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Chadman
03-16-2011, 12:24 AM
Ok, it's been a slow day, and Chadman is tired of talking about unions & owners...so let's have a bit of a play on a different Mock here.

Having used a few people's observations, Chadman's own theories on the Colbert/Tomlin draft techniques & a little bit of magic, Chadman has come up with what will likely be lambasted as the very worst Mock draft of all time.

But Chadman's a big boy & can take the critisism- all the while knowing he is right and once again, you guys are wrong...

Here...we....go....

Chadman
03-16-2011, 12:37 AM
ROUND 1.

MARTEZ WILSON ILB ILLINOIS
6'4" 250lbs
4.44 40 Time
Bench- 23 times
Vertical- 36"
Arm Length- 34 5/8"

http://www.illinoisloyalty.com/i/20080830-football-illinois-illini-missouri-tigers/951-martez-wilson.jpg

Ok, so this is not what some were expecting. This does not, in any way, shape or form fill an immediate 'need' for this Franchise. And it's not designed to either. That's not the way Colbert/Tomlin think. They take best player vs need available. Is the 5th best OT better value than the #1 ILB? No. The 5th best CB better than the #1 ILB? No. 5th best DE better than the #1 ILB? Again, no. Wilson simply presents possibly the best value selection at #31. He has few real faults in his game, he's a junior which Colbert/Tomlin have shown a fondness for drafting, very athletic, and a difference maker on the field. James Farrior is 100 years old. Larry Foote is 95 years old. They can't go forever. Timmons & Wilson could very well be the most explosive ILB combination of any 3-4 NFL Defense if they get put on the field together. The Steelers tend to draft for the future more than the now. Wilson would be a starter in a year or two, which gives him the necessary time to digest the playbook, while helping on ST's.

Overview
Wilson is one of the most heralded prospects ever to suit up for Illinois, a consensus high school All-American who decided to stay in-state instead of heading to Miami (Fla.), Southern Cal, Notre Dame and many other major programs. Until 2010, however, his production had not matched the blue-chip billing. His 112 tackles included 11.5 for loss and four sacks, and the second-team All-Big 10 selection also forced three fumbles, deflected four passes and blocked a kick before deciding his junior season was his last in Champaign.

He played in all 13 games as a reserve for the Illini as a true freshman in 2007, being credited with 29 tackles, three for loss and two sacks. Wilson pushed up his game a notch as a sophomore, making 73 stops, 5.5 for loss, three sacks and three pass breakups. Wilson admitted when he entered school he wanted to be three-and-done, but a herniated disk in his neck cost him all but the first game of the 2009 season.

Wilson's straight-line speed and length could allow him to play an inside linebacker spot in a 3-4 defense as his build and game are very similar to Miami Dolphins starter Karlos Dansby. He might move outside in the right system. If teams are not overly concerned about his neck injury, Wilson's versatility and athleticism make him a likely top 50 selection.

Analysis
Read & React: Not the most instinctual player. A step or two late to recognize run or pass, and will be fooled by misdirection. Excellent reaction speed once he sees it develop. Finds a crease to attack the backfield or slice through a stretch play.

Run defense: Gap-attacking defender who uses his length to bring down most backs in the hole. Lanky-framed linebacker with fair upper-body development. Extends his long arms to keep offensive linemen at an arm's length as they try to reach him. Works his way through traffic near the line. Better when he sling-shots around blockers than trying to stack-and-shed. Good speed to get the angle down the sideline to minimize big plays. Willing to hit backs head-on in the hole and stand them up. Needs to get stronger in pro strength and conditioning and be more violent with his hands to shed blocks. Overpursues and is too aggressive reading angles.

Pass defense: Gets a hand on receivers crossing over the middle to knock them off their routes. Good speed to get deep in his drop. Runs the seam with receivers, sometimes 40-50 yards downfield. Great length and speed to affect passing lanes when focusing on the quarterback. Good hustle to the ball in zone coverage. Should handle man coverage against tight ends. Only adequate anticipating routes into the flat, too often gets caught in no-man's land between pass rush and defense. Must improve his ability to read routes. Susceptible to cut blocks in run and pass defense.

Tackling: One of the leading tacklers in the country, relying on his length and speed. Not usually explosive upon contact but slows down backs and makes a lot of ankle tackles when other linebackers would not even get a hand on the ballcarrier. Shows good hustle, comes off blitz to pursue 15-20 yards downfield. His height hinders his ability to drop his hips and get low, rolling off ballcarriers instead of sticking them. Only average flexibility, which could limit his 3-4 role to the inside rather than a pass-rushing outside 'backer. Nice range allows him to help teammates bring down receivers and can beat the ball to the sideline.

Pass Rush/Blitz: Uses his slim frame to get skinny through holes inside to regularly bring down running backs in the backfield. Also uses length and speed to beat tackles outside with swim or rip moves. Very good closing speed to the quarterback. Lines up with his hand on the ground occasionally, flashing get-off but lacking great flexibility to turn the corner.

Intangibles: Relied purely on athleticism early in his career. Began watching film before 2010 season. Had surgery on a herniated disk in his neck after the first game of the 2009 season, redshirted. Still wears neck protector. Suffered knife wound coming to the aid of teammate De'Angelo McCray, who was being beaten outside a Champaign bar in December 2008. Focused more on academics and football after the incident.

Chadman
03-16-2011, 01:01 AM
ROUND 2.

RASHARD CARMICHAEL CB VIRGINIA TECH
5'10" 192lbs
4.49 40 Time
Bench- 13 Times
Vertical- 31"
Arm Length- 31 3/4"

http://tommeltonscouting.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/rashad-carmichael.jpg

Ahh! Chadman's gone mad! No he hasn't. :D Carmichael is a very good athletic CB that has played against some tough competition. He's not the biggest CB in the draft, but he's fast & willing. And he could play Nickle almost right away. With an investment in Keenan Lewis & Crezdon Butler in the last 2 years, adding another CB can only offer the Steelers another athlete that can compete for playing time. Carmichael also offers more 'big play' or, dare Chadman say it.. 'splash play' ability than any other CB on the roster.

Overview
Carmichael possesses the instincts and awareness to be an effective contributor in a zone defensive scheme, but thus far has not shown the physicality and aggressiveness at the line of scrimmage necessary to succeed as an every-down press coverage corner at the next level.

Despite shortcomings in man coverage, his sub-4.4 speed and ability to play the ball make him a legitimate mid-round candidate who can provide nickel support and solid depth in a Cover 2-type of zone scheme, while bringing some explosive big-play ability to the field.

Analysis
Positives: Explosive, rangy athlete with nice acceleration and top-end speed. Lanky and slender, but isn't afraid to go for the big hit. Fearless tackler willing to engage bigger backs and receivers head-on. Gets his head around in coverage and adjusts his body nicely to the ball in the air. Has a second gear that allows him to correctively close gaps between himself and receivers who have gained separation. Light-footed, smooth backpedal maintaining still head and upper body. Displays good awareness of both the quarterback's eyes and receiver location when playing off in zone coverage. Gets his hands up quickly to make plays on balls that he may get his head around late on. Keeps his eyes in the backfield and shows good zone discipline when defending the run.

Negatives: Struggles to get his hands on opposing receivers and create disruptive contact at the line of scrimmage when playing press. Doesn't crowd receivers enough in man coverage, often leaving an unnecessary cushion of space both off the line and downfield, thus allowing the receiver room to maintain balance and keep route accuracy. Tends to slow up when turning out of his backpedal and running upfield, often leaving himself in a "catch up" situation with his assigned receiver. When reacting to slant routes underneath in zone coverage, doesn't get a quick enough first step to consistently meet the ball at the receiver. Puts himself in good position to make tackles against the run, but tends to wait on the ballcarrier rather than drive through him, thus leaving him vulnerable to jukes and cutbacks. Displays very poor tackling technique when engaging the ballcarrier at times, tending to lock his knees and lead with his head.

Chadman
03-16-2011, 01:12 AM
ROUND 3.

LAWRENCE GUY DE ARIZONA STATE
6'5" 300lbs
4.95 40 Time
Bench- 28 Times
Vertical- 29"
Arm Length- 33"

http://rakadd.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/lawrence-guy-tackle2591065.jpg

The Steelers Defense is the oldest in the NFL. The DL is responsible largely for this, with only 1 player under the age of 30. Aaron Smith can't stay healthy, and there's little depth behind Ziggy & Keisel. Guy is a junior, again fitting the Tomlin/Colbert wish list & has a great body shape/length for a 3-4 DE. Even if he only ever develops into a rotational player, the DL needs an injection of youth so that we are not presented with a DL that mass-retires in a year or two.

Overview
Guy signed with Arizona State as a highly touted prep prospect, turning down Oklahoma, Oregon, Nebraska and Tennessee, among others. His size and physicality make him one of the better, if anonymous, defensive tackle prospects in the draft.

Scouts would have preferred to see Guy return for his senior season -- as he's still getting by on physical talent rather than technique -- but there is no doubting his ability. Teams operating out of the 3-4 alignment will like his length and strength, as Guy projects nicely as a five-technique defensive end. Guys' statistics are solid -- 122 tackles, 23 tackles for loss and eight sacks in 35 games -- but not spectacular, leading to some discounting his talents.

Don't be surprised when this Sun Devil defensive tackle proves to be anything but just another "guy" and hears his name called among the top 100 picks.

Analysis
Positives: Rare size with a quick burst off the snap. Can slide through gaps and disrupt a play before it develops. Good strength at the point of attack. Good flexibility and core strength to anchor and create a pile. Flashes an effective spin move, which could be made more effective with the development of his technique. Good lateral agility and straight-line speed for a man of his size. Possesses a late burst to the ball and can be an explosive hitter. Locates the ball quickly and pursues well. Flashes a nasty demeanor. An ascending player whose best football is ahead of him. Developed into a leader and high-achieving student after a poor start at ASU.

Negatives: Remains a bit raw technically. Doesn't use his hands well and can be blocked effectively by smaller, weaker linemen because of it. Struggles to completely disengage, so he rarely is able to take advantage of his closing burst with a free shot at the quarterback. Diagnosed with dyslexia and attention deficit disorder. Struggled with academics and maturity early in his career at Arizona State.

Chadman
03-16-2011, 01:20 AM
ROUND 4.

JOHN MOFFITT OG WISCONSIN
6'4" 319lbs
5.51 40 Time
Bench- 23
Vertical-
Arm Length- 33"

http://nflsoup.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/John-Moffitt-2011.jpg

Here's your damn OG! Ok, the Steelers probably need some more bodies on the OL, but the group is pretty set, to be honest. the only spot that really has doubt is RG. Moffitt seems a pretty good player with good charachter. Plus, he's reportedly a funny guy. Chadman likes funny guys. They are good at press conferences. This pick might drag up ghosts of Urbik's past, but let's not tarnish all of the Badgers due to one bad pinenut.

Oh, and Tomlin, Colbert & Kugs were at Wisconsin's Pro Day..

03/15/2011 - Wisconsin pro day: The always-entertaining 319-pound lineman was at it again yesterday. Moffitt said he was pleased with his Pro Day performance and his showing at the NFL combine. But he readily admits his 40-yard dash time isn't anything special. After running at the combine, it was no surprise to see Moffitt dodge that event at his Pro Day this time around. "My 40 [yard dash] wasn't great. It was about a swift seven seconds," Moffitt said with a laugh. "It was horrible. ... It was about 30 yards too far. ... But my other numbers I was really happy about, and those are the things that really pertain to me, to my position." - Max Henson, UW Badger Herald

Chadman
03-16-2011, 01:26 AM
ROUND 5.

JULIUS THOMAS TE PORTLAND STATE
6'5" 248lbs
4.63 40 Time
Bench- 16 Times
Vertical- 35.5"
Arm Length-

http://www.hometeamsonline.com/photos/football/TOKAYFOOTBALL/news1296416075374.jpg

Ok, a raw product at this point. The Steelers have shown plenty of interest in TE's so far, and under the Bruce Arian's "No Fullbacks In My Team" mantra, the #2 TE is actually a starter in this offense. That means Matt Speath is a starter. Urgh. Thomas is a former basketball player that is incredibly athletic. Should be a mismatch for a number of Safeties in the NFL, let alone LB's. Fast enough to actually be a weapon, and has the physical build to be a Red Zone target.

Latest News
03/15/2011 - Portland State Pro day: Tight ends coaches Rob Boras from the Jaguars and James Daniel from the Steelers were among 14 scouts on hand Wednesday to check out Portland State's Julius Thomas (6-foot-4 3/8, 248 pounds). Thomas stood on his numbers from the combine but did position drills outdoors on FieldTurf and looked very good. - Gil Brandt, NFL.com

Full Julius Thomas News Wire
Overview
A four-year letterwinner in basketball, he walked on with the football team in the spring so impressed the coaching staff that he figures to play an important role in 2010 played one season of football in high school before focusing on his basketball career has the size and athleticism to fill the role.

Chadman
03-16-2011, 01:33 AM
ROUND 6.

CHYKIE BROWN CB TEXAS
5'11" 190lbs
4.45 40 Time
Bench- Injured
Vertical- 36.5"
Arm Length- 34"

http://www3.pictures.gi.zimbio.com/Arkansas+v+Texas+2pXIRfi4hIBl.jpg

Most likely a MUCH better player than a 6th Round pick, but injury may push him lower than he deserves to go, considering the depth of the CB's this season. Big time player at a Big Time college against Big Time opposition. Dipping into the CB well once more probably gives the Steelers a CB too many...but it might also give the Steelers the opportunity to move Keenan Lewis to FS. Chadman sees Brown much in the way of Crezdon Butler- enough talent to consider them as future starters, if things go well. Worth a punt, regardless.

Analysis
Strengths: Can lock down receivers and rarely saw frequent passes thrown to his side of the field. Plays a mix of off-man and press coverage. Flips his hips well. Can turn and run with receivers and uses good body and hand positioning to stay with them. Has good agility and quick feet after the snap. Takes good angles on the ball and locates it well in the air. Displays great technique when using his long arms and hand-eye coordination to knock away passes in front of the receiver without interfering. Not fooled by head or body fakes and can glue himself to receivers. Never gives up on a play and always wants to be a part of the action. Accelerates quickly once recognizing what's coming. Physical player with good length on the edge, also breaks down well in space. Loves to support vs. the run and will wrap up and bring down most backs.

Weaknesses: Stands upright in his backpedal, making him a step slow to plant and drive on short routes. Good height for a corner, but can get overpowered and shielded by big, strong receivers on the outside. Slow to recognize what's coming: run or pass. Looks to be confused in zone coverage at times, gets turned around and does not always spot receivers coming into his area. Is athletic but can be outrun by pure speed receivers if he doesn't read the initial move. Quick enough to stick with receivers when he keeps contact or the route is simple, but lacks the speed to recover deep. Missed three games as a sophomore due to a sprained ankle he suffered in mid-October of that season, also multiple games in 2010 with a broken right forearm.

Chadman
03-16-2011, 01:38 AM
ROUND 7.

DAVID CARTER DE UCLA
6'5" 297lbs
5.04 40 Time- (Projected)
Bench-
Vertical-
Arm Length-

http://www.statesman.com/multimedia/dynamic/00548/SPORTS-FBC-HOUSTON-_548947c.jpg

Back to the DL well again, this time with another good framed 3-4 DE in Carter. Here's your UCLA/Carnell Lake inside information guy. Might end up as a PS guy to start with, but with the age of the DL, it can't hurt to have a few extra bodies in Training Camp.

hawaiiansteel
03-16-2011, 01:51 AM
very good draft... :Clap

the DL definitely needs some youth but my only suggestion would be instead of drafting two DEs how about choosing only one and picking a NT instead of that 2nd DE...Hampton and Hoke can't last forever.

StarSpangledSteeler
03-16-2011, 02:01 AM
ROUND 1.

MARTEZ WILSON ILB ILLINOIS
6'4" 250lbs
4.44 40 Time
Bench- 23 times
Vertical- 36"
Arm Length- 34 5/8"

http://www.illinoisloyalty.com/i/20080830-football-illinois-illini-missouri-tigers/951-martez-wilson.jpg

Ok, so this is not what some were expecting. This does not, in any way, shape or form fill an immediate 'need' for this Franchise. And it's not designed to either. That's not the way Colbert/Tomlin think. They take best player vs need available. Is the 5th best OT better value than the #1 ILB? No. The 5th best CB better than the #1 ILB? No. 5th best DE better than the #1 ILB? Again, no. Wilson simply presents possibly the best value selection at #31. He has few real faults in his game, he's a junior which Colbert/Tomlin have shown a fondness for drafting, very athletic, and a difference maker on the field. James Farrior is 100 years old. Larry Foote is 95 years old. They can't go forever. Timmons & Wilson could very well be the most explosive ILB combination of any 3-4 NFL Defense if they get put on the field together. The Steelers tend to draft for the future more than the now. Wilson would be a starter in a year or two, which gives him the necessary time to digest the playbook, while helping on ST's.

Overview
Wilson is one of the most heralded prospects ever to suit up for Illinois, a consensus high school All-American who decided to stay in-state instead of heading to Miami (Fla.), Southern Cal, Notre Dame and many other major programs. Until 2010, however, his production had not matched the blue-chip billing. His 112 tackles included 11.5 for loss and four sacks, and the second-team All-Big 10 selection also forced three fumbles, deflected four passes and blocked a kick before deciding his junior season was his last in Champaign.

He played in all 13 games as a reserve for the Illini as a true freshman in 2007, being credited with 29 tackles, three for loss and two sacks. Wilson pushed up his game a notch as a sophomore, making 73 stops, 5.5 for loss, three sacks and three pass breakups. Wilson admitted when he entered school he wanted to be three-and-done, but a herniated disk in his neck cost him all but the first game of the 2009 season.

Wilson's straight-line speed and length could allow him to play an inside linebacker spot in a 3-4 defense as his build and game are very similar to Miami Dolphins starter Karlos Dansby. He might move outside in the right system. If teams are not overly concerned about his neck injury, Wilson's versatility and athleticism make him a likely top 50 selection.

Analysis
Read & React: Not the most instinctual player. A step or two late to recognize run or pass, and will be fooled by misdirection. Excellent reaction speed once he sees it develop. Finds a crease to attack the backfield or slice through a stretch play.

Run defense: Gap-attacking defender who uses his length to bring down most backs in the hole. Lanky-framed linebacker with fair upper-body development. Extends his long arms to keep offensive linemen at an arm's length as they try to reach him. Works his way through traffic near the line. Better when he sling-shots around blockers than trying to stack-and-shed. Good speed to get the angle down the sideline to minimize big plays. Willing to hit backs head-on in the hole and stand them up. Needs to get stronger in pro strength and conditioning and be more violent with his hands to shed blocks. Overpursues and is too aggressive reading angles.

Pass defense: Gets a hand on receivers crossing over the middle to knock them off their routes. Good speed to get deep in his drop. Runs the seam with receivers, sometimes 40-50 yards downfield. Great length and speed to affect passing lanes when focusing on the quarterback. Good hustle to the ball in zone coverage. Should handle man coverage against tight ends. Only adequate anticipating routes into the flat, too often gets caught in no-man's land between pass rush and defense. Must improve his ability to read routes. Susceptible to cut blocks in run and pass defense.

Tackling: One of the leading tacklers in the country, relying on his length and speed. Not usually explosive upon contact but slows down backs and makes a lot of ankle tackles when other linebackers would not even get a hand on the ballcarrier. Shows good hustle, comes off blitz to pursue 15-20 yards downfield. His height hinders his ability to drop his hips and get low, rolling off ballcarriers instead of sticking them. Only average flexibility, which could limit his 3-4 role to the inside rather than a pass-rushing outside 'backer. Nice range allows him to help teammates bring down receivers and can beat the ball to the sideline.

Pass Rush/Blitz: Uses his slim frame to get skinny through holes inside to regularly bring down running backs in the backfield. Also uses length and speed to beat tackles outside with swim or rip moves. Very good closing speed to the quarterback. Lines up with his hand on the ground occasionally, flashing get-off but lacking great flexibility to turn the corner.

Intangibles: Relied purely on athleticism early in his career. Began watching film before 2010 season. Had surgery on a herniated disk in his neck after the first game of the 2009 season, redshirted. Still wears neck protector. Suffered knife wound coming to the aid of teammate De'Angelo McCray, who was being beaten outside a Champaign bar in December 2008. Focused more on academics and football after the incident.

Stepping back and looking at this unemotionally... ILB is an area of need. Farrior is just as much a liability against the quick passing offenses as any of our CB's, and yet he is our best current option. I don't see much sense in drafting a middle round replacement (that's pretty much what we have already in Fox, Foote, and Sly). We need a legit stud at that position and I don't know that a "Sheppard" or a "McCarthy" fills the bill. Wilson is a good tackler, shows good speed, and in the coming years will get even stronger and improve his technique. I would not be pissed at the selection... BUT I do not think Wilson will be the BPA at 1.31. Here's why:

I think his neck is a concern (not a deal breaker but a concern). I've heard his flexibility is an issue (he can't touch his toes) which gives me concern he may have injury issues in the future. The Heath Miller gamble turned out well, but usually I don't want any part of a first round prospect with injury issues. I think he runs a little too high to really dominate at the NFL level. I think there are serious questions as to how well Wilson will adapt to NFL pass coverage duties. I think that has to do more with instincts than physical traits. You MUST have excellent instincts to dominate at ILB and I just don't know for sure that he does.

My biggest problem with Wilson is not really "him" though, it's the urgency of his position. Of course you always take a clear BPA over a reach, but in general you have to look at your most immediate first. Our OL and CB positions costed us a Super Bowl. The LB's did not. We must draft the most elite talent we can at those two positions if the value is there. And I believe the value will be there.

In summary, I would have no problem drafting a 1st round ILB next year (even trading up to get the top prospect). Our need is just too big in other areas this year. Just my opinion.

Chadman
03-16-2011, 02:04 AM
Some Video for your pleasure..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHEqRiHAIV0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCQ-56ME8gE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03DEc02-sxY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZ8HUbaZ8Ps

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDyjCA1Kk3o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cb3BNXAHyRQ

hawaiiansteel
03-16-2011, 02:16 AM
Walter Football has us taking Wilson in their latest mock:


31) Pittsburgh Steelers: Martez Wilson, ILB, Illinois

Martez Wilson just had an outstanding Combine, running a 4.44 40 and leaping a 36-inch vertical. Wilson, at 6-4, 250 pounds and 34 5/8-inch arms, is a very talented linebacker and one of the top players on the board.

I know the Steelers drafted Stevenson Sylvester to compete as James Farrior's heir apparent, but I don't think they'll be able to pass on a premier talent like Wilson.

http://www.walterfootball.com/draft2011_1.php

papillon
03-16-2011, 06:50 AM
If the Steelers could manage to get an ILB, CB, DE and OT in the first four rounds and the kicker from Nebraska or UCLA is available in the 5th I would change your 5th round selection for the kicker, Suisham isn't the answer long term or short term.

Kicker is a position of need for this team and using a 5th round pick on a kicker that could potentially be a Steeler for 12-15 years has to be good value.

Pappy

flippy
03-16-2011, 07:30 AM
I've been secretly thinking Wilson could be the guy for some time, but I haven't mentioned it for fear of jinxing it.

Something about him seems like a Tomlin guy. I guess it's the big and fast part.

Maybe it's that his potential way exceeds what he's done on the field a la Lawrence Timmons.

He's a junior out of a big program. But he is 22, the only strike against him.

At the end of the day, our D is designed for LBs to make plays. And as much as I like Farrior, he's the one LB making the least big plays. He's becoming a liability in coverage on 3rd downs. He's one of my favorites on the team. And he works so hard, I'd hate to see him replaced. But his days are numbered.

I was also thinking about the best use of Sylvester recently. And his motor kinda reminds me of Brett Keisel a little. And I kinda want to see a guy like that going after the QB. Wilson would free him up a little to spend some time working on the OLB position too.

One final consideration, if this season doesn't happen, could Farrior retire?

steelblood
03-16-2011, 07:39 AM
That is a very Steeler-like draft. I don't love Wilson's tightness as lateral agility is a key in our D. But, he does possess great measurables. Carmichael is really a nickel back type, spot starter in my eyes, but I do think he'll be able to play by the end of his rookie year. I don't like Lawerence Guy. I don't see any great production or upside. I love Moffit. He seems the type of road grader we need. I'd love to get the kid from Portland State. He could be great in a year or two.

I don't believe that the #1 ILB is necessarily better than the #5 corner. In this draft there are two great corners and no great ILBs. The #3-#5 CBs are hard to sort out. You may end up being right, but I'm not so sure the logic is correct.

NJ-STEELER
03-16-2011, 03:23 PM
i'm curious where you guys go to find where these players are slotted to go.

wanna do my own version of a Mock

Oviedo
03-16-2011, 03:27 PM
i'm curious where you guys go to find where these players are slotted to go.

wanna do my own version of a Mock

Here are a couple

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/prospectrankings

http://www.draftinsider.net/rankings