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hawaiiansteel
01-27-2011, 04:17 PM
Collier: For seven's sake, let's give it all a rest

Thursday, January 27, 2011
By Gene Collier, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/images/201101/led0127_160.jpg

Amy Sancetta/AP
Leave the Stairway to Seven stuff to Led Zep.


Maybe sometime before the Steelers have landed and settled themselves where the stars at night are big and bright, the rest of us can flush from our systems this sudden and stubborn compulsion to invoke this oh-thank-heaven-for-7 (but not 11) word play.

Apparently, and I mean very apparently, the Steelers have come upon the opportunity to win their seventh Super Bowl a week from Sunday in Texas, so the first burst of seventh heaven cleverness and spontaneous wit was perhaps inevitable and even inspired in the hours after the AFC championship game grounding of Rex Ryan's deafening Jets.

"At the gates of seven" was certainly a solid, worthy and playful headline on Monday of this week, but by Monday of next, let's hope that the next four thousand usages of classic rock imagery unleashed by "Stairway to Seven" and "Knock knock knockin' on Seven's door" haven't led us over the edge of an even slipperier slope.

I bumped into Steelers personnel chief Kevin Colbert upstairs near the club's executive offices on the South Side Wednesday, for example, but it didn't occur to me that I'd gotten there by climbing the Stairway to Kevin.

Oh, like you could resist it.

As it happens, Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" and Dylan's "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" do not merely provide the seven-rhyming capacity required as the jumping off point for all these constructions, but actually provide a cultural link between the pantheonic Steelers teams of the '70s and this new dynasty in waiting.

"Stairway" was written in 1971, which is deep in the Old Testament, or B.F. -- before Franco. By the time Zeppelin began performing one of the greatest rock songs of all time to initially lukewarm receptions, the Emperor Charles Henry Noll had finally begun rolling out the Hall of Fame icons of Super Bowls IX, X, XIII, and XIV. Lyrically, there's plenty of symbolism available in "Stairway" that can be converted for the truly Steeler-centric in multiple generations.

And as we wind on down the road
Our shadows taller than our soul
There walks a lady we all know
Who shines white light and wants to show
How everything still turns to gold
And if you listen very hard
The tune will come to you at last
When all are one and one is all
To be a rock and not to roll ...

Obviously a Robert Plant reference to Rocky Bleier right there, and it's worth pointing out that you never had to play it backward to know that the Rock didn't roll for anybody.

"Knockin' on Heaven's Door" is of that same era, written for a 1973 film called Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid, but this knock-knock-knockin' is hard-as-concrete elemental Dylan, nothing terribly allegorical but rather the uncomplicated dying words of a deputy asking his mother to take off his badge. The Seven represented by this Heaven and the Seven you take the Stairway to seem diametrically opposed, so unless you feel like the Steelers are going to be down 21-0 at half, you might want to lean hard toward Zeppelin on this issue.

After that, of course, is where things get tricky, because you need some fairly convoluted modern story lines to make the whole heaven/seven technique work for your purposes in the cultural backwoods. The most popular slogan in Wisconsin by week's end will doubtless be Seven Can Wait. (If that's not the headline over a Packers win in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel the morning of Feb. 7, well, they're just not trying.)

The remaining heaven/seven book and film and song titles aren't terribly promising.

I suppose if one team or another loses in some circumstance traced directly to the officiating, you could present that story under Seven Angry Men, or if the Steelers littered Super Bowl 45 with the right number of mistakes, four penalties, two turnovers, and a touchdown-causing special teams breakdown, we could give you the Seven Deadly Sins.

Look, I told you this wouldn't go well.

I suppose any number of ramp-up stories having to do with Ben Roethlisberger could fall under Seven Help Us, or that a final score of 77-7 might bring you Sevens to Betsy, but the best case narrative along these lines remains for the Steelers to beat the Packers, secure Lombardi Trophy No. 7, only to find upon their arrival at the postgame celebration that a massive shipment of Iron City bound for North Texas had been inexplicably intercepted.

Somewhere, there's someone who just can't wait to pull the trigger on that headline:

In Seven there is no beer.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11027/11 ... z1CGTQuKid (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11027/1120959-66.stm#ixzz1CGTQuKid)

snarky
01-27-2011, 04:38 PM
It would be difficult for me to express the level of contempt I have for phrases like "One for the thumb" and "Stairway to seven"

IMO, "One for the thumb" hung over the steelers like a bad stench for 25 years.

Crash
01-27-2011, 04:57 PM
I'm sick of everything this team does now and the 1970's have to be thrown in.

This team is playing in it's third SB since 2005. It's time to let the 70's team go.

Franco Harris was making me ill. Yo, dude, you weren't playing. Present the trophy and get out of the way. No one wants to hear your gibberish.

MeetJoeGreene
01-27-2011, 06:19 PM
I'm sick of everything this team does now and the 1970's have to be thrown in.

This team is playing in it's third SB since 2005. It's time to let the 70's team go.

Franco Harris was making me ill. Yo, dude, you weren't playing. Present the trophy and get out of the way. No one wants to hear your gibberish.

Without the 70s, we don't have the depth of tradition that we do now.
Without the 70s, there probably isn't a "Steeler Nation" nearly as large as there is now.
Without the 70s, we have less Lombardis than the Cheats.

As long as there are those of us alive who lived/remembered the 70s, they shall forever be brought up/remembered/revered/etc.

Crash
01-27-2011, 06:24 PM
I'm sick of everything this team does now and the 1970's have to be thrown in.

This team is playing in it's third SB since 2005. It's time to let the 70's team go.

Franco Harris was making me ill. Yo, dude, you weren't playing. Present the trophy and get out of the way. No one wants to hear your gibberish.

Without the 70s, we don't have the depth of tradition that we do now.
Without the 70s, there probably isn't a "Steeler Nation" nearly as large as there is now.
Without the 70s, we have less Lombardis than the Cheats.

As long as there are those of us alive who lived/remembered the 70s, they shall forever be brought up/remembered/revered/etc.

That's fine. But when Mendenhall has 100 yards in the AFC title game? I don't care what Franco Harris thinks about it.

He's old news. Just like that era.

NW Steeler
01-27-2011, 06:26 PM
I'm sick of everything this team does now and the 1970's have to be thrown in.

This team is playing in it's third SB since 2005. It's time to let the 70's team go.

Franco Harris was making me ill. Yo, dude, you weren't playing. Present the trophy and get out of the way. No one wants to hear your gibberish.

Without the 70s, we don't have the depth of tradition that we do now.
Without the 70s, there probably isn't a "Steeler Nation" nearly as large as there is now.
Without the 70s, we have less Lombardis than the Cheats.

As long as there are those of us alive who lived/remembered the 70s, they shall forever be brought up/remembered/revered/etc.

I agree completely! We should embrace the 70's team as well. For a lot of us, that was the team of our childhood. They are a part of the Steelers RICH history, and the team that turned the Steelers into a champion. We should feel fortunate that we have them to celebrate.

SteelCrazy
01-27-2011, 07:01 PM
I'm sick of everything this team does now and the 1970's have to be thrown in.

This team is playing in it's third SB since 2005. It's time to let the 70's team go.

Franco Harris was making me ill. Yo, dude, you weren't playing. Present the trophy and get out of the way. No one wants to hear your gibberish.

Without the 70s, we don't have the depth of tradition that we do now.
Without the 70s, there probably isn't a "Steeler Nation" nearly as large as there is now.
Without the 70s, we have less Lombardis than the Cheats.

As long as there are those of us alive who lived/remembered the 70s, they shall forever be brought up/remembered/revered/etc.

:Agree :Agree :Cheers :Cheers
Why would you want to forget about the 70's? The standard is the standard!

Crash
01-27-2011, 07:14 PM
You don't have to forget. But there's no need to parade them out anymore.

This team is forging it's own identity. Let it stand on it's own merit.

BradshawsHairdresser
01-27-2011, 08:22 PM
You don't have to forget. But there's no need to parade them out anymore.

This team is forging it's own identity. Let it stand on it's own merit.

This team already stands on its own merit. But why is there any problem connecting with players who represent a great part of Steelers' history? Many of the current players embrace this connection. I've read a couple articles lately where they talked about having won six Lombardis and going after #7.

For example:
"I got comments about me saying something about six Lombardi Trophies really early in the game, so I guess that kind of messed with them,'' said safety Ryan Clark. "But if I win this one, they won't have to hear about me talk about six next year. I'll be talking about seven.''


Read more: Harris: Steelers on road to dynasty - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/s ... z1CHiOlgpI (http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:J1abd0UbI4QJ:www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/s_719581.html+pittsburgh+tribune+review+sports+ste elers+january+24+2011&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a&source=www.google.com&safe=strict#ixzz1CHiOlgpI)


As long as current players are identifying with those Super Bowl teams from years ago, I don't see what's wrong with a little reciprocation.

Irongut
01-27-2011, 08:44 PM
Wow! Crapping on the 70's dynasty team and their players?

Without them, this team isn't even likely in Pittsburgh now.

I knew Crash hated most things Steelers related not named Ben but I didn't think his hatred went all the way back to the 70's teams outside of Bradshaw and a few others he's bashed over the years.

feltdizz
01-27-2011, 09:52 PM
Wow... let's stop parading around the guys from the 70's? That's an awesome idea. :roll:

SanAntonioSteelerFan
01-27-2011, 10:53 PM
I'm sick of everything this team does now and the 1970's have to be thrown in.

This team is playing in it's third SB since 2005. It's time to let the 70's team go.

Franco Harris was making me ill. Yo, dude, you weren't playing. Present the trophy and get out of the way. No one wants to hear your gibberish.

Without the 70s, we don't have the depth of tradition that we do now.
Without the 70s, there probably isn't a "Steeler Nation" nearly as large as there is now.
Without the 70s, we have less Lombardis than the Cheats.

As long as there are those of us alive who lived/remembered the 70s, they shall forever be brought up/remembered/revered/etc.


:Bow :Bow :Bow :Bow

That is all.

Crash
01-27-2011, 10:57 PM
Wow... let's stop parading around the guys from the 70's? That's an awesome idea. :roll:

No need anymore. This current team has won two of their own. They aren't in the 70's shadow anymore.

They had their special night for the 1974 team.

They had their special day for the 1979 team.

Enough is enough. Appreciate what they did. But move on.

Greg Lloyd said the same thing when he was playing. And he didn't have two rings.

A lot of these guys on the team now do.

Shawn
01-27-2011, 11:09 PM
I'm sick of everything this team does now and the 1970's have to be thrown in.

This team is playing in it's third SB since 2005. It's time to let the 70's team go.

Franco Harris was making me ill. Yo, dude, you weren't playing. Present the trophy and get out of the way. No one wants to hear your gibberish.

Without the 70s, we don't have the depth of tradition that we do now.
Without the 70s, there probably isn't a "Steeler Nation" nearly as large as there is now.
Without the 70s, we have less Lombardis than the Cheats.

As long as there are those of us alive who lived/remembered the 70s, they shall forever be brought up/remembered/revered/etc.

Good post.

MeetJoeGreene
01-27-2011, 11:46 PM
Wow... let's stop parading around the guys from the 70's? That's an awesome idea. :roll:

No need anymore. This current team has won two of their own. They aren't in the 70's shadow anymore.

They had their special night for the 1974 team.

They had their special day for the 1979 team.

Enough is enough. Appreciate what they did. But move on.

Greg Lloyd said the same thing when he was playing. And he didn't have two rings.

A lot of these guys on the team now do.

Meh.
I like the connection, the tradition, the continuity.

I, personally, don't think honoring the 70s teams diminishes the current teams.

It actually solidifies things for me.. makes me realize that our team's spirit/essence spans generations.


I don't know how people who are "young" and didn't experience those days feel... whether they view it in awe or with annoyance.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
01-28-2011, 12:17 AM
Those who do not experience history are doomed to deride it?

Doesn't have to be that way. There is value in forging links to the past, whether we were part of it or not. We honor our country's forefathers, our family ancestors. Should we take down the pictures of grandpa from the dresser? Get rid of Washington and Lincoln from coins and bills?

Heck no!!

BTW - Tomlin's speech in the locker room before the team took the field in Superbowl XLIII - "How we go out and play the game honors those who play before us".

I'm with Coach!!

GO STEELERS!!

fordfixer
01-28-2011, 02:57 AM
Flower Mound's Mean Joe Greene: Current Steelers carrying my legacy

http://www.dallasnews.com/sports/super- ... legacy.ece (http://www.dallasnews.com/sports/super-bowl/the-game/20110128-flower-mound_s-mean-joe-greene-current-steelers-carrying-my-legacy.ece)

http://www.dallasnews.com/incoming/20110128-3516565.jpg.ece/ALTERNATES/w260/3516565.jpg
Mean Joe Greene appeared in this famous commercial in 1979, in which a child gives him a Coke, prompting Mean Joe to smile and give the kid his team jersey. The commercial was listed as one of the top ten commercials of all time by TV Guide magazine.


By KATE HAIROPOULOS, Staff Writer

Published 28 January 2011

PITTSBURGH Mean Joe Greene , a Pro Football Hall of Famer and founding member of the Pittsburgh Steelers' Steel Curtain defenses of the 1970s, endorses the current Steelers D.

From linebacker James Harrison "he's still on a mission," Greene said to bushy-haired safety Troy Polamalu , whom Greene complimented as a throwback player who lets his playmaking do his talking, the contemporary shutdown defense reflects the modus operandi the Steelers' empire was built on. The unit has lifted the team into Super Bowl XLV against Green Bay on Feb. 6 at Cowboys Stadium.

"I'm a fan of theirs," said Greene, a native Texan who played at North Texas and lives in Flower Mound . The former defensive tackle serves as a scout for the Steelers, with whom he won four Super Bowls in six seasons in the late '70s.

Current Steelers are relentlessly reminded about Pittsburgh's snarling defensive greatness of Greene's Era. Playing in their third Super Bowl in six seasons, it's something they embrace.

"We want to uphold that tradition somewhat," Harrison said after a recent practice at the Steelers' snowy South Side headquarters.

"So far, so good," cornerback Ike Taylor said. "We know the guys in the 1970s were mean sons of guns. We're trying to do that the same way.

"It's about being physical. Coach [Mike Tomlin] always says throw the first punch, lay the first hit."

The Steelers led the NFL in rushing defense in 2010 , allowing 62.8 yards per game impressive even for them in their specialty. They ranked first in scoring defense (14.5 points per game) and sacks (48), second in total defense (276.8 yards per game), third in takeaways (35) and 12th against the pass (214.1 yards per game).

In the AFC championship win over the New York Jets, the Steelers withstood the Jets' second-half surge in part because of a defensive touchdown late in the first half and a goal-line stand in the fourth quarter.

In the divisional playoff against Baltimore, the Steelers forced three turnovers in the third quarter to spur a come-from-behind win.

Tomlin is a former defensive coordinator. Defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau, 73, in the seventh season of his second stint with the Steelers, entered the Hall of Fame in August. The whole team took the bus ride to Canton, Ohio for the induction.

Beloved for his zone-blitzing 3-4 scheme and consistently strong defenses, LeBeau received tributes from players and fans. A poster on Carson Street features his face accompanied by the word "Blitz."

Harrison, Polamalu and defensive end Brett Keisel were chosen for the Pro Bowl. Harrison, who was fined four times for a total of $125,000 during the season for dangerous hits, registered 101/2 sacks and 100 tackles. Polamalu had seven interceptions despite missing two games with an ankle injury.

To win the franchise's seventh Super Bowl title, the current Steelers will have to limit Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers and his deep fleet of receivers. Rodgers is "hot as fish grease right now," linebacker James Farrior said. "We've all got a lot of confidence in Dick LeBeau that he's going to come up with something."

The secondary has been called the Steelers' defensive weakness, which has riled some players. Well, here's the chance to clear it up.

"I'm done being disrespected, I'm done even caring," safety Ryan Clark said. "Maybe the other six or seven people on the field are that much better than everybody else that they can overcome us being so terrible. Maybe we're all right. Either way, it doesn't matter.

"This group can say it's played two or three Super Bowls together. I think we're doing all right."

Another Super Bowl ring would indicate that's the case, moving the Steelers closer to what those vaunted defenses of the past accomplished. Greene, who said he wants the Steelers to play well so much that he physically feels the ups and downs of games, will be at Cowboys Stadium to take it all in.

"It's unfair to us, and it's unfair to them," Greene said of comparing the eras. "I'm so happy that they're here and can get a third ring. ... If this group can put their third up, then we can start seriously talking about it. ... They are carrying the legacy further, and that's what's wonderful about it."

feltdizz
01-28-2011, 01:59 PM
Wow... let's stop parading around the guys from the 70's? That's an awesome idea. :roll:

No need anymore. This current team has won two of their own. They aren't in the 70's shadow anymore.

They had their special night for the 1974 team.

They had their special day for the 1979 team.

Enough is enough. Appreciate what they did. But move on.

Greg Lloyd said the same thing when he was playing. And he didn't have two rings.

A lot of these guys on the team now do.

No one is trapped in the 70's... the only person who needs to move on is you.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
01-28-2011, 02:17 PM
Wow... let's stop parading around the guys from the 70's? That's an awesome idea. :roll:

No need anymore. This current team has won two of their own. They aren't in the 70's shadow anymore.

They had their special night for the 1974 team.

They had their special day for the 1979 team.

Enough is enough. Appreciate what they did. But move on.

Greg Lloyd said the same thing when he was playing. And he didn't have two rings.

A lot of these guys on the team now do.

No one is trapped in the 70's... the only person who needs to move on is you.

Huh??

http://images.bizrate.com/resize?sq=500&uid=2069617060

hawaiiansteel
01-30-2011, 02:18 AM
Steelers teams of past, present linked by pedigree

By Scott Brown
PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, January 30, 2011

http://files.pittsburghlive.com/photos/2011-01-29/bondsofsteel-g.jpg

Mahogany shelves are filled with neatly lined books. Pictures that cover an adjacent wall also tell the history of the Steelers.

But what makes the second-floor room at Steelers headquarters one of the most unique libraries on the planet: Six Lombardi Trophies are displayed in a row, and they have the same effect as a six-car pile-up on the Parkway.

"I don't ever walk by without looking at them," Steelers receiver Hines Ward said. "I just stop, and you look at being a part of this history, of being a part of this organization. It's a special feeling to be a part of this."

If the Steelers win another Lombardi Trophy next Sunday in Dallas, they will have to confront the welcome problem of where exactly to put it. Room in the space reserved for NFL dynasties may also have to be found if the Steelers beat the Green Bay Packers at Cowboys Stadium.

A Steelers win would give them three Super Bowl titles in six years. A victory over the Packers would also stir talk about whether this current group ranks with the 1970s teams that won four Super Bowls in six seasons.

Such a question makes for good bar-stool banter. But it misses the point, one that is made by something as simple as Steelers legend Franco Harris showing up for a charity event run by Ward.

The Steelers' past and their present are not in competition with one another.

"One thing that I always wondered and always hoped for: Will they keep what we built going? They have, and that makes me so proud," Harris, the MVP of Super Bowl IX, said. "I always tell people that it's not us and them. It's one big family and it's just evolution. It's not us against them because they're just our younger generation and we're a part of them, and they're a part of us."

PERSONNEL PROWESS

The Steelers of the 1970 were built with some of the best drafts in NFL history, including the '74 one that netted four future Pro Football Hall of Famers.

The success of this current group can be traced, in part, to the fact that the Steelers have not missed on a first-round draft pick since 1999. Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and strong safety Troy Polamalu are among the players that the Steelers have taken with their top selections during that time.

"The two keys have been the defense and the quarterback during the period of time," former NFL general manager Charley Casserly said of the Steelers' current run.

What has also set the Steelers apart during a the salary cap era: They have had an uncanny knack for identifying core players to keep and not overpaying their own free agents.

"You don't ever see them make bad decisions on players they give money to," said Casserly, now an NFL analyst for several TV networks.

That has allowed the Steelers to enjoy as much success in the 2000s as any team, including the New England Patriots.

The two are the only franchises to win multiple Lombardi Trophies this century. The Steelers are one win away from tying the Patriots for the most Super Bowl victories during that time.

New England won its three titles in a four-year period but that run may have been tainted by the "Spygate" scandal and still lingering questions about how much the Patriots benefited from illegal videotaping.

"In the last 10 years we've been to five AFC Championship Games, and the two times we didn't go to the Super Bowl (the Patriots) cheated so we could be looking at a whole lot more if that didn't happen," nose tackle Casey Hampton said of the Steelers' Super Bowl victories. "You never know what could have been."

Figuring out the Steelers' place in their era as well as in history will have to come after Super Bowl XLV.

"We've got to finish the job," Hampton, a first-round draft pick in 2001, said. "You can't compare yourselves to the '70s team since we've got two and haven't won another one. If we win it, then we can start talking about that. When you're that close to history you want to reach the goals and do the things that they did."

In an attempt to make history the Steelers frequently draw on their own and specifically what the teams in the 1970s accomplished and the bar that they set.

"I like it when (coach) Mike Tomlin talks about the standard and this is what we stand for, this is who we are, this is what we're trying to achieve," said Harris, who served as the Steelers' honorary co-captain for the AFC Championship Game. "To be able to keep something at that level for that long is a lot tougher than all of the other teams trying to get there."

'ONCE IN, ALWAYS IN'

If the accomplishments of the '70s teams don't hang over the current players, that is because the past is still very much present.

Many of the ex-players are still in contact with the organization, and that has prevented them from morphing into mythical beings whose accomplishments can never be matched.

The alumni dinner that the Steelers hold after the first day of minicamp practice gives rookies a chance to meet the players who came before them.

It is not uncommon to see Hall of Famer Mel Blount in his trademark cowboy hat at the Steelers' practice facility. And perhaps the greatest Steelers player of them all, Joe Greene, works in the organization's scouting department.

"Seeing those guys and the love they have and the respect they show us when they see us is great, because they don't have to," Steelers free safety Ryan Clark said. "They started all of this. For them to always be so excited about us and to be so complimentary of the things we're doing is amazing. It's a fraternity almost. Once in, always in."

The Steelers players often talk of themselves as family, and that reflects the spirit of the team's late founder, Art "The Chief" Rooney.

The glass wall outside of the library at team headquarters wasn't built just so the Steelers could showcase their Lombardi Trophies.

It was constructed as an ode to Rooney and the open-door policy he adhered to as the Steelers' owner.

The library is filled with black and white photographs that hung in Rooney's old office at Three Rivers Stadium. But the trophies and the picture displays that are behind them dominate the room and give it the feel of a shrine.

Almost every Steelers player can recall the first time he saw all of the Lombardi Trophies together.

Mike Wallace took a picture of them. Emmanuel Sanders said a prayer.

No, really.

"I said, 'God, please bless me with the opportunity to be hoisting one of these one day,' " the rookie wide receiver said.

Not long after that, the Steelers issued the No. 88 to Sanders.

He immediately balked at the number not because it had been Hall of Famer Lynn Swann's.

Sanders had wanted a number in the teens. After Ward told him about the significance of what he was given, Sanders researched Swann on the Internet.

Sanders, who grew up outside of Houston, didn't even know who Swann was before getting drafted by the Steelers.

Now, he is well aware of what players like Swann mean to the Steelers.

"This is the greatest organization in football. You can tell that guys embrace it and love to be around the Steelers franchise," said Sanders, who hopes to meet Swann soon. "Once you're a Steeler, you're always a Steeler."

That is essentially what Harris, one of the most beloved Steelers ever, tells people when asked about his teams and the ones that have continued the legacy started in the '70s.

"I won't compare," Harris said. "This is just an extension of who we are. They are me, and I am them."

Scott Brown can be reached at sbrown@tribweb.com or 412-481-5432.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... z1CUbiEvti (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/print_720511.html#ixzz1CUbiEvti)