PDA

View Full Version : SpyGate II? Not surprisingly, it's two ex-Patriots in Denver



RuthlessBurgher
11-27-2010, 01:02 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5854856


Broncos official on leave amid probe
ESPN.com news services
Updated: November 27, 2010, 10:40 AM ET

In a case reminiscent of the New England Patriots' Spygate scandal of 2007-08, the Denver Broncos have fallen under the microscope of the NFL for possible impermissible videotaping of an opponent, The Denver Post has reported.

Broncos chief operating officer Joe Ellis confirmed to the newspaper Friday that the league was reviewing the team's possible filming of the San Francisco 49ers from before their London game of Week 8. Team sources told the paper that the Broncos were actively working with the league in regard to the investigation.

The team's video operations director, Steve Scarnecchia, is on a "personal leave of absence" while the NFL's investigation takes place, Ellis told The Post. He declined to address the matter further. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello declined to comment when reached by The Post.

The Broncos lost the London game 24-16. The investigation is focused on walk-through practice sessions held the day before at Wembley Stadium, according to the report.

Scarnecchia, who also declined comment, worked for the Patriots along with Broncos coach Josh McDaniels in 2008, when commissioner Roger Goodell docked their first-round draft pick for that year and fined coach Bill Belichick $500,000 for a violation of NFL rules that bar teams from filming opponents' signals. The Patriots, who were found to have videotaped New York Jets coaches during a 2006 game, were fined an additional $250,000.

McDaniels was the Patriots' offensive coordinator that season, having been promoted from quarterbacks coach in 2006 to make him the youngest coordinator in the league at the time.

McDaniels said at his introduction as Broncos coach that the videotaping scandal "didn't really affect" the team.

"That situation was something that happened," McDaniels said at a January 2009 news conference. "I was not aware of that. I wasn't aware of it and all the things that did happen in terms of that whole scenario. It really didn't affect us, to tell you the truth. It was all about preparation and trying to do whatever we felt was best that week. It really didn't have anything to do with that.

"I don't think it is good. To have that kind of attention was a distraction, and I think that is how we all treated it. We tried to do the best we could to limit those distractions every week, and it will be no different here. Certainly we are never looking to do anything that is not within the rules established by the National Football League. They determined the punishment on that, and it was what it was and we moved on."

Djfan
11-27-2010, 01:09 PM
He saw the benefits of it, saw that there was no real punishment, and saw that Goodell would do nothing about it.

So why not keep on doing it?

Nice legacy Rogie-poo!

fezziwig
11-27-2010, 01:30 PM
He's almost saying, " poor patricheats, we got caught and had to deal with the distraction of it. "

To say the cheating did not help or serve a purpose is a lie. As Lebeau said when asked if he thought the cheating by the patricheats had any affect on the outcome of the games his response was, " I rather they didn't know our signals. " Something to that affect but in other words, he was saying yes, the patricheats screwed everyone to gain their wins.

Now this dude is doing what he knows works best or at least helps them gain another edge.

Goodell needed this all to go away because the patiricheats coach, organization really put a black eye on the NFL that is so much trying to have a good image. Goodell and the team owners couldn't come and say, " Americas number one sport has been a sham since Bellicheat has taken over the patricheats as their head coach. All these teams, citiess, players, owners, fans, businesses families have been getting screwed for the last 7 to 8 years because one guy ( bellicheat ) decided he, will cheat to gain what other teams have worked their tales off for.

patricheats earned and won nothing.

Crash
11-27-2010, 02:16 PM
Bowlen has to be loving this. Now he can fire McDoosh "with cause" and not have to pay him.

hawaiiansteel
11-27-2010, 02:48 PM
Bowlen has to be loving this. Now he can fire McDoosh "with cause" and not have to pay him.



McDoosh did nothing wrong except for not properly reporting the violation in a timely manner.

the vidographer acted on his own accord and McDoosh refused to look at the video... :roll:

ALLD
11-27-2010, 03:45 PM
Since many people stated that the video recording did not help the Patiots, why do their protog'es continue to do it?

$50k fines got the Broncos off lightly. Patriots get an extra first and second round draft pick next year.

Crash
11-27-2010, 03:52 PM
Bowlen has to be loving this. Now he can fire McDoosh "with cause" and not have to pay him.



McDoosh did nothing wrong except for not properly reporting the violation in a timely manner.

the vidographer acted on his own accord and McDoosh refused to look at the video... :roll:

Of course....I'm convinced.

McDoosh knew the guys past, and brought him to Denver anyway.

RuthlessBurgher
11-27-2010, 04:45 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5855075


Broncos, McDaniels fined $50K each
Associated Press
Updated: November 27, 2010, 3:32 PM ET

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -- The NFL fined the Denver Broncos and coach Josh McDaniels $50,000 each because the team's video operations director broke league rules by filming a San Francisco 49ers practice in London last month.

The NFL investigation determined that Steve Scarnecchia took the six-minute video of the walkthrough and presented it that day to McDaniels. The coach declined to view it.

But the NFL fined both the coach and team because the matter was not promptly reported, as required by league policy.

Scarnecchia was fired by the Broncos and notified by commissioner Roger Goodell that as a repeat violator of league rules regarding integrity he faces a hearing to determine if he will be banned from the NFL.

The NFL was to discuss the situation in a conference call Saturday. McDaniels was to speak to the media in the afternoon at the team complex.

"I apologize for not promptly reporting the improper conduct of our video director before our game against the 49ers in London," McDaniels said in a statement. "The actions of this individual are in no way representative of the values and integrity held by myself, our players and coaches, and the entire Denver Broncos organization.

"I understand the punishment from the National Football League and support its commitment to the integrity of the game. We have addressed the situation internally to assure that nothing like this happens again."

The investigation concerned practices at Wembley Stadium on Oct. 30, the day before the 49ers' 24-16 win over the Broncos. It was the only time the teams worked out on the same field while in London.

Scarnecchia and McDaniels previously worked for the New England Patriots, who were found to have videotaped New York Jets coaches sending in signals during a game four years ago in a scandal dubbed Spygate. The NFL bans such videotaping and issued $750,000 in fines against the Patriots and coach Bill Belichick. The Patriots also were stripped of their 2008 first-round draft pick.

Scarnecchia worked for the Patriots in the early 2000s. McDaniels, who worked in New England from 2001-09, hired him in Denver shortly after he became the Broncos' coach 22 months ago.

Team owner Pat Bowlen said in a statement Saturday that when he learned what happened the team "promptly began an investigation" and reported this violation to the NFL. He said the Broncos "fully cooperated with every aspect of the league investigation."

The NFL determined that Broncos executives were made aware of the videotaping on Nov. 8 and told the league about it four days later after an internal review. On Nov. 16, Bowlen and Broncos executives met with league officials in New York.

After that meeting, the NFL security department began its investigation, which included interviews of Broncos personnel. They also arranged for an analysis of the laptop computers used by the team's video department, which confirmed the 49ers' practice had been recorded. The league retained that tape.

Scarnecchia acknowledged to NFL investigators that he taped the walkthrough, according to excerpts from Goodell's letter to Bowlen.

Goodell's letter stated that Scarnecchia maintained that he had not previously recorded a walkthrough or other practice or "engaged in any other improper videotaping [such as recording coaching signals of an opposing team] since joining the Broncos."

The letter also said Scarnecchia "knew that what he did in London was wrong," that taping the walkthrough was his decision alone and nobody instructed him to record the practice.

In addition, the investigation found that when Scarnecchia offered to show the tape to McDaniels, the coach replied, "No, I'm not doing that." Scarnecchia said he didn't show the tape to any other staff member.

Goodell's letter to Bowlen stated that McDaniels was interviewed "under circumstances that would have made it impossible for him to have spoken to Mr. Scarnecchia in advance" and that McDaniels' recollection of events matched Scarnecchia's.

"Although I find no fault with the way the club handled this matter once you and your executives became aware of it, I nonetheless believe that some penalty must be imposed," Goodell wrote. "We have no more important responsibility than preserving the integrity and competitive fairness of the game and avoiding any implication that games are decided by anything other than what takes place on the field."

The letter added: "This appears to be a single incident by an employee who acted entirely on his own; there was no competitive effect; and, most importantly, the Broncos promptly took the initiative to report the violation. Had any of those factors not been present, I would have almost certainly imposed much more substantial discipline on the club."

But, he added, "clubs are ultimately accountable for the conduct of their employees."

Goodell said that while McDaniels "apparently declined to look at the tape, I also believe that he should have immediately advised you or one of your senior executives when he learned what Mr. Scarnecchia had done."

Goodell cited a policy in which team executives, head coaches and others are obliged to promptly report violations tied to the integrity of the game. The commissioner said a "significant number of club employees" have certified in writing they are aware of no further violations of the policy.

Goodell added that if further information comes to light, the league will reopen the investigation and, if necessary, impose further discipline.

This is the latest embarrassment for a Broncos team that is 3-7 and has lost 15 of 20 for the first time since 1971-72. The Broncos, who face St. Louis at Invesco Field on Sunday, were routed 59-14 by archrival Oakland last month in what many consider the worst home loss in the team's 51-year history.

After they turned the tables and routed Kansas City on the same field two weeks later, Chiefs coach Todd Haley snubbed McDaniels in the post-game handshake, wagging a finger at him. Haley apologized the next day but refused to say what set him off.

It might have been McDaniels' chest-bumping his players on the sideline during the blowout, challenging calls late in the game or maybe blitzing a gimpy Matt Cassel well into the fourth quarter.


Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press

Djfan
11-27-2010, 06:37 PM
"Although I find no fault with the way the club handled this matter once you and your executives became aware of it, I nonetheless believe that some penalty must be imposed," Goodell wrote. "We have no more important responsibility than preserving the integrity and competitive fairness of the game and avoiding any implication that games are decided by anything other than what takes place on the field."

You steaming heap of camel turd! You suck so bad that I am actually looking at the UFL as THE future of my fan passion.

LIE LIE LIE!!!!!

Crash
11-27-2010, 07:06 PM
Goodell is garbage. This is just another example of how incompetent he is.

RuthlessBurgher
11-27-2010, 07:37 PM
"Although I find no fault with the way the club handled this matter once you and your executives became aware of it, I nonetheless believe that some penalty must be imposed," Goodell wrote. "We have no more important responsibility than preserving the integrity and competitive fairness of the game and avoiding any implication that games are decided by anything other than what takes place on the field."

You steaming heap of camel turd! You suck so bad that I am actually looking at the UFL as THE future of my fan passion.

LIE LIE LIE!!!!!

http://www.glitschka.com/upload/camel_turd.jpg

:lol:

fordfixer
11-27-2010, 11:53 PM
Broncos, coach fined for taping of 49ers’ practice

By ARNIE STAPLETON, AP Pro Football Writer 52 minutes ago
http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=a ... lmingprobe (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=ap-broncos-filmingprobe)

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP)—The NFL fined the Denver Broncos and coach Josh McDaniels $50,000 each because the team’s video operations director filmed a San Francisco 49ers practice in London last month, breaking league rules.

The NFL investigation determined Steve Scarnecchia took a six-minute video of the walkthrough and presented it that day to McDaniels. The coach declined to view it. Still, the NFL fined both the coach and team because the matter was not promptly reported, as required by the league.

Scarnecchia was also involved in the NFL’s last videotaping scandal, dubbed Spygate. After the Patriots were caught videotaping New York Jets coaches sending in signals during a 2007 game, the league’s investigation determined New England had violated rules over several seasons. Scarnecchia, who had left the Patriots by the time they were caught, was found to have taken part in the videotaping when he worked for the team in the early 2000s.
In this photo taken in 2010, Denver Broncos video operations director Steve Scarnecchia is shown in Englewood, Colo. The NFL fined the Broncos and coach Josh McDaniels $50,000 each on Friday, Nov. 27, 2010, because the team's video operations director broke league rules by filming a San Francisco 49ers practice in London last month. The NFL investigation determined Scarnecchia took the six-minute video of the walkthrough and presented it that day to McDaniels. The coach declined to view it. Scarnecchia was

Scarnecchia was fired by the Broncos and was notified by Commissioner Roger Goodell that, as a repeat violator of league rules regarding the integrity of the game, he faced a hearing to determine if he would be banned from the NFL.

“We certainly did not view or do anything with the footage, and he was made aware that it was something we didn’t condone in our organization,” McDaniels said Saturday. “I failed to follow through and report it to the proper individuals in our organization and with the league.”

Asked why he failed to report the incident immediately, McDaniels said: “I made a mistake. I made a mistake and I should have done that right away. We felt we handled it the right way by not doing anything with that but I did not follow through with it.”

McDaniels also worked for New England, but NFL Executive Vice President Jeff Pash said there was no evidence he was involved with the videotaping there.

The Broncos didn’t report this latest incident to the NFL for nearly two weeks, and Scarnecchia remained involved with the team until mid-November. Two hours before the league announced the results of its investigation Saturday, the team said Scarnecchia was on a leave of absence. Later, it said he’d been fired.

A call to a listing for Scarnecchia went to a voice message that said the mailbox was full.

McDaniels, who worked in New England from 2001-09, hired Scarnecchia in Denver shortly after he became the Broncos’ coach 22 months ago.

“When we hired Steve, it was with the understanding that he would come here and do good work,” McDaniels said. “In no way did we think this situation or type of situation would come up and be an issue for us or for him.”

Broncos chief operating officer Joe Ellis said that when Scarnecchia was hired, the team was aware he had been involved in Spygate, but not of the specifics.

“He knew full well what was expected from him in terms of the types of behavior we would expect out of him,” Ellis said on a conference call.

The videotaping occurred during practices at Wembley Stadium on Oct. 30, the day before the 49ers’ 24-16 win over the Broncos. It was the only time the teams worked out on the same field in London.

Ellis said the Broncos promptly notified the NFL after their executives learned of the violation. He declined to reveal how they became aware.

“The Denver Broncos, their ownership, and their executives had their moral compass pointed in the right direction,” Pash said.

He added: “I think they’ve set an example as to how incidents of this type are properly handled.”

The NFL determined Broncos executives were told about the videotaping Nov. 8, and told the league about it four days later after an internal review. On Nov. 16, Broncos owner Pat Bowlen, Ellis and team general counsel Rich Slivka met with league officials in New York.

After that meeting, NFL security began its investigation, which included interviews of Broncos personnel and an analysis of laptop computers used by the team’s video department. It was confirmed the 49ers’ practice had been recorded, and the league retained that tape.

“This incident cuts into the trust and respect our fans, our ticket holders, our community and our fellow competitors have for our organization. … We will take all steps to ensure that an incident like this never occurs again,” Bowlen said in a statement.

Scarnecchia acknowledged to NFL investigators he taped the walkthrough, according to excerpts from a letter Goodell sent to Bowlen.

The letter stated that Scarnecchia maintained that he had not previously recorded a walkthrough or other practice or “engaged in any other improper videotaping (such as recording coaching signals of an opposing team) since joining the Broncos.”

The letter also said Scarnecchia “knew that what he did in London was wrong,” that taping the walkthrough was his decision alone and nobody instructed him to record the practice.

In addition, the investigation found that when Scarnecchia offered to show the tape to McDaniels, the coach replied, “No, I’m not doing that.” Scarnecchia said he didn’t show the tape to any other staff member.

Goodell’s letter to Bowlen said that McDaniels was interviewed “under circumstances that would have made it impossible for him to have spoken to Mr. Scarnecchia in advance” and that McDaniels’ recollection of events matched Scarnecchia’s.

“Although I find no fault with the way the club handled this matter once you and your executives became aware of it, I nonetheless believe that some penalty must be imposed,” Goodell wrote. “We have no more important responsibility than preserving the integrity and competitive fairness of the game and avoiding any implication that games are decided by anything other than what takes place on the field.”

The letter added: “This appears to be a single incident by an employee who acted entirely on his own.”

McDaniels should have immediately notified team executives of what happened, however, the commissioner wrote. Goodell cited a policy in which team executives, head coaches and others are obliged to promptly report violations tied to the integrity of the game. Pash said that as a coordinator and head coach, McDaniels would have been required to file a report with the league at the end of each season that acknowledged the policy.

The league issued a much sterner punishment against the Patriots after Spygate. It included imposing $750,000 in fines against the team and coach Bill Belichick, and stripping New England of its 2008 first-round draft pick for what were found to be repeated violations.

This is the latest embarrassment for a Broncos team that is 3-7 and has lost 15 of 20 for the first time since 1971-72. The Broncos, who face St. Louis at Invesco Field on Sunday, were routed 59-14 by archrival Oakland last month in what many consider the worst home loss in the team’s 51-year history.

Ellis said McDaniels made a mistake, but it wasn’t a fireable offense.

“We’re disappointed with the season as it’s gone thus far, but we have six games left to play,” he said. “This particular incident that one employee took advantage of does not sway Mr. Bowlen’s feelings about Josh one way or the other.”

Ellis said Broncos officials had contacted their counterparts in San Francisco. The 49ers released a statement saying the team had no comment.

“I don’t really care about that stuff, seriously,” coach Mike Singletary told reporters. “It didn’t affect us, let’s just move on.”

AP Sports Writers Rachel Cohen in New York and Janie McCauley in San Francisco and AP freelancer Dennis Georgatos in Englewood contributed to this report.

Mister Pittsburgh
11-28-2010, 12:06 PM
Yeah right. I am sure that the videographer went rogue and filmed on his own accord.

And to say that New England did not benefit at all from their video taping is preposterous. Maybe a team without this guy

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/eticket/story?page=adams

would not have benefited all that much from having video. But you give a dude with a photographic memory that video, and he completely changes things. Even if you change your hand signals, he can figure it out in a half and by the second half he knows what you are running.

Counting cards might not be illegal in Vegas, but it will get your knees broken with a baseball bat.

ALLD
11-28-2010, 12:09 PM
November 27 2010 Last updated at 09:27 PM ET
Broncos' Spygate Reeks of Cover-Up
By Greg Couch
National Columnist
Text SizeAAAPrint this page|EmailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Lifestream
It was all done by "one employee." That's how the Denver Broncos front office kept referring to Steve Scarnecchia, videographer.

You don't use his name, because referring to him as "employee" dehumanizes him. Say he was "one" because that means he's the bad guy, the one bad guy, the only bad guy.

That way, the Broncos are just poor, helpless victims in Spygate II.

Ha!

What we saw Saturday from the Broncos and the NFL was scapegoating, pure and simple. Some guy named Steve Scarnecchia is not the mastermind. He is not the problem. There is no such thing as a rogue videographer.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

More Coverage: Broncos Heavily Fined for Incident | Josh McDaniels Apologizes

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Let's connect a few dots here. In 2007, the NFL fined New England coach Bill Belichick for the original Spygate. He had his video guys capturing the New York Jets coaches on the sideline to figure out their signals. It is against NFL rules.

The league fined Belichick $500,000, and the Patriots were out $250,000 and a first-round draft choice, because Belichick had been instructing his video people to do stuff like that for years.

During those years, but not specifically in 2007, Scarnecchia was a videographer for the Patriots. The NFL considered him in violation of rules.

Josh McDaniels was an assistant coach under Belichick. Now, McDaniels is the head coach of the Denver Broncos. And of all the people in the world who can point a camera at a team's practices, guess who McDaniels hired?

Scarnecchia. And the Broncos approved the hire.

So now, with a fresh scandal, the Broncos fired Scarnecchia for getting video of the San Francisco 49ers practice before the Broncos played them in London last month. The league fined McDaniels just $50,000 after he said that when One Employee approached him with the video, he said the video should be deleted immediately.

Well, draw your own conclusions. But to me, this story is laughable.

I haven't met Scarnecchia and couldn't pick him out of a lineup. Don't know if he's a saint or sinner.

But he is coming across as one of those guys willing to do all the dirty work for rich, powerful guys who want it done while keeping their own hands clean.

A guy like that is incredibly valuable. Then, if anything goes wrong, he takes the fall all by himself, and a new guy like him comes in.

Let's start with this one: Why did the Broncos choose to hire Scarnecchia?

"We did hire him," said Joe Ellis, Broncos chief operating officer. "We were aware of some allegations, not specifics.

"He knew full well what was expected from him in terms of the type of behavior we would expect out of him, what Josh stood for, what Mr. Bowlen (team owner Pat Bowlen) stood for, what the Denver Broncos stood for, how we conducted ourselves.

"It's disappointing that he chose the wrong path when he was in London. But he was fully aware of the standards here."

Well put. Scarnecchia knew what was expected of him. He knew what McDaniels and the Broncos expected of him, as Ellis said.

Yet at the same time, he thought his head coach might be interested in some video that was obtained against NFL rules.

I wonder why.

There are a few more dots to connect. By the time Belichick was busted for Spygate, Scarnecchia wasn't with the Patriots anymore.

Eric Mangini, another Belichick assistant, had left the Patriots to become head coach of the New York Jets. He hired Scarnecchia. Mangini is widely accepted as the one who told the league on Belichick.

So Mangini seemed to know about Belichick's dirty video practices. Yet he hired one of the videographers. Then, McDaniels, who also knew, hired the same guy.

Jeff Pash, an NFL VP, said there are worse things than giving someone a second chance, even if that someone fails again.

True. And maybe that's what happened here.

Or, maybe the incredible value Scarnecchia has, the reason some coaches seem to feel he's the world's only videographer, is because they know what he's willing to do for them.

And their hands stay clean.

Well, eight days passed from the time McDaniels supposedly found out what Scarnecchia had done and the time the Broncos front office knew about it. No one will say who told the Broncos suits, but presumably it wasn't McDaniels but another team employee who was promised anonymity.

McDaniels said he never even looked at the video, but the league says its forensics search can't confirm that.

Scarnecchia, who will have a hearing with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, is considered a repeat-offender. He could be kicked out of the league for good.

Are we sure he's the one who is the repeat offender? That sure does make him sound awfully important.

Yet after his first offense, he was never fined or suspended. I asked the NFL why. "Sanctions in that case were imposed on the club and the head coach," said league spokesman Greg Aiello, "not the videographers carrying out the operation."

Carrying out the operation. That doesn't sound like the job description of a mastermind, but rather a foot soldier following orders.

Suddenly, the new story is, he has developed into someone who can come up with these schemes all by himself.

Pretty impressive growth from one employee.

Email me at gregcouch09@aol.com. Follow me on Twitter @gregcouch.