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hawaiiansteel
01-29-2011, 09:13 PM
remind me not to renew my SI subscription... :roll:


Wins shouldn't make us forget about Roethlisberger's past actions

by Ann Killion
http://i.cdn.turner.com/si/.element/img/4.0/global/writer_headshots/new/ann_killion.jpg

Story Highlights: (or Lowlights, in my opinion)

Roethlisberger is being deified, standard procedure for championship-winning QBs
But let's not forget about the disturbing off-field behavior that got him suspended
Roethlisberger may not have been charged, but his actions were disgusting

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/si/2011/writers/ann_killion/01/28/ben.roethlisberger/ben.roethlisberger.jpg

Ben Roethlisberger has led the Steelers to a third Super Bowl, but it's not fair to call him a changed man.

What's the prism through which you view sports?

The prism of team colors and city name?

The singular filter of athletic achievement?

A window on human interest, finding athletes you feel you can truly root for?

It's an interesting exploration. Why does one city cheer for its own accused steroid cheat yet degrade an accused visitor? Why do some stay loyal to a team even after it has moved and turned its back on its fan base? Why can you hate one player when he plays across the country and adore him as soon as he signs with your team?

And why does a person's vile behavior off the field become less relevant the more his team wins?

That brings us to Ben Roethlisberger, who is leading the Pittsburgh Steelers into the Super Bowl for the third time in his seven-year career. Roethlisberger is being lauded, standard procedure at this time of year for conference championship-winning quarterbacks.
We're hearing about the obstacles he has overcome, his resilience, his redemption.
And it's making some of us more than a tad nauseous.

In case you've forgotten, or would like to gloss it over lest it dampen your guacamole-and-chips plans, Roethlisberger was accused of sexually assaulting a 20-year old college student.

It's not like this is ancient history, when Roethlisberger was some foolish kid. It happened less than 11 months ago, in Milledgeville, Ga., when Roethlisberger was a 28-year old, two-time Super Bowl winner, who had been accused of rape just 20 months earlier in Nevada.

And while no charges were filed in either case, a look at the Milledgeville police report, physical evidence and an investigative story by Sports Illustrated leaves no doubt that something awfully repellent happened that night in Georgia.

The D.A. overseeing Milledgeville (population 18,000) opted not to file charges against Roethlisberger. And the accuser asked to drop charges because, according to her lawyer, "it would be a very intrusive personal experience" for her; the young woman's reputation was already in the process of being trashed.

OK. But that doesn't mean that something sordid and perhaps criminal didn't take place. The D.A. decided there wasn't enough evidence for an open-and-shut case: the operative word there is enough. The bar in Georgia is quite high in sexual assault cases. And nationally, superstar athletes -- superstar white athletes in particular -- have been given the legal and societal benefit of the doubt forever.

The justice system of the NFL worked more quickly. Commissioner Roger Goodell suspended Roethlisberger for more than a third of the regular season (and as a result caused him to lose several million dollars of salary), later reducing the suspension from six to four games after Roethlisberger underwent a "comprehensive behavioral evaluation."

Goodell wrote to Roethlisberger that while he recognized that "the allegations in Georgia were disputed and that they did not result in criminal charges being filed against you," his ruling was because "you are held to a higher standard as an NFL player, and there is nothing about your conduct in Milledgeville that can remotely be described as admirable, responsible or consistent with either the values of the league or the expectations of our fans."

Since last spring, much of the conversation surrounding the incident is the same deafening, reactive noise that always surrounds these types of accusation in the sports world: that it is simply he said, she said. The young woman is painted in terms of being a gold-digger or a drunken slut.

My personal observation after several years in the sports world is that grown men tend to be more infatuated with pro athletes than young women are, going to great lengths to protect, excuse and enable them.

Roethlisberger had a posse of the infatuated men: pals and off-duty police officers acting as bodyguards, who set up and enabled the encounter with the young woman. He also wasn't questioned immediately by police. One police officer later resigned after his unprofessional conduct in the case became public.

In the months since, the Roethlisberger incident has been casually spoken about in the same breath as the harassment of a female television personality in the Jets locker room and the sexting accusations surrounding Brett Favre. To be clear, sexual harassment shouldn't ever be excused. But neither should it be confused with sexual assault.

The outrage surrounding Michael Vick continues to be expressed at a higher volume than any talk about the Roethlisberger case. Yet Vick served almost two years in prison for his crimes, paid his dues to society (it should be noted that Vick was tried and convicted and Roethlisberger was not).

Resilient? That may be the Steelers, who had to play four games without their starting quarterback and went 3-1, but I don't know that it is a useful descriptor of Roethlisberger. A changed man? Who knows, but certainly the loss of millions of dollars is motivation to not act like a Neanderthal in public.

Redemption? Please. Success on the football field does not make you a better person, though some in the sports media try to frame it that way.

Roethlisberger's style of play is called "bruising." That is being celebrated by many this week. For others it conjures up details of the evidence -- "bruises, lacerations and bleeding" -- that was found on a 20-year-old, 5-foot-4 college girl last March, after she went to the police and then to the hospital.

Guess your perspective all depends on what prism you're looking through.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/w ... z1CTMBGsBU (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/ann_killion/01/28/ben.roethlisberger/index.html#ixzz1CTMBGsBU)

aggiebones
01-29-2011, 09:28 PM
"the young woman's reputation was already in the process of being trashed."

It was pretty easy to trash her rep. She left a dirty trail.

Jigawatts
01-29-2011, 09:39 PM
Check out this piece of garbage scribbled in crayon by Buzz Bissinger.

"May the Packers break your legs on the first series of downs."

http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and- ... on-debate/ (http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2011-01-26/ben-roethlisberger-and-the-nfls-silly-redemption-debate/)

Crash
01-29-2011, 10:33 PM
Nice hatchet job by that SI cu*t.

Too bad she failed to report facts.

She should be fired.

Discipline of Steel
01-29-2011, 10:47 PM
(it should be noted that Vick was tried and convicted and Roethlisberger was not).

At least it was noted :roll:

SteelAbility
01-29-2011, 11:11 PM
Allegation = Guilt.

That's the take-home message here. I'm guessing this guy isn't posing much of a threat to the great legal minds of our time. :lol:

SteelCrazy
01-29-2011, 11:45 PM
That is disgusting article and I let her know.

rpmpit
01-30-2011, 12:12 AM
Does anyone actually read SI anymore??

Starlifter
01-30-2011, 12:45 AM
looking at her photo you would think she (like most of the rest of us) would realize just how important alcohol is to successful mating.

and I really don't recall reading too many, if any, posts here defending ben's actions. apparently this reporter has a problem with the bias towards white athletes. I suppose she thinks Inez Sainz is a legitimate reporter who only dresses the way she does because she's discriminately underpaid and can't afford loose clothing.....

sd steel
01-30-2011, 12:55 AM
Check out this piece of garbage scribbled in crayon by Buzz Bissinger.

"May the Packers break your legs on the first series of downs."

http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and- ... on-debate/ (http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2011-01-26/ben-roethlisberger-and-the-nfls-silly-redemption-debate/)

I am suprised that none of the comments regarding this story make reference to Buzz going to school with Belichek and Ernie Adams. That is where he got the idea to write Friday Night Lights. He is close friends the Belichek* and they go back a long way. I am sure he is privy to how Ernie Adams and Belichek used the videos to beat the Steelers in the past during Spygate. I think the guy realizes that Ben and the Steelers are overtaking his buddies' glory.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
01-30-2011, 12:56 AM
I'm surprised a national magazine published this. I see it's a web article. I don't generally read SI.com - is it very different in the kind of things it publishes compared to the "hard copy" SI magazine? Even though they published an article earlier this year that was fairly negative on Ben, I didn't think it went over the top too much (low expectations for the media).

I'm almost to the point where I realize it's hopeless, there's a target on his and the Steelers' backs, and there's nothing much that can be done about it. So, believing that Ben is capable of turning it around (after all, by all accounts, he started out as a nice young man, it's not like he has to make it all up from scratch ) all I can say is ...

HERE WE GO, STEELERS!! :tt2 :tt1 :tt2 :tt1

Crash
01-30-2011, 12:58 AM
Buzz also wrote a piece in December how its time to forgive CON Mike Vick.

Snatch98
01-30-2011, 01:03 AM
Unbelievable and absolutely shameful. Stop at nothing to be controversial I guess and it's not like his image is completely repaired. There are plenty of people in the Pittsburgh area that still can't get behind a Big Ben led Steeler team. Although most of the time it's absolutely clueless, non-football fans with a activist axe to grind (Not that there is anything wrong with activism). A complete and total slander piece if you ask me. The woman should definitely be fired but we all know that article will have copies flying off the shelves.

Mister Pittsburgh
01-30-2011, 01:51 AM
That was a horrible article. She basically says he is guilty of raping an innocent 20 year old college student even though the DA didn't find enough to do anything and most people that night say the chick followed Ben from bar to bar, through 3 bars, ultimately ending up in his back room party.

Sounds like she was pretty infatuated with Ben too, not just middle aged men.

People also like to lump the two accusations together, but never express the facts from the first incident where the chick was saying she wanted to move to Pgh to be Ben's girlfriend, wanted to have his kids, etc....and these statements are in emails or text messages they have. The first chick also did some weird crap to a married guys wife or something.

Once the first incident happened, Ben became a target. All it would take would be a google search from an Iphone for 3 college sorority sisters to come up with a plan to extort money from a big time rich athlete with a 100 million dollar contract. Once the pressure and reality of their actions hit home, the accuser bailed out.

I can't wait till this Nevada BS is over. Hopefully Ben tells his side at that point.

I mean this lady is saying she believes what this girl said is the truth. Basically picked sides from reading the evidence a DA couldn't even press charges from.

Anyway, here is her twitter account with a bunch of moron sheep writing to her saying boo Ben the rapist.

https://twitter.com/annkillion

ColumbusSteelerFan
01-30-2011, 06:30 AM
Allegation = Guilt.

That's the take-home message here. I'm guessing this guy isn't posing much of a threat to the great legal minds of our time. :lol:

Of course it ALWAYS means guilty, just like the Duke lacrosse team. Oh wait...

anger 82&95
01-30-2011, 08:31 AM
So how and when is redemption apparent to this forth-tier and inconsequential “reporter?” He’s done everything asked of him by our ridiculously fickle society and he’s made tremendous personal changes. And… he’s managed the simple little task of leading his team to the super bowl!

Scarletfire1970
01-30-2011, 08:43 AM
It is a shame but Ben better get used to it. He is going to be hearing a lot of this crap. Innocent until proven guilty, yeah right. This just isn't the same America anymore.

And for her to suggest that he got off because he had cop friends is ridiculous. Why no mention of the accusers conflicting stories? Why no mention of the fact that she was so drunk and also acted irresponsibly that night by putting herself in that position and underage drinking. It is more likely she did something she later regretted or just flat our regretted her behaviour that night than it is that she was raped. I mean she said that night she wasn't raped.

papillon
01-30-2011, 10:05 AM
Personally, I hope Ben reads more articles like this one. Publicly, he stays above the fray with his statements about the incident; privately, I think it drives him to rub it people's faces. The Steelers play well when Ben is motivated.

He's doing a great job by not saying anything to incite a verbal war of words with analysts and pundits, but carrying a big stick and helping the Steelers win games. One more win and he gets the ultimate "in your face" to anyone who doubts him, hates him or wants to continue the crusade.

I'm glad the mediot woman wrote the article.

Pappy

SanAntonioSteelerFan
01-30-2011, 10:15 AM
As usual, the public gets the media it deserves.

The general public has the attention span of a Twittering gnat - the average depth of their understanding is about 20 words, and if a topic needs more than that to be understood, well cross that one off the list.

"Roethlisberger - rape - bad person" is about it. It's not worth anyone's time essentially to care to look into it more. And the media looks to sell more commercials, so they'll present it as salaciously as they can. Like the 10 PM news at home - "If it bleeds, it leads". Im just surprised that an outlet as "high class" as SI let this be published. SI's online division must be losing a lot of money.

I believe Ben understands he's pretty much hosed for an unspecified period of time, and that the best thing he can do is just do his best from here on in. He apparently was raised with the right values, and if that's the case, I'm betting he'll do just fine moving forward. Did I hear he's actually living with his parents this season? That's what I call recharging the moral batteries. The fact that he's stayed out of the news so far is very encouraging. This off-season will be another big test.

FWIW - If I thought he raped or sexually assaulted someone (meaning, non-consensual activity), I would want him off the Steelers. However, I do believe it was a DTF consensual sort of thing.

snarky
01-30-2011, 10:44 AM
As some of you will remember, I never defended Ben regarding this incident in Georgia. My personal opinion is that it is possible there was substance to the allegation. However, without an alleged victim who is willing to follow through with a criminal case and without a DA who is willing to pursue the case we have no right damning Ben in the court of public opinion. We all have to make our own private decision about whether or not we care about the allegation and about the extent to which it matters to us.

All that is prologue to point out that what I am about to say is not some blind defense of Ben.

I looked through her past articles and I notice the bitch couldn't be arsed to write one word about this incident until nine months later when Ben is about to play in the Super Bowl. If he really is the monster she paints in that article why didn't she write an opinion piece months ago arguing for a longer suspension.

Chachi
01-30-2011, 11:18 AM
Steelers fans just need to let it go.

Professional athletes do bad things. Not all of them, but there is a fair share. You can point to any team in the league and find a player, look at their current or past off the field behavior, and say, "How can you root for a team with THAT guy on it?!?!?!???"

Now, this statement isn't to pin any guilt/innocence on Ben. I am just relating the reality I share with anyone who brings Ben and his behavior up to me.

I don't care what pro athletes do on their spare time. I don't root for a team or person just because he does good things like donates to charity, or delivers Meals on Wheels. Why would I automatically root against someone because of the opposite behavior? I root for them because they are good at their job.

Nobody says, "Yea, he is slow as a turtle and has hands of clay, but, he visits sick children every weekend so he should make the team and be our #1 receiver."

I understand pro athletes live in a completely different world than the general public. I don't hold them to the same standards I hold the general public to. When you live in a magnified world your accomplishments and mistakes are magnified. It doesn't mean we as a general public need to magnify our praise/indignation....but we do anyway....it's how the media attempts to stay relevant....and it's how people are proven "guilty" in the eyes of the public before any trail goes before a court.

How does the old saying go........he may be a son of a b!tch, but he is OUR son of a b!tch......it's what makes the world go 'round.

Mister Pittsburgh
01-30-2011, 12:04 PM
Why hasn't anyone written an article calling Michael Irvin of the HOF and NFL Network a rapist?

Legal troubles
In March 1996, Irvin was arrested on charges of cocaine possession at a hotel party celebrating his 30th birthday. After numerous court appearances amid a national media circus, which featured Irvin showing up to court in a full-length mink coat, he pled no contest to the charges and was sentenced to community service, ordered to pay a $10,000 fine, and put on 4-years probation. When drug-tested for illicit drugs, he tested negative. But the NFL suspended Irvin for the first five games of the 1996 season.

In Irvin's 1996 absence, the Cowboys struggled out of the gate and never recovered. Upon his return from suspension, Irvin tallied 962 receiving yards in only 11 games.

Irvin sustained further damage to his reputation in 1996 when controversy reared its head again as the Cowboys prepared to play the Carolina Panthers for their NFC Divisional Playoff game. Media reports stated that Irvin and teammate Erik Williams had sexually assaulted a Dallas woman, Nina Shahravan, and, with a gun to her head, videotaped the interaction.

Despite Williams' and Irvin's denials of the allegations, the story overshadowed the game, which the Cowboys lost. The accuser was later proven to have fabricated the entire incident. She recanted her story, pled guilty to perjury and filing a false police report and was sentenced to 90 days in prison and a fine.

In the first quarter of the playoff game with Carolina, with Shahravan's allegations under active investigation by Dallas police, Irvin suffered a broken collarbone, ending his 1996 season.

In 1998 Irvin was alleged to be involved in a bizarre incident during training camp when he allegedly inflicted a two-inch cut in the neck of Dallas guard Everett McIver while some team members were getting haircuts.[9] Whether it was battery or accidental McIver did not press charges, and rumors swirled that Irvin brokered a six-figure settlement with McIver to drop the matter. Accounts of this incident after the alleged settlement became difficult to find or research in the local Dallas press.

Arrests since retirement
A year following his retirement from the NFL, Irvin again was arrested on drug possession charges. In this case, Irvin was in a Dallas apartment with an unrelated woman. Neither answered the door when police drug task force agents arrived with a search warrant. Police entered the apartment forcibly, finding drugs. Irvin and the female were placed under arrest, though charges against Irvin were later dropped.

The promises of a new lifestyle in broadcasting appeared to be short-lived, with Irvin again arrested. In this instance Irvin was pulled over in Plano, Texas, for speeding on November 25, 2005. Irvin was arrested on an outstanding warrant on an unpaid speeding ticket in Irving, Texas, but was also cited for misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia after police searched his car and found a pipe, and plastic bags with marijuana residue.[13] Irvin was arrested for a Class C misdemeanor. He was later released on bond, with ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz saying only that: "We are reviewing the facts of the situation and have no comment at this time."

Two days after his arrest, Irvin appeared on ESPN's "Sunday NFL Countdown", as scheduled, on November 27, 2005. In his on-the-air comments that evening, he stated that he had taken the drug paraphernalia away from a longtime friend who was battling a drug addiction. Irvin told the Associated Press he was trying to help someone close to him get off drugs and cares more about that than his chances of being inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The next day Irvin said the pipe was in fact his brother's and he (Irvin) was going to throw it out but had forgotten to do so.

On December 1, 2005, however, ESPN suspended Irvin for the Sunday and Monday night Countdown shows on December 4 and December 5, 2005. He returned to both shows with no mention or consequence of the past incident.

Another sexual assault allegation On July 4, 2007 Irvin was accused of sexual assault while he was at the Seminole Hard Rock Casino in Hollywood, Florida. Charges were never filed, but a civil suit was filed against him in 2010.
Victim of alleged carjacking attemptIrvin claims that he was a victim of a possible carjacking attempt while stopped at a light in Dallas on January 12, 2009. He filed a police report claiming that two men flashed a gun at him, but eventually drove away after commenting that they were Cowboys fans.[16] Dallas police suspended their investigation two weeks later, stating that Irvin had not cooperated in the investigation and that without more information from him, they could not proceed.

The Answer
01-30-2011, 12:29 PM
Wins shouldn't make us forget about Roethlisberger's past actions

Ann Killion

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/ann_killion/01/28/ben.roethlisberger/index.html#ixzz1CXKGLZTs


Ben Roethlisberger has led the Steelers to a third Super Bowl, but it's not fair to call him a changed man.

What's the prism through which you view sports?

The prism of team colors and city name?

The singular filter of athletic achievement?

A window on human interest, finding athletes you feel you can truly root for?

It's an interesting exploration. Why does one city cheer for its own accused steroid cheat yet degrade an accused visitor? Why do some stay loyal to a team even after it has moved and turned its back on its fan base? Why can you hate one player when he plays across the country and adore him as soon as he signs with your team?

And why does a person's vile behavior off the field become less relevant the more his team wins?

That brings us to Ben Roethlisberger, who is leading the Pittsburgh Steelers into the Super Bowl for the third time in his seven-year career. Roethlisberger is being lauded, standard procedure at this time of year for conference championship-winning quarterbacks.

We're hearing about the obstacles he has overcome, his resilience, his redemption.

And it's making some of us more than a tad nauseous.

In case you've forgotten, or would like to gloss it over lest it dampen your guacamole-and-chips plans, Roethlisberger was accused of sexually assaulting a 20-year old college student.

It's not like this is ancient history, when Roethlisberger was some foolish kid. It happened less than 11 months ago, in Milledgeville, Ga., when Roethlisberger was a 28-year old, two-time Super Bowl winner, who had been accused of rape just 20 months earlier in Nevada.

And while no charges were filed in either case, a look at the Milledgeville police report, physical evidence and an investigative story by Sports Illustrated leaves no doubt that something awfully repellent happened that night in Georgia.

The D.A. overseeing Milledgeville (population 18,000) opted not to file charges against Roethlisberger. And the accuser asked to drop charges because, according to her lawyer, "it would be a very intrusive personal experience" for her; the young woman's reputation was already in the process of being trashed.

OK. But that doesn't mean that something sordid and perhaps criminal didn't take place. The D.A. decided there wasn't enough evidence for an open-and-shut case: the operative word there is enough. The bar in Georgia is quite high in sexual assault cases. And nationally, superstar athletes -- superstar white athletes in particular -- have been given the legal and societal benefit of the doubt forever.

The justice system of the NFL worked more quickly. Commissioner Roger Goodell suspended Roethlisberger for more than a third of the regular season (and as a result caused him to lose several million dollars of salary), later reducing the suspension from six to four games after Roethlisberger underwent a "comprehensive behavioral evaluation."

Goodell wrote to Roethlisberger that while he recognized that "the allegations in Georgia were disputed and that they did not result in criminal charges being filed against you," his ruling was because "you are held to a higher standard as an NFL player, and there is nothing about your conduct in Milledgeville that can remotely be described as admirable, responsible or consistent with either the values of the league or the expectations of our fans."

Since last spring, much of the conversation surrounding the incident is the same deafening, reactive noise that always surrounds these types of accusation in the sports world: that it is simply he said, she said. The young woman is painted in terms of being a gold-digger or a drunken slut.

My personal observation after several years in the sports world is that grown men tend to be more infatuated with pro athletes than young women are, going to great lengths to protect, excuse and enable them.

Roethlisberger had a posse of the infatuated men: pals and off-duty police officers acting as bodyguards, who set up and enabled the encounter with the young woman. He also wasn't questioned immediately by police. One police officer later resigned after his unprofessional conduct in the case became public.

In the months since, the Roethlisberger incident has been casually spoken about in the same breath as the harassment of a female television personality in the Jets locker room and the sexting accusations surrounding Brett Favre. To be clear, sexual harassment shouldn't ever be excused. But neither should it be confused with sexual assault.

The outrage surrounding Michael Vick continues to be expressed at a higher volume than any talk about the Roethlisberger case. Yet Vick served almost two years in prison for his crimes, paid his dues to society (it should be noted that Vick was tried and convicted and Roethlisberger was not).

Resilient? That may be the Steelers, who had to play four games without their starting quarterback and went 3-1, but I don't know that it is a useful descriptor of Roethlisberger. A changed man? Who knows, but certainly the loss of millions of dollars is motivation to not act like a Neanderthal in public.

Redemption? Please. Success on the football field does not make you a better person, though some in the sports media try to frame it that way.

Roethlisberger's style of play is called "bruising." That is being celebrated by many this week. For others it conjures up details of the evidence -- "bruises, lacerations and bleeding" -- that was found on a 20-year-old, 5-foot-4 college girl last March, after she went to the police and then to the hospital.

Guess your perspective all depends on what prism you're looking through.

calmkiller
01-30-2011, 12:42 PM
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16262 (http://www.planetsteelers.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16262)

2 threads below this post...

frankthetank1
01-30-2011, 01:16 PM
Steelers fans just need to let it go.

Professional athletes do bad things. Not all of them, but there is a fair share. You can point to any team in the league and find a player, look at their current or past off the field behavior, and say, "How can you root for a team with THAT guy on it?!?!?!???"

Now, this statement isn't to pin any guilt/innocence on Ben. I am just relating the reality I share with anyone who brings Ben and his behavior up to me.

I don't care what pro athletes do on their spare time. I don't root for a team or person just because he does good things like donates to charity, or delivers Meals on Wheels. Why would I automatically root against someone because of the opposite behavior? I root for them because they are good at their job.

Nobody says, "Yea, he is slow as a turtle and has hands of clay, but, he visits sick children every weekend so he should make the team and be our #1 receiver."

I understand pro athletes live in a completely different world than the general public. I don't hold them to the same standards I hold the general public to. When you live in a magnified world your accomplishments and mistakes are magnified. It doesn't mean we as a general public need to magnify our praise/indignation....but we do anyway....it's how the media attempts to stay relevant....and it's how people are proven "guilty" in the eyes of the public before any trail goes before a court.

How does the old saying go........he may be a son of a b!tch, but he is OUR son of a b!tch......it's what makes the world go 'round.

i think everyone needs to just let it go

Wolfhound45
01-30-2011, 02:04 PM
I could care less what this reporter says. She is paid to have an opinion and she expressed it. SI is paid to report sporting news and they reported it. Fair enough.

I am more concerned that our quarterback learns from his latest series of misfortunes and grows as a person from it. Hopefully he will. No one is guaranteed another day.

Crash
01-30-2011, 02:17 PM
And Irvin just settled the latest civil suit this week.

The NFL should remove him from the broadcast.

Mister Pittsburgh
01-30-2011, 02:27 PM
And Irvin just settled the latest civil suit this week.

The NFL should remove him from the broadcast.

Yeah. Goodell should suspend him for 6 games. I would like to see this blond man-hater write up an article on Irvin. That crazy bastage would probably invite her on air to tell her off.

RuthlessBurgher
01-30-2011, 02:52 PM
Check out this piece of garbage scribbled in crayon by Buzz Bissinger.

"May the Packers break your legs on the first series of downs."

http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and- ... on-debate/ (http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2011-01-26/ben-roethlisberger-and-the-nfls-silly-redemption-debate/)

It is just me, or does Buzz's face kinda look like Ben Lovejoy on the plane to Washington after getting hit in the face with the puck on Pens/Caps 24/7?

http://www.tdbimg.com/files/2010/12/13/img-author-photo---buzz-bissinger_011310427333.jpghttp://whatsupyasieve.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/bennysface.jpg?w=327&h=292

hawaiiansteel
01-30-2011, 03:03 PM
Cook: A better version of Steelers Roethlisberger

Sunday, January 30, 2011
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/images/201101/20110115lf_benwarmup_330.jpg

Lake Fong/Post-Gazette
Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger.


There's not much doubt about how Ben Roethlisberger will perform on Super Bowl Sunday. He almost always is at his best in the big games. He's one of the great clutch players in NFL history, 10-2 as a starting quarterback in the postseason with two championship rings. No one should be surprised if he leads the Steelers past the Green Bay Packers and is the Most Valuable Player of Super Bowl XLV.

The big question is how Roethlisberger will act after the confetti has stopped falling in Cowboys Stadium and the bright lights have been turned out. Win or lose the game, the Big Ben persona will be back, bigger and stronger than ever. From coast to coast -- OK, from Ambridge to Zelienople, at least -- people will be telling Roethlisberger how terrific he is. That's often been a curse for him, not a blessing. It created an ugly sense of entitlement in him. Actually, by his admission, it created something of a monster.

So will the new Big Ben be a kinder, gentler human being after this Super Bowl?

"Absolutely," Roethlisberger said, firmly. "I feel like I've grown up a lot."

This was during a quiet moment in the locker room after practice last week. Roethlisberger talked openly for the first time this season about the old Big Ben and the Big Ben he anticipates being in the weeks, months and years ahead.

"I don't know how to say this without it sounding really bad, but I used to tell my dad and my agent and my closest friends, 'If I can win a Super Bowl or two or three, nobody can say anything to me. I can do anything I want,' " Roethlisberger said. "That's just stupid. I know that now. That's what I mean about growing up. I realize now that I can use the platform I'll have for something good. If I can win a third Super Bowl with this team, can you imagine the possibilities? That's what I'm excited about."

Roethlisberger admitted he had doubts about being in this position again, in another Super Bowl, leading the Steelers to what he hopes is a third title in six seasons. He said it took losing nearly everything to find his "inner peace" at 28. You know the sorry story. Roethlisberger was accused -- but not charged -- in March of sexual assault by a 20-year-old college student in a college bar bathroom in Milledgeville, Ga. His reputation took a beating. He was suspended for the first four games of the season by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell for conduct detrimental to the league.

It's a relatively short plane flight from Milledgeville to Dallas, but it must seem like a million miles to Roethlisberger.

"Did I think I might be done playing football? A slight chance," he said. "Did I think I might be done playing here? A slight chance. But I knew it was going to be up to me how I came out of all this. I was going to be the one who determined if I played football again. I never doubted myself. If I changed as a person and became a better person, I thought I'd get another chance. I would have played in the UFL or the Arena League if I had to."

It didn't come to that. The Rooneys stood behind the disgraced Roethlisberger even though their franchise's image also took a big hit. "I just believed that if he got back to being the type of person he really is deep down inside, he is still the type of person we want to be around," team president Art Rooney II said last week. "He hasn't disappointed us."

That trust wasn't lost on Roethlisberger.

"I felt horrible that [the Rooneys] were criticized because of me. That killed me. I know they didn't have to keep me. I've told them many times, 'You stood by me. I appreciate it. I'll always appreciate it.' I've said all along I want to be a Steeler my whole career. I want to retire as a Steeler. I want to go into the Hall of Fame one day as a Steeler ...

"But that's the family side of this organization. It all starts at the top. It's like when you do something wrong and your grandfather tells you, 'I'm so disappointed in you, but I still believe in you and I'm still here for you. I know you're better than this.' That's what families do. They don't give up on each other."

Roethlisberger said he wouldn't have made it back to another Super Bowl if his teammates also hadn't been there to pick him up after he fell. They always liked and respected him on the field. They knew he put a lot of money in their pockets and two championship rings on their fingers. But, off the field, he could be aloof even with them. Big Ben? No, sorry. Big Jerk.

Not anymore.

When the Steelers talk about their veteran leaders, they mention James Farrior, Aaron Smith, Hines Ward and Flozell Adams. They also mention Roethlisberger.

"I love playing with these guys," he said. "That's why I can break my foot and have my nose broken and plastered against my cheek and I'm still going to be out there with them. I don't want to miss a snap. I think maybe that's why I sometimes hold on to the ball too long and take a sack. I don't ever want to give up on a play for those guys."

Winning with and for his teammates and the Rooneys is powerful motivation, Roethlisberger said. But it might not be exactly as you think.

"It would be amazing to win another Super Bowl, but it won't be like I'll say, 'Do you forgive me now?' " Roethlisberger said. "It'll just be another step in earning back everything I lost."

The process has gone a little smoother because Roethlisberger had another fine season. He looked every bit the part of a $102 million franchise quarterback when he came back from his suspension. In the playoffs, he did what he does best -- find a way for the Steelers to win. He completed a 58-yard pass to rookie wide receiver Antonio Brown on third-and-19 to set up the winning touchdown against the Baltimore Ravens. He completed late passes to tight end Heath Miller and Brown to run out the clock against the New York Jets.

You might want to send a thank-you note to Ray Lewis.

Yes, that Ray Lewis.

One of the people Roethlisberger turned to for advice after the Milledgeville incident was the Ravens' great linebacker. Lewis knows something about rebuilding an image. He pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of obstruction of justice in a double-murder case after Super Bowl XXXIV in Atlanta. That was 11 years ago. Now, Lewis, who just finished his 15th NFL season, isn't just the face of the Baltimore franchise. He's doing national television commercials for a body-wash company.

"He just told me to stay focused on the task at hand," Roethlisberger said.

Here's how Lewis remembered their text exchange: "All you can do is move on. Don't let nobody pull you back into [Milledgeville]. Don't let nobody make you keep talking about it. Once it's done, it's done."

Roethlisberger is expected to follow that advice when he meets the national media this week. He's expected to answer football-related questions and deflect all others. "I'm just going to take it in stride and see what happens."

The scrutiny won't stop for Roethlisberger after the Super Bowl, of course. It's been on him since the Milledgeville incident. It will be on him the rest of his career.

"That's OK. I welcome that," Roethlisberger said. "I want people to see the person I am. I want to earn their trust back. I want kids to wear my jersey. I want to be a role model. I hear guys say they don't care about that stuff, but I do. I want people to like me."

Maybe you're thinking what I'm thinking.

The new Big Ben is off to a pretty good start.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11030/11 ... z1CXiUoU1o (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11030/1121338-66.stm#ixzz1CXiUoU1o)

hawaiiansteel
01-31-2011, 02:35 PM
Jeremy Piven doesn’t want “Rapistberger” in Super Bowl

Posted by Mike Florio on January 31, 2011

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/ex_jeremy_piven.jpg?w=195

From our friends at TMZ comes the kind of hard-hitting journalistic effort that will help set the agenda as Super Bowl week unfolds.

Or that simply will help stir things up a little.

Jeremy Piven, one of the stars of HBO’s Entourage, recently was captured on film complaining about this year’s participants in the NFL title game.

“Jets and Bears would have been the greatest Super Bowl,” Piven said. “Now its Rapistberger and the Cheeseheads. The Cheesy Rape Burger.”

Piven then noticed that someone had videotaped his words. “Noooooo,” he said.

Obviously, Piven was referring to the multiple sexual assault allegations previously made against Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. He never has been arrested or charged with rape. A civil suit alleging rape has been filed against Roethlisberger, but the suit remains unresolved.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... uper-bowl/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/01/31/jeremy-piven-slams-rapistberger-in-super-bowl/)

Oviedo
01-31-2011, 02:38 PM
Ben's sanctuary from all the BS is on the football field for 60 minutes. Let the haters continue to run their mouths and let him shove it up their A$$es

Ghost
01-31-2011, 02:45 PM
"bruises, lacerations and bleeding" -

I know they found NO DNA, but did the police report have the above?

JAR
01-31-2011, 02:48 PM
"bruises, lacerations and bleeding" -

I know they found NO DNA, but did the police report have the above?

No, there was evidence of sex, but it must be something she was very used to since she was walking around wearing a DTF sticker.

hawaiiansteel
01-31-2011, 03:50 PM
Advice for Ben: Just shut up!

MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2011 06:00 AM WRITTEN BY BOB SMIZIK


Ben Roethlisberger has been the recipient of the best public-relations advice money can buy in the largely successful effort to remake his image following the gigantic hit it took about 11 months ago.

So Roethlisberger, who won a media award as the most cooperative Steelers player, doesn’t need my advice as he gets ready to handle the media hordes at the Super Bowl. These writers and broadcasters will want to look under every rock in his life. They'll want to psychoanalyze him in public and on a daily basis.

They’re only doing their jobs and the public that scorns them for asking tough questions would love to know the answers.

It’s about those answers that I have some free advice for Roethlisberger:

Don’t say a word, Ben. Give them nothing.

And this from a guy who'd love to know what's under some of those rocks.

There is nothing to be gained for Roethlisberger by baring his soul. I’ve seen guys do it, although on less sensitive issues, at these events and it can not only make for a good story, it can actually help the person doing the opening up.

It doesn’t matter. Again, Ben, just shut up.

Oh, answer the questions about the game and all of the silly stuff that will be thrown your way and do it with a smile. But when they want to talk about the past, you need to be Mark McGwire.

It didn’t work for him but it will work for you. You’ve got a football game to play and a life to live. A public catharsis is not for you.

Roethlisberger will be the star of every media session he attends. He won’t have a table on the side. He’ll have a podium in the middle of the room. He won’t be one of 47 Steelers being interviewed. He’ll be one of one.

Paul Domowitch, an excellent pro football writer for the Philadelphia Daily News, set the scene in a column he wrote last week about what Roethlisberger will face.

``At every single one of those four sessions next week, including Tuesday's Media Day zoo at Cowboys Stadium, Roethlisberger is going to be asked about what happened last March in Milledgeville, Ga., when he was accused of sexually assaulting a 20-year-old college student in the bathroom of a bar.

``And he's going to be asked about the four-game suspension he served at the beginning of the season for violating the league's personal-conduct policy after the league did its own investigation of the incident after law enforcement declined to prosecute.

``It would be nice if Roethlisberger took the same approach as Michael Vick and opened up about the mistakes he's made and how he has changed and matured.’’

It would be nice for the media if Roethlisberger took the Vick approach but not for Roethlisberger. Vick was charged and convicted of a crime and had something for which he could repent.

As we all know, Roethlisberger was not charged. He was suspended by the NFL for poor behavior and has made his apologies for that. There’s a world of difference between Vick and Roethlisberger.

Roethlisberger got a hint of what’s in store for him at the Super Bowl before and after the AFC title game. At a conference call before the game, he was asked about the past:

His answer: "Right now, it's not about living in the past for me. It's about living in the here and now.''

After the game, he was asked whether he looked back on the off-season. Before the question was finished, Roethlisberger provided an answer. ``I don’t. I’ll stop you now. I don’t. Not at all.’’

Like I said, Ben has the best advice money can buy and has learned well.

But just in case, here's some more free advice, Ben: Just shut up.

http://communityvoices.sites.post-gazet ... st-shut-up (http://communityvoices.sites.post-gazette.com/index.php/sports/bob-smiziks-blog/27269-advice-for-ben-just-shut-up)

Crash
01-31-2011, 04:37 PM
He can't shut up. He does that and they'll complain.

He needs to start off media day with: "I cannot talk about Reno or Georgia".

Questions?

If they persist? He'll leave.

Djfan
02-01-2011, 01:54 AM
Does anyone actually read SI anymore??


I only get it when the Steelers win the SB, so I can have the book, football and video. I'll be getting it this year, too.

I never read it, and it goes to the trash.

hawaiiansteel
02-01-2011, 03:19 PM
Writer clarifies Goodell's quote about players' take on Big Ben

NFL.com Wire Reports
Published: Jan. 31, 2011


The Pittsburgh Steelers arrived in Texas on Monday and immediately faced questions about NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell's comment that quarterback Ben Roethlisberger wasn't supported by his teammates during last year's league investigation.

There was only one problem: Goodell didn't exactly say that.

Sports Illustrated's Peter King, who used the quote in question, issued a clarification Monday night, explaining that Goodell wasn't referring to Steelers players when he said "two dozen players" had no nice things to say about Roethlisberger.

"I erred in inserting the parenthetical 'Steelers' in a quote by Goodell, which was an incorrect assumption on my part," wrote King, who added, "I regret the error."

Goodell did tell King on Jan. 7: "Not one, not a single player, went to (Roethlisberger's) defense. It wasn't personal in a sense, but all kinds of stories like, 'He won't sign my jersey.'" However, those players weren't Steelers.

Goodell also told King that Roethlisberger was agitated with the six-game suspension he received in April for violating the league's personal-conduct policy. The ban ultimately was reduced to four games.

Roethlisberger was accused of sexually assaulting a Georgia college student following a night of drinking in a Milledgeville, Ga., bar on March 5. He wasn't charged by Georgia authorities.

Roethlisberger, who met with reporters Monday in Fort Worth, Texas, ahead of this weekend's Super Bowl XLV, said that some Steelers teammates did, in fact, defend him to Goodell.

"I know for a fact that when the commissioner came to the training camp and talked, a lot of guys, kind of, did," Roethelisberger said. "I'm just thankful, like I said, my teammates are who they are, and I'm really appreciative of them."

Asked to clarify Goodell's comments, Roethlisberger said: "I'm not sure, I wasn't there, so I don't know exactly what was said. So it's hard to say."

Watch NFL Playoff games online and in HD with NFL Game Rewind. Sign up now to get full access to the Postseason archives.
Reporters asked Roethlisberger about the perception that he has changed since serving his suspension.

"It has to do with a lot of things, you know, a lot of praying and talking to the Lord, and saying thank you for the opportunity that I get to play this game and, like I say, come back to the Super Bowl," he said.

Steelers coach Mike Tomlin also spoke with reporters Monday and downplayed Goodell's comments.

"I don't know what he means, or you mean, by 'coming to his defense.' I don't know the nature of the conversation or the discussion," Tomlin said. "So, it's going to be difficult for me to comment on it, to be quite honest with you. Ben is a highly respected member of our football team."

http://www.nfl.com/superbowl/story/0900 ... -disagrees (http://www.nfl.com/superbowl/story/09000d5d81e06b30/article/goodell-says-some-steelers-didnt-back-big-ben-qb-disagrees)

AngryAsian
02-01-2011, 03:42 PM
Practically every person that has ever talked negatively to me regarding Ben and his "off-season antics" has digested some sort of skewed article from some anti-steeler hack reporter, that no inkling about producing an article with facts. When the story first broke out, I was outraged and pre-judged, like most, with a mindset of "where there's smoke, there's fire." But after seeing the video tape of the alleged victim's testimony, I was like, "no wonder they never charged him." Anyone with half a brain listening/seeing this interview couldn't have walked away with a "he's guilty" opinion. Her demeanor was far from distraught and at times was downright giddy. I think those who could care less about the Steelers never saw this footage and thus could never really have a fair perspective.

What I came away with is that Ben made an idiotic judgment call having sex in a public place with a stranger who was intoxicated and under the drinking age. Lesson learned folks, but unfortunately Ben lives in the "information highway" era where public perception is never about clarity, but more about what will the media yarn spinners could do with skewed information that will sell to the public.

Crash
02-01-2011, 03:51 PM
When the story first broke out, I was outraged and pre-judged, like most, with a mindset of "where there's smoke, there's fire." But after seeing the video tape of the alleged victim's testimony, I was like, "no wonder they never charged him." Anyone with half a brain listening/seeing this interview couldn't have walked away with a "he's guilty" opinion. Her demeanor was far from distraught and at times was downright giddy. I think those who could care less about the Steelers never saw this footage and thus could never really have a fair perspective.

Same here.

But anyone who saw like, her 2nd interview like, knows like, that she was like, full of like, sh*t.

Even when a FEMALE GBI member was talking to Colon, she was JOKING about the DTF label with him.

Do you really believe she would have if she thought she was raped?

feltdizz
02-01-2011, 05:16 PM
Does anyone actually read SI anymore??


I only get it when the Steelers win the SB, so I can have the book, football and video. I'll be getting it this year, too.

I never read it, and it goes to the trash.

I picked one up in the book store because Harrison was on the cover. I thought it was a SB special because it was light as a feather. It's half the pages it used to be.

There is a great article about Aliquippa, PA and their connection to the NFL.

My mom's side of the family is from their and she moved back to try to turn the community around about 10 years ago. She re-opened the swimming pool and Revis worked there in the summertime before he left. She also got the school a huge grant to keep the music and arts program afloat. She also said Mike Ditka was the dirtiest player she ever saw.

My uncle is still a coach on the HS team.

hawaiiansteel
02-02-2011, 12:54 AM
Feb 01, 2011

Michael Strahan: Pressure is on Steelers, not Packers

By Jim Corbett, USA TODAY


ARLINGTON, Texas -- Four days before his team stunned the previously-unbeaten New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLII, former New York Giants defensive leader Michael Strahan thought the pressure was on the Patriots to complete their perfect season with a Lombardi Trophy.

Those Giants played fast, physical and loose, knowing they had nothing to lose.

Asked Tuesday in his role as a Fox analyst who faced more pressure in Super Bowl XLV, the Pittsburgh Steelers chasing a seventh Lombardi Trophy or the sixth-seeded Green Bay Packers, Strahan didn't hesitate.

"I'll pick Pittsburgh,'' Strahan said. "Because they're going for No. 7 as far as rings. I think Ben Roethlisberger with everything that happened in the offseason with him, this is like a vindication of it, that whole comeback incentive from a very unique situation.''

Strahan referenced Roethlisberger's return from a four-game for violating the league's personal conduct policy after the seventh-year quarterback was accused in March of sexual assault of a 20-year-old Georgia college student. No charges were filed.

"I'm pretty sure there's a lot of people who still haven't forgiven, or will forget,'' Strahan said. "We're usually in a situation like this where that great comeback is forgiven. So I think there's a lot more pressure on Pittsburgh than there is on Green Bay.

"Green Bay is a sixth seed that shouldn't be here anyway, kind of like us. Play your best, see what happens, we had nothing to lose and we put it all on the line.''

And the Giants' defensive line took it to Tom Brady and the Patriots in the Giants' 17-14 Super Bowl win after they were empowered by a three-point, Dec. 29 loss in their regular-season finale.

The fifth-seeded Giants had nothing on the line in that game but pride yet their showing against the then 16-0 Patriots emboldened them that they could not only stand toe-to-toe with that season's dominant team, but beat them.

"The greatest thing about that last game was we felt, 'Boy, if that was the best team in the league and we were that close, we must be one of the best teams in the league because we didn't show anything because we were already in the playoffs,''' Strahan said. "If we can be this vanilla and still almost beat the best, undefeated team, we're pretty good.'

"We weren't afraid of Tom Brady and their offense at all."

http://content.usatoday.com/communities ... -packers/1 (http://content.usatoday.com/communities/thehuddle/post/2011/02/michael-strahan-pressure-is-on-steelers-not-packers/1)

Crash
02-02-2011, 01:06 AM
Strahan's a boob. If anything the pressure is on GB because of all the Rodgers hype.

hawaiiansteel
02-02-2011, 03:23 AM
Wins don't give Ben Roethlisberger a free pass

Feb 1 | By Jane McManus

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2011/0115/nfl_u_brothlisbrg_sy_576.jpg

Jason Bridge/US Presswire
Ben Roethlisberger isn't a redemption story just because he's reached the Super Bowl.


Americans love to turn their athletes into heroes. And we sportswriters are sometimes guilty of providing storylines when they don't arrive on schedule. This week, the Super Bowl is a major deadline.

So I'm a little wary of stories about the Pittsburgh quarterback.

Roethlisberger has had a number of interactions with women that have involved courts or police to one degree or another. The most troubling came last April, when Roethlisberger celebrated his 28th birthday in Milledgeville, Ga.

The prosecutor couldn't recover enough DNA from a dingy bathroom, and the alleged victim declined to press charges. But the police report from that night has the handwritten account of a woman who said she was trapped there as Roethlisberger had sex with her -- while bodyguards kept her friends from coming to help her.

"No, this is not okay," she said she told him.

To his credit, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell didn't let himself off the hook when the prosecutor said there wasn't enough evidence to charge Roethlisberger. The NFL investigated the matter itself and suspended the quarterback for Pittsburgh's first six games (the suspension was later reduced to four).

Now the Steelers are in the Super Bowl. What that means is that reporters will want to write about what happened, but will have a hard time using phrases like "alleged rape." Instead, you might hear a lot of references to "off-the-field distractions."

So weak. You cannot lump DWIs, drug use, alleged rape and assault charges into the same phrase you'd use for trying to talk and text at the same time.

For the record, what happened also does not count as "overcoming adversity." That's when you successfully rehab a gruesome compound fracture, like Seattle's Leon Washington, and go on to regain your status as a formidable kickoff returner. It's not when you act like the villain in some film noir and then win a bunch of football games.

Maybe we need to invent some new terms for antiheroes -- are you listening Antonio Cromartie, you wordsmith? -- so that players like Big Ben, Mike Vick, Tiger Woods and Kobe Bryant can be discussed without being idolized.

Playing a good game and leading a good life are two distinct things -- and not every athlete needs to be Man of the Year. But that gets confused a lot when we talk about sports.

Santonio Holmes is one athlete who refused to play the good-guy role the league -- and the media -- wanted to assign him. The wide receiver was suspended for four games at the start of the 2010 season for violating the league's substance-abuse policy. The Steelers traded him to the Jets on the cheap, and when Holmes came back from his suspension, reporters asked what he learned from the experience.

He didn't let anybody write the redemption story.

"To look in your eyes and be honest with you, not one percent," Holmes said in response to a question about whether he'd changed during his time off. "I've been the same person since I stepped foot in this NFL, I'll continuing being the same person until I leave."

Holmes' point: Admire him for what he can do on the field, but don't try to make him a poster child for a D.A.R.E. campaign. One might even respect Holmes for refusing to be shoe horned into a cuddly narrative arc simply to improve his public image.

Roethlisberger hasn't talked publicly about what happened in Milledgeville. It's hard to know if he's changed, or how he has processed the events of that night. Has he undergone a personal transformation in the aftermath of the scandal? Has he decided he needs to more thoroughly script his media interactions?

Nobody likes all those blanks. It's tempting to try to fill them in for Roethlisberger.

Maybe one day he will found a church, underwrite programming on NPR, pay for thousands of impoverished kids to go to college, cure malaria and fund a league-wide program called No Means No.

On that day, everyone can write that Ben Roethlisberger has redeemed himself.

But winning another Super Bowl shouldn't be part of that storyline.

http://espn.go.com/espnw/blog/_/post/60 ... -free-pass (http://espn.go.com/espnw/blog/_/post/6080853/wins-do-not-give-ben-roethlisberger-free-pass)

Crash
02-02-2011, 04:12 AM
The NFL investigated the matter itself and suspended the quarterback for Pittsburgh's first six games (the suspension was later reduced to four).

"My decision today is not based on a finding that you violated Georgia law"

-Roger Goodell to Ben Roethlisberger

I've had it up to here with every bitch female reporter looking for their 15 minutes of fame.

Shut up and go bake me a pie.


One might even respect Holmes for refusing to be shoe horned into a cuddly narrative arc simply to improve his public image.

Yeah that's it you twat. Respect a habitual criminal like Holmes who has also flunked two drug tests and besmirch Roethlisberger who's never been arrested in his life.

Real smooth Toots.

The Answer
02-02-2011, 01:26 PM
Practically every person that has ever talked negatively to me regarding Ben and his "off-season antics" has digested some sort of skewed article from some anti-steeler hack reporter, that no inkling about producing an article with facts. When the story first broke out, I was outraged and pre-judged, like most, with a mindset of "where there's smoke, there's fire." But after seeing the video tape of the alleged victim's testimony, I was like, "no wonder they never charged him." Anyone with half a brain listening/seeing this interview couldn't have walked away with a "he's guilty" opinion. Her demeanor was far from distraught and at times was downright giddy. I think those who could care less about the Steelers never saw this footage and thus could never really have a fair perspective.

What I came away with is that Ben made an idiotic judgment call having sex in a public place with a stranger who was intoxicated and under the drinking age. Lesson learned folks, but unfortunately Ben lives in the "information highway" era where public perception is never about clarity, but more about what will the media yarn spinners could do with skewed information that will sell to the public.

O.K. I'll give you that for one. But there's two in a month. Where there's twice smoke, there's always fire. Two, thousands of miles apart. Not two women that know each other. One trial still to go. I'm not saying Ben is your classic rapist by any means. But I think he just learned that no means no. I think it's very naive to pass the two cases off as simply co-incidence or something.

ScoreKeeper
02-02-2011, 01:39 PM
Two in a month?

And have you ever read the reports on McNutty?

ikestops85
02-02-2011, 01:41 PM
Practically every person that has ever talked negatively to me regarding Ben and his "off-season antics" has digested some sort of skewed article from some anti-steeler hack reporter, that no inkling about producing an article with facts. When the story first broke out, I was outraged and pre-judged, like most, with a mindset of "where there's smoke, there's fire." But after seeing the video tape of the alleged victim's testimony, I was like, "no wonder they never charged him." Anyone with half a brain listening/seeing this interview couldn't have walked away with a "he's guilty" opinion. Her demeanor was far from distraught and at times was downright giddy. I think those who could care less about the Steelers never saw this footage and thus could never really have a fair perspective.

What I came away with is that Ben made an idiotic judgment call having sex in a public place with a stranger who was intoxicated and under the drinking age. Lesson learned folks, but unfortunately Ben lives in the "information highway" era where public perception is never about clarity, but more about what will the media yarn spinners could do with skewed information that will sell to the public.

O.K. I'll give you that for one. But there's two in a month. Where there's twice smoke, there's always fire. Two, thousands of miles apart. Not two women that know each other. One trial still to go. I'm not saying Ben is your classic rapist by any means. But I think he just learned that no means no. I think it's very naive to pass the two cases off as simply co-incidence or something.

It's not coincidence. The two cases are very much related and you are correct assuming where there is smoke there is fire. A one night stand in Nevada felt jilted and a year after decided to seek revenge on the famous man who wronged her. She filed a civil suit claiming that Ben sexually assaulted her.

Approximately 9 months later at Ben's birthday party another girl felt jilted that Ben wasn't paying enough attention to her so she started calling him a rapist. Ben had her thrown out of the party. She talks her drunk sorority sister into believing Ben raped her. After 3 or so tries the sorority sister gets her story straight and the bruhaha results. After sobering up the sorority sister realizes the error of her ways and declines to cooperate with the investigation.

So yes, where there is smoke there is fire. Don't hang around with drunk women who might want to get back at you if you don't want to marry them. This is what you meant, right? :twisted:

JAR
02-02-2011, 01:44 PM
Two in a month?

And have you ever read the reports on McNutty?

Apparently not.

I'd also like to find where the concrete evidence is that Ben had sex with DTF or was even in the bathroom with her at all. The only ones ever saying those two things were the drunken DTFs.

Crash
02-02-2011, 03:16 PM
Two, thousands of miles apart

Real slow, and for the 100th time:

Miss DTF and her party knew of the Reno accusations, and one of her friends was removed from the VIP room for mentioning it.

Do you really think Ben tried to rape a women mere minutes after being called a rapist?

The McNulty case will end the minute she is asked how she knew Ben's TV was "broken" 24 hours BEFORE Ben did.

NW Steeler
02-02-2011, 03:51 PM
looking at her photo you would think she (like most of the rest of us) would realize just how important alcohol is to successful mating.
.

That was AWESOME!!! LMAO!!!

:Cheers

ScoreKeeper
02-02-2011, 05:57 PM
Two, thousands of miles apart

Real slow, and for the 100th time:

Miss DTF and her party knew of the Reno accusations, and one of her friends was removed from the VIP room for mentioning it.

Do you really think Ben tried to rape a women mere minutes after being called a rapist?

The McNulty case will end the minute she is asked how she knew Ben's TV was "broken" 24 hours BEFORE Ben did.
And she told the cops he was 6'5" 241 pounds. The same listing as the SDteelers official web site.

And he was probably pushing more like 260 at the time.

hawaiiansteel
02-03-2011, 02:55 AM
Wed Feb 02

Poll: Roethlisberger is most disliked player in Super Bowl

By Chris Chase

http://a323.yahoofs.com/ymg/ept_sports_nfl_experts__31/ept_sports_nfl_experts-165191391-1296677115.jpg?ym8z0fEDcxqFQiVr


No surprise here. According to a recent poll, Ben Roethlisberger will be the most disliked player in Super Bowl XLV. What, you were expecting Mason Crosby?

The Hollywood Reporter commissioned a poll by Penn Schoen Berland which revealed that the Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback will be the least favorite player on the field at Cowboys Stadium. He is "strongly disliked" three times more than any other player in the game.

Poll results were released before Big Ben's all-smiles performance at Tuesday's media day.

According to the survey, Roethlisberger isn't the most disliked player in the league. He finished fourth overall in that category behind Brett Favre, Michael Vick and Tom Brady. (Really, people? More of you dislike Brady than Big Ben? Nobody is going to accuse me of being a big fan of adult Bieber, but come on.)

Other findings in the poll reveal that 78 percent of Americans plan to watch Sunday's game, more people will be rooting for the Packers, and that men look forward to the game more than their anniversaries (probably because they can actually remember the date of the Super Bowl).

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdo ... nfl-316000 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Poll-Roethlisberger-is-most-disliked-player-in-?urn=nfl-316000)

The Sodfather
02-03-2011, 08:05 AM
And she told the cops he was 6'5" 241 pounds. The same listing as the SDteelers official web site.

And he was probably pushing more like 260 at the time.


That's the part that really makes you wonder.

The Answer
02-03-2011, 01:19 PM
Crash. I'm not saying he's your classic rapist. But he has to learn that no means now. doesn't matter if it's the first time or the 100th. Doesn't matter who knew a TV was broke. Doesn't matter who's drunk. You ignore the protests, and you get listed as a sexual offender like everyone else. He's very lucky to be playing in this Super Bowl.

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
02-03-2011, 04:00 PM
Crash. I'm not saying he's your classic rapist. But he has to learn that no means now. doesn't matter if it's the first time or the 100th. Doesn't matter who knew a TV was broke. Doesn't matter who's drunk. You ignore the protests, and you get listed as a sexual offender like everyone else. He's very lucky to be playing in this Super Bowl.

I know it was a typo, but that is funny.

Anyways, I think that you are taking a giant leap in assuming that Ben was told no and proceeded to have sex with these women despite their protests.

Start with Nevada. Woman has sex with famous guy. She brags for months to friends and co-workers. She talks about him being her boyfriend. He ignores her continued attempts at communication. Suddenly now she was raped.

Lets get past that before we even discuss number two.

hawaiiansteel
02-06-2011, 05:04 PM
Ron Cook: Big Ben will repay his biggest debt

Teammates stood behind quarterback during his trying year

Sunday, February 06, 2011
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/images/201102/dianasteelers020111_09_500.jpg

Peter Diana/Post-Gazette

Ben Roethlisberger takes time to shoot video of the media gathered before player interviews Tuesday.


ARLINGTON, Texas -- The other Steelers had Ben Roethlisberger's back as long ago as that disgusting March night in Milledgeville, Ga., despite assertions to the contrary that you might have heard this week from NFL commissioner Roger Goodell. They had his back when Dennis Dixon and mostly Charlie Batch led the team to a 3-1 start during his four-game NFL suspension. They had his back here, deep in the heart of Texas, all week during the hysterical run-up to Super Bowl XLV.

Tonight, Roethlisberger will return the favor. Tonight, he will say thank you to his teammates in the best possible way. Tonight, he will lead the Steelers past the Green Bay Packers for their third Super Bowl title in the past six seasons and their record seventh in franchise history.

I write that even though a big part of me thinks the Packers are going to win. They are 2 1/2-point favorites for a reason -- they are very, very good. Their powerful front seven could cause fits for the Steelers offensive line, which will play without Pro Bowl center Maurkice Pouncey. Their franchise quarterback, Aaron Rodgers, and his cast of thousands at wide receiver could do the same to the Steelers secondary, much as Tom Brady and his New England bunch did earlier in the season.

But now that it's time to pick the game, I can't pull the trigger and go with the Packers. I can't pick against Roethlisberger. There's just no way. I fully expect him to find a way to win the game for the Steelers.

It's funny, I had to laugh the other day when Steelers wide receiver Mike Wallace called Roethlisberger "one of the best clutch quarterbacks probably to ever play the game." Wallace is 24, hardly old enough to remember Johnny Unitas and Joe Montana and maybe even John Elway. But I'm more than old enough to know those players' greatness. Roethlisberger is right there with them, at least he will be if he leads the Steelers to that third title. I believe he's Hall of Fame-worthy right now, but he'll be an absolute lock if he gets that third ring, a number reached only by Montana and Terry Bradshaw, who have four, and Brady and Troy Aikman, who have three.

Roethlisberger already has led an Elwayesque-drive in a Super Bowl. Two years ago, in Super Bowl XLIII, he took the Steelers 78 yards in the final two minutes for the winning touchdown to beat the Arizona Cardinals, 27-23. His 6-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Santonio Holmes is one of the fabulous plays in the Steelers' long, storied history.

Roethlisberger is 10-2 as a postseason starter after victories in these playoffs against the Baltimore Ravens and New York Jets. He wasn't even close to being spectacular against the Jets -- his 35.5 passer rating is pretty good proof -- but he made two throws in the final three minutes that the Steelers had to have to win.

That's what Roethlisberger does.

He wins football games.

Don't be fooled by the front that Roethlisberger puts up for the media. Before the game against the Jets, he talked about their great defense beating Brady and the Patriots and Peyton Manning and the Indianapolis Colts. "I don't know what I'm supposed to do against them." Here, when told that national surveys showed that more people would pick Rodgers to be their quarterback than him, he grinned and said, "I'd take Aaron, too."

That's nonsense, of course.

Roethlisberger hardly lacks confidence.

Especially late in games when everything is on the line.

"I don't know what it is," he said. "I think it's probably the competitiveness, the drive to want to do whatever it takes to win the game. I want it to be on my shoulders. I don't do it for the glory. I don't want to be a hero. I just want to win the game."

Or, as Steelers offensive line coach Sean Kugler put it so eloquently, "Competitiveness, desire, that unbelievable will to win, you name it, this guy has it."

The other Steelers see it. They appreciate it. Mostly, they love that Roethlisberger wins games, puts money in their pockets and rings on their fingers.

That's why it wasn't surprising when all of the Steelers rushed to support Roethlisberger last week after Goodell was quoted by Sports Illustrated that "not a single player" came to Roethlisberger's defense after he was accused of sexual assault in Milledgeville. I know Roethlisberger wasn't the most popular player in the locker room at the time, but I don't believe Goodell for one second in this instance. Nor does Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel, who is among Roethlisberger's closest friends.

"All of us care about him," Keisel said. "We are his brothers."

Roethlisberger anticipated the questions about his personal life during Super Bowl week. But he was blind-sided by Goodell's assertion, which was deplorable considering the timing of the story. Clearly, he appreciated the united show of support from everyone from coach Mike Tomlin to offensive coordinator Bruce Arians, who said, "I couldn't ask for a better person for [my kids] to hang out with," from Keisel to running back Rashard Mendenhall, who said, "Ben is a great teammate and a great leader."

Said Roethlisberger, "I'm just lucky to be on this team with these guys."

Roethlisberger said he wants to win tonight for Steelers offensive tackle Flozell Adams, who spent the first 12 years of his NFL career with the Dallas Cowboys and was a part of just one wild-card round playoff win before joining the Steelers in the summer. But that's only a part of Roethlisberger's motivation. He wants to win for all his guys. He is determined to have their backs in the biggest game after they had his for so long.

I can't pick against that.

Steelers 24, Packers 17.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11037/1123058-87.stm#ixzz1DD7MKuIS