay our bills, a mortgage, have a car that runs, groceries, etc? You can look at lots of professions that people would love to be doing but the reality is that have to get real jobs to support themselves. Sounds like some of these players are just figuring it out. And hasn't the Union been telling players for over a year now to save money and prepare for the worst?

I'm not anti-player, but I am strongly anti-union. The problem with the players is the sense of entitlement. They believe they should have half million dollar homes and that they should have fancy cars. They are so divorced from "normal Americans" like us that they can't even comprehend using their FREE college educations to go get a job that pays like $50,000 per year.

There was no reason for the players and the union to stop talking back in march. That whole thing was orchestrated by union leadership to decertify and hopefully get a friendly judge in court. DeMarcus Smith has played this whole thing to establish his "rep" as a bad a$$ labor leader.

Yes the owners opted out, but have you been paying attention to the economy. Teams aren't immune to that. Corporations and companies have folded which means less suites sold, less advertising, etc. Many assume because you are a "billionaire" (and that for most is just on paper not reality) it is OK if money comes out of your pocket. The players think they should never bear the neagative side of the economic structure only reap the positive side.

feltdizz
04-25-2011, 04:28 PM
I am firmly on the players side as all of the owners are legitimately billionaires who's position just doen't make that much sense - do a lot more work for less pay?

But it's a little much to ask to feel a ton of sympathy for a lot of these players. You were an F-16 mechanic and can't find a mechanic job?

Know what I WASN'T DOING at age 27 - having 3 kids under the age of 8. WTF? Invest in some condoms or the pill but don't blame the NFL for continually knocking up your wife when you knew you were a fringe player at best. Responsible people have children based on their ability to care for them.

Didn't these guys go to college? Doesn't everyone who goes have to look for a job at some point? Didn't all of you have to look for work?

Don't a lot of us go to jobs we don't like (or just tolerate) to pay our bills, a mortgage, have a car that runs, groceries, etc? You can look at lots of professions that people would love to be doing but the reality is that have to get real jobs to support themselves. Sounds like some of these players are just figuring it out. And hasn't the Union been telling players for over a year now to save money and prepare for the worst?

I'm not anti-player, but I am strongly anti-union. The problem with the players is the sense of entitlement. They believe they should have half million dollar homes and that they should have fancy cars. They are so divorced from "normal Americans" like us that they can't even comprehend using their FREE college educations to go get a job that pays like $50,000 per year.

There was no reason for the players and the union to stop talking back in march. That whole thing was orchestrated by union leadership to decertify and hopefully get a friendly judge in court. DeMarcus Smith has played this whole thing to establish his "rep" as a bad a$$ labor leader.

Yes the owners opted out, but have you been paying attention to the economy. Teams aren't immune to that. Corporations and companies have folded which means less suites sold, less advertising, etc. Many assume because you are a "billionaire" (and that for most is just on paper not reality) it is OK if money comes out of your pocket. The players think they should never bear the neagative side of the economic structure only reap the positive side.

I don't think that's the case at all Ovie... Damn near all Americans think they should have Mcmansions and 3 cars and 4 flatscreens. Why is it a shock that athletes would think the same way? America is broke... it's not just the players who feel entitled. Most of the nation feels this way.

I'm sure most of the fringe players will go get jobs if this isn't resolved. I don't think it's fair to say players won't do this and that while both sides are negotiating.

You keep saying the players don't bear the negative side but look at the fringe players.. those are the ones who are cut, do the grunt work of special teams and get beat up in practice. When a player is cut they feel the negative.. the money stops, the health care stops, etc.

Players don't bear the negative in the form of money lost from suites when they look at their paycheck but they also don't gain MORE money if MORE suites are sold or ticket if prices go up.

Players don't just reap the positive....

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
04-25-2011, 10:10 PM
but look at the fringe players.. those are the ones who are cut, do the grunt work of special teams and get beat up in practice. When a player is cut they feel the negative.. the money stops, the health care stops, etc.

The fringe players are the ones who should be prepared to be pounding the pavement to find a menial $50K a year job whether there is football played or not.

feltdizz
04-25-2011, 11:20 PM
well, it's been a few days... are these players still going to break ranks or was this all a rumor? Given the latest ruling I would love to see some of these 70 players step forward... if they even exist.

Starlifter
04-27-2011, 03:00 PM
I have no sympathy for players that squander millions and make poor decisions - but this isn't about those lucky few that score big and have a chance to end up like mark brunnel. This is about a guy who has on average a handful of years to enjoy his chosen career and hopefully make enough to provide for his family. The day an owner starts looking for a second job or has to worry about a blown ACL stopping his paycheck - then I might reconsider my position.

the players aren't asking for more, just to keep the same deal. the owners locked them out, are crying poor and won't open the books. yeah, I trust the owners....... :wft

Oviedo
04-27-2011, 03:52 PM
I have no sympathy for players that squander millions and make poor decisions - but this isn't about those lucky few that score big and have a chance to end up like mark brunnel. This is about a guy who has on average a handful of years to enjoy his chosen career and hopefully make enough to provide for his family. The day an owner starts looking for a second job or has to worry about a blown ACL stopping his paycheck - then I might reconsider my position.

the players aren't asking for more, just to keep the same deal. the owners locked them out, are crying poor and won't open the books. yeah, I trust the owners....... :wft

Who do you trust to have the long term interests of the game and the NFL? The business owners who are in it for the long haul? The players who are short term temporary employees?

I'll go with those who want the game to prosper for many more years.

feltdizz
04-27-2011, 06:10 PM
I have no sympathy for players that squander millions and make poor decisions - but this isn't about those lucky few that score big and have a chance to end up like mark brunnel. This is about a guy who has on average a handful of years to enjoy his chosen career and hopefully make enough to provide for his family. The day an owner starts looking for a second job or has to worry about a blown ACL stopping his paycheck - then I might reconsider my position.

the players aren't asking for more, just to keep the same deal. the owners locked them out, are crying poor and won't open the books. yeah, I trust the owners....... :wft

Who do you trust to have the long term interests of the game and the NFL? The business owners who are in it for the long haul? The players who are short term temporary employees?

I'll go with those who want the game to prosper for many more years.

:lol:

Players’ Percentage of All Revenues in 2000 was 56.5, in 2009 it was 50.6. DOWN 5.9%

Players’ Percentage of "Total Revenue" in 2000 was 61.7, in 2009 - 57.1 DOWN 4.6%

Now why would the owners want to change things? It's because of revenue sharing...
Jerry Jones doesn't want to share his money with the small market teams even though this is in the best interest of the league.


quick question... I read that the NFL is an unincorporated 501 association.
Federal tax exempt, antitrust protected.

So are the players employees are partners?