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SteelCrazy
12-29-2010, 09:19 PM
BEREA — Eleven isn’t Mike Wallace’s idea of a lucky number.

On April 26, 2009, he became the 11th wide receiver selected in the NFL draft.

He had a whole night to lose sleep over it, because only two rounds were conducted April 25 — the last two wideouts drafted on the first day were Brian Robiskie and Mohamed Massaquoi.

Wallace was angry. Draft position is money. He was insulted. He knew he would be a star. He thought all kinds of crazy thoughts.

“I guess I just really didn’t get much hype,” he says now. “Draft analysts make you or break you. I think if you don’t get any hype, you kind of get overlooked.”

That’s a foolish blanket indictment. General managers and scouts probably weren’t worried about what Mel Kiper and Mike Mayock thought. They had legitimate concern that Wallace, whose incredible speed anyone could see, would be too much of a project. Good luck teaching that guy an NFL route tree.

Updated memo to GMs and scouts: Good luck covering him.

In just his second year with the Steelers, Wallace looks like Browns Hall of Famer Paul Warfield.

His 57 catches pale in comparison to the high-volume wideouts. His average per catch, 20.2, leads the AFC — Warfield averaged more than 20 yards a catch in each of four consecutive seasons before Art Modell got the bright idea of trading him for the draft rights to Mike Phipps.

Heading into Sunday’s game at Cleveland, Wallace has 1,152 receiving yards, fifth in the league.

Yes, the 11th wideout picked in the 2009 draft is fully aware that Cleveland double-snubbed him.

The Browns had three second-round picks and spent two of them on players at his position. Robiskie and Massaquoi were the seventh and eighth wide receivers selected.

“I take it real personal,” said Wallace, 24.

He caught only three passes against the Browns in October, but he made them hurt. They went for 90 yards. One was a touchdown.

He had a monster game against New England a few weeks later, eight catches for 136 yards and two TDs. In the six games since then, he has caught 27 passes for 509 yards.

There’s a chance that when he runs past the Browns bench Sunday, he’ll be winking or scowling inside.

“The only thing that matters now is, they did overlook me, and I’m gonna have to make ‘em pay, that’s all,” Wallace said.

Wallace makes no bones about whether he is the fastest man in the NFL.

“Uh ... probably,” he said.

He is no track man in a football suit. He remembers running an open 100 meters maybe once in high school, clocking something around a 10.4. He remembers running a 40-yard dash in 4.21. His game is football.

In fairness to the teams that passed on Wallace after he played college ball for Mississippi, some of his wrath could be directed at his own team.

Before the Steelers picked him, they spent a first-round pick on defensive end Ziggy Hood, who has started recently only because Aaron Smith has been hurt. They didn’t have a Round 2 pick, but with the first of two third-rounders, they took tackle Kraig Urbik, whom they cut in September.

In terms of draft value, then, it cannot be denied that the Steelers thought Wallace was no Kraig Urbik.

“We felt pretty good about filling the void left by Nate Washington,” head coach Mike Tomlin said Wednesday. “During his rookie year, we realized we had a guy with big-play potential.

“That was one of the reasons we felt comfortable enough to move Santonio (Holmes).”

“As soon as the trade happened,” Wallace said earlier Wednesday, “coach told me I was gonna move up and be starting.

“That was nice. I never played football wanting to be the third receiver.”

Holmes, a former Round 1 pick coming off a 95-catch, 1,167-yard season, was shipped to the Jets.

The Jets’ leading receiver is ex-Brown Braylon Edwards. One way to appreciate Wallace’s big-play value is to note that his 57 catches have produced 1,152 yards. Edwards has milked 852 yards out of 52 catches.

Wallace kind of chuckled to himself when asked if he suspected the Browns were going to pick him in the ‘09 draft.

“I never really thought about it,” he said.

He does seem to have thought about the Cleveland-Pittsburgh rivalry.

“Oh, man,” he said. “It’s very serious. They don’t like us very much in Cleveland. We don’t like them much, either.”



http://www.cantonrep.com/newsnow/x15993 ... draft-snub (http://www.cantonrep.com/newsnow/x1599383438/Wallace-aims-to-make-Browns-pay-for-draft-snub)

papillon
12-30-2010, 01:11 AM
I'm not sure why he would care at this point. Let's weigh the situation, Steelers....Browns, Steelers...Browns I think Wallace got the better of it over Robiskie and massaquai. What do you think? :P :tt2

Pappy

SidSmythe
12-30-2010, 07:13 AM
I'm not sure why he would care at this point. Let's weigh the situation, Steelers....Browns, Steelers...Browns I think Wallace got the better of it over Robiskie and massaquai. What do you think? :P :tt2

Pappy

Here's what I think???? :brownssuck :Agree :brownssuck :tt1

JUST-PLAIN-NASTY
12-30-2010, 09:19 AM
I love Wallace and his future here with the Steelers...But just Shut up & play. Nothing ever good comes out from opening your mouth. The Steelers passed on you twice too. Play the game & let your game speak. No better way to make someone sorry than kicking their A$$ & being humble about it.

fezziwig
12-30-2010, 03:13 PM
I agree, nothing ever comes to any good complaining about what could have, should have been.
Enjoy the success because it isn't a yearly guarantee.

RuthlessBurgher
12-30-2010, 04:41 PM
I'm not sure why he would care at this point. Let's weigh the situation, Steelers....Browns, Steelers...Browns I think Wallace got the better of it over Robiskie and massaquai. What do you think? :P :tt2

Pappy

Wallace wouldn't want to meet Harrison coming over the middle.

http://img.fannation.com/upload/si_blog_post_images/70041/tx_harrison_massaquoi.jpg

ScoreKeeper
12-30-2010, 05:22 PM
I'm not sure why he would care at this point. Let's weigh the situation, Steelers....Browns, Steelers...Browns I think Wallace got the better of it over Robiskie and massaquai. What do you think? :P :tt2

Pappy

Wallace wouldn't want to meet Harrison coming over the middle.

http://img.fannation.com/upload/si_blog_post_images/70041/tx_harrison_massaquoi.jpg
Man, that cat went down like he was shot.

SteelCrazy
12-30-2010, 08:02 PM
Mike Wallace: NFL's Best Big Play WR.


When the Pittsburgh Steelers traded Santonio Holmes to the New York Jets this past offseason, the biggest question for the offense was who would replace him as the its big-play threat in the passing game. Holmes, for all of his problems off of the field (two suspensions: one by the team in 2008, one by the NFL in 2010, a now infamous and probably forgotten Twitter meltdown) was an impact player on it. A Super Bowl MVP and an explosive wide receiver capable of turning any pass into a touchdown.

The answer for his replacement was an easy one, coming in the form of second-year wide receiver Mike Wallace. Fresh off a rookie campaign that saw him finish with the highest yards-per-catch average in the NFL, he's emerged as not only the Steelers biggest impact player on offense, but also the best big play wide receiver in the NFL.

As a rookie in the Steelers offense in 2009, many of Wallace's catches came as the result of him using his freakish speed and simply out-running defensive backs down the field and hauling in bombs from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. That is very different from the type of player that Holmes was for the Steelers. Holmes excelled at turning the 10-yard pass into a 60-yard gain. He was at his best after he already had the football in his hands and was making people miss. Wallace simply managed to run past everybody and pick up all 60 yards at once.

Over the course of his sophomore season, Wallace's game has started to round into shape. He's no longer the guy that simply runs "9 routes" down the sidelines every play (though, he still does that) and gets behind the secondary. He's also starting to improve his route running and become more of a factor on the short and intermediate routes and turning short passes into big gains.

During the Steelers' Week 16 win against Carolina, for example, he took advantage of a Carolina blitz, hauled in a hot route, and sprinted through the entire Panthers secondary for a 43-yard touchdown.

Head coach Mike Tomlin, who has at times this season called Wallace a "one trick pony," referring to his ability to burn secondaries down field, was asked at his weekly press conference on Tuesday what improvements Wallace still needed to make to become a more complete receiver. Tomlin pointed to attention to detail in route running and reading coverages. When asked if the touchdown against Carolina was what he had in mind, Tomlin simply smiled and said he liked what he saw on that play. Tomlin is big on talking about how there's always room for improvement, even in victory, so it's not a surprise that he'd like to see even more from his still raw -- and extremely talented -- second-year receiver.


So far this season Wallace has scored on plays of 41, 46, 29, 53, 39, 33, 52 and 43, and has two additional plays of 50 yards or more. No player on the NFL has more catches of 20-or-more yards entering Week 17 (24), and only DeSean Jackson of the Eagles averages more yards per catch. He's currently sixth in the NFL in receiving yards, despite only being targeted on 95 passes (catching 57), which ranks 40th in the NFL. Basically: even though he's not targeted as often as some other receivers, when the ball is thrown in Wallace's direction, big plays tend to happen.

The advanced statistical metrics at Football Outsiders (http://www.footballoutsiders.com/stats/wr) rank Wallace as the No. 1 receiver in the NFL in 2010 both in terms of total value and value per play. He's also managed to catch 61 percent of the balls thrown his direction, which is an impressive accomplishment when you consider how many of his passes are deep down field and lower percentage plays.

The FO metrics aren't perfect, nor are they the end-all, be-all, but they're no more flawed than simply looking at total receptions or total yards without any context. A receiver that plays on a dreadful team that is constantly playing from behind and forced to throw the football in an effort to play catch up is going to make a lot of catches (Santana Moss and his 84 catches for the Redskins come to mind as an example of this). But hauling in a bunch of passes when your team is fighting a lost cause down by 20 points in the fourth quarter isn't as valuable as making big plays to put your team in a position to win. The Steelers rarely play from behind and have run the ball over 440 times this season, which doesn't give a receiver like Wallace as many opportunities to rack up huge reception numbers. But that doesn't take away from his overall value to the offense.

For as good as Holmes was for the Steelers (and still is for the Jets), Pittsburgh hasn't missed him due to the meteoric rise of Wallace, as well as the late-season development of rookies Emmanuel Sanders and Antonio Brown.

http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2010/12/30/mike ... g-play-wr/ (http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2010/12/30/mike-wallace-nfls-best-big-play-wr/)

sentinel33
12-30-2010, 08:29 PM
Wallace is the Poster Child for getting the biggest bang for your buck. he's not selfish. getting harder and harder for teams to cover and thats opening things up for others like Sanders, who saw the opening and has used the attention Wallace gets and has made good use of his opportunitys.

i dont care where people draw there motivation from. wallace just needs to know that your draft position has little to do with your success in the nfl. i'd rather go to the steelers in round 6 than the browns in round 2. i think john dwyer will agree with me on that one. wheres jamarcus russell. hows marsha doin these days.

Sugar
12-31-2010, 12:37 AM
So... if the Browns hadn't snubbed Wallace, we'd have gotten Robiskie?

hawaiiansteel
12-31-2010, 12:48 AM
So... if the Browns hadn't snubbed Wallace, we'd have gotten Robiskie?


no, Kevin Colbert would have undoubtedly selected WR Austin Collie from BYU instead... :tt2

Sugar
12-31-2010, 02:23 AM
Could you imagine the Browns having the speed of Cribbs and Wallace on the field at the same time? With our Secondary concerns, I'm glad not to have to worry about it.