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hawaiiansteel
04-10-2011, 02:11 AM
Should the Steelers Consider Adding Another Pass Catching Tight End?

Posted on April 9, 2011 by adam


If you’re compiling a list of Steelers pre-draft needs (and I’m willing to bet that you are) you’re not likely to put tight end anywhere near the top.

Heath Miller is one of the best all-around players at the position in the NFL (despite being snubbed by the folks over at ESPN in their positional power rankings), is still in the prime of his career and isn’t likely to be going anywhere anytime soon. Combine that with the issue of depth and talent along the offensive line and at cornerback, along with a defensive line that’s getting to be a little long in the tooth and tight end probably doesn’t strike you as something that’s in dire need of addressing. And, truth be told, it’s probably not.

Still, I tend to be very liberal with my approach to the draft. I want to see talent and players that can make a long, lasting impact, regardless of position. In other words: don’t take a cornerback just to say you addressed the need; if that player doesn’t have a grade that justifies his selection at that spot, look somewhere else.

Could that “somewhere else” be another tight end that can make an impact in the passing game?

Under offensive coordinator Bruce Arians the Steelers utilize quite a few two-and-three tight end sets. For example, 437 of the Steelers’ 994 offensive plays (or about 44 percent) in 2010 featured multiple tight ends, up slightly from the 42 percent (408 of 1,014 offensive plays) they used in 2009. The most common combination used Miller and Matt Spaeth, while there were also variations that included Miller and David Johnson and Johnson and Spaeth, depending on the situation — down and distance, injuries, etc.

Here’s a quick look at the “usage” of each tight end in 2010 in the passing game: how many plays there were on the field for and how many times a pass was thrown in their direction…

Heath Miller: 781 plays, 67 passes (42 catches)
Matt Spaeth: 444 plays, 19 passes (9 catches)
David Johnson: 266 plays, 6 passes (4 catches)

To the surprise of no one Miller is the player that gets thrown to the most, while Spaeth and Johnson are essentially an extra offensive lineman when they step on the field. In two years with the team Johnson, who looks to be a fine blocker and even somewhat useful as a fullback, has had just 10 passes thrown in his direction. Over the past two years Spaeth (who JJ has often applauded for his improvement as a blocker) has been targeted on 26 passes (19 in 2010, 7 in 2009) and has struggled to consistently make catches.

If you’re going to use that many formations that include multiple tight ends, doesn’t it make at least some amount of sense to have more than one that can actually be a viable option in the passing game? If you’re an opposing defensive coordinator and the Steelers roll out a formation with Miller and Spaeth, which one is going to catch your attention in the passing game? Yeah, it’s Miller. But throw another guy in there that can hurt you down field, and it suddenly makes things a little more difficult to defend.

Looking around the NFL there are a number of teams that have used multiple tight ends to their advantage in the passing game, including Dallas (Jason Witten and Martellus Bennett), New England (Aaron Hernandez and Rob Gronkowski) and New Orleans (Jeremy Shockey, David Thomas and Jimmy Graham). Even Indianapolis has Dallas Clark and Jacob Tamme; though, Tamme was never used much until this year when Clark was injured.

The Steelers haven’t been afraid to use picks on tight ends in recent years, selecting five since 2004, including late-round picks Johnson (seventh round in ’09), Matt Kranchick (sixth round in ’04) and Charles Davis (fifth round in ’06), along with ” day one” guys Miller (first round in ’05) and Spaeth (third round in ’07).

It’s becoming more of a passing league, both with the style of play and the rules and the way they’re starting to be enforced. And to go back to something Mike Tomlin said during the 2008 draft: “There are two schools of thought to protect a quarterback … You can get linemen or you can get him weapons – people that people have to account for.”

Is adding another weapon, and a player that could help complement Miller at the tight end position in the passing game, something to consider? I’m not expecting them (or asking them) to go tight end with the 31st pick in the first round, but I wouldn’t mind seeing them use an early pick on the position. It would be bold, perhaps unexpected, and maybe even a little crazy. And that’s kind of what I like about it.

http://www.steelerslounge.com/2011/04/s ... #more-4776 (http://www.steelerslounge.com/2011/04/steelers-adding-pass-catching-tight/#more-4776)

pfelix73
04-10-2011, 09:46 PM
Actually, I would be surprised if they DON'T take a TE in the first 3-4 rounds. Spaeth is on his way out anyway, and yea, BA loves his TE formations. He'll be wanting another and, I think it would be a good idea to look for one too.

:tt1

steelz09
04-11-2011, 09:13 AM
No -- They shouldn't take a TE especially a pass catching one until Arian's learns how to utilize the one pass catching TE they already have (i.e. Miller).

That's all we need is another underutilized offensive weapon.

Oviedo
04-11-2011, 09:38 AM
Despite all the "Spaeth-hate" he isn't the problem at the TE positon. He is a slightly above average back-up TE. The problem is Johnson. He is terrible both as a FB and a TE. The guy couldn't catch a cold. He offers nothing.

I'd keep Spaeth, dump Johnson and get someone like Stocker, Wiiliams or Hendricks.

steelblood
04-11-2011, 01:05 PM
I agree that Spaeth may be unfairly judged. But, I have trouble saying that Spaeth is above average (even for a backup).

Spaeth is an average to slightly above average blocker. He has developed in this area. He is inconsistent, but he does have a big frame and generally walls off linebackers and DEs well. He does get too high and does not drive people off the line.

As a receiver, Spaeth is not used much. But, I think there is a reason for that. Spaeth was overdrafted largely on the assumption that he was a large, mobile receiver with deceptive speed. During post draft interviews, Arians claimed that Spaeth had the speed to stretch the seam and challenge safeties. Now, I am not sure about many things in life. But, one thing I'm sure about is that Spaeth is neither quick nor fast for a TE. He lumbers and has trouble creating separation. His hands are average to good and his run after the catch is poor.

Overall, I'd say Spaeth is a very average backup TE. Spaeth has no special skills and has reached his career potential. The best thing Spaeth has going for him is that he knows this offense. Any rookie coming in will have a steep learning curve.

feltdizz
04-11-2011, 01:15 PM
Despite all the "Spaeth-hate" he isn't the problem at the TE positon. He is a slightly above average back-up TE. The problem is Johnson. He is terrible both as a FB and a TE. The guy couldn't catch a cold. He offers nothing.

I'd keep Spaeth, dump Johnson and get someone like Stocker, Wiiliams or Hendricks.

Johnson couldn't catch? I only remember him getting about 4 opportunities but I think he caught all 4. 1 was high and he snatched it out of the air with no problem.

I don't have any feelings one way or the other but I was impressed with his hands when they did throw to him. He used his hands and didn't let the ball get into his body.

Northern_Blitz
04-11-2011, 01:50 PM
I really doubt we'd pick a TE early. I don't follow college, but if it gets to the end of rd. 1 and we don't like the CB or OL prospects it sounds like there will be good DL prospects that can make contributions for a long time. I'd much rather this than TE.

IMO we will have alot of passing options next year (Wallace, Ward, Miller, Sanders, Brown, Mendenhall) and I don't want to see opportunities for this group go to a rookie TE. I'd actually like to see us move away from 2TE sets a bit to get Sanders / Brown more PT. My feeling is that this would also spread the opposing D out more and reduce the number sacks Ben has to endure.

If Miller gets hurt, I think Spaeth has shown that he's a decent (if unspectacular) option.

hawaiiansteel
04-11-2011, 02:31 PM
Draft Preview: Best of tight ends

By Jeff Reynolds
NFLDraftScout.com Senior Analyst
April 2, 2011


At least one tight end has been selected in the first round in each of the past 11 drafts, and 16 overall, but any expectations teams have of finding a great one in this class borders on unreasonable.

Notre Dame junior Kyle Rudolph is the best of an average bunch, but a hamstring avulsion -- meaning the muscle separated from the bone -- kept him on the sideline for the second half of the 2010 season. He's been running since February but caught everything in sight at his April 7 pro day, where his athletic testing was solid but unspectacular as expected.

Rudolph could go in the late first round, as Greg Olsen (31st overall, Bears) did as the first tight end drafted in 2007 or Marcedes Lewis (28th overall, Jaguars) in 2006 if a needy team gets anxious even if NFLDraftScout.com has him rated as the 40th overall prospect.

Tennessee's Luke Stocker can't be confused with Jason Witten, but he and D.J. Williams, whose 4.59 speed and soft hands could be coveted, should battle to be the second tight end drafted.

A closer look at the top tight ends in this draft:


TIGHT ENDS

Rating, Player, Position, College, Height, Weight, Projected Round


1. *Kyle Rudolph, Notre Dame, 6-6, 259, 1-2

A tall target who gets off the line well and runs very well for his size, Rudolph's first on-field work in front of scouts during the pre-draft process was April 7. Rudolph was solid, timing at 4.78 in the 40 and showing tremendous hands. He missed the final six games of last season due to a torn hamstring, and needs to display good straight-line speed. Some have compared Rudolph to Rob Gronkowski, the Patriots' 2010 standout rookie who missed his final season at Arizona due to back surgery, but Rudolph isn't as athletic. He does have good size and should be able to contribute as a run-blocker. However, his mark in the NFL will be a receiver capable of stretching defenses and making plays after the catch. In three seasons in South Bend, he caught 90 passes for 1,032 yards and eight touchdowns.

2. Luke Stocker, Tennessee, 6-5, 258, 2

Stocker has to be given credit for remaining productive through three different head coaches during his time in Knoxville. In a weak class, he has soft, reliable hands and the potential to be a starter down the road, although he doesn't truly excel in any one area. What Stocker does have going for him is good size and experience in a pro-style offense. His best 40-yard dash time of 4.68 seconds doesn't display seam-busting speed and he is a bit of a project as a blocker. But once he gets his hands on the ball, Stocker is a load to bring down. He was the only Volunteer to catch a pass in every game last season, finishing with 39 catches for 417 yards.

3. D.J. Williams, Arkansas, 6-2, 245, 2-3

Williams endured a rough childhood, which included his mother moving with her three children to Little Rock, Ark. to get away from Williams' physically abusive father. Now, the 2010 John Mackey Award winner is poised to be one of the top tight ends draft this year. He's undersized to be considered an every-down player in the NFL, but Williams is a tenacious blocker and gives excellent effort every play. As an H-back, he has the potential to be put in motion to take advantage of his good quickness off the snap, straight-line speed (4.59 40) and reliable hands. A three-year starter, Williams caught a team-high 49 passes for 589 yards and four touchdowns as a senior -- second only to his sophomore season (61-723-3).

4. Lance Kendricks, Wisconsin, 6-3, 243, 3

A high school wide receiver, it took Kendricks a few seasons to wade his way up the draft chart behind current NFL tight ends Owen Daniels (2006, fourth round, Texans), Travis Beckum (2009, third, Giants) and Garrett Graham (2010, fourth, Texans). He still has a slight frame and limited top-end speed, but Kendricks gets off the line in a hurry for the position, can stretch the field and is an underrated blocker who could contribute early in two-tight end sets. Despite the slow start to his career, Kendricks is 18th in school history with 1,160 receiving yards.

5. Jordan Cameron, USC, 6-5, 254, 3-4

Cameron went from unheralded mid-round prospect to viral sensation with the YouTube video he filmed with Clippers star Blake Griffin spoofing the classic Michael Jordan/Spike Lee "Mars Blackmon" commercial. The video, showing various shots of Cameron dunking a basketball, did show off the former Trojans' athleticism. The high school wide receiver is still learning the nuances of playing tight end, and didn't make his first career reception until his senior season. He'll also have to add bulk to handle blocking duties in the NFL, but Cameron is an intriguing prospect. He's a versatile athlete hoping to follow in the footsteps of former college basketball players such as Tony Gonzalez, Antonio Gates and Jimmy Graham in translating those skills to the tight end position in the NFL.

6. Rob Housler, Florida Atlantic, 6-5, 248, 3-4

Housler is on track to join quarterback Rusty Smith (2010, sixth round, Tennessee) as the only former Owls to get drafted into the NFL. It's a deserved honor for a team-first player who played as a true freshman in 2006 but agreed to redshirt in 2009 with FAU having a logjam at his position. He put his athleticism on display by working as a quarterback on the scout team and simulating the spread-style offenses of FAU's opponents. Back on the field on game days in 2010, Housler earned second-team All-Sun Belt by catching 39 passes for 629 yards and four touchdowns. He has the height/speed combination teams are looking for, with the ability to work down the seam. Due to his lack of bulk, Housler won't be an every-down player but can carve out a spot as an H-back-type.

Reynolds is the Senior Editor for NFLDraftScout.com. Derek Harper contributed to this report.

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/stor ... tight-ends (http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/story/14919392/draft-preview-best-of-wide-receivers-and-tight-ends)

hawaiiansteel
04-13-2011, 03:18 PM
STEELERS POSITION REVIEW – TIGHT ENDS

Tight end is a strength for the Steelers…….sort of.

Part of the problem is that offensive coordinator Bruce Arians has a unique view of the tight end position. Arians is a firm believer in using a tight end as an H-back to serve as the primary blocker for his running back. Steelers fans have long complained about this approach and lobbied for a traditional fullback, or using two running backs so it isn’t always so obvious who is going to get the ball.

Arians has also shown a greater reluctance to throw to his tight end relative to many other offensive coordinators. Seventeen tight ends caught more passes than Heath Miller in 2010. Dallas Cowboys’ tight end Jason Witten caught 94 passes in 2010. That’s more than twice as many as Heath Miller caught (42 passes). Moreover, it’s twice as many as Heath Miller has averaged throughout his career (47 catches/season).

So in my opinion, part of the Steelers problem at tight end lies with the offensive coordinator, and not the players.

Heath Miller is one of the most talented tight ends in the NFL. He has sure hands, and seldom drops a pass. He’s also one of the best blocking tight ends in the NFL. But as mentioned earlier, Miller doesn’t get nearly as many opportunities to catch the ball as many of his contemporaries at the position. Players like Witten, Tony Gonzalez, Ben Watson, and Kellen Winslow play a much more integral role in their team’s passing attack.

Part of Arians’ reluctance to involve Miller more in the passing attack is probably due to the Steelers’ suspect offensive line. Because the Steelers’ offensive line has been a weakness for years, they are often forced to keep Miller at the line of scrimmage to help in the blocking scheme. If their offensive line were upgraded, I believe Miller would be freed up to catch more passes.

David Johnson is the Steelers’ H-Back. He’s a vicious blocker who is rarely targeted in the Steelers’ passing game. In fact, Johnson only has 6 reception in his two year NFL career. The Steelers use Johnson so seldom in the passing game, that I believe that they should do so every now and then just to catch their opponent by surprise. Having watched film of the Steelers, the opponent will NEVER expect them to throw to Johnson.

While Johnson is a very physical blocker, he has shortcomings at the position. He sometimes fails in picking up blitzes. He’s also not particularly fast, and sometimes seems to be in Rashard Mendenhall’s way when he’s trying to hit the hole.

The Steelers’ third tight end is Matt Spaeth. When the Steelers first drafted Spaeth out of college, I was excited about the pick. After all, I was envisioning Ben Roethlisberger throwing the ball to the 6’7? Spaeth in red zone situations. Yet, in the 4 years that Spaeth has been with the Steelers, we’ve seldom seen him used in that fashion.

Spaeth has 36 total catches during his 4 years in the NFL, and has only reached double digit receptions once (in 2008).

Heath Miller missed games due to injury in both 2008 and 2010. In both cases, Spaeth proved to be a liability when he filled in for Miller. Spaeth drops balls that Miller routinely catches. Moreover, Spaeth is not a good blocker like Miller and Johnson are. Frankly, Spaeth blocks like a matador (although he has gotten slightly better over the years).

So if he can’t catch, can’t block, and the team doesn’t utilize his height in the red zone, I have to ask “why is Matt Spaeth on the team?”

Spaeth is a free agent this season, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Steelers let him leave without tendering an offer. His production (or lack thereof) can easily be replaced by a late round draft pick or an undrafted free agent.

The Steelers’ tight ends fit well in their current offensive system. However, if they were to use their tight ends in a more traditional fashion, both Spaeth and David Johnson would probably need to be upgraded. But until they do that, Johnson is probably safe in his role with the Steelers.

http://steelerstoday.com/?p=8465

BradshawsHairdresser
04-13-2011, 07:21 PM
No -- They shouldn't take a TE especially a pass catching one until Arian's learns how to utilize the one pass catching TE they already have (i.e. Miller).

That's all we need is another underutilized offensive weapon.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Chadman
04-13-2011, 09:04 PM
A direct swap of new-TE for Speath or Johnson doesn't necessarily make a lot of sense. That said, both Speath & Johnson can be upgraded- an the importance of pass catching 'underneath' catchers might well become more prudent with the diminishing returns of Hines Ward. If Miller & say, Kendricks, can fill that 'possession reciever' role, then Wallace, Sanders & Brown could concentrate on stretching the field.

That sounds like a dangerous passing offense to Chadman- particularly coupled with Mendy out of the backfield.

hawaiiansteel
04-15-2011, 09:20 PM
Top TE carries "when healthy" qualifier

By Bob Labriola - Steelers Digest
Posted Apr 13, 2011

http://www.steelers.com/assets/images/imported/PIT/photos/article/Kyle_Rudolph_Tight_End_article.jpg

(A series looking at the top players at various positions leading up to the 2011 NFL Draft, set for April 28-30.)

Maybe the most telling thing about this 2011 crop of tight ends is the consensus No. 1 prospect carries the one qualifier that raises a red flag with every NFL team. “When healthy.”

One year after the draft yielded Jermaine Gresham, Rob Gronkowski, Andrew Quarless and Aaron Hernandez, rookie contributors all, this draft will present a medical question mark in Kyle Rudolph at the top of the class to be followed by a bunch of guys who can do some of the things demanded of the position but not others.

Rudolph (6-foot-6, 260 pounds) started 13 games as a freshman for Charlie Weis and finished that 2008 season with 29 catches and two touchdowns, but that was followed by two seasons ruined to different degrees by injuries. In 2009 it was a separated shoulder that eventually required surgery in December, and last year he tore two tendons off the bone in his right hamstring and had season-ending surgery on Oct. 15. Provided that all of Rudolph’s pre-draft medical evaluations checked out, he could become the only tight end drafted in the first round.

If Rudolph isn’t that guy, there doesn’t figure to be another prospect at this position to come off the board on Thursday, April 28.

After Rudolph, the top prospects here are being identified as Wisconsin’s Lance Kendricks, Tennessee’s Luke Stocker, Arkansas’ D.J. Williams and Nevada’s Virgil Green.

Kendricks (6-3, 245) is considered a solid receiver, but this fifth-year senior can present an interesting dilemma to teams investigating his background. He was cited twice for underage drinking within a span of a couple of months in 2008, but he bounced back from that to earn his degree and become a team captain.

Stocker (6-5, 260) has the same body type and attended the same college as Dallas tight end Jason Witten, and so the comparisons already have been made. Stocker ran a 4.74 at the Combine, so he uses skills other than speed to get open. Another fifth-year senior, he started 38 of the 52 games in which he appeared for the Volunteers.

Williams (6-2, 245) has the most impressive package of statistics of all the top prospects here, but his size is not ideal for the NFL. Still, Williams was a three-time All-SEC selection who averaged 47 catches over the previous three seasons. He was the 2010 winner of the Mackey Award, given annually to college football’s top tight end.

Green (6-3, 250) benefited from playing with quarterback Colin Kaepernick, himself a legitimate NFL prospect, during his time at Nevada. Another fifth-year senior who was recruited originally as a wide receiver, Green improved over the course of his college career and then helped himself at the Combine where he ran a 4.56.

THE 2010 NFL DRAFT, TE STATISTICS

Number drafted: 20

Picks by round: 1 in the first; 1 in the second; three in the third; 4 in the fourth; 3 in the fifth; 4 in the sixth; 4 in the seventh

Highest pick: Jermaine Gresham, Oklahoma, Round 1, 21st overall, by Cincinnati
Biggest impact: Rob Gronkowski, Arizona, Round 2, 42nd overall, started 11 games and finished with 42 catches for 546 yards and 10 touchdowns for New England.

http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/ ... 73dfd04922 (http://www.steelers.com/news/article-1/Top-TE-carries-when-healthy-qualifier/40967259-0b53-4c04-9f3a-a973dfd04922)

phillyesq
04-16-2011, 04:22 PM
No -- They shouldn't take a TE especially a pass catching one until Arian's learns how to utilize the one pass catching TE they already have (i.e. Miller).

That's all we need is another underutilized offensive weapon.

I'm not sure that Miller is underutilized. He caught 76 passes in 2009, which off the top of my head would put him top 5-8 at the position. Last year, he caught fewer passes, but he was also dinged up, missing a few games.

Shawn
04-16-2011, 04:44 PM
No -- They shouldn't take a TE especially a pass catching one until Arian's learns how to utilize the one pass catching TE they already have (i.e. Miller).

That's all we need is another underutilized offensive weapon.

I'm not sure that Miller is underutilized. He caught 76 passes in 2009, which off the top of my head would put him top 5-8 at the position. Last year, he caught fewer passes, but he was also dinged up, missing a few games.

I agree Heath isn't underutilized. It's not like Heath has true seperation speed, and is open on most plays but is just overlooked.

I think part of the issue this year wasn't just his injury. It was the fact that the OL was dinged up and he was called on to help with blocking.

NJ-STEELER
04-16-2011, 05:29 PM
No -- They shouldn't take a TE especially a pass catching one until Arian's learns how to utilize the one pass catching TE they already have (i.e. Miller).

That's all we need is another underutilized offensive weapon.

I'm not sure that Miller is underutilized. He caught 76 passes in 2009, which off the top of my head would put him top 5-8 at the position. Last year, he caught fewer passes, but he was also dinged up, missing a few games.

no ones happy until heath has 80+ catches, wallace 50+ cathes, hines 70+ catches, mendy 30+ catches

then what that happens, some will b*tch why dont we run the ball more

RuthlessBurgher
04-17-2011, 01:25 PM
If the Steelers indeed want to add another pass catching TE in the draft, I'd rather use a day 3 pick on a upside potential boom/bust former basketball player such as Julius Thomas instead of using a day 2 pick on someone like Lance Kendricks. I want our first 3 picks to be used to improve our lines on both sides of the trenches as well as the secondary (in some order...OL, CB, DL...CB, DL, OL...DL, OL, CB...whatever) rather than a luxury pick like another TE.

steelz09
04-17-2011, 02:06 PM
Heath doesn't need separation speed. He finds gaps in the zones.

We wouldn't need another TE for pass catching if we would fix the offensive line so Heath could be involved in the passing game. Instead, our interior line has sucked for forever so Heath is stuck in max protect.

Still can't believe that a "pass catching TE" is even remotely being considered given our other holes in this team and future needs.

Chadman
04-17-2011, 10:20 PM
Heath doesn't need separation speed. He finds gaps in the zones.

We wouldn't need another TE for pass catching if we would fix the offensive line so Heath could be involved in the passing game. Instead, our interior line has sucked for forever so Heath is stuck in max protect.

Still can't believe that a "pass catching TE" is even remotely being considered given our other holes in this team and future needs.

You'll have an apoplexy if the Steelers take a TE- won't you?

:D

ikestops85
04-18-2011, 11:18 AM
Heath doesn't need separation speed. He finds gaps in the zones.

We wouldn't need another TE for pass catching if we would fix the offensive line so Heath could be involved in the passing game. Instead, our interior line has sucked for forever so Heath is stuck in max protect.

Still can't believe that a "pass catching TE" is even remotely being considered given our other holes in this team and future needs.

You'll have an apoplexy if the Steelers take a TE- won't you?

:D

I know I will if they take one earlier than round 5. :wink:

buckeyehoppy
04-18-2011, 04:32 PM
No -- They shouldn't take a TE especially a pass catching one until Arian's learns how to utilize the one pass catching TE they already have (i.e. Miller).

That's all we need is another underutilized offensive weapon.

Damned Straight! F--- BA!!! :Agree

His dumb @$$ed approach to O doesn't use all the tools in the box anyway. How about play action passing? How about using RBs as receivers? How about teaching his QB not to wait forever to throw the g-ddamned ball?

He shouldn't get any more weapons until he figures out a way to use what he has. Look at my Mock Draft. There's a perfectly good g-ddamned reason there are no skill position players for the O on it: we don't need marquee players, we need DEPTH. And depth can be obtained @ the @$$ end of the Draft or as UDFAs.

Considering we will, at most, have seven picks this year, those selections are at a premium. We need both interior lines (3 picks, at least), a CB (maybe 2), a FS (1) and maybe an ILB and the math rounds out to what we will use our picks for. At the rate he's going, Ben doesn't have more than maybe 3 or 4 good years left if we don't get him protection right now. And when your best CB is a UFA and the entire corps got lit up like a Christmas tree in the SB, the sooner they get help, the better. And our geriatric DL has needed new blood for each of the last two drafts and the need is still there.

If we get ANY O skill position help, Round 7 is the earliest we even look at it if the FO is smart.

buckeyehoppy
04-18-2011, 04:55 PM
No -- They shouldn't take a TE especially a pass catching one until Arian's learns how to utilize the one pass catching TE they already have (i.e. Miller).

That's all we need is another underutilized offensive weapon.

I'm not sure that Miller is underutilized. He caught 76 passes in 2009, which off the top of my head would put him top 5-8 at the position. Last year, he caught fewer passes, but he was also dinged up, missing a few games.

no ones happy until heath has 80+ catches, wallace 50+ cathes, hines 70+ catches, mendy 30+ catches

then what that happens, some will b*tch why dont we run the ball more

I think every execution problem we have on O can be at least indirectly blamed on the OL.

Heath probably doesn't have the number of catches anyone would like him to have because he digs in to support blocking. RBs can't get outside because the OL doesn't have enough foot speed to get in front for a RB to turn to the sideline and get a 1st Down on a tight rope. WRs don't have enough time to get downfield and Ben has to hurry his throw because the OL doesn't consistently keep the rush from disrupting the timing of the play.

There's no way anyone should be complaining about Heath's production. He does everything well, but, right now, he is also called upon to do a few more things that he shouldn't have to do as often.

buckeyehoppy
04-18-2011, 04:59 PM
If the Steelers indeed want to add another pass catching TE in the draft, I'd rather use a day 3 pick on a upside potential boom/bust former basketball player such as Julius Thomas instead of using a day 2 pick on someone like Lance Kendricks. I want our first 3 picks to be used to improve our lines on both sides of the trenches as well as the secondary (in some order...OL, CB, DL...CB, DL, OL...DL, OL, CB...whatever) rather than a luxury pick like another TE.

What do ya think of this guy? Possible @$$ end of the draft guy?

http://www.nfldraftscout.com/ratings/ds ... &genpos=TE (http://www.nfldraftscout.com/ratings/dsprofile.php?pyid=64415&draftyear=2011&genpos=TE)

http://warroom.sportingnews.com/nfl/dra ... /9883.html (http://warroom.sportingnews.com/nfl/draft/2011/players/9883.html)