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View Full Version : Best article of the season, regarding the league, hits, etc



aggiebones
12-03-2010, 12:04 PM
Yes, this may have been posted already though I didn't see it.

It really covers EVERY topic. Valid points as to why Tomlin can't belabor the issues. He can't be seen using this problem as an excuse. If he acknowledges a target, then everyone has an excuse. He is VERY smart is staying mum.
It also speaks that the Rooneys all of them remain behind closed doors operators.
They don't routinely talk to the media for VERY good reason. Embarrassing someone in front of the media NEVER gets you what you want.
Anyway, I think this article answers all the questions, regardless of whether you like the answer or not. I think they are doing what they do, from the top down, and it is appropriate.
As angry as we want to be, we have no magic wand here.
The CBA looming is the biggest problem for the team's future.
Ward is about the only guy that can run his mouth with impunity cause he may retire anyway. A few guys like ASmith or Keisel could, but they don't carry as much clout out of Pittsburgh.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... 12044.html (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_712044.html)

brothervad
12-03-2010, 02:56 PM
This is the part that is going to come home to roost...

Inside linebacker James Farrior asked why NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith had not done more to back Harrison.

As of right now, it's all about the CBA, but I do believe the Players Union is going to start seeing a lot of rumblings that they need to protect all of their players, not just Tom Brady and Peyton Manning.

I believe this thing is going to be a huge point of contention in the near future, but right now the CBA over shadows everything else.

brothervad

ALLD
12-03-2010, 06:50 PM
This is the part that is going to come home to roost...

Inside linebacker James Farrior asked why NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith had not done more to back Harrison.

As of right now, it's all about the CBA, but I do believe the Players Union is going to start seeing a lot of rumblings that they need to protect all of their players, not just Tom Brady and Peyton Manning.

I believe this thing is going to be a huge point of contention in the near future, but right now the CBA over shadows everything else.

brothervad


It makes the Player's Association a virtual proxy for the league in this instance. As stated above, unless you are TB or PM or are playing the Steelers, you are not fairly and completely represented.

hawaiiansteel
12-03-2010, 07:18 PM
This is the part that is going to come home to roost...

Inside linebacker James Farrior asked why NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith had not done more to back Harrison.

As of right now, it's all about the CBA, but I do believe the Players Union is going to start seeing a lot of rumblings that they need to protect all of their players, not just Tom Brady and Peyton Manning.

I believe this thing is going to be a huge point of contention in the near future, but right now the CBA over shadows everything else.

brothervad


It makes the Player's Association a virtual proxy for the league in this instance. As stated above, unless you are TB or PM or are playing the Steelers, you are not fairly and completely represented.


League, union are failing the fans, the game, and themselves

Posted by Mike Florio on December 3, 2010, 4:41 PM EST

The NFL and the NFLPA are moving closer and closer to the expiration of their labor deal, and both sides are far more interested in sniping at each other than in trying to work out a deal.

Less than two weeks after reportedly productive meetings focused on a possible 18-game season, the rhetoric and the red herrings continue, with no progress being made toward giving us what NFLPA spokesman George Atallah described to me a week ago as the ultimate Christmas present for the fans — labor peace on earth, or at least on the frozen tundra.

Instead, we’re all more likely to get coal and/or reindeer road apples.

Both sides are failing. They’re failing the fans, the game, and themselves.

The latest skirmish comes from a conference call conducted Friday by the NFLPA, in which the ongoing parade of lockout horribles was supported by a hired-gun economist who talked about the obvious reality that, if games aren’t played in 2011, money won’t be spent in hotels and bars and other places in the vicinity of football stadiums that see increased business when games are played there.

The league made matters worse by responding with a gratuitous taunt. “The fairy tales continue,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said.

None of this is going to help get a deal done. Instead, both sides are hoping to conjure support from a public that isn’t taking sides, no matter how hard the parties try to make this into a series of red state/blue state wedge issues.

So when the union tells us all the obvious about the impact of not playing games, the union wastes its time, the media’s time, and the time of anyone with the misfortune of reading about it. When the league offers up a snarky response, the NFL compounds the wasted time by making it even harder for these two partners to ever quit acting like enemies.

Meanwhile, when we tried earlier this week to get Aiello and NFLPA spokesman George Atallah to tell us when the two sides would next be meeting to work on a new deal and whether any progress had been made toward blocking out multiple weeks before the end of the year aimed at conducting intensive talks, and neither side wanted to say anything.

“You told us to quit talking publicly,” Aiello said in reference to our proposed to-do list for Patriots owner Robert Kraft, who seems to be willing to take the lead in trying to get a deal done by the end of December. Atallah likewise refrained from comments, but in response to an e-mail sent by PFT this afternoon asking him why they are focusing on broader economic impacts rather than negotiating, Atallah said, “We are willing to ‘lock-in’ and always have been.”

The league has yet to make a similarly clear commitment. We’ll assume that, unless the league unequivocally accepts the union’s offer, there’s no genuine desire to try to salvage their mutual placement on the naughty list.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... hemselves/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/12/03/league-union-are-failing-the-fans-the-game-and-themselves/)