PDA

View Full Version : Chuck Cecil to Interview for Steelers Secondary Coach



hawaiiansteel
02-16-2011, 07:47 PM
Chuck Cecil to Interview for Pittsburgh Steelers Secondary Coach

by Jimmy on Feb 16, 2011

http://cdn3.sbnation.com/entry_photo_images/888037/66941_titans_camp_football.jpg

John Clayton is reporting, via Kuharsky, that Chuck Cecil is going to interview for the Pittsburgh Steelers secondary coaching vacancy. Cecil is a good defensive backs coach. He just wasn't ready to be a defensive coordinator.

If Cecil were to land a job it would be a break for Bud Adams because Adams would only have to pay him the difference between his salary with whatever team he coaches for and what his salary would have been with the Titans. So no one is more excited to hear this news than Bud.

I like Cecil, and the thought of him working for the Steelers makes me a little sick, but I am glad to see that he is at least getting an opportunity to interview for a job. He still has some good coaching years ahead of him, and there really isn't a better coach to learn how to be a coordinator under than D!ck LeBeau.

http://www.musiccitymiracles.com/2011/2 ... dary-coach (http://www.musiccitymiracles.com/2011/2/16/1997707/chuck-cecil-to-interview-for-pittsburgh-steelers-secondary-coach)

steelblood
02-16-2011, 07:58 PM
I am very excited to get a new secondary coach. Horton delivered nothing and developed nothing. New blood is good.

Oviedo
02-16-2011, 08:10 PM
Not sure Horton deserves all the blame. The guy just got selected to be a DC.

One point of view could be that Horton was limited on what he could teach the DBs because of the scheme. How do you teach coverage skills when you force your DBs to play 10 yards off the WR and draft zone cover guys versus man cover guys.

Just looking at it from a different angle.

Ozey74
02-16-2011, 08:11 PM
This would be sweet!! ESPN did a feature on him last season & he is super intense. I think he was a member of the 85' Bears. Instant upgrade (which wouldn't be that hard to do from Horton).


:Beer

steelerkeylargo
02-16-2011, 08:42 PM
This would be sweet!! ESPN did a feature on him last season & he is super intense. I think he was a member of the 85' Bears. Instant upgrade (which wouldn't be that hard to do from Horton).


:Beer


Definitely NOT a member ogf 85 bears. Drafted by Green Bay in the late 80's i think.

proudpittsburgher
02-16-2011, 09:25 PM
Cecil was a headhunter for the Packers in the early 90s or so, wasn't he? I remember him as a dirty player always looking to take a head off over the middle.

hawaiiansteel
02-16-2011, 09:32 PM
Cecil was a headhunter for the Packers in the early 90s or so, wasn't he? I remember him as a dirty player always looking to take a head off over the middle.


here's a pretty good article about Chuck Cecil written by SI back in 1993...


October 11, 1993

Headlong And Headstrong

Fined by the NFL for his savage hitting, Chuck Cecil says that's the only way he knows to play

http://i.cdn.turner.com/sivault/si_online/covers/images/1993/1011_large.jpg


Chuck Cecil's world is exploding. The Phoenix Cardinal free safety has closed on his target like an electron returning to a nucleus, and now he uncoils into Washington Redskin tight end Ron Middleton with a crash that is both terrifying and thrilling to behold. Middleton crumples around Cecil like a crash-test dummy around a telephone pole. His feet buckle and his helmet flies. The headgear will come to rest five yards from the site of impact, and when Middleton revives sufficiently to know where he is—RFK Stadium on Sept. 12—he will notice that all four snaps on his helmet chin strap are still in place; Cecil's blow knocked the helmet off the way carbonation blows a champagne cork out of a bottle.

But just now Middleton is on another planet. Flat on his back, knees up, eyes closed, he looks as though he has been nailed to the ground. Cecil stands over him, twitching with ecstasy. Later, sports-writers will say Cecil appeared to be imitating a boxing referee, counting Middleton out. Cecil doesn't think that's what he was doing, though he admits he doesn't remember much of what happened in the euphoric state he had entered. He does recall kicking Middleton's helmet when he saw it lying in front of him.

For the six-foot, 185-pound Heat Seeking Missile, as Cecil was dubbed during his All-America career at the University of Arizona, the blow approached perfection. For the NFL brass reviewing the collision on slow-motion replay later that week, the hit, and another on the same series, approached insanity. On Sept. 20, Bill Polian, the NFL's vice-president for football development, announced that Cecil was being fined $30,000, one of the largest nonsuspension fines ever imposed on a player, for "two acts of flagrant unnecessary roughness involving the use of his helmet." He is appealing the fine, but he has reportedly been warned that another such hit will result in suspension.

Polian's statement read, "Cecil speared running back Ricky Ervins and tight end Ron Middleton of the Redskins. On each play, Cecil used the top of his helmet to strike intended receivers in the upper body." No matter that the two plays occurred during a crucial fourth-quarter Washington drive in a game that Phoenix would win 17-10, for its first victory at RFK in 15 years. No matter that no penalty flags were thrown on either play. No matter that Ervins bounced up after his hit or that Middleton outweighs Cecil by 75 pounds. The league had spoken: Spearing is illegal: Cecil was a menace to others and to himself. Striking with the crown of the helmet is prohibited, noted Polian, because of the danger it poses to the players involved, "including the one doing the hitting." Told that Cecil didn't think he had used the crown of his helmet for impact, Polian said, "Well, he's totally wrong then." And the fine was the stiffest ever, he said, "in light of Cecil's prior conduct outside the playing rules."

Almost two weeks later Cecil is sitting at a table in Rick's Cafe in Tempe, not far from the Cardinals' training camp. He orders biscuits and craw, ham on the side—"Get the cholesterol level up," he says with a crooked grin—a meal that might stick to his skinny, unmuscled bones. As a high school freshman Cecil weighed less than 90 pounds; as a walk-on at Arizona he weighed 148. "Don't ever let a recruiter see you without a shirt on," Rey Hernandez, his defensive coach at Helix High in La Mesa, Calif., had told him. As it happened, UCLA recruiter Homer Smith did catch a glimspe of the bare-chested Cecil, and that was the end of his interest.

"Why me?" Cecil says now in his quiet, almost docile way. "They single me out for something being done leaguewide on a regular basis. They're saying what I do is dirty and cheap, but I've played this way forever. I signed a million-dollar contract because of it. People cheer when I make a big hit. I mean, that's what I do."

Support for Cecil has come from many sources, including some who were at the game. After watching Middleton's helmet roll to a stop, CBS commentator Randy Cross said, "This, I gotta tell you, is how a safety gets to the Pro Bowl." After the game Redskin coach Richie Petitbon said, "That's football, man. This game is not played in short pants." Said Dallas Cowboy coach Jimmy Johnson, "That's the kind of football I like to see."

Even Middleton doesn't think the hit on him was against the rules. "It was just great lick," he says. "That's the nature of the game. Guys dream of licks like that."

Maybe so. But Middleton's tongue was numb for several minutes after the blow, and when Cecil had hit Ervins moments earlier, it was Cecil who had fallen to the turf in agony, a nerve stinger shooting down his left arm. These days, in fact, he moves his neck with difficulty, even off the field. Cecil says that his head was up on both hits, that he was tackling with his face mask and the front area of his helmet, nose on numbers, trying to drive his body through his opponent, the way coaches, fans and teammates like it. If he doesn't tackle like that, he says, he has little to offer on the playing field.

"He's totally wrong," Polian says of Cecil's insistence that the hits were legal. "His head was down. The sole issue is where his head is at contact. What we say is, 'See what you hit.' " Polian knows about improper head placement on tackles; as a safety for New York University in the mid-'60s, he twice knocked himself out by hitting with the crown of his helmet. Watching Cecil's tackles in slow motion, Polian was overwhelmed by visions of Darryl Stingley, Mike Utley and Dennis Byrd, all victims of spinalcord injuries. If not reined in, Polian concluded, Chuck Cecil would paralyze someone—an opponent or himself. "Are we saving him from himself?" Polian asks. "Perhaps."

And there was that "prior conduct" thing. In 1988, his rookie season with the Green Bay Packers, Cecil walloped New England Patriot receiver Stanley Morgan. "Morgan was on the ground for five minutes, inert," recalls Packer publicist Lee Remmel. "A lot of us were very concerned." But there was no penalty called and no fine from the league. Last year, in the Packers' season finale against the Minnesota Vikings, Cecil dished out two hits, against wide receivers Jake Reed and Joe Johnson, that were deemed flagrant, and he was fined $3,500 for each by the league office. "The one on me was definitely a cheap shot," says Reed. "It was at the end of the game, the ball was way overthrown, uncatchable. I was slowing down, and he hit me helmet first under the chin." Then in the Cardinals' second preseason game this year, against the Chicago Bears, Cecil crushed wideout Anthony Morgan on a crossing pattern, hitting the stretched-out receiver under the chin with his helmet and knocking him into the gray area. "It was a quick slant and the ball was high," recalls Morgan. "I don't remember anything else until the next day."

Morgan spent four days with a concussion. It's no wonder that the Bears now call the NFL-issued locker-room sign, warning players against blocking or tackling with the top of the helmet, the Chuck Cecil poster.

"With repeat offenders you step up the fine to get them to stop," says NFL director of communications Greg Aiello. "It's a deterrent. The important message is to kids, so they don't see these things and practice unsafe tackling techniques."

Funny thing is, young people love Cecil. In Green Bay a group called the Rock 'n' Roll Cecil Club used to come to Lambeau Field wearing Cecil's jersey number, 26, and sporting fake blood on their noses in homage to the gore that often streamed from Cecil's battered beak.

Says Hernandez, Cecil's old coach, "He's a hero to every small, slow kid in the secondary. Kids are always saying to me, 'God, he hits hard!' "

But Cecil's skills are not easily duplicated. He may be small and slow (a 4.7 40 these days), but he has keen football intelligence, great anticipation, outstanding hand-eye coordination and the ability to raise himself to a transcendent state of competitiveness during games. Even his father, a high school football coach in Avenal, Calif., is at a loss to explain it. "I never coached him," says Tom Cecil. "I had to talk to him in fourth and fifth grade and explain to him that games were not as important to other kids as to him.

He's just so competitive at anything he has an interest in." Including academics: In high school Chuck had all A's except for one B, and he graduated from Arizona with a 3.3 GPA and a degree in finance.

Chuck's parents have been divorced since he was a young boy. His mother, Evelyn Aardema, recalls that Chuck, the second oldest of three boys and a girl, was "the most pleasant, honest, straightforward person you'd ever want to meet." She also remembers that she always told him he was too little to play football. Tom agreed. Chuck was not allowed to play Pop Warner ball, and it wasn't until the family moved from central California to the San Diego area during Chuck's junior year in high school that the boy was turned loose on a football field.

"He kept asking me when we'd have hitting drills," recalls Hernandez. "Bugging me all the time. Finally we had the drill, and he took out three players, injured them. Against Monte Vista he took out their two best receivers, and there went their passing attack."

The story was the same in college. Recruited mostly by Ivy League schools and the military academics, Cecil made the squad at Arizona by dominating in drills. "They had to yell at me a lot," he says. At Arizona he had 21 interceptions, running one of them back for a 100-yard touchdown. In his sophomore season he played with a left thumb so badly broken that a doctor later said it looked as though it had been "smashed with a hammer."

At Green Bay, where he was a fourth-round pick, it was more of the same. In his rookie season, after Cecil knocked teammate Scott Bolton out of action on a drill, the coach at the time, Lindy Infante, assembled the team and said, "The next man who hits somebody and makes him miss practice will get the maximum fine of $1,500! Did you hear that, Chuck?"

Last season Cecil's kamikaze style was rewarded when he was voted a starter in the Pro Bowl. He played every game, says Packer coach Mike Holmgren, in a "controlled rage." After a narrow win over the Cincinnati Bengals, Cecil let his inner fire burn out of control, raising a ruckus at a Green Bay restaurant and somehow getting his nose bloodied. Arrested and charged with disorderly conduct, Cecil was described in the police report as being "very intoxicated." He ranted that he was being arrested only because the policemen on the scene were Bengal fans. He exhaled blood onto the Plexiglas shield behind the front seat of the squad car taking him to the station, then used his nose to smear the blood across the partition, the report said.

Cecil, who became a free agent after last season and signed a $5.25 million, three-year contract with the Cardinals in April, described that incident in Green Bay as a "misunderstanding." His concern now is that football may be taken away from him.

"Football has always been the foundation of my life," he said in Phoenix. "It's me. It's what I understand. Now officials are after me, teams may not want me, I may not have a job. I need football. Football gives my life meaning. I don't feel like I'm contributing to the planet unless I'm playing it."

Two days later, in a 26-20 loss to the Detroit Lions, Cecil seemed reserved, subdued. When he broke up a long pass to wideout Willie Green in the second quarter, he didn't detonate. After the game he and Green talked, as friends. "You know I could have knocked you out," Cecil said. "But it's not worth it."

In the locker room Green voiced his compassion for Cecil. "Fining him is like putting a guy in jail for stealing a Snickers bar," he said.

Lion linebacker Chris Spielman was more outraged. "Fining Chuck was terrible," he said angrily. "We all know the risk of this game. Hell, I lived it with my buddy Mike Utley. That's the way it is."

Back in Phoenix, alone in the darkened team auditorium, Cecil is watching a film of his hit on Middleton again and again. He sees himself make a break on the receiver before the ball has even been thrown. It is a move only a brilliant defender could make. It guarantees a critical third-down pass will not be caught. "It's very pure," he says quietly. "I'm not afraid to hurt myself. That's a great hit."

But is it great football? There is a deep scar across the crown of Cecil's helmet that looks like it was made with an axe. He says he has no idea how it got there. No doubt it is from a big collision, one of those meetings that Cecil says happen "much too fast to rationalize." He doesn't think the game should be slowed down on screens and analyzed, the way the league big shots are doing, just as he doesn't think he should be labeled a dirty player. He says there's nothing personal about any of this violence. "I don't see players," he says. "I see situations."

But the damage is real, involving real people. One of Cecil's big hits two years ago was laid on the skull of former Jet wideout Al Toon. The blow gave Toon a concussion. Toon is now retired, the victim of cumulative head trauma, some of it courtesy of the Heat Seeking Missile. Toon doesn't blame Cecil for the blow, though he does feel all contact in pro football should be made below the neck. "Chuck is only going to hurt himself," he says. "He's going to break his own neck."

Cecil brushes such warnings aside, focusing instead on the rapture of a devastating hit. "It's unbelievable," he says. "An orgasm. Euphoria. I don't know if you can put it into words. There is just this feeling of...power. For that split second of time you own that person. You are better. For just one moment, you know where you stand."

Perhaps no longer.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/ ... z1EAh0hwMc (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1137847/index.htm#ixzz1EAh0hwMc)

Chadman
02-16-2011, 10:22 PM
Sounds like he'll get on well with James Harrison...

Snatch98
02-16-2011, 10:40 PM
Sign me up lol. All I had to read was "savage hitting" and see the "claws picture". He seems to be a impressive coach and a Welcome addition. I'm sure the Steelers will make the right decision. He seems like a Tomlin guy.

Crash
02-17-2011, 01:35 AM
Good. Hire a guy who was once too mean for the NFL.

I like it.

:Clap

jj28west
02-17-2011, 06:47 AM
I remember his rep and the pub he was getting. Clark will love his style but the RGL is phasing this type of play out.

Anyways, was he the guy back in the Super Bowl teeing off the Steeler WR's against the Cowboys or was that Jimmy Case?

Steelhere10
02-17-2011, 07:32 AM
I remember his rep and the pub he was getting. Clark will love his style but the RGL is phasing this type of play out.

Anyways, was he the guy back in the Super Bowl teeing off the Steeler WR's against the Cowboys or was that Jimmy Case?Scott Case, a former Falcon.

Oviedo
02-17-2011, 09:03 AM
Sign me up lol. All I had to read was "savage hitting" and see the "claws picture". He seems to be a impressive coach and a Welcome addition. I'm sure the Steelers will make the right decision. He seems like a Tomlin guy.

"Savage hitting" is a no no and will get you 15 yards and a fine.

papillon
02-17-2011, 09:10 AM
We already have Ryan Clark that is always looking for the big hit rather than playing the ball and potentially making a game changing play. I'm not sure Cecil is the answer. The Steeler secondary doesn't lack toughness, they lack ball skills, attention to detail, proper technique, and I don't see Cecil bringing the ability to teach these skills with him. The Steelers are already on the most watched list by referees they don't need more head hunting, they need less head hunting and more defending on the back end.

I'd rather have Horton than Cecil.

Pappy

JUST-PLAIN-NASTY
02-17-2011, 09:51 AM
F'in great...This **** never ends!

www.kissmyfinassroger.com (http://www.kissmyfinassroger.com)
Posted February 17, 2011
Written by Rogers Sniper

The Pittsburgh Steelers were fined $150,000 for the intention of interviewing Chuck Cecil today. When asked what the fine was for, Commssioner Roger S. Goodell commented, "Chuck Cecil was let off to easy back in his playing day. I had no problem letting him get by while continuing his coaching career, but not with the Steelers. There is no way I will tolerate the hits he delivered in the past. I reviewed the films from his games and many were flagrant. He got away with too much. This is clearly a slap on the face by the Steelers organization and I will not tolerate it. I did everything in my power to hold them back in the 2010 season and the almost won the f'in Super Bowl." James Harrison could not be reached for comment.

Snatch98
02-17-2011, 03:43 PM
Sign me up lol. All I had to read was "savage hitting" and see the "claws picture". He seems to be a impressive coach and a Welcome addition. I'm sure the Steelers will make the right decision. He seems like a Tomlin guy.

"Savage hitting" is a no no and will get you 15 yards and a fine.

Obviously but it's the hard nosed mentality and the aggressive nature of "the savage hitting" that our players would benefit. Plus based on the above article he seems to be a very solid football mind and a real student of the game. I hope we sign him.

hawaiiansteel
02-18-2011, 02:59 AM
Steelers anxious to fill coaching position

By John Harris
PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Friday, February 18, 2011


For the first time under coach Mike Tomlin, the Steelers must replace a key member of their defensive coaching staff.

Secondary coach Ray Horton's departure last week to become the Arizona Cardinals defensive coordinator under Ken Whisenhunt marks the first significant loss on that side of the ball since Tomlin took over in 2007.

With the NFL Scouting Combine scheduled for Feb. 23-March 1, it's important, though not imperative, that the Steelers hire Horton's replacement before front-office members, scouts and the coaching staff depart for Indianapolis.

This should be a considered a plum job. Horton parlayed his gig with the Steelers into a major promotion.

Here are some potential candidates:

• Chuck Cecil: Has reportedly interviewed with the Steelers, according to ESPN.com. Spent past two seasons as Tennessee Titans defensive coordinator. Also served as Tennessee's secondary coach from '07-08 and safeties and nickel backs coach from '04-06. Fiery individual who played safety and was considered among the most vicious hitters in league history.

• Lionel Washington: Washington coached Oakland's defensive backs the past two seasons. He was let go earlier this week when the Raiders hired Hall of Famer and former Steelers cornerback Rod Woodson. In his first NFL coaching stint, Washington was a nickel back/cornerbacks assistant with Green Bay from '99-08 before being replaced by former Steelers assistant Darren Perry. Played defensive back for 15 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals, Denver and Raiders twice.

• Donnie Henderson: One of Horton's first moves as Arizona's defensive coordinator was replacing Henderson and making longtime Cincinnati Bengals assistant Louie Cioffi his new secondary coach. Prior to the Cardinals, Henderson coached Jacksonville's defensive backs in '08 and had brief stints as a defensive coordinator with Detroit and the New York Jets.

• Corwin Brown: Departed New England after only one season as secondary coach focusing on safety play. Also coached New York Jets secondary and was an assistant under Charlie Weis at Notre Dame.

• Joe Woods: He's been Minnesota's secondary coach since '06, where he followed Tomlin from Tampa Bay. Tomlin was the Vikings' defensive coordinator for one season before taking over the Steelers; it was rumored that Woods would join Tomlin in Pittsburgh at that time. Woods is expected to have an expanded role under Vikings coach Leslie Frazier. He recently interviewed for the Philadelphia Eagles defensive coordinator opening that went to Juan Castillo.

Notes: The Steelers re-signed six players from last season's practice squad, including wide receiver Tyler Grisham, defensive end Sunny Harris and safety Damon Cromartie-Smith. Other practice players to re-sign with the club include tight end Eugene Bright, linebacker Chris Ellis and tackle Kyle Jolly. Wide receiver Wes Lyons, a Pittsburgh native who attended Woodland Hills and West Virginia, also signed ... Defensive end Brett Keisel, whose long beard received national acclaim during Super Bowl XLV, will host "Shear the Beard'' on Feb. 24 beginning at 7 p.m. at the Diesel Club Lounge on East Carson Street to benefit cancer programs at UPMC's Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Celebrity barbers will be on hand to shave Keisel's beard.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1EHsPFylE (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/print_723454.html#ixzz1EHsPFylE)

papillon
02-18-2011, 07:47 AM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Oviedo
02-18-2011, 08:57 AM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Lynch would be good but does he have any coaching experience. Our secondary is so bad I don't think we can afford to have a coach doing OJT.

Looking at that list I think Joe Woods would on the surface appear to have the inside track due to familiarity. Coaches like guys they know.

papillon
02-18-2011, 09:02 AM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Lynch would be good but does he have any coaching experience. Our secondary is so bad I don't think we can afford to have a coach doing OJT.

Looking at that list I think Joe Woods would on the surface appear to have the inside track due to familiarity. Coaches like guys they know.

I don't believe that Lynch has any experience and that's what I meant by "giving him a chance". No experience, but a smart player, a hitter (rarely the fineable type hits), no stupid penalties, etc. I'd rather him over the others even w/o the experience.

Pappy

Oviedo
02-18-2011, 09:10 AM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Lynch would be good but does he have any coaching experience. Our secondary is so bad I don't think we can afford to have a coach doing OJT.

Looking at that list I think Joe Woods would on the surface appear to have the inside track due to familiarity. Coaches like guys they know.

I don't believe that Lynch has any experience and that's what I meant by "giving him a chance". No experience, but a smart player, a hitter (rarely the fineable type hits), no stupid penalties, etc. I'd rather him over the others even w/o the experience.

Pappy

Lynch and Tomlin know each other well and Lynch has sung the praises about Tomlin as one of the best coaches he ever worked with. My only real issue with Lynch was he never was a cover guy. He was like the Tampa version of Troy. He free lanced and hit and blitzed. He would seem to have great experience for Safeties but not so sure he could develop CBs which is where we are desperate.

Now if Ronde Barber wanted to get into coaching that would be interesting.

steelblood
02-18-2011, 10:02 AM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Lynch would be good but does he have any coaching experience. Our secondary is so bad I don't think we can afford to have a coach doing OJT.

Looking at that list I think Joe Woods would on the surface appear to have the inside track due to familiarity. Coaches like guys they know.

I don't believe that Lynch has any experience and that's what I meant by "giving him a chance". No experience, but a smart player, a hitter (rarely the fineable type hits), no stupid penalties, etc. I'd rather him over the others even w/o the experience.

Pappy

Lynch and Tomlin know each other well and Lynch has sung the praises about Tomlin as one of the best coaches he ever worked with. My only real issue with Lynch was he never was a cover guy. He was like the Tampa version of Troy. He free lanced and hit and blitzed. He would seem to have great experience for Safeties but not so sure he could develop CBs which is where we are desperate.

Now if Ronde Barber wanted to get into coaching that would be interesting.

Lynch has said that Tomlin approached him about joining the Steelers' staff in the past.

frankthetank1
02-18-2011, 10:30 AM
Cecil was a headhunter for the Packers in the early 90s or so, wasn't he? I remember him as a dirty player always looking to take a head off over the middle.

yes i remember him more with the cards later in his career but he was that kind of safey. i never thought he was a dirty player but he was a very hard hitter. besides back then they didnt have the defensless wr rule

RuthlessBurgher
02-18-2011, 11:54 AM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Lynch would be good but does he have any coaching experience. Our secondary is so bad I don't think we can afford to have a coach doing OJT.

Looking at that list I think Joe Woods would on the surface appear to have the inside track due to familiarity. Coaches like guys they know.

I'm not sure why Woods is even on the list. He is currently Minnesota's secondary coach. Harris even mentions that Woods is expected to have an expanded role under Vikings coach Leslie Frazier. He interviewed in Philly because that was for a potential D.C. job (a promotion). That is understandable. But why would the Viking allow us to bring in their secondary coach to be our secondary coach? Does not compute.

Mister Pittsburgh
02-18-2011, 01:10 PM
why would we want the guy that got canned by the Raiders. That would suck. Hopefully off of that list we would go with Cecil.

hawaiiansteel
02-20-2011, 02:37 AM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Lynch would be good but does he have any coaching experience. Our secondary is so bad I don't think we can afford to have a coach doing OJT.

Looking at that list I think Joe Woods would on the surface appear to have the inside track due to familiarity. Coaches like guys they know.

I'm not sure why Woods is even on the list. He is currently Minnesota's secondary coach. Harris even mentions that Woods is expected to have an expanded role under Vikings coach Leslie Frazier. He interviewed in Philly because that was for a potential D.C. job (a promotion). That is understandable. But why would the Viking allow us to bring in their secondary coach to be our secondary coach? Does not compute.


I think Joe Woods is on that list because he and Mike Tomlin are very good friends.

http://www.gcobb.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/JoeWoods1.jpg

Crash
02-20-2011, 02:41 AM
Woods was rumored to be headed our way when Tomlin was hired.

With that said, I hope they hire Cecil. That would pis$ Goodell off even more.

We are the most hated team in football. I say we embrace that role and use it to our advantage.

Mister Pittsburgh
02-20-2011, 10:28 AM
I agree Crash.

[youtube:2tz5pbvd]2j-uDN7TIas[/youtube:2tz5pbvd]

flippy
02-20-2011, 01:16 PM
The nastier the coaches, the better.

F Goodell! Hire Cecil!

Heck, we should create a new position and call it the Director of Pain and hire someone like Mean Joe.

SteelStallion
02-20-2011, 02:14 PM
Sounds good. But I would worry less about getting a seconndary coach and worry more about getting...you know...an actual secondary :lol:

Shawn
02-20-2011, 03:41 PM
The nastier the coaches, the better.

F Goodell! Hire Cecil!

Heck, we should create a new position and call it the Director of Pain and hire someone like Mean Joe.

:lol:

I love it!

RuthlessBurgher
02-20-2011, 09:24 PM
No John Lynch? :( I'd rather give him a chance than any of those guys, particularly the guy from the Raiders that Woodson replaced.

Pappy

Lynch would be good but does he have any coaching experience. Our secondary is so bad I don't think we can afford to have a coach doing OJT.

Looking at that list I think Joe Woods would on the surface appear to have the inside track due to familiarity. Coaches like guys they know.

I'm not sure why Woods is even on the list. He is currently Minnesota's secondary coach. Harris even mentions that Woods is expected to have an expanded role under Vikings coach Leslie Frazier. He interviewed in Philly because that was for a potential D.C. job (a promotion). That is understandable. But why would the Viking allow us to bring in their secondary coach to be our secondary coach? Does not compute.


I think Joe Woods is on that list because he and Mike Tomlin are very good friends.

I understand that. But just because they are friends doesn't mean that Ziggy Wilf is going to let us take away their DB coach to be our DB coach. It's a lateral move. Going from a job as Vikes DB coach to be the Eagles D-coordinator would have been a promotion, which is why they allow him to interview for that job. But our job isn't a promotion. Why would Minnesota allow it? I'm sure Woods is friends with Leslie Frazier too.

hawaiiansteel
02-22-2011, 01:18 AM
Steelers taking time in hiring new defensive backs coach

By Scott Brown, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Monday, February 21, 2011


Mike Tomlin has only one opening to fill on his staff, and the Steelers coach said today that he is in “no hurry” to fill it.

The Steelers need a new defensive backs coach following the loss of Ray Horton to the Arizona Cardinals.

Tomlin said he has only done “research” in regard to replacing Horton, who left a couple of weeks ago to become the Cardinals' defensive coordinator. Tomlin said he has not interviewed any possible replacements even though former Tennessee Titans defensive coordinator Chuck Cecil reportedly interviewed for the job.

“I know that was reported but I have not interviewed Chuck,” Tomlin said.

Tomlin said he expects every other coach on last season’s staff to return. The uncertain labor situation may be the biggest reason why Tomlin is taking his time in hiring a new defensive backs coach.

The collective bargaining agreement (CBA) ends after Mach 3, and if the owners lock out the players most NFL business, including offseason workouts and practices, will be put on hold.

“I want to make sure that we hire the right man,” Tomlin said in regard to the one opening on his staff, “and that has no timetable.”

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1Eer8Y9my (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_723952.html#ixzz1Eer8Y9my)