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View Full Version : Steelers OC next year: Childress vs. Norvy?



SanAntonioSteelerFan
11-22-2010, 10:16 PM
Fair chance both might be available, if Chargers don't pull it together to get past the 1st playoff game.

They both have good offensive pedigrees ... who would you choose?

hawaiiansteel
11-22-2010, 10:37 PM
I would prefer:

1) Gary Kubiak
2) Norv Turner
3) Chan Gailey
4) Bruce Arians
108) Brad Childress

flippy
11-22-2010, 11:22 PM
Maybe Whiz wlll get fired in AZ and we can bring him back. He seemed to be able to push Ben. I know they don't really like each other, but that can be good sometimes.

Or Gailey can get fired in Buffalo.

Although I doubt both.

I wonder when we'll get an DC that's not afraid of Tom Brady?

Crash
11-22-2010, 11:32 PM
Do you guys really think Whiz is coming back after he didn't get the job over Tomlin?

THINK!

flippy
11-22-2010, 11:56 PM
Do you guys really think Whiz is coming back after he didn't get the job over Tomlin?


WHo says we have to keep Tomlin? ;)

Chadman
11-23-2010, 12:53 AM
Childress will give most of you what you want- more emphasis on the running game.

BradshawsHairdresser
11-23-2010, 12:55 AM
I believe Norv would be an outstanding OC for the Steelers. But I suspect he'll barely squeak his Chargers into the postseason, and be safe as their coach for another year.

Djfan
11-23-2010, 01:39 AM
I believe Norv would be an outstanding OC for the Steelers. But I suspect he'll barely squeak his Chargers into the postseason, and be safe as their coach for another year.


Word. Right now the SDSU Aztecs might just win that division.

SidSmythe
11-23-2010, 06:24 AM
Childress will give most of you what you want- more emphasis on the running game.

I was going to point out the same thing. I'd take Childress over Arians. Childress may lack in people skills to be a H.C., but he's a good X & O guy and he has a capable QB to work with.

Oviedo
11-23-2010, 10:40 AM
Do you guys really think Whiz is coming back after he didn't get the job over Tomlin?


WHo says we have to keep Tomlin? ;)

Who ever said we would want a loser like Whiz? Talk about a coach screwing up a team, look at his job this season.

feltdizz
11-23-2010, 11:36 AM
hiring OC's who were fired... hmm

I can hear it now after our first loss. "He was fired for a reason"

proudpittsburgher
11-23-2010, 11:41 AM
hiring OC's who were fired... hmm

I can hear it now after our first loss. "He was fired for a reason"


Hiring an OC who was fired from a head coaching gig. Big difference. And they got a head coaching job for a reason, in most cases . . . they were really good coordinators. See Cameron, Cam.

Djfan
11-23-2010, 11:51 AM
hiring OC's who were fired... hmm

I can hear it now after our first loss. "He was fired for a reason"

Wasn't BA fired from The Stains?

flippy
11-23-2010, 12:39 PM
Do you guys really think Whiz is coming back after he didn't get the job over Tomlin?


WHo says we have to keep Tomlin? ;)

Who ever said we would want a loser like Whiz? Talk about a coach screwing up a team, look at his job this season.

He was fine as an OC. At least he doesn't over promise and under deliver like some other head coaches who say they're building a champion and gonna unleash hell.

flippy
11-23-2010, 12:40 PM
Do you guys really think Whiz is coming back after he didn't get the job over Tomlin?


WHo says we have to keep Tomlin? ;)

Who ever said we would want a loser like Whiz? Talk about a coach screwing up a team, look at his job this season.

He was fine as an OC. At least he doesn't over promise and under deliver like some other head coaches who say they're building a champion and gonna unleash hell.

Mister Pittsburgh
11-23-2010, 12:51 PM
Our next OC will be Randy Fichtner......

Biography
Randy Fichtner is in his first season coaching the Steelers’ quarterbacks after spending three seasons as the team’s wide receivers coach. He joined the Steelers after serving the previous six seasons at the University of Mem*phis. Fichtner was hired by Mike Tomlin on Jan. 29, 2007.

In 2009 the Steelers had two 1,000-yard receivers. Hines Ward posted his club-record sixth 1,000-yard receiving season while Santonio Holmes posted his first career 1,000 yard receiving season, leading the team with 1,248 yards on 79 receptions. Rookie Mike Wallace led all AFC rookies 756 receiving yards and added six touchdowns to the season.

Randy Fichtner is in his first season coaching the Steelers’ quarterbacks after spending three seasons as the team’s wide receivers coach. He joined the Steelers after serving the previous six seasons at the University of Mem*phis. Fichtner was hired by Mike Tomlin on Jan. 29, 2007.


In 2009 the Steelers had two 1,000-yard receivers. Hines Ward posted his club-record sixth 1,000-yard receiving season while Santonio Holmes posted his first career 1,000 yard receiving season, leading the team with 1,248 yards on 79 receptions. Rookie Mike Wallace led all AFC rookies 756 receiving yards and added six touchdowns to the season.


Fichtner’s receiving core had an excellent season in 2008 as Ward topped 1,000 yards (1,043) for the fifth time in his career, and Holmes was named MVP of Super Bowl XLIII after catching nine passes for 131 yards (14.6 avg.) including the game-winning touchdown reception with 35 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter.


Under the tutelage of Fichtner, Ward and Holmes matched their reception total from 2006 (123), while increasing their TD catches from eight in 2006 to 15 in 2007.


Fichtner, who instituted the spread offense at Memphis, was an integral part of the Tiger football team for six years. He was hired in 2001 to serve as the offensive coor*dinator and quarterbacks coach, and his offense re-wrote the Memphis record book for six seasons.


Under Fichtner’s direction, former Tiger quarterback Danny Wimprine emerged as one of the top passers in Conference-USA in 2003.



In 2004, All-American running back in DeAngelo Williams led an offense that lived up to the billing and finished the year ranked ninth nationally in total offense and 10th in the nation in scoring.

Fichtner was a part of unprecedented offensive success at Memphis that also con*tributed to the Tigers playing in three straight bowl games from 2003-05.



The 2002 squad set a record for total offense with 4,258 yards, and then the 2003 team shattered that mark with 5,779 yards of total offense. In 2004, the Tigers amassed 5,524 yards of total offense to rank second all-time. The 2004 Tigers also set school records in points scored with 430 and in passing touchdowns with 25.



Fichtner was no stranger to Memphis when he joined the staff in 2001. He had pre*viously served as an assistant for the Tigers. Prior to his second stint at Memphis, Fichtner spent four years (1997-2000) at Arkansas State University. He arrived in Jonesboro as the quarterback coach in the spring of 1997 and was promoted to of*fensive coordinator in August of 1997.



During his tenure with the Indians, Fichtner worked with quarterback Cleo Lemon, who set virtually every Arkansas State passing and total offense record.



Prior to joining the staff at Arkansas State, Fichtner spent three years at his alma mater, Purdue, serving as wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator from 1994-96.



The Cleveland, Ohio, native originally went to Memphis in the fall of 1990 and coached the Tiger receivers and quarterbacks for four seasons. During his stay at Memphis, Fichtner worked with St. Louis Rams All-Pro wide receiver Isaac Bruce.

Fichtner, 46, worked as a student assistant and graduate assistant at Purdue (1985-86) and at Michigan (1986-87), before serving as a volunteer coach at South*ern California in 1988. He landed his first full-time position in 1989 as the tight ends coach at UNLV and worked for the Rebels for one season before coming to Memphis.



Fichtner graduated from Purdue in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in health promo*tion. He is married to the former Jennifer Parker of Covington, Tenn., and the couple has three children: a son, Nathaniel Ross (14), and daughters, Shelby Brooke (15) and Kirby Lynn (10).

RuthlessBurgher
11-23-2010, 01:10 PM
Childress will give most of you what you want- more emphasis on the running game.

When Chilly was the O.C. in Philly, they barely ran the ball at all. Brian Westbrook was an excellent RB catching passes out of the backfield, but he wasn't handed the ball all that often. When he got Peterson in Minnesota, he adapted and handed the ball off more to what is likely the most talented RB on the planet. Imagine that...adapting to the skills of the players you have!

RuthlessBurgher
11-23-2010, 01:14 PM
Do you guys really think Whiz is coming back after he didn't get the job over Tomlin?


WHo says we have to keep Tomlin? ;)

Who ever said we would want a loser like Whiz? Talk about a coach screwing up a team, look at his job this season.

He was fine as an OC. At least he doesn't over promise and under deliver like some other head coaches who say they're building a champion and gonna unleash hell.

He learned from that. This year, he made no such proclamations and when things started to look bleak after an uninspired performance all-around against the New England Cheetahs, he took action. Cut his kicker and signed another one. Benched Essex and replaced him with Foster. Inserted Sanders as the #3 WR over Randle El. Dressed Antonio Brown and allowed him to return every punt except for one. Utilized all 3 of our young potential game breaking wideouts in a 5 wide formation that we haven't seen all year. Perhaps last year was all talk and no action, but this year is all action and no talk.

Oviedo
11-23-2010, 01:17 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.

feltdizz
11-23-2010, 01:30 PM
Childress will give most of you what you want- more emphasis on the running game.

When Chilly was the O.C. in Philly, they barely ran the ball at all. Brian Westbrook was an excellent RB catching passes out of the backfield, but he wasn't handed the ball all that often. When he got Peterson in Minnesota, he adapted and handed the ball off more to what is likely the most talented RB on the planet. Imagine that...adapting to the skills of the players you have!

Philly barely ran the ball at all and they were terrible at clock management and getting 3rd and inches. They were lucky to have JJ as DC and the NFC was pretty lame when they were in back to back to back NFC championships.

They never adjusted during games...

IN Minny he had Peterson... and they threw the ball like crazy with a 41 year old has been and now he is gone.

No thanks.

Sugar
11-23-2010, 01:31 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.

:Cheers :Clap

aggiebones
11-23-2010, 01:47 PM
I would love Kubiak. For one, we might draft an Aggie for once (granted they have been bad for a decade). And 2, maybe we can stop getting all the tsippers on the team. S-Weed, Hills, JScott, Hampton (OK, I'll make an exception here :)

SanAntonioSteelerFan
11-23-2010, 02:10 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.

:Cheers :Clap

:Agree +1 +1 :lol: :lol:

feltdizz
11-23-2010, 02:47 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.

:Cheers :Clap

:Agree +1 +1 :lol: :lol:
:Clap

this was classic.

focosteeler
11-23-2010, 02:56 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.


:Clap :Bow

Oviedo
11-23-2010, 02:59 PM
Our next OC will be Randy Fichtner......

Biography
Randy Fichtner is in his first season coaching the Steelers’ quarterbacks after spending three seasons as the team’s wide receivers coach. He joined the Steelers after serving the previous six seasons at the University of Mem*phis. Fichtner was hired by Mike Tomlin on Jan. 29, 2007.

In 2009 the Steelers had two 1,000-yard receivers. Hines Ward posted his club-record sixth 1,000-yard receiving season while Santonio Holmes posted his first career 1,000 yard receiving season, leading the team with 1,248 yards on 79 receptions. Rookie Mike Wallace led all AFC rookies 756 receiving yards and added six touchdowns to the season.

Randy Fichtner is in his first season coaching the Steelers’ quarterbacks after spending three seasons as the team’s wide receivers coach. He joined the Steelers after serving the previous six seasons at the University of Mem*phis. Fichtner was hired by Mike Tomlin on Jan. 29, 2007.


In 2009 the Steelers had two 1,000-yard receivers. Hines Ward posted his club-record sixth 1,000-yard receiving season while Santonio Holmes posted his first career 1,000 yard receiving season, leading the team with 1,248 yards on 79 receptions. Rookie Mike Wallace led all AFC rookies 756 receiving yards and added six touchdowns to the season.


Fichtner’s receiving core had an excellent season in 2008 as Ward topped 1,000 yards (1,043) for the fifth time in his career, and Holmes was named MVP of Super Bowl XLIII after catching nine passes for 131 yards (14.6 avg.) including the game-winning touchdown reception with 35 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter.


Under the tutelage of Fichtner, Ward and Holmes matched their reception total from 2006 (123), while increasing their TD catches from eight in 2006 to 15 in 2007.


Fichtner, who instituted the spread offense at Memphis, was an integral part of the Tiger football team for six years. He was hired in 2001 to serve as the offensive coor*dinator and quarterbacks coach, and his offense re-wrote the Memphis record book for six seasons.


Under Fichtner’s direction, former Tiger quarterback Danny Wimprine emerged as one of the top passers in Conference-USA in 2003.



In 2004, All-American running back in DeAngelo Williams led an offense that lived up to the billing and finished the year ranked ninth nationally in total offense and 10th in the nation in scoring.

Fichtner was a part of unprecedented offensive success at Memphis that also con*tributed to the Tigers playing in three straight bowl games from 2003-05.



The 2002 squad set a record for total offense with 4,258 yards, and then the 2003 team shattered that mark with 5,779 yards of total offense. In 2004, the Tigers amassed 5,524 yards of total offense to rank second all-time. The 2004 Tigers also set school records in points scored with 430 and in passing touchdowns with 25.



Fichtner was no stranger to Memphis when he joined the staff in 2001. He had pre*viously served as an assistant for the Tigers. Prior to his second stint at Memphis, Fichtner spent four years (1997-2000) at Arkansas State University. He arrived in Jonesboro as the quarterback coach in the spring of 1997 and was promoted to of*fensive coordinator in August of 1997.



During his tenure with the Indians, Fichtner worked with quarterback Cleo Lemon, who set virtually every Arkansas State passing and total offense record.



Prior to joining the staff at Arkansas State, Fichtner spent three years at his alma mater, Purdue, serving as wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator from 1994-96.



The Cleveland, Ohio, native originally went to Memphis in the fall of 1990 and coached the Tiger receivers and quarterbacks for four seasons. During his stay at Memphis, Fichtner worked with St. Louis Rams All-Pro wide receiver Isaac Bruce.

Fichtner, 46, worked as a student assistant and graduate assistant at Purdue (1985-86) and at Michigan (1986-87), before serving as a volunteer coach at South*ern California in 1988. He landed his first full-time position in 1989 as the tight ends coach at UNLV and worked for the Rebels for one season before coming to Memphis.



Fichtner graduated from Purdue in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in health promo*tion. He is married to the former Jennifer Parker of Covington, Tenn., and the couple has three children: a son, Nathaniel Ross (14), and daughters, Shelby Brooke (15) and Kirby Lynn (10).

Not sure how college OC translates to Pro OC but he does enough enough time with the Steelers that he would likely get an interview

Mister Pittsburgh
11-23-2010, 03:24 PM
Our next OC will be Randy Fichtner......

Biography
Randy Fichtner is in his first season coaching the Steelers’ quarterbacks after spending three seasons as the team’s wide receivers coach. He joined the Steelers after serving the previous six seasons at the University of Mem*phis. Fichtner was hired by Mike Tomlin on Jan. 29, 2007.

In 2009 the Steelers had two 1,000-yard receivers. Hines Ward posted his club-record sixth 1,000-yard receiving season while Santonio Holmes posted his first career 1,000 yard receiving season, leading the team with 1,248 yards on 79 receptions. Rookie Mike Wallace led all AFC rookies 756 receiving yards and added six touchdowns to the season.

Randy Fichtner is in his first season coaching the Steelers’ quarterbacks after spending three seasons as the team’s wide receivers coach. He joined the Steelers after serving the previous six seasons at the University of Mem*phis. Fichtner was hired by Mike Tomlin on Jan. 29, 2007.


In 2009 the Steelers had two 1,000-yard receivers. Hines Ward posted his club-record sixth 1,000-yard receiving season while Santonio Holmes posted his first career 1,000 yard receiving season, leading the team with 1,248 yards on 79 receptions. Rookie Mike Wallace led all AFC rookies 756 receiving yards and added six touchdowns to the season.


Fichtner’s receiving core had an excellent season in 2008 as Ward topped 1,000 yards (1,043) for the fifth time in his career, and Holmes was named MVP of Super Bowl XLIII after catching nine passes for 131 yards (14.6 avg.) including the game-winning touchdown reception with 35 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter.


Under the tutelage of Fichtner, Ward and Holmes matched their reception total from 2006 (123), while increasing their TD catches from eight in 2006 to 15 in 2007.


Fichtner, who instituted the spread offense at Memphis, was an integral part of the Tiger football team for six years. He was hired in 2001 to serve as the offensive coor*dinator and quarterbacks coach, and his offense re-wrote the Memphis record book for six seasons.


Under Fichtner’s direction, former Tiger quarterback Danny Wimprine emerged as one of the top passers in Conference-USA in 2003.



In 2004, All-American running back in DeAngelo Williams led an offense that lived up to the billing and finished the year ranked ninth nationally in total offense and 10th in the nation in scoring.

Fichtner was a part of unprecedented offensive success at Memphis that also con*tributed to the Tigers playing in three straight bowl games from 2003-05.



The 2002 squad set a record for total offense with 4,258 yards, and then the 2003 team shattered that mark with 5,779 yards of total offense. In 2004, the Tigers amassed 5,524 yards of total offense to rank second all-time. The 2004 Tigers also set school records in points scored with 430 and in passing touchdowns with 25.



Fichtner was no stranger to Memphis when he joined the staff in 2001. He had pre*viously served as an assistant for the Tigers. Prior to his second stint at Memphis, Fichtner spent four years (1997-2000) at Arkansas State University. He arrived in Jonesboro as the quarterback coach in the spring of 1997 and was promoted to of*fensive coordinator in August of 1997.



During his tenure with the Indians, Fichtner worked with quarterback Cleo Lemon, who set virtually every Arkansas State passing and total offense record.



Prior to joining the staff at Arkansas State, Fichtner spent three years at his alma mater, Purdue, serving as wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator from 1994-96.



The Cleveland, Ohio, native originally went to Memphis in the fall of 1990 and coached the Tiger receivers and quarterbacks for four seasons. During his stay at Memphis, Fichtner worked with St. Louis Rams All-Pro wide receiver Isaac Bruce.

Fichtner, 46, worked as a student assistant and graduate assistant at Purdue (1985-86) and at Michigan (1986-87), before serving as a volunteer coach at South*ern California in 1988. He landed his first full-time position in 1989 as the tight ends coach at UNLV and worked for the Rebels for one season before coming to Memphis.



Fichtner graduated from Purdue in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in health promo*tion. He is married to the former Jennifer Parker of Covington, Tenn., and the couple has three children: a son, Nathaniel Ross (14), and daughters, Shelby Brooke (15) and Kirby Lynn (10).

Not sure how college OC translates to Pro OC but he does enough enough time with the Steelers that he would likely get an interview

Tomlin and him coached together at Arkansas State too.

Shawn
11-23-2010, 08:46 PM
LeBeau is a failed HC but a terrific DC.

fordfixer
11-23-2010, 11:57 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.


I see a problem with your post. I believe that both http://www.fireChilly.com and http://www.firenorvy.com have all ready been used. So we must find some one who has no OC experience. IMHO

Djfan
11-24-2010, 10:22 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.


I see a problem with your post. I believe that both http://www.fireChilly.com and http://www.firenorvy.com have all ready been used. So we must find some one who has no OC experience. IMHO


FordFixer for OC!!!!!!! :tt2 :tt2 :tt1 :tt1 :Bow :Bow

Sugar
11-24-2010, 10:35 PM
LeBeau is a failed HC but a terrific DC.

True fact. Many times they simply aren't the same skillsets.

hawaiiansteel
11-25-2010, 02:52 AM
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010

Worst Steelers Offensive Coordinator Poll Recap


Perhaps it is odd to recap a poll that closed months ago, but between the 2010 NFL draft, the Steelers Judiciary woes, and working a second job, I simply have not had time.

The poll began in February and ran for over a month, attracting over 100 votes. Bruce Arians “won” the poll is a little of a surprise, which I’ll address at the end.

For now, let’s look at the other “contenders.”

The "Bottom" Seven

Ken Whisenhunt and Tom Moore drew only a single votes, and that is one vote too many for both men.

Chan Gailey and Ron Erhardt polled three votes a piece, which is a slight surprise, given that so many fans blame Gailey for calling goal line passes that were intercepted in the 1997 AFC Championship game when he had Jerome Bettis in his backfield.

Gailey is not worthy of the “worst coordinator” ignominy, but I expected that more fans would beg to differ.

Inspector gadget, aka Mike Mularkey picked up five votes, and while Mularkey perhaps got a little too captivated with his own innovations, Pittsburgh’s offense enjoyed a lot of success during his tenure.

Kevin Gilbride was the first to break double digits with 11 votes and that is how it should be as he is the first offensive coordinator to merit serious consideration for the “worst ever title.” Bill Cowher’s hiring of Gilbride, he of run and shoot fame, mystified me from its announcement to Gilbride’s dismissal. Gilbride never seemed to “get it.”

Gilbride was bad, but he was not the worst Steelers offensive coordinator ever.

Joe Walton vs. Ray Sherman

The poll went up while the article “Walton’s Mountain, Good Night Chuck” was on Steel Curtain Rising’s home page.

So it is no surprise there that Walton took an early lead.

But the Walton article got put down and ultimately off the home page, Ray Sherman and Bruce Arians picked up support quickly.

The real debate is between Sherman and Walton.

Ray Sherman had one ill-fated season as the Steelers offensive coordinator. Picked after the 1997 season on the heels of Jerry Jones surprise decision to hire Chan Gailey as his head coach, Sherman arrived as a second tier choice.

Still, Sherman had a good track record with Brad Johnson and it was thought that he would transform Kordell Stewart into a finished product.

Instead Sherman was an unmitigated disaster.

Stewart had his own weaknesses, so perhaps it is too harsh to condemn Sherman for “ruining him,” but Ray Sherman certainly failed to foster Kordell Stewart’s development.

Under Sherman, Stewart became tentative, the long ball disappeared and Sherman was either unwilling or unable to call plays that capitalized on Stewart’s mobility. Bill Cowher took note and stripped Sherman of his play calling duties late in the season.

Sherman’s offense was predictable. I can remember a third and long situation during one late-season drubbing, where I said to my buddies at the Baltimore’s Purple Goose Saloon, “Watch, it is going to be a weakside pitch to Fred McAfee.” Sherman called just that, and to the surprise of no one, the Steelers failed to convert.

In Sherman’s defense, John Jackson’s departure had already weakened his offensive line and disintegrated further with Justin Strzelczyk’s injury. The Steelers had also lost Yancy Thigpen and neither Charles Johnson, Will Blackwell nor Jahine Arnold could pick up the slack.

Why It Is Walton

I’ve already written at length about Joe Walton so I’ll only add a few more comments.

Walton’s offensive line had its own weaknesses and his wide receiving corps was less than stealer.

Like Sherman, Walton shares in possibly having had a hand in ruining a promising young quarterback whose raw talent mirrored his myriad flaws.

On balance, however, for me Walton was worse than Sherman because he stubbornly refused to change even when evidence mounted that his system was failing. Worse yet, the Steelers had established themselves as a team on the rise after the 1989 season, and they floundered under Walton.

A final point in Walton’s “favor.” Ray Sherman arrived in 1998, just as the Steelers defense ws beginning to decline. In 1990 however, the Steelers had the number one overall defense, an effort wasted by Walton and his offense.

About Arians

Steel Curtain Rising regulars know how I went from being an Arians’ Attacker to an Arians Agnostic, so I will not recount that journey here (you can click on the highlighted links to read more.)

One does not need to be an Arians’ Apologist to know one thing: The Steelers won Super Bowl XLIII with Arians as offensive coordinator, and Arians’ game plan played a crucial part in the Steelers victory.

Arians may not be the Steelers best offensive coordinator, but he certainly is not the worst.

http://steelcurtainrising.blogspot.com/ ... nator.html (http://steelcurtainrising.blogspot.com/2010/05/worst-steelers-offensive-coordinator.html)

1st and Goal--
11-26-2010, 06:50 PM
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010

Worst Steelers Offensive Coordinator Poll Recap


Perhaps it is odd to recap a poll that closed months ago, but between the 2010 NFL draft, the Steelers Judiciary woes, and working a second job, I simply have not had time.

The poll began in February and ran for over a month, attracting over 100 votes. Bruce Arians “won” the poll is a little of a surprise, which I’ll address at the end.

For now, let’s look at the other “contenders.”

The "Bottom" Seven

Ken Whisenhunt and Tom Moore drew only a single votes, and that is one vote too many for both men.

Chan Gailey and Ron Erhardt polled three votes a piece, which is a slight surprise, given that so many fans blame Gailey for calling goal line passes that were intercepted in the 1997 AFC Championship game when he had Jerome Bettis in his backfield.

Gailey is not worthy of the “worst coordinator” ignominy, but I expected that more fans would beg to differ.

Inspector gadget, aka Mike Mularkey picked up five votes, and while Mularkey perhaps got a little too captivated with his own innovations, Pittsburgh’s offense enjoyed a lot of success during his tenure.

Kevin Gilbride was the first to break double digits with 11 votes and that is how it should be as he is the first offensive coordinator to merit serious consideration for the “worst ever title.” Bill Cowher’s hiring of Gilbride, he of run and shoot fame, mystified me from its announcement to Gilbride’s dismissal. Gilbride never seemed to “get it.”

Gilbride was bad, but he was not the worst Steelers offensive coordinator ever.

Joe Walton vs. Ray Sherman

The poll went up while the article “Walton’s Mountain, Good Night Chuck” was on Steel Curtain Rising’s home page.

So it is no surprise there that Walton took an early lead.

But the Walton article got put down and ultimately off the home page, Ray Sherman and Bruce Arians picked up support quickly.

The real debate is between Sherman and Walton.

Ray Sherman had one ill-fated season as the Steelers offensive coordinator. Picked after the 1997 season on the heels of Jerry Jones surprise decision to hire Chan Gailey as his head coach, Sherman arrived as a second tier choice.

Still, Sherman had a good track record with Brad Johnson and it was thought that he would transform Kordell Stewart into a finished product.

Instead Sherman was an unmitigated disaster.

Stewart had his own weaknesses, so perhaps it is too harsh to condemn Sherman for “ruining him,” but Ray Sherman certainly failed to foster Kordell Stewart’s development.

Under Sherman, Stewart became tentative, the long ball disappeared and Sherman was either unwilling or unable to call plays that capitalized on Stewart’s mobility. Bill Cowher took note and stripped Sherman of his play calling duties late in the season.

Sherman’s offense was predictable. I can remember a third and long situation during one late-season drubbing, where I said to my buddies at the Baltimore’s Purple Goose Saloon, “Watch, it is going to be a weakside pitch to Fred McAfee.” Sherman called just that, and to the surprise of no one, the Steelers failed to convert.

In Sherman’s defense, John Jackson’s departure had already weakened his offensive line and disintegrated further with Justin Strzelczyk’s injury. The Steelers had also lost Yancy Thigpen and neither Charles Johnson, Will Blackwell nor Jahine Arnold could pick up the slack.

Why It Is Walton

I’ve already written at length about Joe Walton so I’ll only add a few more comments.

Walton’s offensive line had its own weaknesses and his wide receiving corps was less than stealer.

Like Sherman, Walton shares in possibly having had a hand in ruining a promising young quarterback whose raw talent mirrored his myriad flaws.

On balance, however, for me Walton was worse than Sherman because he stubbornly refused to change even when evidence mounted that his system was failing. Worse yet, the Steelers had established themselves as a team on the rise after the 1989 season, and they floundered under Walton.

A final point in Walton’s “favor.” Ray Sherman arrived in 1998, just as the Steelers defense ws beginning to decline. In 1990 however, the Steelers had the number one overall defense, an effort wasted by Walton and his offense.

About Arians

Steel Curtain Rising regulars know how I went from being an Arians’ Attacker to an Arians Agnostic, so I will not recount that journey here (you can click on the highlighted links to read more.)

One does not need to be an Arians’ Apologist to know one thing: The Steelers won Super Bowl XLIII with Arians as offensive coordinator, and Arians’ game plan played a crucial part in the Steelers victory.

Arians may not be the Steelers best offensive coordinator, but he certainly is not the worst.

http://steelcurtainrising.blogspot.com/ ... nator.html (http://steelcurtainrising.blogspot.com/2010/05/worst-steelers-offensive-coordinator.html)


How could I possibly have missed this? It's hilarious. I can't believe I had not seen this earlier.

A special ty for reminding me of the guy who came here between Gailey and Mularkey. For weeks now I was trying to remember his name but could not. So it was Al Sherman. Reason I was trying to remember his name was I knew there was a guy in there that came in and I don't think he was here more than a couple hours when already they were talking about getting rid of him. Even that one puzzled me. Seems to me the Steelers did the same thing they always do whoever is the OC. Run some---Pass some. Obviously, analyzing OC's is not my thing.

But I can't help commenting on Oviedo's criteria for selecting an OC.

By his standards then Randy Fichtner is definitely out.

This reminded me of something I read in the PG as long as 2 years ago. A reporter asked BA if he was aware of all the heat he was getting from fans and forums etc. Now mind you, this was pretty early in his tenure as OC and he replied some standard stuff like they are entitled to their opinions blah blah etc. But, at the end of this he added its all right "As long as they spell my name right" This really made me laugh because I thought his name had either a y or an h in it since I was at that time not familiar with who he was. Anyway, I did make a point if I ever had a reason to type his name I would get it right. Bruce Arians. [There is a red line under the Arians, but I do think it is correct.

Anyway, besides Fictner being so long it is also too hard to spell. I can see an endless number of variations on his name being laid out while the fans are blasting him. Fitchner, Finkner, Fricter, Frishner, FICKTNER etc. Now, I already forgot the correct one. But one more thing, the i and the u are awfully close on the keyboard---I can see how this could really cause complications. Yeah, on this one Oviedo is right. :Cheers

RuthlessBurgher
11-26-2010, 07:03 PM
For weeks now I was trying to remember his name but could not. So it was Al Sherman.

Actually, it was Ray Sherman. Al Sherman was a Depression-era songwriter.

1st and Goal--
11-26-2010, 10:27 PM
For weeks now I was trying to remember his name but could not. So it was Al Sherman.[/quot

Actually, it was Ray Sherman. Al Sherman was a Depression-era songwriter.

Okay! Guess I was trying to shorten his name up so he would fit Oviedo's OC requirements. :D

BTW RuthlessBurgher: I noticed that in your earlier post listing all those positive changes last week---the return of the 5W's, the starting of #88, the use of #84 etc. There was no mention of anyone usually connected with offensive measures. Was that by design?

Actually, Sanders was on the field as the 1st #3 WR in two games prior to last week, although he did not play more downs than El for some reason. It wasn't until the NE game when he played just about the entire game [Ward injured] that the connection with Ben was made[TY-NE]. Then, last week like you mentioned he was clearly the #3 WR. He was on the field for 30 snaps and El played 8 downs. Wonder if that will be continued this week?

RuthlessBurgher
11-26-2010, 10:45 PM
[quote="1st and Goal--":2oywnfif]For weeks now I was trying to remember his name but could not. So it was Al Sherman.[/quot

Actually, it was Ray Sherman. Al Sherman was a Depression-era songwriter.

Okay! Guess I was trying to shorten his name up so he would fit Oviedo's OC requirements. :D

BTW RuthlessBurgher: I noticed that in your earlier post listing all those positive changes last week---the return of the 5W's, the starting of #88, the use of #84 etc. There was no mention of anyone usually connected with offensive measures. Was that by design?

Actually, Sanders was on the field as the 1st #3 WR in two games prior to last week, although he did not play more downs than El for some reason. It wasn't until the NE game when he played just about the entire game [Ward injured] that the connection with Ben was made[TY-NE]. Then, last week like you mentioned he was clearly the #3 WR. He was on the field for 30 snaps and El played 8 downs. Wonder if that will be continued this week?[/quote:2oywnfif]

On the basis of Sanders' TD catches in each of the past two weeks, I sure would hope that would continue. Randle El's only TD this season came from his arm (throwing to Wallace). Sanders has really only been used on offense after the bye week (since Ben has been back). Both Randle El and Sanders each had 5 catches in the NE game when we threw a ton in the 2nd half (and Ward was injured). Other than that, both guys have been making a catch or two per week for the most part. If that is all the production that our offense is going to get out of its #3 WR, you might as well give the young explosive kid some experience, where he can possibly make some plays for TD's.

Antwaan Randle El

WK Game Date Opp Result G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
1 09/12 ATL W 15-9 1 0 2 8 4.0 4 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2 09/19 @ TEN W 19-11 1 0 1 0 0.0 0 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 09/26 @ TB W 38-13 1 0 1 14 14.0 14 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
4 10/03 BAL L 14-17 1 0 2 50 25.0 34 0 -- -- -- -- -- 1 0
5 Bye -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
6 10/17 CLE W 28-10 1 0 1 11 11.0 11 0 -- -- -- -- -- 1 0
7 10/24 @ MIA W 23-22 1 0 1 13 13.0 13 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
8 10/31 @ NO L 10-20 1 0 3 33 11.0 13 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
9 11/08 @ CIN W 27-21 1 0 1 10 10.0 10 0 1 2 2.0 2 0 -- --
10 11/14 NE L 26-39 1 0 5 66 13.2 20 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
11 11/21 OAK W 35-3 1 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
TOTAL 10 0 17 205 12.1 34 0 1 2 2.0 2 0 2 0

Emmanuel Sanders

WK Game Date Opp Result G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost

1 09/12 ATL W 15-9 1 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2 09/19 @ TEN W 19-11 0 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 09/26 @ TB W 38-13 0 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
4 10/03 BAL L 14-17 0 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
5 Bye -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
6 10/17 CLE W 28-10 1 0 2 37 18.5 22 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
7 10/24 @ MIA W 23-22 1 0 1 18 18.0 18 0 -- -- -- -- -- 1 1
8 10/31 @ NO L 10-20 1 0 1 21 21.0 21 0 -- -- -- -- -- 1 0
9 11/08 @ CIN W 27-21 1 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
10 11/14 NE L 26-39 1 0 5 41 8.2 11 1 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
11 11/21 OAK W 35-3 1 0 2 35 17.5 22T 1 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
TOTAL 7 0 11 152 13.8 22 2 0 0 0.0 0 0 2 1

steeler_fan_in_t.o.
11-27-2010, 12:08 AM
Kevin Gilbride was the first to break double digits with 11 votes and that is how it should be as he is the first offensive coordinator to merit serious consideration for the “worst ever title.” Bill Cowher’s hiring of Gilbride, he of run and shoot fame, mystified me from its announcement to Gilbride’s dismissal. Gilbride never seemed to “get it.”

Gilbride was bad, but he was not the worst Steelers offensive coordinator ever.



Gilbride was awful. His entire system was based on everyone making the same reads. It required a high football IQ to play in his system. That is fine when you have a Warren Moon at QB and a core of veteran receivers, but not with the personnel we had here.

In 1999, Kordell was in his fifth year, but just became the starter in '97 and was never known as having the greatest football sense - but was an unbelievable athlete. Troy Edwards was a rook, Hines was in his second season, Will Blackwell in his third.....and these were kids that were new to starting.

Thigpen, Charles Johnson, Ernie Mills, Andre Hastings....all gone in the few years leading up to the Gilbride era.

That is what I hated most about him...he tried to fit these athletes into his system instead of fitting the system around the skill of the players. I think if you would have put a better fit for Kordell at OC at that time then he would now be remembered a lot more fondly than he is now.

1st and Goal--
11-27-2010, 05:28 AM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.

Is there any reason why no consideration is being given to the candidates first names? I would think Joe Childress [12 strokes] would proclaim himself the winner vs Norville Turner [14 strokes] using both names in the process. Then again, a check of the birth certificates of the individuals would be in order to insure fairness. More than likely it would be Joseph Childress [15 strokes] again favoring Turner. However, depending on the ethnic origin of Childress, he could be a Josef Childress thereby resulting in a tie.

I think, in order to avoid this confusion both Turner and Chilly should be discounted and some others be given consideration. How about Jimmy Ray [8 strokes] or Jimmy Raye [9 strokes] even James Ray, or Raye [again only 8 or 9 strokes]. Clearly, in every category, this is the most qualified candidate.

papillon
11-27-2010, 07:49 AM
Kevin Gilbride was the first to break double digits with 11 votes and that is how it should be as he is the first offensive coordinator to merit serious consideration for the “worst ever title.” Bill Cowher’s hiring of Gilbride, he of run and shoot fame, mystified me from its announcement to Gilbride’s dismissal. Gilbride never seemed to “get it.”

Gilbride was bad, but he was not the worst Steelers offensive coordinator ever.



Gilbride was awful. His entire system was based on everyone making the same reads. It required a high football IQ to play in his system. That is fine when you have a Warren Moon at QB and a core of veteran receivers, but not with the personnel we had here.

In 1999, Kordell was in his fifth year, but just became the starter in '97 and was never known as having the greatest football sense - but was an unbelievable athlete. Troy Edwards was a rook, Hines was in his second season, Will Blackwell in his third.....and these were kids that were new to starting.

Thigpen, Charles Johnson, Ernie Mills, Andre Hastings....all gone in the few years leading up to the Gilbride era.

That is what I hated most about him...he tried to fit these athletes into his system instead of fitting the system around the skill of the players. I think if you would have put a better fit for Kordell at OC at that time then he would now be remembered a lot more fondly than he is now.

You mean Vince Young and 3 or 4 rookies would flounder in Gilbride's offensive system? Just askin... :P

Pappy

Djfan
11-27-2010, 01:27 PM
Is this the Al Sherman you are talking about?

[youtube:319i19ve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2Hx_X84LC0&feature=related[/youtube:319i19ve]

RuthlessBurgher
11-27-2010, 02:09 PM
I think the real key to who shoiuld be the next OC is which potential candidate requires the fewest keystrokes to type. This is critical because when the inevitable criticisms of his play calling and intelligence begin we should be seeking to maximize efficiency so the complaints and second guessing can flow more freely.

The way I figure it Childress requires nine keystrokes and Turner requires just six. That is a big advanatage for Turner getting selected. That is not the whole story however because if we refer to Childress as "Chilly" that reduces his keystroke count down to six also and it does sound more insulting so that draws him even with "Turner." However if we refer to Turner as Norvy that is five keystrokes.

Based on my analysis we should select Turner or Norvy because it will increase the efficiency of the bemoaners, complainers, second guessers and those who have never played organized football beyond high school. I think he will be a great coice and should at least provide us with 2-3 years of endless posts about how incompetent he is but we will have saved potentially tens of thousands of keystokes over his tenure.

Is there any reason why no consideration is being given to the candidates first names? I would think Joe Childress [12 strokes] would proclaim himself the winner vs Norville Turner [14 strokes] using both names in the process. Then again, a check of the birth certificates of the individuals would be in order to insure fairness. More than likely it would be Joseph Childress [15 strokes] again favoring Turner. However, depending on the ethnic origin of Childress, he could be a Josef Childress thereby resulting in a tie.

I think, in order to avoid this confusion both Turner and Chilly should be discounted and some others be given consideration. How about Jimmy Ray [8 strokes] or Jimmy Raye [9 strokes] even James Ray, or Raye [again only 8 or 9 strokes]. Clearly, in every category, this is the most qualified candidate.

Man, you are batting 1.000 with coaches' first names this weekend. It's Brad Childress. Joe Childress was a RB for the Cardinals in the 50's and 60's.

RuthlessBurgher
11-27-2010, 02:12 PM
And it is also Norval Turner, not Norville. Deborah Norville was a host of the Today show back in the late 80's/early 90's. :P

1st and Goal--
11-27-2010, 06:51 PM
RuthlessBurgher said "Man, you are batting a 1.000 with coaches first names its Brad etc."

So it's Norval. Son of a gun, that's right. Those names were correct in the thread.

How'd I do with Jimmy Ray? Raye?.

Oh well, I don't suppose I'll be misnaming any of these guys in the future. They have about as much of a chance of being here as a _______ __ _________[fill in your favorite no way type phrase here.

Anyway, I haven't been too thrilled at my favorite [Cowher era] OC being on that list. Mitch, I mean Mike Mularkey was then and probably still is one of the best OC's in the league.