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hawaiiansteel
02-18-2011, 05:36 PM
Ranking The Top 3-4 Prospects

Breaking down the players who best fit into this ever-growing defense.

by Wes Bunting
FEBRUARY 17, 2011


Top nose tackles

1. Phil Taylor: Baylor (6-4, 340)
When he plays with leverage the guy is an absolute bear to move inside, has the athleticism to play the five techniques as well.

2. Kenrick Ellis: Hampton (6-5, 336)
Possesses good natural strength, pad level and initial quickness, just has some of the field troubles that are a concern.

3. Jerrell Powe: Ole Miss (6-2, 331)
A thick, wide-bodied two down lineman who will likely go higher than his play deems worthy due to supply vs. demand.

4. Marvin Austin: North Carolina (6-2, 313)
More of a 4-3 nose, but possesses natural anchor strength, good athleticism for his size and if the light ever goes on, he can be as good as he wants to be in the NFL.

5. Sione Fua: Stanford (6-2, 307)
Played the nose in Stanford’s 3-4 this year, struggles to find the football, but has an above-average anchor for his size.

Top five techniques

1) Cameron Jordan: Cal (6-4, 287)
Can hold the point both inside and out, but it’s his ability to rush the passer that makes him tops in this group.

2) Marcell Dareus: Alabama (6-3, 309)
A naturally powerful lineman with a good anchor and knows how to fend off blocks. Looks like a very solid starting 5-tecnique at the next level.

3) Cameron Heyward: Ohio State (6-5, 288)
A heavy-handed player who finds the football well in the run game and knows how to stack and shed.

4) J.J. Watt: Wisconsin (6-6, 292)
Plays with good leverage for his size, can disengage well on the edge and exhibits a motor that runs non-stop.

5) Adrian Clayborn: Iowa (6-3, 287)
Might be better suited to play in a 43, but he can anchor vs. the run and knows how to shed well enough to definitely get a look as a five-technique.

6) Christian Ballard: Iowa (6-4, 297)
As athletic sideline-to-sideline as any DL in the draft and has the skill set to set the edge and play off blocks.

7) Muhammad Wilkerson: Temple (6-5, 305)
A gifted athlete who still possesses a lot of upside to his game, has an ideal frame for the position.

8) Lawrence Guy: Arizona State (6-5, 300)
Is a natural bender for his size who can play with leverage and work his way off blocks, but needs to continue to improve his ball awareness.

Top rush linebackers

1. Von Miller: Texas A&M (6-3, 237)
Lacks great size, but is simply the most natural pass rusher in this year’s draft.

2. Robert Quinn: UNC (6-5, 268)
Is a better fit as a 4-3 DE in my view, but looks fluid enough in space to make the move as a 34-rush guy if need be.

3. Akeem Ayers: UCLA (6-4, 255)
His size makes him a perfect fit for the position and he does have some experience rushing the passer.

4. Justin Houston: Georgia (6-3, 258)
He’s more explosive off the edge coiled up in a three-point stance, but with the needs for 34 rush backers, Houston should definitely get a long look in round one.

5. Aldon Smith: Missouri (6-4, 258)
Much like Quinn, he seems like a better fit with his hand on the ground, but has the natural athleticism to get a long look standing up as well.

6. Martez Wilson: Illinois (6-4, 250)
Was at his best this season when Illinois allowed him to create havoc off the edge and rush the passer.

7. Dontay Moch: Nevada (6-2, 229)
Possesses an explosive first step, good fluidity when asked to change directions and is the type of guy who you just let pin his ears back and go.

Follow me on twitter: @WesBunting

http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Ran ... pects.html (http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Ranking-the-top-34-prospects.html)

Shawn
02-18-2011, 07:02 PM
Ballard and Wilkerson are my two top picks for round 2 if Dowling is off the board.

Dee Dub
02-18-2011, 07:45 PM
I've sen a lot of Lawrence Guy (ASU), and think he could be a real sleeper.

Now the one I would be weary of is OLB Martez Wilson. Some have him as the number one ILB (Mike Mayock), and others have him as a top 5 OLB. He has all the physical tools however on the field he wasnt all that productive.

The one that I think is missing on this list is Washington's OLB Mason Foster. He is going to surprise a lot of people.

sentinel33
02-19-2011, 02:45 AM
'ppreciate the thread.

hawaiiansteel
02-26-2011, 07:45 PM
February 26 Combine Weigh-In Results:

(5:00 PM): Fairley lite; just about everybody else heavy at DL weigh-in … Perhaps the big surprise at the weigh-in and measurement for the defensive linemen and LBs at the scouting combine in Indianapolis earlier today was the fact that Auburn DT Nick Fairley, a candidate to be the #1 pick at the 2011 draft, tipped the scales at only 291 pounds. That’s somewhat light for a 4-3 DT at the next level, although most 3-4 teams would rate it adequate for DE in that scheme. In contrast, Alabama DT Marcel Dareus, Fairley’s main competition to be the first DT off the board this spring, weighed in at a full-sized 320 pounds. Indeed, no one was asking where the beef was at today’s weigh-in for defensive linemen which featured a lot of big guys. Hampton NT Kendric Ellis was the heaviest at 346 pounds, while Ole Miss DT Jerrel Powe and Baylor NT Phil Taylor tipped the scales at 335 and 334 respectively. Of note, Miami DE Allen Bailey was back up to 285 pounds after showing up at last month’s Senior Bowl at a slimmed down 278, while Oregon State DT Stephen Paea registered at 303 pounds, up from a disappointing 295 in Mobile, Also of note, emerging Temple DT Muhammad Wilkerson weighed in at 315 pounds, while Clemson DE Da‘Quan Bowers, another possible #1 pick overall this year, measured in at a solid 6-3, 280.

http://www.gbnreport.com/index.htm

hawaiiansteel
02-28-2011, 03:55 PM
QBs beware: Draft's strength is its 'nasty' pass rushers

By Steve Wyche NFL.com
Senior Writer
Published: Feb. 27, 2011


INDIANAPOLIS -- The confluence of a subtle change in the NFL, along with the strength of the top-end talent in the upcoming draft, should make for a lot of people on the defensive side of the ball feel happy/lucky about their timing.

The scales have tilted back to teams playing a 4-3 defensive front, with Cleveland and Denver converting from a 3-4 next season. Their timing couldn't be better because they'll have to re-configure their defensive line, which is the strength of this draft. Better yet, the top players are better suited for four-man fronts, several NFL personnel evaluators at the combine said this week.

"The outside guys are shaping up as defensive ends. It's really deep," Rams general manager Billy Devaney said. "We're a 4-3 team, but we think there's some real quality depth and pass rushers at defensive end -- not just hybrid guys."

This is a draft deep and talented at defensive end. Not hybrid ends who can switch to outside linebacker in a 3-4 defense, but more traditional, hand-in-the-ground pass-rushing 4-3 ends. Clemson's Da'Quan Bowers and North Carolina's Robert Quinn are considered the top two ends in the draft, but they have plenty of company.

The defensive tackle prospects are also strong, with Alabama's Marcell Dareus and Auburn's Nick Fairley neck-and-neck as the front-runners.

Several GMs here described the group as nasty, competitive and mature defenders who can get after the quarterback. Teams can never have enough pass rushers, and this year there are plenty -- and plenty of teams that need them. Some personnel evaluators have said there could be at least 10 defensive linemen selected in the first round -- or one of every three players taken on the first day.

What's also different about these prospects compared to the past few years is the talent is clearly divided between 4-3 or 3-4 players. According to scouts and general managers, the size and strengths of the players fit one of the particular schemes, and there aren't nearly as many players they would consider versatile enough to succeed while transitioning from one scheme to the other.

Up to 18 teams could be using the 4-3 as their base defense next season.

In 4-3 fronts, the linemen tend to be smaller and are asked to be playmakers, especially the ends, who weigh around 270 pounds but can run and are quick enough to penetrate through gaps. In the 3-4, the linemen are bigger -- nose tackles exceed 315 pounds and ends typically weigh closer to 290 -- and occupy blockers so the linebackers can make plays, especially the outside linebackers, who weigh more in the 250-255 range.

The 3-4 has been the rage of the NFL the past few years because so many teams have had success in the system. Of the four teams that made it to the conference championship games this past season, only one -- Chicago -- played a 4-3. The Jets and Super Bowl combatants Pittsburgh and Green Bay use the 3-4.

It's not for everybody, though. New Broncos coach John Fox said his decision to play the 4-3 in Denver is a personal preference and one he used during his time coaching the Carolina Panthers. Cleveland's new defensive coordinator, Dick Jauron, prefers the four-man front, although it could require some significant re-tooling of the Browns' personnel.

"Going to the four-man line, there are some people we need (to add in the draft)," Broncos president John Elway said. "Going from a 3-4 to 4-3, the numbers are there. Obviously it's something we have to look at. We're still in that process. ... There's been an emphasis on the defensive side because we've got to get a lot better."

Denver has the second overall pick, Cleveland the sixth. Carolina, with the No. 1 pick, is sticking with the 4-3 under new coach Ron Rivera, and the Bengals, who run a 4-3, have the fourth overall pick. Tennessee, Minnesota, Detroit and St. Louis are other teams with top 14 picks that play four-man schemes. In need of a defensive line upgrade, each will likely augment their lines through the draft at some point.

And this is the draft to do it in.

"There might not be that great player like last season's group," one general manager said, referring to Ndamukong Suh, "but this overall is a very strong group."

The past few drafts, there's been a push to find hybrid edge pass rushers who can play a 4-3 end or 3-4 outside linebacker. Players like Brian Orakpo, Aaron Maybin, Larry English, and Robert Ayers were collegiate ends who switched to outside linebackers in 3-4 schemes. Only Orakpo has made a smooth transition. This draft, there's not nearly as much talk about players possibly being able to do both.

There are more prototypical 4-3 ends, like Quinn (6-4, 265), Bowers (6-3, 280) -- Bowers also could slide to tackle if needed -- and Purdue's Paul Kerrigan (6-4, 267), and more teams that need them. Besides the teams at the front of the draft, Tampa Bay (pick No. 20), New Orleans (24), Seattle (25), and Atlanta (27) need pass-rushing ends who can also hold the edge against the run.

Purdue's Kerrigan and Missouri's Aldon Smith are among other 4-3 ends who could be picked in the first round, but there's enough depth for quality rotational players to be found later. That depth is what makes this draft so heavily tilted toward defensive linemen early in the draft.

Denver could target Dareus or Fairley to help establish the inside anchor, much like Detroit did last season when it selected Suh, who went on to win defensive rookie honors, with the second overall pick. Devaney said the talent at tackle isn't quite as deep as it is at end, but there is some quality at the front of the draft. The Browns, who already cleared some room by cutting Shaun Rogers, could target the tackle Denver doesn't take.

And though much of the talent seems suited for four-man fronts, there are several 3-4 defensive linemen who will be pursued, but none projected to have the immediate impact of the 4-3 defenders. And while Denver and Cleveland are switching from a 3-4, Houston is changing from a 4-3 to the 3-4 scheme under new defensive coordinator Wade Phillips.

At some point in the draft, the Texans will have to add linemen to fit the need for the bulkier, space-eating players up front, and there is talent in that regard too in the draft.

Wisconsin's J.J. Watt, Cal's Cameron Jordan and Ohio State's Cam Heyward are better suited to play end in the 3-4 scheme. Dareus is projected as an end in this front, but some personnel evaluators here think he could be more influential at either tackle position in a 4-3.

http://www.nfl.com/combine/story/09000d ... ss-rushers (http://www.nfl.com/combine/story/09000d5d81e85720/article/qbs-beware-drafts-strength-is-its-nasty-pass-rushers)

hawaiiansteel
02-28-2011, 05:39 PM
Bevy of defensive ends could intrigue Steelers

By Scott Brown
PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Monday, February 28, 2011


INDIANAPOLIS -- If the Steelers stay true to their drafting philosophy of taking the best player available, they could select a defensive end with their first-round pick in April.

And there may be several enticing options for them at the bottom of the first round, including Ohio State's Cameron Heyward.

Heyward's father's, the late Craig "Ironhead" Heyward, starred as a running back at Pitt in the 1980s and then played for more than a decade in the NFL.

Heyward died of cancer in May 2006.

"He was a great player, and he's always in my heart," Heyward said at the NFL Scouting Combine. "I appreciate what he's done, but I'm not asking anybody to give me a second look or anything just because my dad was 'Ironhead.' "

Lineage is hardly the reason teams will give Heyward a long look leading up to the draft.

The 6-foot-5, 294-pounder had a solid career at Ohio State, with some spectacular moments spliced in during his time in Columbus.

Heyward did not get a chance to show much during the combine; he is still recovering from the elbow surgery he had in the mid-January. Heyward said he tore ligaments in the second quarter of Ohio State's 31-26 win over Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl.

"But I finished the game," he said.

Heyward recently received clearance to start running and doing some light weightlifting. But he will still be limited during Ohio State's Pro Day at the end of March because of the length of his recovery process.

That may cause Heyward to slide in the draft, especially since it is such a deep class for defensive ends.

NFL Network draft analyst Mike Mayock said as many as nine defensive ends could get taken in the first round. The Steelers took defensive end Ziggy Hood with their first-round pick two years ago, but they could still afford to get younger at the position.

"It's the best defensive end class I've seen," Mayock said.

That class includes the player who wants to be known as more than just Craig Heyward's son.

"I want to leave a legacy of my own," Heyward said.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1FHvkFsgV (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/print_724981.html#ixzz1FHvkFsgV)

ScoreKeeper
02-28-2011, 05:59 PM
A DE would not suprise me but we so much help at corner and OL that I really think we should focus there. I know BPA is the Steeler standard but it might not make sense this year drafting so late. Keisel is still a very good DE and Ziggy is going to be a very, very good DE. We need a corner and in saying that, I still don't want them to reach to get one. I'm just a bit torn at this point. Maybe reach a little or stay "safe" with BPA?

NJ-STEELER
02-28-2011, 08:51 PM
a DE would really surprise me. i can see one drafted in the 3rd round or later to develop but cant see us spending another #1 on a DL who's primary responsibility will be to "take up 2 blockers" as our scheme calls for.

if we were moving to a 4-3, then i could see it

hawaiiansteel
03-01-2011, 02:32 AM
Combine notes: DTs Fairley, Dareus as good as advertised

By Chad Reuter
NFLDraftScout.com
Feb. 28, 2011


The consensus opinion is that the defensive front-seven talent in the 2011 draft could be special. In Monday's workouts, the immense athletic ability of prospects projected to be drafted in the first few rounds was impossible to ignore.

NFLDraftScout.com's top two defensive tackles -- Nick Fairley (Auburn) and Marcell Dareus (Alabama) -- cemented their elite status, each excelling in his own area of strength. They ran the 40-yard dash in the mid-to-high 4.8-second range even though Dareus outweighs Fairley by almost 30 pounds (319 to 291).

The 40 times are similar, but their workouts in drills were as different as the prospects themselves.

Dareus looked as powerful as he played, punching bags to the ground in turn-the-corner position drills. Fairley impressed scouts with his footwork in linebacker and movement drills. He was more fluid then Dareus dropping back and changing direction.

That's not to suggest Dareus isn't quick for his size; or that Fairley doesn't have NFL-caliber strength. SEC linemen who faced Dareus raved about his quick first step and hands and about Fairley's bull rush and willingness to hold the point of attack.

Both players have the versatility to fit in 3-4 or 4-3 fronts.

Dareus has proven capable of playing inside and outside in Nick Saban's aggressive 3-4 scheme at Alabama, but his skill set also intrigues 4-3 teams looking for a disruptive presence inside.

When asked during media interviews to compare himself to Dareus, Fairley simply said "he's a great player, and I'm a great player."

That's why both will be snapped up in the top 10 next April.

• Three other defensive tackles with top-50 ability -- Marvin Austin (North Carolina), Corey Luiget (Illinois) and Muhammad Wilkerson (Temple) -- also helped themselves, but not to the point that any of them are likely to close the gap on Dareus and Fairley. However, Austin looked like the highly-recruited talent he was at North Carolina before a year-long suspension ended his career. His 4.8 40 and explosiveness in drills could allow a team to forget about the off-field issues to pick him early. Luiget isn't quite in the athletic stratosphere of Dareus and Fairley, but he acquitted himself well with his speed (4.95), movement and strong punch. Wilkerson ran a bit better than expected, coming in right around 5.0 in his 40 and showing some of the same agility his tape portended he would have.

• Kenrick Ellis (Hampton) and Jerrell Powe (Ole Miss) played at the NFLPA All-Star Game in late January, and continued their rise up draft boards by showing athleticism in Indianapolis. Ellis is a massive, 6-5, 346-pound tackle who ran well (5.0 40 time) for his size. He projects as a fine 3-4 lineman who can play on the nose, but also provide some pass rush at five-technique as a second-round version of B.J. Raji or Vince Wilfork. Powe is a 6-2, 335-pound nose tackle, so his 5.2 40s really didn't affect his stock. Scouts appreciated his hustle in drills, however, which emulated his effort on the field -- even if his production wasn't as good in 2010 as it was in 2009. Both players also have off-field issues scouts would have to overlook for either to be selected in the first two rounds.

• The proliferation of 3-4 defenses throughout the league greatly increases the value of 290-pound defensive ends like Cameron Jordan (California) and J.J. Watt (Wisconsin). Jordan has played in a 3-4 base scheme at Cal and earlier in his career played in a 4-3, while Watt moved all over the Badgers' four-man line, which switched to a three-man front in some situations. Watt's 34 reps, 34-inch vertical and 4.84 40 at 6-5 1/2, 290 could land him in the top half of the draft. Jordan could be right there with him; his 4.78 40 and very good quickness in drills give him a fighting chance.

• Purdue star defensive end Ryan Kerrigan has been considered a "try-hard, high-motor" player, which is scouting code for unathletic. But he gained 12 pounds since the Senior Bowl and his weight was 267 in Indianapolis. He outperformed more highly-rated Adrian Clayborn (Iowa) with a 4.67 40 and 31 reps of 225 pounds. Clayborn was no slouch, either, running 4.83 at 281 pounds and hustling through drills. Both players are top 20 quality, and Kerrigan might leap above Clayborn after proving his athleticism.

• Brooks Reed (Arizona) has gotten a lot of comparisons to NFL Defensive Player of the Year Clay Matthews over the past few weeks. He's not quite as athletic as Matthews, but Reed's respectable 4.67 40, ability to change direction fluidity, and quickness in turn-the-corner drills make him a legitimate second-round pick as a 3-4 rush linebacker. Sam Acho (Texas) is another second-round value conversion player who looked strong at the Combine (4.68 40) after a very good Senior Bowl week.

• Workout warriors always seem to pop up during the combine. Two of the top candidates for that dubious distinction are defensive ends Christian Ballard (Iowa) and Allen Bailey (Miami, Fla.). Ballard's play improved in 2010, and everyone knew he was capable of running 4.8 at 283 pounds, but his inability to break down or diagnose plays left him out in the cold in term of making plays. Bailey, too, looks outstanding on the hoof (4.77 40, 27 reps at 285), but like Ballard is inconsistent holding up inside at tackle and lacks the burst and technique to be a consistent edge rusher in the NFL. Both are likely second-round picks, but their game film isn't special.

• The stock of two players who lined up as defensive ends but project as NFL linebackers -- Justin Houston (Georgia) and Akeem Ayers (UCLA) -- went in opposite directions Monday. Houston's 4.68 40 at a well-built 270 pounds was impressive to 3-4 teams looking for strength and speed on the outside, while Ayers' 4.8 times did not convince scouts he's a speed rusher. Some team will value his skills as a 3-4 inside linebacker, however, where he doesn't need to run all over the field.

• Martez Wilson (Illinois) and Von Miller (Texas A&M) entered the combine as NFLDraftScout.com's top-rated linebackers -- Wilson inside and Miller outside -- and they'll leave that way, too. They both stepped up to compete and ran in the mid-4.4 range in the 40 at around 250 and 246 pounds, respectively. Wilson's build and extra inch of height (6-4 to Miller's 6-3) makes him look a bit leaner. Both looked a bit straight-linish in drills, which mirrors what they showed on tape. But the closing speed that allowed them to rack up tackles for loss and sacks at the college level translated in those 40 times.

• Three mid-to-late round linebackers stood out in the Lucas Oil Dome: UConn's Scott Lutrus, West Virginia's J.T. Thomas and Washington's Mason Foster. All three ran in the 4.65-4.70 range and moved with fluidity in drills. Lutrus is a nice strong-side 'backer prospect capable of running with tight ends, though injury and off-field issues could drop his grade. Thomas is tough and productive but doesn't play with great instincts. Foster was one of the most prolific tacklers in the country last season and could sneak into the third round if a team likes his ability.

Chad Reuter is a Senior Analyst for NFLDraftScout, distributed by The Sports Xchange. Follow him on Twitter: @ChadReuter.

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/stor ... advertised (http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/story/14752868/combine-notes-dts-fairley-dareus-as-good-as-advertised)

The Sodfather
03-01-2011, 08:21 AM
a DE would really surprise me. i can see one drafted in the 3rd round or later to develop but cant see us spending another #1 on a DL who's primary responsibility will be to "take up 2 blockers" as our scheme calls for.

if we were moving to a 4-3, then i could see it

Everyone knows we need help at CB but what happens if the top 5 or 6 are off the board and none of the rest are graded high enough (by Tombert) to be worth picking at #31? When you start picking based purely on need you end up with Troy Edwards.

Think back to 07 when everyone in the world said we needed an OT and it was a good class for them. What happened??? All the highly rated ones were picked and we had a choice of taking the next rated OT (Duane Brown) or BPA in Mendy. I'd say that worked out pretty well for us.

Having said that, I see DE more likely in the 2nd but would not be completely surprised if a Watt or Heyward dropped and that was the pick. More and more we are in our nickel and dime packages and it would be nice to have a young DE who can get some pass rush to pair with Hood.

NJ-STEELER
03-01-2011, 05:29 PM
it could happen, but like i said...i'll be surprised

i think they'll have enough guys at around that area that fill more of a need while also looking at BPA. i guess i dont see DE as big of a need as others do. i think we have one of the best front 7's in the league

and RB was a need back in 07. most just thought we'd draft one a bit later.

Oviedo
03-01-2011, 06:36 PM
a DE would really surprise me. i can see one drafted in the 3rd round or later to develop but cant see us spending another #1 on a DL who's primary responsibility will be to "take up 2 blockers" as our scheme calls for.

if we were moving to a 4-3, then i could see it


if we were moving to a 4-3, then i could see it

What have I been saying :stirpot

The Sodfather
03-02-2011, 07:35 AM
it could happen, but like i said...i'll be surprised

i think they'll have enough guys at around that area that fill more of a need while also looking at BPA. i guess i dont see DE as big of a need as others do. i think we have one of the best front 7's in the league

and RB was a need back in 07. most just thought we'd draft one a bit later.

I'm not saying it's a big need but IMO it is a need and could provide some great value. Smith is about done and Keisel is no spring chicken. So there is some need there just like RB in 07.

steelblood
03-02-2011, 09:37 AM
As long as we draft a DE with real pass rush ability, I'd be fine with it. We need someone that can push the pocket consistently and have the quickness to penetrate to the QB in our nickel/dime packages. A better interior pass rush will prevent QB's from being able to step up to throw or move up in the pocket. More pressure will help our pass D. Keisel and Hood are average interior rushers. We need someone with some more natural skills and a better arsenal of moves. Imagine in nickel package, if we brought 4 guys (Wood, Harrison, Keisel/Hood, and a dynamic rookie) and got pressure consistently without blitzing and still forced them to keep a back in the backfield. Now we can drop Farrior and Timmons into the underneath zone to cut off the slant. We can have safety help over the top and our corners can play more effectively at the LOS. And, when we do blitz, guys will be running free all over the place. I'm telling you, a dynamic interior pass rusher will improve our mediocre CBs.

steelblood
03-02-2011, 09:37 AM
As long as we draft a DE with real pass rush ability, I'd be fine with it. We need someone that can push the pocket consistently and have the quickness to penetrate to the QB in our nickel/dime packages. A better interior pass rush will prevent QB's from being able to step up to throw or move up in the pocket. More pressure will help our pass D. Keisel and Hood are average interior rushers. We need someone with some more natural skills and a better arsenal of moves. Imagine in nickel package, if we brought 4 guys (Wood, Harrison, Keisel/Hood, and a dynamic rookie) and got pressure consistently without blitzing and still forced them to keep a back in the backfield. Now we can drop Farrior (or DB) and Timmons into the underneath zone to cut off the slant. We can have safety help over the top and our corners can play more effectively at the LOS. And, when we do blitz, guys will be running free all over the place. I'm telling you, a dynamic interior pass rusher will improve our mediocre CBs.

Oviedo
03-02-2011, 10:51 AM
As long as we draft a DE with real pass rush ability, I'd be fine with it. We need someone that can push the pocket consistently and have the quickness to penetrate to the QB in our nickel/dime packages. A better interior pass rush will prevent QB's from being able to step up to throw or move up in the pocket. More pressure will help our pass D. Keisel and Hood are average interior rushers. We need someone with some more natural skills and a better arsenal of moves. Imagine in nickel package, if we brought 4 guys (Wood, Harrison, Keisel/Hood, and a dynamic rookie) and got pressure consistently without blitzing and still forced them to keep a back in the backfield. Now we can drop Farrior (or DB) and Timmons into the underneath zone to cut off the slant. We can have safety help over the top and our corners can play more effectively at the LOS. And, when we do blitz, guys will be running free all over the place. I'm telling you, a dynamic interior pass rusher will improve our mediocre CBs.

I agree. I do disagre with your assessment of Hood thoiugh. I want another Ziggy Hood who can push the pocket and get after the QB. Hood is being held back by the scheme and his assignments. If we turned him loose to go after the QB, I think he would be outstanding. Same with Kiesel.

I DO NOT want a DE who folds his ground and just occupies blockers. It is a passing league. You need to be able to attack QBs not just with OLBs but also with DL.

NJ-STEELER
03-02-2011, 03:14 PM
i'd probably look at WR in the first before i would DE.

we ask our DE to (for the most part) to take up space and free our LBs.

dont need to spend another #1 for something like that, IMO

ScoreKeeper
03-02-2011, 03:19 PM
i'd probably look at WR in the first before i would DE.

we ask our DE to (for the most part) to take up space and free our LBs.

dont need to spend another #1 for something like that, IMO
However, being a passing league and playing more nickle and dime packages, we are asking for pressure from our DE's.

hawaiiansteel
03-02-2011, 07:32 PM
Best for scheme: Top prospects for 3-4 defenses

By Chad Reuter
The Sports Xchange/CBSSports.com
March 2, 2011


The 3-4 defense has been a part of the NFL for decades as a way to disrupt the passing offenses prevalent since the 1980s.

With the success of head coach Nick Saban's "34" scheme at Alabama and the continuing proliferation of spread offenses, college teams have begun falling in line with the odd-man front.

Saban has one of the best 3-4 prospects in his year's draft in Marcell Dareus. The list below highlights many of the other teams using "30" fronts in college: California, Texas A&M and Georgia. Even BCS conference heavyweights Ohio State and Texas regularly moved their defensive ends inside to the five-technique position.

This, of course, plays into the hand of NFL scouts. They can more easily see how many players will translate to the next level and precisely measure how they'll fit in the 3-4 scheme. The players below should be highly coveted by the dozen or so teams using base 3-4 schemes.

Five-technique (3-4 defensive end)

1. Marcell Dareus, Alabama
Likely top 10 pick after consistently standing out on game film and displaying exceptional athleticism at 319 pounds at the combine.

2. Cameron Jordan, California
Shot up boards during the season showing strength playing the run and has quickness rushing the passer.

3. J.J. Watt, Wisconsin
Proved more than a try-hard guy on the Lucas Oil Dome floor. His quick step off the snap and relentlessness toward the quarterback make him a likely top 15 pick.

4. Cameron Heyward, Ohio State
Despite decreased production in 2010 and a Tommy John surgery, Heyward owns the length and strength to excel as a 3-4 defensive end.

5. Muhammad Wilkerson, Temple
Once he is coached up on how to bend his knees to play with leverage, Wilkerson's 6-4, 315-pound frame will make him the ideal defensive end in the 3-4.

Outside linebackers

1. Von Miller, Texas A&M
He ran 4.5-second 40s in Indy, which helped set the stage for the pass rusher extraordinaire to be a top five pick.

2. Robert Quinn, North Carolina
Forget the average Combine numbers. Quinn's length, mobility and pass-rush skills make him a nice 3-4 rush linebacker prospect.

3. Aldon Smith, Missouri
Stood up at times for the Tigers and his still-growing frame could make him a DeMarcus Ware-type rush threat in time.

4. Martez Wilson, Illinois
His 2009 neck injury might scare teams, but he fits inside or outside in the 3-4 due to his elite athleticism.

5. Justin Houston, Georgia
Running in the 4.6s at 270 pounds at the combine gave Houston's draft stock a nice boost.

Nose tackles

1. Phil Taylor, Baylor
Very large and strong interior lineman (6-3, 334) is likely a second-round pick, based largely on concerns he turned up his intensity with only NFL paychecks in mind. His dismissal from Penn State also miffs some scouts.

2. Kenrick Ellis, Hampton
Another massive (6-5, 346) prospect with very good athleticism for his size. Ellis proved a second-round bargain due to character concerns.

3. Jerrell Powe, Mississippi
Powe's play in 2010 did not overwhelm scouts, but he is powerful and gives good effort. Off-field questions will need to be answered by Powe.

Chad Reuter is a Senior Analyst for NFLDraftScout.com, distributed by The Sports Xchange. Follow him on Twitter: @ChadReuter.

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/stor ... 4-defenses (http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/story/14761286/best-for-scheme-top-prospects-for-34-defenses)

hawaiiansteel
03-09-2011, 07:08 PM
Lande’s Mock Draft

Sporting News 3/9/11


1. Panthers—Marcell Dareus, DT, Alabama

2. Broncos—Robert Quinn, OLB, North Carolina

3. Bills—Cam Newton, QB, Auburn

4. Bengals—Da'Quan Bowers, DE, Clemson

5. Cardinals—Blaine Gabbert, QB, Missouri

6. Browns—A.J. Green, WR, Georgia

7. 49ers—Von Miller, OLB, Texas A&M

8. Titans—Patrick Peterson, CB, LSU

9. Cowboys—Anthony Castonzo, OT, Boston College

10. Redskins—Ryan Mallett, QB, Arkansas

11. Texans—Corey Liuget, DT, Illinois

12. Vikings—Nick Fairley, DT, Auburn

13. Lions—Tyron Smith, OT, USC

14. Rams—Julio Jones, WR, Alabama

15. Dolphins—Mark Ingram, RB, Alabama

16. Jaguars—Jabaal Sheard, DE, Pitt

17. Patriots (from Oakland)—Adrian Clayborn, DE, Iowa

18. Chargers—Cameron Jordan, DE, Cal

19. Giants—Ryan Williams, RB, Virginia Tech

20. Buccaneers—Aldon Smith, DE, Missouri

21. Chiefs—Cameron Heyward, DE, Ohio State

22. Colts—Derek Sherrod, OT, Mississippi State

23. Eagles—Prince Amukamara, CB, Nebraska

24. Saints—Ryan Kerrigan, DE, Purdue

25. Seahawks—Danny Watkins, G, Baylor

26. Ravens—Nate Solder, OT, Colorado

27. Falcons—Stephen Paea, DT, Oregon State

28. Patriots—Mikel Leshoure, RB, Illinois

29. Bears—Jerrel Jernigan, WR, Troy

30. Jets—Christian Ballard, DE, Iowa

31. Steelers—Muhammad Wilkerson, DE, Temple

32. Packers—Mike Pouncey, C, Florida

Read more: http://aol.sportingnews.com/nfl/feed/20 ... z1G8uLjAJZ (http://aol.sportingnews.com/nfl/feed/2011-01/2011-nfl-draft/story/nfl-mock-draft-mallett-liuget-and-sherrod-moving-up-draft-boards#ixzz1G8uLjAJZ)

RuthlessBurgher
03-10-2011, 08:48 PM
Wilkerson could be a legit possibility for us, but not if Pouncey is still on the board.

A year after the Jags reeeeeeached for Tyson Alualu at #10, do you really think they will reeeeeeeach again for Jabaal Sheard at #16?

steelz09
03-10-2011, 09:24 PM
I would hope they have NT in mind for Wilkerson. The coaching staff really needs to think about life without Casey Hampton

hawaiiansteel
03-16-2011, 08:21 PM
Sources: Kenrick Ellis on radar of five teams

3/16/2011


Aaron Wilson of the National Football Post reports Hampton defensive lineman Kenric Ellis is drawing serious interest from several NFL teams, including the Pittsburgh Steelers, Philadelphia Eagles, Denver Broncos, New England Patriots and the Green Bay Packers, according to league sources with knowledge of the situation.

The 6-foot-5, 346-pounder has drawn second-round grades from several draft analysts.

Per a source, Ellis interviewed well at the NFL scouting combine and was accountable for past transgressions that got him dismissed from South Carolina (reportedly failed drug tests) before transferring to Hampton and being suspended for one game.

"We like the kid," an NFL source said. "We were impressed with him."

Ellis addressed the off-field problems at the NFL scouting combine during an interview with a crowd of media.

"I had character issues," he acknowledged. "I had disciplinary problems. They did everything they could. It just didn't work out for me. I had to get out of there.

"I had to look within myself and change a lot of things within myself and around me. And after I changed those things, it was pretty much easy after that. I had to realize that I had a problem, and I confronted it and overcame it."

http://www.theredzone.org/BlogDescripti ... fault.aspx (http://www.theredzone.org/BlogDescription/tabid/61/EntryId/15740/Sources--Kenrick-Ellis-on-radar-of-five-teams/Default.aspx)

RuthlessBurgher
03-17-2011, 09:09 AM
I had Ellis in my original mock, but removed him after hearing about his history of off-the-field issues, replacing him with DE Lawrence Guy instead. I do like Ellis a bit more than Guy when looking solely at on-the-field prowess, and I think we could use a younger NT candidate more than we need a younger DE at this time. Sounds like he has been handling his past discretions the polar opposite of CB Jimmy Smith. Smith lies about his checkered past, and we remove him from our draft boards entirely. Ellis mans up about his checkered past, and we are showing interest. Moral of the story is that these prospects should realize that teams already know the answers to the questions they are asking you at the combine...they just want to see if you will level with them or lie to them. The liars get crossed of the list of possible draft picks, and the folks that seem to have grown up will continue to receive consideration. I'm considering moving Ellis back into my mock now.

birtikidis
03-17-2011, 09:16 AM
Think Fua could be there in the 3rd?
wouldn't mind a Pouncey, Dowling, Fua draft...

ikestops85
03-18-2011, 09:52 AM
I'm no expert at this but to think Seattle would take 26 year old Danny Watkins with Pouncey still on the board makes no sense to me.

hawaiiansteel
03-24-2011, 04:31 PM
Clayborn could be there when we pick @ #31...


Adrian Clayborn takes part in Pro Day

Thu, 24 Mar 2011


University of Iowa DE Adrian Clayborn measured a 35 1/2-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-6 broad jump and completed 17 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press at his Pro Day Monday, March 21, reports Gil Brandt, of NFL.com. He performed position drills in front of defensive line coach from the Baltimore Ravens, Pittsburgh Steelers, Arizona Cardinals and Cincinnati Bengals during the workout.

Source: NFL.com - Gil Brandt

http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nflRead more: http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nfl#ixzz1HXjCDlTc

birtikidis
03-25-2011, 11:26 AM
Clayborn could be there when we pick @ #31...


Adrian Clayborn takes part in Pro Day

Thu, 24 Mar 2011


University of Iowa DE Adrian Clayborn measured a 35 1/2-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-6 broad jump and completed 17 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press at his Pro Day Monday, March 21, reports Gil Brandt, of NFL.com. He performed position drills in front of defensive line coach from the Baltimore Ravens, Pittsburgh Steelers, Arizona Cardinals and Cincinnati Bengals during the workout.

Source: NFL.com - Gil Brandt

http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nflRead more: http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nfl#ixzz1HXjCDlTc
17 reps is pretty weak.. hell I did it 26 times before my car accident. what is his size (ht/wt)?

RuthlessBurgher
03-25-2011, 12:10 PM
Clayborn could be there when we pick @ #31...


Adrian Clayborn takes part in Pro Day

Thu, 24 Mar 2011


University of Iowa DE Adrian Clayborn measured a 35 1/2-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-6 broad jump and completed 17 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press at his Pro Day Monday, March 21, reports Gil Brandt, of NFL.com. He performed position drills in front of defensive line coach from the Baltimore Ravens, Pittsburgh Steelers, Arizona Cardinals and Cincinnati Bengals during the workout.

Source: NFL.com - Gil Brandt

http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nflRead more: http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nfl#ixzz1HXjCDlTc
17 reps is pretty weak.. hell I did it 26 times before my car accident. what is his size (ht/wt)?

Clayborn's listed at 6'3" 281 lbs. His primary issue is that he was born with Erb's palsy. It's a paralysis of the arm caused by injury to the nerves during the birthing process. He grew up without full range of motion in his right arm, but physical therapy has enabled him to minimize the effects of the birth injury. It is understandable how such a condition could hinder the amount of bench reps at 225 lbs. But he has always been able to play, and play well, with this condition throughout high school and college, and he's now a top prospect in this draft.

birtikidis
03-25-2011, 01:53 PM
Clayborn could be there when we pick @ #31...


Adrian Clayborn takes part in Pro Day

Thu, 24 Mar 2011


University of Iowa DE Adrian Clayborn measured a 35 1/2-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-6 broad jump and completed 17 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press at his Pro Day Monday, March 21, reports Gil Brandt, of NFL.com. He performed position drills in front of defensive line coach from the Baltimore Ravens, Pittsburgh Steelers, Arizona Cardinals and Cincinnati Bengals during the workout.

Source: NFL.com - Gil Brandt

http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nflRead more: http://www.kffl.com/hotw/nfl#ixzz1HXjCDlTc
17 reps is pretty weak.. hell I did it 26 times before my car accident. what is his size (ht/wt)?

Clayborn's listed at 6'3" 281 lbs. His primary issue is that he was born with Erb's palsy. It's a paralysis of the arm caused by injury to the nerves during the birthing process. He grew up without full range of motion in his right arm, but physical therapy has enabled him to minimize the effects of the birth injury. It is understandable how such a condition could hinder the amount of bench reps at 225 lbs. But he has always been able to play, and play well, with this condition throughout high school and college, and he's now a top prospect in this draft.
Ok, I forgive him then.