PDA

View Full Version : James Harrison's Interview is a Big F Goodell



flippy
02-01-2011, 02:39 PM
Harrison was killing on the mic today.

What's your thought process now on tackling since you've been fined?
"Get the guy down by whatever means possible"

Then later he's says in a complete monotone voice, "We're not going hurt no one cause we don't want to get fined". Then he stares menacingly into the camera.

Every comment was like he could care less about Goodell.

Steelgal
02-01-2011, 02:41 PM
He also said something about using pillows or hitting them and having them land on pillows. Hopefully someone will have an exact quote, but it was hilarious!!!!

Djfan
02-01-2011, 02:48 PM
He was awesome. That man is amazing.

Steelgal
02-01-2011, 02:54 PM
Been watching all the cameras online and Harrison's is by far the most entertaining. He's having fun with the media. Gotta love him.

AngryAsian
02-01-2011, 03:51 PM
Every great Steeler Defense incarnation has had an iconic tough guy.... Lambert, Lloyd... is there any doubt that Harrison is this generation's ideal? Love this guy.

NW Steeler
02-01-2011, 03:59 PM
I hope that Rodgers can hear Harrison's footsteps already!!!

Ghost
02-01-2011, 04:01 PM
I hope that Rodgers can hear Harrison's footsteps already!!!


Just have to hope the refs don't go blind as Harrison is being tackled to the ground all day with no call....

hawaiiansteel
02-01-2011, 06:00 PM
He also said something about using pillows or hitting them and having them land on pillows. Hopefully someone will have an exact quote, but it was hilarious!!!!


here it is, pretty funny and sarcastic stuff... :lol:


James Harrison mocks Goodell, suggests covering the field with pillows

Posted by Michael David Smith on February 1, 2011

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/jamesharrison1.jpg?w=250


Super Bowl Media Day has transformed James Harrison from the schoolyard bully to the class clown.

Harrison, the Steelers linebacker who racked up fines topping six figures this season, mocked NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell when asked about the league’s commitment to player safety. Harrison joked about players getting hurt as reminiscent of kids stubbing their toes, and he offered a suggestion for how the game could be made safer.

“Lay pillows down where I tackle them so they don’t get hurt when they hit the ground, Mr. Goodell,” Harrison said.

Harrison is known as one of the league’s most intimidating players, but at Media Day he has been something of a comedian, clowning the league office — which he clearly thinks is a joke.

Still, Harrison also said he’s bitter about having $100,000 taken out of his paychecks. If the Steelers win on Sunday, Harrison and Goodell on the podium together would make for the most compelling Super Bowl post-game show in history.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... h-pillows/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/02/01/james-harrison-mocks-goodell-suggests-covering-the-field-with-pillows/)

Discipline of Steel
02-01-2011, 07:27 PM
He also said something about using pillows or hitting them and having them land on pillows. Hopefully someone will have an exact quote, but it was hilarious!!!!


here it is, pretty funny and sarcastic stuff... :lol:


James Harrison mocks Goodell, suggests covering the field with pillows

Posted by Michael David Smith on February 1, 2011

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/jamesharrison1.jpg?w=250


Super Bowl Media Day has transformed James Harrison from the schoolyard bully to the class clown.

Harrison, the Steelers linebacker who racked up fines topping six figures this season, mocked NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell when asked about the league’s commitment to player safety. Harrison joked about players getting hurt as reminiscent of kids stubbing their toes, and he offered a suggestion for how the game could be made safer.

“Lay pillows down where I tackle them so they don’t get hurt when they hit the ground, Mr. Goodell,” Harrison said.

Harrison is known as one of the league’s most intimidating players, but at Media Day he has been something of a comedian, clowning the league office — which he clearly thinks is a joke.

Still, Harrison also said he’s bitter about having $100,000 taken out of his paychecks. If the Steelers win on Sunday, Harrison and Goodell on the podium together would make for the most compelling Super Bowl post-game show in history.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... h-pillows/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/02/01/james-harrison-mocks-goodell-suggests-covering-the-field-with-pillows/)

Oh, he will be up there, dont you worry Mr. Smith.

Chachi
02-01-2011, 07:32 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMZoFcWY3XE

Shawn
02-01-2011, 07:58 PM
Every great Steeler Defense incarnation has had an iconic tough guy.... Lambert, Lloyd... is there any doubt that Harrison is this generation's ideal? Love this guy.

Harrison has grown into my favorite Steeler linebacker ever.

hawaiiansteel
02-01-2011, 08:09 PM
Harrison has grown into my favorite Steeler linebacker ever.


Harrison and this guy:

http://throwbacksnw.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Lambert1.jpg

Chadman
02-01-2011, 10:16 PM
That could just about be the best response to the whole 'illegal hits' argument yet.

James Harrison.....just rose a few notches on the awesome belt.

Wolfhound45
02-01-2011, 10:32 PM
Saw the clips of him. Hilarious.

papillon
02-01-2011, 10:38 PM
That could just about be the best response to the whole 'illegal hits' argument yet.

James Harrison.....just rose a few notches on the awesome belt.

I'm out of notches when it comes to moving Harrison up and where he ranks on my all time linebacker list. 1A and 1B it's James Lambert or Jack Harrison either way is good by me, love them both as players and Steelers.

Pappy

Chadman
02-01-2011, 10:46 PM
"I don't want to hurt nobody. I don't want to step on nobody's foot or hurt their toe. I don't want to have no dirt or none of this rubber on this field fly into their eye & make their eye hurt. I just want to tackle them softly on the ground and if you all can, we'll lay a pillow down where I'm going to tackle them, so they don't hit the ground too hard.....Mr Goodell."

http://turbo.inquisitr.com/wp-content/2010/10/alg_harrisoninq.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_ZzSeX2ctOaA/TL9srfGsRtI/AAAAAAAACyE/dEaZRvcB7es/s1600/silverbackmassaquoi.jpg

http://thumbnails.truveo.com/0011/EE/E0/EEE0CBA6B82681C851ED99_Large.jpg

hawaiiansteel
02-02-2011, 06:04 PM
Cook: Harrison's sarcasm crosses line

Wednesday, February 02, 2011
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


ARLINGTON, Texas -- It might be the longest declarative sentence in the history of Super Bowl Media Day.

There's no doubt it was the most sarcastic.

"I don't want to hurt nobody, I don't want to step on nobody's foot and hurt their toe, I don't want to have no dirt or none of this rubber on the field fly into their eye and make their eye hurt, I just want to tackle them softly on the ground and, if y'all can, lay a pillow down where I'm going to tackle them so they don't hit the ground too hard, Mr. Goodell."

You don't think Steelers linebacker James Harrison is bitter, do you?

About the $100,000 in fines he received this season from the NFL office because of helmet hits that commissioner Roger Goodell and his staff believed were against the rules?

Bitter doesn't even begin to describe Harrison. "They took $100,000 out of my pocket," he said, glaring.

Using the pulpit he had on Media Day Tuesday at Cowboys Stadium, Harrison mocked Goodell at every turn. It was clear that was his intention from the start. He brushed off questions about making the greatest play in Super Bowl history when he returned an interception 100 yards for a touchdown to help the Steelers beat the Arizona Cardinals in Super Bowl XLIII. "I don't really remember too much about it." Asked if he has watched the replay on television, he said, "I don't really watch sports. I watch cartoons." Asked if the play changed his life, he said, "It didn't change my life at all. It changed the outcome of the game, but that's really about it."

No, Harrison couldn't wait to get to the Goodell questions. He didn't have to wait long and went after the commissioner with the same ferocity he's expected to go after Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers in Super Bowl XLV Sunday night. He talked of the league looking for "a poster boy" for its crackdown on helmet hits earlier in the season and "they just chose me because I was the most visible player." He said every decision the league makes is based on "whatever makes them more money." He said his trip to Goodell's office in New York in November for a meeting of the minds was "a waste of time. Nothing was really accomplished."

It was funny for a while, and you can argue that Goodell deserves all the scorn coming his way from the Steelers. The commissioner isn't popular with anyone in the organization after he unconscionably blind-sided quarterback Ben Roethlisberger by telling SportsIllustrated.com before the playoffs that "not a single player" came to Roethlisberger's defense during the NFL's investigation into a sexual assault allegation against him in March in Milledgeville, Ga. The story was released earlier this week, the worst possible time for the Steelers.

But Harrison went too far. His points would have had more validity if he didn't sound like such a fool with a few of his other comments. The most galling showed his cavalier disregard for the seriousness of head injuries in the NFL.

"I've had concussions at the pro level," Harrison said. "It wasn't bad enough to where I needed to come out of the game. I'll put it like this: If you don't tell [the medical staff], they don't know unless you get knocked out and you're laying there with your arms stuck in the air."

Nice, huh?

Medical research has linked concussions in football to brain disease, dementia and other maladies in players later in life. When asked if Goodell and the league are trying to protect Harrison from himself, Harrison scoffed, "I'm not worried about that. It's part of the game. We signed up for this. It's not a touchy, feely game. I've said it many times. I'm willing to go through hell so my kids don't have to."

It's admirable and honorable that Harrison is willing to do what it takes to support his family. Where he loses me is with his unwillingness to realize that one of his helmet hits could end another player's career and devastate that player's family. That's shameful.

Harrison was fined $5,000 for corkscrewing Tennessee quarterback Vince Young into the ground Sept. 19. The fine was deserved because it was a dirty play. Harrison was fined $75,000 for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Cleveland wide receiver Mohamed Massaquoi Oct. 17. The league conceded that was excessive, reducing it to $50,000 in December.

Harrison talked of retiring after the Massaquoi hit, which seemed odd for a guy who wants to provide for his family. He said he met with Steelers coach Mike Tomlin, who sent him home from practice for a day to cool off. He admitted the retirement talk "wasn't well-thought out."

Harrison said he changed the way he played for a game or two but then realized it "wasn't conducive to me helping the team win." The fines continued to come. He was docked $20,000 for a hit on New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees and $25,000 for one on Buffalo quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick. Both fines were legitimate because Harrison led with his helmet.

Harrison said he believes comments he made after the Cleveland game Oct. 17 contributed to the severity and frequency of his fines. "I don't want to see anyone injured, but I'm not opposed to hurting anyone," he said that day. "There's a difference. When you're injured, you can't play. But, when you're hurt, you can shake it off and come back. I try to hurt people."

Of course, all anyone remembered was, "I try to hurt people."

"I think that contributed to me getting fined," Harrison said.

That's what led to that comment about putting down a pillow to make for a soft landing in Cowboys Stadium.

It was funny, sure.

But it also was sad.

"I've had concussions at the pro level. It wasn't bad enough to where I needed to come out of the game. ... If you don't tell [the medical staff], they don't know unless you get knocked out and you're laying there with your arms stuck in the air."

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11033/11 ... z1CpzZJcD0 (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11033/1122316-66.stm#ixzz1CpzZJcD0)

grotonsteel
02-02-2011, 07:09 PM
Harrison Interview was awesome. I enjoyed it the most. And yes it was a big F U BADall

Oviedo
02-02-2011, 07:17 PM
Cook is full of BS. Everything that harrison said was true. He isn't trying to end someone's career but if he lets up he gives up a big play his team is screwed. That is the problem with the subjective BS Goodell has introduced into the game. He wants football with scores of 45-42 because he thinks that is what the fans want. Maybe casual fans, but real fans who understand football know that is crap.

hawaiiansteel
02-02-2011, 10:40 PM
James Harrison turns up criticism of NFL

Updated Feb 2, 2011


FORT WORTH, TEXAS (AP)

Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison is not letting up in his criticism of the NFL in the days leading up to the Super Bowl.

A day after sarcastically suggesting a pillow could be used to soften blows he delivers to opponents, Harrison called the NFL's talk about wanting to protect players ''just a show.''

Harrison said before Wednesday's practice that the owners' push for an 18-game regular season and the possibility of a lockout prove the NFL is more interested in maximizing revenue than the health of its players.

''It's not about player safety,'' Harrison said. ''It's about money.''

The league and the players' union face an early March deadline for trying to negotiate a new labor agreement.

''It's no doubt to me,'' said Harrison, whose Steelers play the Green Bay Packers for the NFL championship Sunday. ''I believe they're going to lock us out.''

Harrison was fined $100,000 by the NFL for illegal hits this season, and even went briefly so far as to threaten to retire because he said it was too difficult to adjust to the new way rules were being enforced. On Wednesday, though, he acknowledged any talk of quitting was a result of being ''hotheaded.''

Asked Wednesday whether he's worried about the dangers of concussion from violent hits on the field, he said: ''That's my style of play. There's a risk with everything you do. ... Since I was knee-high to a grasshopper, that's how you play the game.''

At Tuesday's media day at Cowboys Stadium, Harrison said he feels as if the league was ''looking for a poster boy'' when it started fining him.

In a deadpan delivery, Harrison said: ''I don't want to hurt nobody. I don't want to step on nobody's foot or hurt their toe. I don't want to have no dirt or none of this rubber on this field fly into their eye and make their eye hurt.

''I just want to tackle them softly on the ground and, if y'all can, we'll lay a pillow down where I'm going to tackle them, so they don't hit the ground too hard, Mr. Goodell.''

http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/Jame ... ers-020211 (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/James-Harrison-Roger-Goodell-criticism-continues-Pittsburgh-Steelers-020211)

hawaiiansteel
02-03-2011, 12:05 AM
Harrison remains the NFL’s angriest man

By JIM LITKE AP Sports Columnist

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP)—James Harrison(notes) needs protection.

From himself.

It sounds strange to say that about one of the most feared, and by far the most-fined player in the NFL this season, someone who calls himself the “poster guy” for the league’s campaign to stop the kind of vicious hits that harm others. Yet Harrison seems unconcerned with the possible damage he’s doing to himself in the short and long term. Either way, he’s convinced himself it’s well worth it.

“I’m willing to go through hell in gasoline drawers,” Pittsburgh’s All-Pro linebacker said Wednesday, “so that my kids don’t have to.”

Harrison may someday get the chance.

Several hours before the Steelers returned to the practice field at TCU to prepare for Sunday’s Super Bowl, Harrison was well-rested and injury-free. Yet mounting scientific evidence suggests that even high school and college football players are involved in more than enough collisions to risk lingering damage to both body and brain.

But when someone asked Harrison whether he worried about the toll all that hitting would take by the time he turned 50, this was his answer:

“My (linebackers) coach, Keith Butler, who played 10 years in the league, he’s close to around there and he’s doing fine. He’s coaching us very, very well. Nothing’s wrong with his head and he played when you could do a lot worse than what we’re doing right now.

“So I’m hoping,” he added, “I’m as blessed and as fortunate as him, to be in the same position that he is now - minus a couple hips and shoulders that he got replaced.”

Funny line.

But watching a former player wobble around with all his wits is not research, just like hoping is not a retirement plan.

Worse still, Harrison not only derided the league’s efforts to stop headhunting as just another moneymaking scheme; he’s used his podium for two straight days to taunt Commissioner Roger Goodell for trying.

“I don’t want to hurt nobody. I don’t want to step on nobody’s foot or hurt their toe. I don’t want to have no dirt or none of this rubber on this field fly into their eye and make their eye hurt,” he said during Tuesday’s media day. “I just want to tackle them softly on the ground and, if y’all can, we’ll lay a pillow down where I’m going to tackle them, so they don’t hit the ground too hard, Mr. Goodell.”

Given a chance to retract those comments Wednesday, Harrison proceeded full-speed ahead.

“If you want to get (hard hitting) totally out of the game, put flags on us. We’ll tag off and pull flags off each other,” he said, “and we’ll see how popular the game is then, and how many people come to watch it.”

None of this should come as a surprise. Harrison is one of those guys who made it to the NFL by refusing to back down, who used evaluations by pro scouts that he was too small and too slow as kindling. Undrafted out of college, he was cut four times and exiled for a season to Germany and NFL Europe.

To remember that difficult climb to stardom, he carried around his equipment bag from the Rhine Fire until it fell apart. Now 32, he remains as defiant as ever.

Soon after Goodell levied the first of what became $100,000 in fines for what he deemed illegal hits by Harrison, the Steeler star threatened to retire rather than try to change his style. Harrison acknowledged that playing that way had resulted in several concussions of his own, but not even one that he bothered to report.

By his twisted logic, Harrison says he’s “all for player safety.” But in the very next breath, he vowed to continue to do his best to hide future concussions from team officials.

“You shouldn’t be able to come back in the game,” he said. “But if they don’t know, they don’t have that decision to make. …

“It’s a choice. No one is forcing me to play this game. They didn’t put a gun to my head and say, ‘James, go out there and play.’ It’s what I want to do. It’s what I like to do. It’s what I love to do.”

Harrison, paused and scanned the crowd of reporters standing in front of him.

“Did they force you to come out and do this? Did they put a gun to your head?” he asked.

No, we assured him, then pointed out that sports writers don’t risk concussions doing their jobs.

“You could,” Harrison said with a menacing smile, “if you say the wrong thing.”

—-=

Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke(at)ap.org

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=txjimlitke020211