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Herewegosteelers!
10-17-2010, 08:24 PM
On the NBC Sunday Night pre-game show, the crew there are saying that some of the hits that took place today including one that Harrison had, should be enough for a suspension not just a fine. Do you think the commissioner would do something like that being that he decisions have been questionable to say the least?

SteelAbility
10-17-2010, 08:33 PM
I didn't see the game, but I heard Harrison's hit on Cribbs was clearly set up as a shoulder hit, but Cribbs made a last second turn into a helmet-to-helmet collision. It shouldn't even be fined, much less involve a suspension.

Sugar
10-17-2010, 08:50 PM
I found it interesting that Tomlin specifically said in his press conference that Harrison's hits were clean and unfineable. It was good of the coach to put it out there what his opinion is because if the NFL does levy a fine he won't be able to say jack after that.

stlrz d
10-17-2010, 08:55 PM
Where was Harrison supposed to go and what else should he have done on those hits?

It's football ferchrissakes!

Sugar
10-17-2010, 08:57 PM
I thought James was a beast yet again today. He was fantastic!!

focosteeler
10-17-2010, 09:00 PM
Where was Harrison supposed to go and what else should he have done on those hits?

It's football ferchrissakes!

:Agree i understand they are trying to keep head injuries low, but harrisons werent even close to as bad as the patriots one or the one on desean jackson...

Sugar
10-17-2010, 09:03 PM
I come from a boxing background and both Cribbs and Masso looked like Wlad Klitscko just popped them with a left hook. They fell badly- facefirst for Cribbs and that twisted lean that masso had.

True highlight reall stuff!

Flasteel
10-17-2010, 09:08 PM
Both were totally clean hits. The KO on Cribbs was helmet to helmet, but Cribbs fell into the path of an already committed Harrison...it would have been humanly impossible to avaoid. The second one was great timing and Harrison did not lead with his helmet, he led with his forearm and shoulder. I remember the commentators remarking that it was clearly a clean hit and they universally agreed both hits to be clean on NFL network.

AngryAsian
10-17-2010, 09:14 PM
Its Browns/Steelers intra-divisional grudge match. The only thing is that for several years its been lopsided.... so of course the team that inflicted the most punishment are gonna seem the bully on this one. All the hits were clean and any bobble heads that cry about the licks that were dealt need to start looking for jobs commentating on badminton matches.

Herewegosteelers!
10-17-2010, 10:22 PM
Its Browns/Steelers intra-divisional grudge match. The only thing is that for several years its been lopsided.... so of course the team that inflicted the most punishment are gonna seem the bully on this one. All the hits were clean and any bobble heads that cry about the licks that were dealt need to start looking for jobs commentating on badminton matches.
:Agree I thought they were both clean. I was wondering what Dungy and co. were talking about!

D Rock
10-17-2010, 10:24 PM
“You don’t want to injure people. I don’t want to injure anybody,” Harrison said. “But I’m not opposed to hurting anybody.”


http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/recap;_ylt= ... 0101017023 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/recap;_ylt=Avxu_dNXhjynAVPpDb5uEgRDubYF?gid=201010 17023)

grotonsteel
10-17-2010, 10:34 PM
“You don’t want to injure people. I don’t want to injure anybody,” Harrison said. “But I’m not opposed to hurting anybody.”


http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/recap;_ylt= ... 0101017023 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/recap;_ylt=Avxu_dNXhjynAVPpDb5uEgRDubYF?gid=201010 17023)

:Clap

HArrison ... :Bow :Bow

Steelers don't play flag football... :tt2 :tt2

SteelTorch
10-17-2010, 10:51 PM
Already fans are whining about it:

http://www.coldhardfootballfacts.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=13857

:lol:

stlrz d
10-17-2010, 11:52 PM
Mike Florio (aka douche) said that every helmet to helmet hit (he didn't imply intent or not, just every helmet to helmet hit) should result in a penalty, ejection and fine.

What a fscking moron!

stlrz d
10-17-2010, 11:54 PM
LOL! Mark Schlereth just tweeted this re: Florio - How does this dude that has never played a down say that all helmet to helmet hits need to be fined. Ever watch the LOS? Put flags on!

Love it!

phillyesq
10-18-2010, 12:33 AM
The hit on Cribbs was absolutely clean. He is a runner, not a defenseless receiver. Harrison went low to make the hit and get the ball (which he did), and Cribbs was also coming down. No problem with that hit.

The hit on MM was a closer call, but also seemed clean. It looked more like MM lowered his head as Harrison was coming in to make a clean hit.

I'm sure that people will complain about the Harrison hits because of the results, but oh well.

Djfan
10-18-2010, 12:36 AM
Yes. Goodell is a putz.

Chachi
10-18-2010, 12:52 AM
Bring the pain.

fordfixer
10-18-2010, 12:57 AM
POSTED: Sunday, Oct. 17, 2010
Injuries dog Browns in loss to Steelers
By NATE ULRICH - Akron Beacon Journal
http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2010/10 ... ss-to.html (http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2010/10/17/1673983/injuries-dog-browns-in-loss-to.html)

PITTSBURGH - The Cleveland Browns don't have a surplus of weapons to begin with, so they simply can't afford to lose their top playmaker against ultra-talented opponents like the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Not even rookie quarterback Colt McCoy's solid NFL regular-season debut could compensate for the loss of wide receiver/return man Josh Cribbs. When Steelers linebacker James Harrison knocked Cribbs out of the game with a helmet-to-helmet hit in the second quarter, he also eliminated the Wildcat offense from the game plan. To make matters worse, Harrison delivered another devastating tackle, causing the removal of wide receiver Mohamed Massaquoi late in the first half.

The Browns did enough to hang with the Steelers for the majority of the game, but their lack of firepower eventually cost them. In the end, Pittsburgh celebrated the return of quarterback Ben Roethlisberger with a 28-10 victory before a crowd of 65,168 Sunday at Heinz Field.

"It makes it tough," Browns coach Eric Mangini said of Cribbs and Massaquoi leaving the game with head injuries. "You're planning to vary the attack with different things, whether it be the multireceiver pack, the Wildcat or whatever it may be. We're out of that, and we're out of it with quite a bit of the game left."

Would the Browns (1-5) have beaten the Steelers (4-1) if Cribbs and Massaquoi had returned? Probably not, but they would have had a better shot to shake up the AFC North. Pittsburgh led just 7-3 at halftime before dominating in the final two quarters.

Wide receiver Chansi Stuckey inherited Cleveland's punt-return duties when Cribbs was sidelined. With about eight minutes left in the fourth quarter, he fumbled a punt, and the Steelers recovered at the Browns' 13-yard line. Four plays later, running back Rashard Mendenhall ran for a 2-yard touchdown, helping extend Pittsburgh's lead to 21-3 with 5:50 left in the fourth quarter.

"I just dropped the ball," Stuckey said. "It's plain and simple. I've just got to make a better play and catch the ball."

McCoy answered during the ensuing drive with a 12-yard touchdown pass to tight end Benjamin Watson. But the Steelers recovered an onside kick, and Roethlisberger ensured his team would exact revenge after falling to the Browns last December. He threw his third touchdown pass of the day, a 14-yard strike to tight end Heath Miller, with 1:25 left.

Without much support from the running game (70 yards on 22 carries), McCoy completed 23-of-33 passes for 281 yards and one touchdown with two interceptions. He was sacked five times for a combined loss of 23 yards, but he escaped pressure on several occasions and finished with four carries for 22 yards.

"You have to give credit to Pittsburgh and their defense," said McCoy, who became the Browns' 16th starting quarterback since 1999 because Jake Delhomme and Seneca Wallace were inactive with ankle injuries. "They drew up some blitzes. They were coming after us. We fought through, we held tough, we converted on some third downs. When we get in their territory, we've got to find a way to keep the drive going, to get some points. We had some opportunities. We let 'em slip away from us."

The Browns lost the turnover battle 3-1. Rookie cornerback Joe Haden intercepted a pass from Roethlisberger and returned 62 yards to set up Phil Dawson's franchise-record 235th field goal, a 39-yard attempt, with 1:51 left in the first quarter.

Other than throwing one pick, Roethlisberger didn't show much rust after a four-game suspension from the NFL following sexual-assault allegations. He completed 16-of-27 passes for 257 yards. He encountered pressure from the Browns, but he wasn't sacked. Eric Wright was exploited in coverage on Roethlisberger's first two touchdown passes, and fellow cornerback Sheldon Brown was beaten by Heath for the final one.

"There's not really anything you can be too frustrated about," Wright said. "Just have a short-term memory and move on. Those type of plays happen. You've got to find a way to put yourself in better position to find the ball."


Read more: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2010/10 ... z12gPaCeem (http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2010/10/17/1673983/injuries-dog-browns-in-loss-to.html#ixzz12gPaCeem)

fordfixer
10-18-2010, 12:59 AM
Harrison out to hurt, not injure opponents
Monday, October 18, 2010
By Ron Cook, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10291/1096089-87.stm

You're damn right Steelers linebacker James Harrison tried to hurt Cleveland's Joshua Cribbs Sunday.

Mohamed Massaquoi, too.

Just as he'll try to hurt quarterback Chad Henne and running backs Ronnie Brown and Ricky Williams when the Steelers play the Dolphins in Miami Sunday.

"I don't want to see anyone injured," Harrison said, "but I'm not opposed to hurting anyone."

Say what?

"There's a difference," Harrison said. "When you're injured, you can't play. But when you're hurt, you can shake it off and come back. I try to hurt people."

I decided right then that made perfect sense.

I mean, really, would you argue with Harrison?

On a day when he knocked out the two Browns and generally was "a beast" -- teammate Hines Ward's words -- in the Steelers' 28-10 win?

"You get hit by James, you feel it. It's over," Steelers safety Ryan Clark said. "There's no bouncing back up after he hits you. He's not playing around out there. It's no joke to him."

It's hard to say Cribbs felt anything on the play he was injured ... excuse me, hurt. He appeared to be knocked out cold. It happened early in the second quarter when Cribbs lined up at quarterback in the Browns' wildcat formation. He rolled to his right, looked to pass, then decided to run. Just as he started to cut back across the field, he was drilled by Harrison, who caught him helmet-to-helmet in a violent collision. No penalty was called because Cribbs was a fair target as a ball carrier.

Many of the Cleveland players huddled around Cribbs and prayed as he received attention from the Browns' medical staff. Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger also was there, a concerned observer.

"You hate to see anyone down like that, but then you realize he just went to sleep for a little bit and he came out of it and he's going to be OK," Harrison said.

Apparently, no one sent Harrison the memo from the NFL office expressing more concern than ever about concussions and the long-term effects they might have on players, including brain disease and dementia.

"That's football," Harrison said, shrugging.

Another realization hit Harrison when Cribbs walked slowly to the Browns' sideline, then to their locker room, done for the afternoon.

"That ends the wildcat, It's out the window," Harrison said.

The Browns had hoped to use Cribbs -- their best offensive player -- often in that role to take pressure off rookie quarterback Colt McCoy, who was making his first NFL start. Cribbs had hurt the Steelers in that formation when the Browns beat the Steelers, 13-6, in December. He ran eight times for 87 yards.

Of course, the Browns also hoped McCoy would be able to throw to Massaquoi, their best wide receiver. That, too, went out the window late in the second quarter when Harrison put a shoulder-to-helmet hit on Massaquoi to force an incompletion on a pass over the middle. Like Cribbs, Massaquoi was done for the day.

"Legal hits, not fineable hits," Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said.

Said Harrison of the Massaquoi play, "I was in the right place at the right time. It was zone coverage, and he ran through my zone ...

"That was a good, clean, legal hit. I put my head across the bow. To be honest, I laid off him a little bit. I could have put a lot more into him."

Harrison's hits didn't just sabotage the Browns' best strategical planning. They juiced the Steelers.

"They geek up everybody," Harrison said.

Quieted the Browns, too.

"[Running back] Peyton Hillis had just made a big run [on a 23-yard screen pass] before the hit on Cribbs," Clark said. "Their sideline was dogging [Steelers cornerback Ike Taylor] for trying to tackle him high. Then, James comes right back and puts that hit on Cribbs. You shut up real fast when you see something like that. It was like James said, 'See, we hit, too.' "

One more thing ...

"People are going to focus on the hit on Cribbs, but James came a long way from the backside to make that play," Clark said. "That's the way we play. Run to the ball and be physical. James is the leader of that. He's just extremely strong and extremely explosive."

The hits were just two parts of Harrison's big day. He finished with 10 solo tackles, 1 1/2 sacks, three quarterback hurries, one pass defense and the forced fumble by Cribbs.

"It felt like I was getting a little more action today," Harrison said, "but it didn't feel like it was my best game."

Maybe this performance wasn't as good as Harrison's legendary game against the Baltimore Ravens in 2007 when he had eight solo tackles, 3 1/2 sacks, an interception, three forced fumbles and a fumble recovery. But it still was pretty special.

"James is always ready to deliver for his teammates," Tomlin said. "That's why they have so much respect for him."

How is that Ward described Harrison again?

A beast, indeed.


Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10291/10 ... z12gQhi3DP (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10291/1096089-87.stm#ixzz12gQhi3DP)

eniparadoxgma
10-18-2010, 01:10 AM
"That was a good, clean, legal hit. I put my head across the bow. To be honest, I laid off him a little bit. I could have put a lot more into him."

Bwahahahaha! That article is full of awesome Deebo quotes, but that's my favorite right there.

hawaiiansteel
10-18-2010, 01:48 AM
Bires: Harrison puts hurt on Cleveland

By: Mike Bires Beaver County Times
Sunday October 17, 2010 11:33 PM

http://photos.triblive.com/photos/PITT/1098697/32179188E.jpg

Years before he developed into one of the NFL’s most ferocious and feared defenders, James Harrison claimed he was the meanest of all Steelers.

He said that during the 2004 season when he backed up Joey Porter, himself a meanie who prided himself on talking tough and playing tougher.

Since taking over for Porter at right outside linebacker three years ago, Harrison has lived up to his bravado. He’s been the NFL’s best defensive player since the start of the ’07 season, and he’s certainly been the meanest.

Surely, Harrison won’t get any arguments from the Cleveland Browns. Not after what happened Sunday when he single-handedly blasted the Browns’ hopes of an upset into smithereens.

Not only did he knock out the Browns’ most valuable player with a vicious hit, he took out another offensive weapon as well.

Early in the second quarter of a 28-10 Steelers’ runaway, Harrison drilled Joshua Cribbs, who was running with the ball out of the Wildcat formation.

Play was stopped while Cribbs lay motionless on the ground.

“I thought James killed him,” Steelers linebacker James Farrior said.

Fortunately, Cribbs wasn’t seriously hurt. But his day was done. He spent the rest of the game on the sideline with a concussion.

Later in the second quarter, Harrison did the same to wide receiver Mohamed Massaquoi.

While trying to catch a short pass, Massaquoi had the ball knocked from his grasp and his senses knocked silly by another violent hit from Harrison.

Play was stopped again as the Browns’ medical staff attended to Massaquoi.

Fortunately, Massaquoi wasn’t seriously injured either. But like Cribbs, he had sustained a concussion and sat out the rest of the game.

Advertisement

“It’s football,” Steelers linebacker LaMarr Woodley said.

“Things happen sometime. I don’t think James was celebrating because he knocked out two guys. That’s a serious situation. So it wasn’t like he was on the sideline bragging about it. That’s just how he plays football.”

Woodley was right. Harrison wasn’t bragging about knocking Cribbs and Massaquoi for a loop. But he did say that “I want to hurt people.”

Harrison went on to explain that there’s a difference between injuring a player and hurting him.

Injuring a player, he said, is when you intentionally hurt someone with a hit that causes a serious injury.

Hurting someone is what he did to Cribbs and Massaquoi, both of whom could be back on the field next week.

“He’s a beast,” Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward said of Harrison. “I’m glad he’s on our side.”

After the game, some of the Browns wondered if either of Harrison’s knockout hits was an illegal helmet-to-helmet blow.

The referees didn’t call a penalty on either of them.

Harrison claimed there was nothing illegal about them. So did his coach.

“Legal hits, not fineable hits,” Mike Tomlin said. “He played good football. James is always ready to deliver for his teammates.”

On Sunday, Harrison delivered again for the Steelers.

He led the team with 10 solo tackles. He recorded 1 1/2 sacks. And he delivered two brutal hits that added to his legend.

He didn’t knock out just one of the Browns. He took out two.

There’s no defender more productive or meaner than James Harrison.

Mike Bires can be reached at mbires@timesonline.com

http://www.timesonline.com/sports/sport ... eland.html (http://www.timesonline.com/sports/sports_details/article/1501/2010/october/17/bires-harrison-puts-hurt-on-cleveland.html)

Shawn
10-18-2010, 03:17 AM
I'm about to get boo'd here but I believe Harrison will get fined for the hit on Cribbs. I don't think Harrison's intent was to debrain Cribbs because this is a fast game played by fast and powerful men. I can't imagine the split second decisions that need to be made. With that said, in slow motion Cribbs head is clearly down. Harrison's head is up, takes two steps then puts the top of his helmet into Cribbs helmet. For me this is a no brainer fine.

As for suspension...well that would be absurd in this case. Suspension should only be for intent to injure. This appears to be a poor split second decision rather than a malicious ill intended hit.

Guys, I hear ya about flag football and all that. But, we are talking about the brains of men with families. If a man is being tackled and you come in to assist in that tackle no one can convince me you must lead with the top of your helmet in order to tackle the man.

hawaiiansteel
10-18-2010, 03:44 AM
the NFL will feel the need to make a statement regarding helmet to helmet hits.

James Harrison doesn't deserve to be fined, but he will be.

Snatch98
10-18-2010, 04:16 AM
Easily the best quote in the thread.

"That ends the wildcat, It's out the window," Harrison said.

bwaaahahahahahahahahah I spit out my Dr. Pepper after initially reading it.

Flasteel
10-18-2010, 06:54 AM
I'm about to get boo'd here but I believe Harrison will get fined for the hit on Cribbs. I don't think Harrison's intent was to debrain Cribbs because this is a fast game played by fast and powerful men. I can't imagine the split second decisions that need to be made. With that said, in slow motion Cribbs head is clearly down. Harrison's head is up, takes two steps then puts the top of his helmet into Cribbs helmet. For me this is a no brainer fine.

As for suspension...well that would be absurd in this case. Suspension should only be for intent to injure. This appears to be a poor split second decision rather than a malicious ill intended hit.

Guys, I hear ya about flag football and all that. But, we are talking about the brains of men with families. If a man is being tackled and you come in to assist in that tackle no one can convince me you must lead with the top of your helmet in order to tackle the man.

Please...men with families. Why don't they go out and get real jobs to support their families then. Every single one of those player would knowingly trade brain damage for the chance to play on that stage. Their families are well taken care of.

My primary concern is entertainment value, and yesterday, that was taken care of. Thanks Jimmy!! :tt2

MaxAMillion
10-18-2010, 08:45 AM
I'm about to get boo'd here but I believe Harrison will get fined for the hit on Cribbs. I don't think Harrison's intent was to debrain Cribbs because this is a fast game played by fast and powerful men. I can't imagine the split second decisions that need to be made. With that said, in slow motion Cribbs head is clearly down. Harrison's head is up, takes two steps then puts the top of his helmet into Cribbs helmet. For me this is a no brainer fine.

As for suspension...well that would be absurd in this case. Suspension should only be for intent to injure. This appears to be a poor split second decision rather than a malicious ill intended hit.

Guys, I hear ya about flag football and all that. But, we are talking about the brains of men with families. If a man is being tackled and you come in to assist in that tackle no one can convince me you must lead with the top of your helmet in order to tackle the man.

Please...men with families. Why don't they go out and get real jobs to support their families then. Every single one of those player would knowingly trade brain damage for the chance to play on that stage. Their families are well taken care of.

My primary concern is entertainment value, and yesterday, that was taken care of. Thanks Jimmy!! :tt2

Players are human beings...and their lives do matter. Just because they make a lot of money doesn't mean anything goes. There is a Rutgers player who is paralyzed as a result of a hit. Does he have it coming because he chose to play football? Harrison should get fined for the Massaquoi hit. He led with the helmet and that is against the rules. All these head injuries are potentially dangerous. The league has to try and curb those hits.

Rodney Harrison said that he put money aside for all his fines for his dirty hits. It didn't bother him to get fined. He admitted it would bother him to get suspended. Suspensions are the only way that helmet to helmet hits will be stopped. The hit on Jackson in the Eagles game was scary. I will be surprised if Jackson can play for a month. Same thing with the hit on Heap in the Pats/Ratbird game. Both defensive players should be suspended. That will begin to stop those launches with the helmet.

feltdizz
10-18-2010, 08:57 AM
Harrison wasn't head hunting.. helmets hit all the time. The Pats game showed Merriwather(I think) leaping in the air to make contact with the helmet twice.. both on Heap.

When a guy is running to clean up a play and the guys head dips at the last second it's not his fault.

The Rutgers injury is terrible to hear... but should the players involved lose their scholarships over the hit?

Ghost
10-18-2010, 09:01 AM
Isn't the point of the game to stop the other team from catching the ball and advancing it? Massaquoi was about to catch the ball and turn up field going for the first down when he was tackled, dislodging the ball - just as anyone who has played was taught from a very young age. I don't think that play was even remotely close to dirty or a penalty.

I think it would have been impossible for Harrison to stop his momentum after Cribbs turned into him but that hit brings a fine. It's getting too much attention and the camera angle was right on top of it showing helmet to helmet contact. The rules may say it has to be intentional but that one is going to bring a loss of $$ for JH under the guise of "sending the right message" about helmet hits.

feltdizz
10-18-2010, 09:05 AM
"but then you realize he went to sleep for a little bit" LOL!!!

comedian Katt Williams: "I've been knocked before and umm... it's not that bad, I woke up refreshed"

feltdizz
10-18-2010, 09:11 AM
Isn't the point of the game to stop th eother team from catching the ball and advancing it? Massaquoi was about to catch the ball and turn up field going for the first down when he was tackled, dislodging the ball - just as anyone who has played was taught from a very young age. I don't think that play was even remotely close to dirty or a penalty.

I think it would have been impossible for Harrison to stop his momentum after Cribbs turned into him but that hit brings a fine. It's getting too much attention and the camera angle was right on top of it showing helmet to helmet contact. The rules may say it has to be intentional but that one is going to bring a loss of $$ for JH under the guise of "sending the right message" about helmet hits.

5 to 10K... Tomlin will pay for it.

I'm just glad JH plays for us...

Peezy had great quotes but I think other teams laughed at them too... I don't think the other players are laughing at JH's quotes. He sounds a little dark and twisted. When he went over to Cribbs as he was walking off the field it looked like James gave him the "No hard feelings but if you come back...I'll phuck you up again"

Notleadpoisoned
10-18-2010, 09:37 AM
James Harrison > Turkey Jones

AkronSteel
10-18-2010, 10:00 AM
Even most of the Cleveland media was saying the hits were clean!! The hit on Cribbs was just a solid hit, he caught him broad and hit him right on the button. It wasn't like James was trying to injure Cribbs, JC is one of his best friends in the NFL, they did play together @ Kent, and have been friends since then. The hit on MM was really McCoy's fault. He led him right into James and set him up for the shot plus MM ducked his head to avoid the hit which made it look worse than it should.

Leper Friend
10-18-2010, 10:22 AM
I'm about to get boo'd here but I believe Harrison will get fined for the hit on Cribbs. I don't think Harrison's intent was to debrain Cribbs because this is a fast game played by fast and powerful men. I can't imagine the split second decisions that need to be made. With that said, in slow motion Cribbs head is clearly down. Harrison's head is up, takes two steps then puts the top of his helmet into Cribbs helmet. For me this is a no brainer fine.

As for suspension...well that would be absurd in this case. Suspension should only be for intent to injure. This appears to be a poor split second decision rather than a malicious ill intended hit.

Guys, I hear ya about flag football and all that. But, we are talking about the brains of men with families. If a man is being tackled and you come in to assist in that tackle no one can convince me you must lead with the top of your helmet in order to tackle the man.

Please...men with families. Why don't they go out and get real jobs to support their families then. Every single one of those player would knowingly trade brain damage for the chance to play on that stage. Their families are well taken care of.

My primary concern is entertainment value, and yesterday, that was taken care of. Thanks Jimmy!! :tt2Well said.I'm sick of the pc crap. Every player knows the risks involved and they are compensated well for that risk.If you don't want to have the risk of a concussion, then don't accept the millions of dollars that are offered to you..

I'm also so sick of crybaby fans and announcers that have to break down every hard hit so meticulously. It's a violent , collision based game played at extremely high speed.There is a huge difference between blatantly leading with your head and helmets colliding during a hit.It happens , get over it.

flippy
10-18-2010, 10:33 AM
I say he may get a small fine for the 2nd hit because of all the knockouts this weekend across the league.

The Cribbs hit was incidental and Cribbs was a RB on the play afterall. RBs get hit in the helmet all the time because of the traffic.

On the 2nd hit, it looked like Harrison was going for the numbers/shoulders but the WR ducked into his helmet.

I remember being taught to tackle with my face up so as not to hurt myself by leading with my head. So many players in the NFL lead with the crown of their helmet and I'm always surprised defenders don't get hurt tackling more often.

NorthCoast
10-18-2010, 12:18 PM
I'm about to get boo'd here but I believe Harrison will get fined for the hit on Cribbs. I don't think Harrison's intent was to debrain Cribbs because this is a fast game played by fast and powerful men. I can't imagine the split second decisions that need to be made. With that said, in slow motion Cribbs head is clearly down. Harrison's head is up, takes two steps then puts the top of his helmet into Cribbs helmet. For me this is a no brainer fine.

As for suspension...well that would be absurd in this case. Suspension should only be for intent to injure. This appears to be a poor split second decision rather than a malicious ill intended hit.

Guys, I hear ya about flag football and all that. But, we are talking about the brains of men with families. If a man is being tackled and you come in to assist in that tackle no one can convince me you must lead with the top of your helmet in order to tackle the man.


Exactly what local radio is saying here. Harrison led with his helmet on the Cribbs hit when he clearly did not need to. I have not seen the slow mo replay, so I won't comment other than these kinds of hits happen in football.

ikestops85
10-18-2010, 12:18 PM
I realize that football players are finely tuned athletes but do people really think a defender can adjust in a split second to a finely tuned offensive player's moves which change the position of the head on both the X, Y, and Z axis? Do they not realize that receivers/runners/QBs duck their head trying to get low before contact with a defender.

The other thing I think is stupid is complaining that tacklers lead with their head. Try bending at the waist or diving and leading with something other than your head.

It is IMPOSSIBLE!!!

Now I understand that you are supposed to keep your head up so that you can see what you hit but if I see another guy's helmet coming at me I am going to duck. That is just a normal reaction.

Harrison will get fined but I don't think I can blame this on Czar Goodell. We have to look at one of his Lieutenants for that. It used to be Gene Washington (an offensive player) but I don't know if he is still in charge of this.

The pussification of football --- sheesh

Mister Pittsburgh
10-18-2010, 12:30 PM
I don't like that the honus is on the defender to avoid a helmet to helmet hit. Start fining offensive players that lower their heads before contact. Don't always just keep fining the defenders when they are trying to make a play just like the offensive guy. Seriously, start fining stupid offensive players that lower their heads.

hawaiiansteel
10-18-2010, 03:12 PM
Harrison's hits on Massaquoi, Cribbs should earn a stiff fine

Sunday, October 17, 2010
Terry Pluto, The Plain Dealer

http://media.cleveland.com/plutoblog_impact/photo/8972990-large.jpg

This hit on Mohamed Massaquoi -- and an earlier one on Josh Cribbs -- would seem to be the kind of dangerous helmet-to-helmet hit that the NFL wants to eliminate, says Terry Pluto.


1. So James Harrison doesn't think he should be fined for either of his helmet-to-helmet hits on Joshua Cribbs and Mohamed Massaquoi? That's what the Steelers linebacker said after Sunday's victory. Within seven minutes in the second quarter, Harrison's helmet knocked two Cleveland receivers out of the game -- and he didn't draw a single flag from the officials.

2. You can debate which was worse, but the fact is Harrison led with his helmet on both plays -- regardless of his intent. The fact is that both plays taken together certainly are a more serious offense than the hit on the Bengals' Jordan Shipley that cost Browns' rookie T.J. Ward a $15,000 fine. The Browns' safety also was flagged for unnecessary roughness.

3. Harrison was fined $5,000 for body slamming Tennessee quarterback Vince Young in a Sept. 19 game. He was fined $5,000 last season for punching the Bengals' Andrew Whitworth. He punched Arizona's Aaron Francisco in the Super Bowl, but was not fined. Hall of Fame coach and television commentator John Madden said Harrison should have been ejected for that play.

4. None of this is an excuse for how the Browns lost. Nor is it meant to take away from Harrison's accomplishments, as he went from an undrafted player out of Kent State and Coventry High to All-Pro. But if the NFL is serious about cutting down the head injuries, they simply can't ignore what happened in this game.

5. It's still discouraging to think about how Steelers' receiver Hines Ward wrestled the ball away from Eric Wright on his eight-yard touchdown reception. Wright has regressed this season, when the Browns thought he had emerged as one of the league's better cover cornerbacks. He has given up at least four touchdown passes.

6. In two games last season, the Browns had 11 sacks of Ben Roethlisberger. There weren't any on Sunday. The Browns had only two quarterback hits -- and one still resulted in a 50-yard completion to Mike Wallace. In the past, Roethlisberger was confused by the Browns' blitzes, but not on this day.

7. When the Browns blitzed, Roethlisberger beat them with quick throws. When they dropped eight defenders, he seemed to stand in the pocket for a month and pick them apart. He is a Pro Bowl quarterback, even if a bit rusty after coming back from his four-game suspension. Roethlisberger is now 11-1 vs. the Browns.

8. Perhaps the best things about Colt McCoy's career at Texas was his accuracy -- and how he handled the pressure of being the Longhorns' quarterback. Browns fans caught glimpses of both of those attributes in this game. McCoy was not overwhelmed making his first pro start. He didn't have to call a timeout because of confusion in the huddle or on the line. The offense didn't jump offside, despite the crowd noise. Twice, the Steelers' defense was drawn offside by McCoy's snap count.

9. None of this is to say McCoy is destined to be a starter. He was sacked five times, took nine hits but still managed to complete 23 of 33 passes for 281 yards. Granted, 143 of those yards were in the fourth quarter when the Steelers were ahead 14-3 and in the dreaded prevent defense. But McCoy did look confident and most of his passes were close to receivers. In college, he completed 70 percent of his passes -- 76 percent as a junior.

10. The Steelers showed why they have the NFL's best run defense. The Browns managed only 70 yards on 22 carries (3.2 average). Peyton Hillis had 41 yards on 12 attempts. They ran three wildcat plays to Cribbs, good for only two yards before he was injured. Hillis continues to excel as a receiver, as he had six catches and is very effective when used on a short screen pass.


http://www.cleveland.com/pluto/blog/ind ... es_20.html (http://www.cleveland.com/pluto/blog/index.ssf/2010/10/terry_plutos_pregame_scribbles_20.html)

decleater
10-18-2010, 04:10 PM
This is a bunch of crap! Both hits, the one on Josh Cribbs and the one on Massaquoi, were perfectly legal decleaters administered by one James Harrison! If any action is taken against James by the league it will be a travesty! What's next? Flag football in skirts???!!! :tt2

Dee Dub
10-18-2010, 04:16 PM
I'm about to get boo'd here but I believe Harrison will get fined for the hit on Cribbs. I don't think Harrison's intent was to debrain Cribbs because this is a fast game played by fast and powerful men. I can't imagine the split second decisions that need to be made. With that said, in slow motion Cribbs head is clearly down. Harrison's head is up, takes two steps then puts the top of his helmet into Cribbs helmet. For me this is a no brainer fine.

As for suspension...well that would be absurd in this case. Suspension should only be for intent to injure. This appears to be a poor split second decision rather than a malicious ill intended hit.

Guys, I hear ya about flag football and all that. But, we are talking about the brains of men with families. If a man is being tackled and you come in to assist in that tackle no one can convince me you must lead with the top of your helmet in order to tackle the man.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

This is the funniest thing I have read in a long time.

Man...back in the days guys were allowed to do a lot more than lead with their helmet...and now we have come to this??

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Dee Dub
10-18-2010, 04:25 PM
"The first hit [on Cribbs, who was a runner] was legal," NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told the newspaper. "The second will be reviewed."

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5699976

skyhawk
10-18-2010, 04:25 PM
the NFL will feel the need to make a statement regarding helmet to helmet hits.

James Harrison doesn't deserve to be fined, but he will be.

I am tired of seeing the term helmet to helmet being used all the time. Helmets hit each other on every play.

How about we have the players not wear them? :roll:

decleater
10-18-2010, 04:51 PM
Hypocrisy 101!!!

http://nflfromthesidelines.blogspot.com/

Tomlinator
10-18-2010, 04:54 PM
the NFL will feel the need to make a statement regarding helmet to helmet hits.

James Harrison doesn't deserve to be fined, but he will be.

I am tired of seeing the term helmet to helmet being used all the time. Helmets hit each other on every play.

How about we have the players not wear them? :roll:

Exactly. Hell, on most running plays the RB ducks his head/shoulder as he hits the line.

Harrison will catch a fine though. Jim Rome the Tool blathered on and on about how the hits were dirty. Plus Harrison isn't helping himself with his "I like to hurt 'em" quote.

skyhawk
10-18-2010, 04:55 PM
And every tackle is made with the head leading. What's next? Tackles leading with ones feet? With ones butt?

BURGH86STEEL
10-18-2010, 05:41 PM
Appeared that Harrison lead with his helmet. He will be fined as a result. It did not help his case when he stated he wanted to hurt people. Some things are better left unsaid.

I understand why the league does not want players leading with their helmets. No one wants to see any player paralyzed. It's a difficult situation for players.

Oviedo
10-18-2010, 05:45 PM
Ben's suspension is over and the Steelers lead the AFC North. I'm sure Goodell will be looking to suspend another Steeler for something to give the Ravens every chance he can. He'll have to ask Bob Kraft's permission first though :stirpot

Snatch98
10-18-2010, 05:59 PM
My current facebook status.

Who is signing up for the NFFL? Rumor has it there will be sign ups for the National Flag Football league this Thursday at the Carnegie children's Museum in Pittsburgh after a Barney sing along and a course on how to redirect your sprinting body at the last moment to avoid violent contact. Issac Newton may have a problem with this but have no fear Roger Goodell is teaching the course. *sigh of relief*

Leper Friend
10-18-2010, 06:13 PM
Appeared that Harrison lead with his helmet. He will be fined as a result. It did not help his case when he stated he wanted to hurt people. Some things are better left unsaid.

I understand why the league does not want players leading with their helmets. No one wants to see any player paralyzed. It's a difficult situation for players.
Pansy.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
10-18-2010, 07:36 PM
Sounds like an NFL rep said the Cribbs hit was legal, even though it was helmet to helmet, because he was rushing AND wasn't simultaneously being held up by another tackler.

The 2nd hit is going to get reviewed, according to the same NFL rep. Those who have seen the video from a certain angle ("Dagger", e.g., on Post Game Heroes) say that Harrison led with his forearm to the receiver's neck or head.

That is reported to be clearly illegal (I can't say for sure, who has ever "seen" a true NFL rule book??). But the good news is that it wasn't helmet-to-helmet. So hopefully, that means fine, not suspension.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
10-18-2010, 07:36 PM
Sounds like an NFL rep said the Cribbs hit was legal, even though it was helmet to helmet, because he was rushing AND wasn't simultaneously being held up by another tackler.

The 2nd hit is going to get reviewed, according to the same NFL rep. Those who have seen the video from a certain angle ("Dagger", e.g., on Post Game Heroes) say that Harrison led with his forearm to the receiver's neck or head.

That is reported to be clearly illegal (I can't say for sure, who has ever "seen" a true NFL rule book??). But the good news is that it wasn't helmet-to-helmet. So hopefully, that means fine, not suspension.

skyhawk
10-18-2010, 07:39 PM
Bunch of crap. The second hit looks more "legal" to me than anything. He just hit him with his arms and body.

SteelHoss
10-18-2010, 08:34 PM
NFL from the sidelines
After hobnobbing around the NFL in the press boxes and sidelines, sports reporter Dale Lolley will let you know the insider scoop.
http://nflfromthesidelines.blogspot.com ... -post.html (http://nflfromthesidelines.blogspot.com/2010/10/blog-post.html)
Monday, October 18, 2010
Hypocrisy 101


Rodney Harrison talking about players needing to be suspended for helmet to helmet hits on other players screams of hypocrisy.

This is the same Rodney Harrison, after all, who routinely won the vote for being the dirtiest player in the game when he still played. This is the same Rodney Harrison who was fined over $200,000 during his playing career and suspended himself for illegal hits.

And some of the hits he pointed to were made by Steelers linebacker James Harrison Sunday against the Browns.

I sat in, as I do every year, on the officials meeting with the media when they come to training camp to explain rules interpretations and points of emphasis.

One of the new ones this year was put in place to protect receivers from dangerous hits. Defenders are no longer permitted to launch themselves into those receivers and must aim their hit to the torso.

Take a look at the hit by Harrison on Mohamed Massaquoi in the photo that is posted here and you see he's not launching himself. He simply lowers his shoulder moments after the ball arrives. It's a legal hit - as explained to me this summer by the NFL officials who attended the Steelers training camp.

As for the hit on Josh Cribbs, he's a running back on that play and there are no rules in place to protect them from helmet-to-helmet plays. In addition, that play was more of a freak happenstance than anything. Cribbs happened to turn into Harrison just as he arrived to help LaMarr Woodley get Cribbs to the ground.

posted by Dale Lolley @ 1:21 PM

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

hawaiiansteel
10-18-2010, 08:43 PM
October 18, 2010, 8:27 PM ET

NFL might suspend players for hits

NEW YORK -- Aiming for the head or leading with the helmet to deliver a blow could soon cost NFL players game time as well as money.

The league is considering suspending players for illegal hits in an effort to help prevent serious injuries, NFL executive vice president of football operations Ray Anderson told The Associated Press on Monday, one day after several scary collisions in games.

"There's strong testimonial for looking readily at evaluating discipline, especially in the areas of egregious and elevated dangerous hits," he said in a phone interview. "Going forward there are certain hits that occurred that will be more susceptible to suspension."

Anderson, a member of the league's competition committee and one of its loudest voices on the need for enhanced player safety, said the NFL could make the changes immediately, with Commissioner Roger Goodell's approval. League officials would consult with the players' union, but he didn't expect any opposition.

"Obviously suspensions would be a much bigger deal than fining guys," said Colts center Jeff Saturday, the team's player representative. "But if guys are headhunting out there to knock a guy out of the game, that's the only way to take care of it."

On Sunday, the Eagles' DeSean Jackson and the Falcons' Dunta Robinson were knocked out of their game after a frightening collision in which Robinson launched himself head first. Both sustained concussions.

Ravens tight end Todd Heap took a vicious hit from Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather that Heap called "one of those hits that shouldn't happen." The team was in contact with the league about the tackle.

"The thing we try to coach our players to do is basically hit in the strike zone," Ravens coach John Harbaugh said. "Try to make an effort to do that and keep your head out of it. It's not just the safety of your opponent, it's safety for yourself. When you throw your head in there like that you put yourself at risk. It's just not good football."

DeSean Jackson's severe concussion was at the forefront of several head injuries Sunday, leading the NFL to suggest suspensions may follow.

Steelers linebacker James Harrison sidelined two Browns players with head injuries after jarring hits. An NFL spokesman said one of the tackles, on Josh Cribbs, was legal. The Browns were more upset about Harrison's hit on Mohamed Massaquoi, which the league is reviewing.

"The one against Mohamed was illegal," Browns tight end Benjamin Watson said. "I can't judge his character, I can judge his conduct. It was an illegal hit. He led with his head. He hit Mo right in the head. He dove at his head. Whether he meant to hurt him or not, I can't comment on that. It was illegal and the league should take care of him with the max, whatever it is."

Harrison defended those hits after the game.

"If I get fined for that, it's going to be a travesty," Harrison said. "They didn't call [a penalty] on that. There's no way I could be fined for that. It was a good, clean legit hit. ... I didn't hit that hard, to be honest with you. When you get a guy on the ground, it's a perfect tackle."

Anderson wouldn't speculate on how many players would be punished for hits from Sunday's games. Players also can be ejected from games for illegal hits, but that's rare.

It's also a part of the game the league has outlawed. As far back as 2007, NFL officials were told to eject players for such flagrant fouls. The NFL said Monday that 17 players have been ejected since 2007. The AP accounted for 14 of those ejections: nine for throwing a punch or fighting, two for contact with officials, two that fall into the category of helmet hits, and one for head-butting.


"If I get fined for that, it's going to be a travesty. They didn't call [a penalty] on that. There's no way I could be fined for that. It was a good, clean legit hit. ... I didn't hit that hard, to be honest with you.

-- James Harrison, speaking about his concussion-causing hits Sunday
There have been occasional suspensions in recent years, including safety Roy Williams, then with Dallas, for one game in 2007 for three horse-collar tackles during that season. Tampa Bay cornerback Elbert Mack and New York Jets safety Eric Smith each drew one-game suspensions for "flagrant violations of player safety rules" by launching themselves into an opponent helmet first.

Last season, Carolina defensive back Dante Wesley drew one game for launching himself into a punt returner who had not caught the ball and was in a defenseless position.

Retired safety Rodney Harrison, now an analyst for NBC, was adamant about the need for stiff, swift punishment. He was fined more than $200,000 during his career and suspended for one game in 2002 for a helmet-to-helmet hit.

"You didn't get my attention when you fined me 5 grand, 10 grand, 15 grand," he said during the pregame broadcast for "Sunday Night Football." "You got my attention when I got suspended and I had to get away from my teammates and I disappointed my teammates from not being there. But you have to suspend these guys. These guys are making millions of dollars."

Tony Dungy, the former coach and Harrison's broadcast partner, echoed his sentiments -- something that wasn't lost on Anderson.

"When someone as respected as Tony Dungy and a player respected for his play and known for his hitting prowess such as Rodney Harrison say that, in fact, fines do not have a deterrent effect and that suspensions might, it is sobering," he said.

Not only is the league concerned with defenders turning themselves into human missiles, but with aiming for the head with the forearm, shoulder or any other body part.

"The fundamentally old way of wrapping up and tackling seems to have faded away," Anderson said. "A lot of the increase is from hits to blow guys up. That has become a more popular way of doing it. Yes, we are concerned they are getting away from the fundamentals of tackling, and maybe it has been coached that way. We're going to have to look into talking to our coaches."

Dolphins safety Yeremiah Bell wonders if the NFL is getting "too strict" about tackles involving the helmet.

"As a defensive player, you have to think about how you hit somebody now, which is totally ridiculous to me," Bell said. "You're trying to get a guy down. Sometimes you get caught leading with your helmet. When you're going to tackle a guy full speed, you can't really think, 'Oh, I have to hit this guy a certain way.' You have to get him down as best you can. Sometimes it's helmet to helmet, which guys aren't trying to do, but that's just the way it is. It's part of the game."

Eagles coach Andy Reid saw the Jackson-Robinson collision from close range.

"That was a tough one there from both sides," Reid said Monday. "The league has put a lot of emphasis on removing the helmet out of the contact point, in particular around the chin or neck area. But some of these are bang-bang. That was a bang-bang deal right there. That wasn't something this kid had planned. He wasn't going to go in there and knock himself out. That's not what he was trying to do here."

Jets safety Jim Leonhard was flagged 15 yards for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Brandon Lloyd in a 24-20 win over the Broncos. Denver coach Josh McDaniels called it an example of how hits often look vicious on TV, but aren't really what they appear.

"I don't think there's anybody that's out there coaching helmet-to-helmet hits," McDaniels said. "I sure know we're not and I don't believe in my heart that there's anybody out there trying to hurt other players."

Asked recently about the league's effort to eliminate helmet hits, Dr. Hunt Batjer, co-chairman for the NFL's Brain, Head and Neck Medical Committee, said:

"If it is not getting the message out, I don't know how to do it. It has been broadcast at every level not to lead with your head. In the heat of battle, things are going to happen. But they just have to be a minimum."

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5699517

Vindrow
10-18-2010, 08:48 PM
Guess it's time for the NFL to change its name to the NFFL....National Flag Football League.

hawaiiansteel
10-18-2010, 09:08 PM
Originally Published: October 18, 2010

Hard hits will keep coming

Helmet-to-helmet collisions can never be completely eliminated from a violent game

By Ross Tucker
ESPN.com


Falcons cornerback Dunta Robinson's collision with Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson on Sunday was incredible. Steelers linebacker James Harrison's punishing hit on Browns jack-of-all-trades Josh Cribbs was awesome. Likewise for the shot Harrison gave receiver Mohamed Massaquoi later in Sunday's contest.

I loved and was completely enthralled by every one of those violent encounters and I'm not afraid to admit it. That is the essence of this sport we all adore called football. My guess is that deep down the vast majority of people out there feel the exact same way, whether they would confess to it publicly or not.

I imagine that for a lot of people those types of vicious collisions are a lot like the car wrecks that occur in a NASCAR race. They generate a tremendous amount of excitement when they occur, and the mere possibility that something like that can and sometimes does take place in these sports creates a palpable sense of urgency and maybe even a dash of tension that is intoxicating.

For me, the physicality of football and what that represents have always been more interesting than a great catch by a receiver or a tremendous run by a back. Don't get me wrong, I love big plays as much as the next fan. Just not as much as a huge hit.

And while my first reaction is always one of pure ecstasy, it is always followed immediately by concern for all parties involved. Nobody wants to see anyone get hurt, especially if the injury sustained is to something as important as one's brain.

That's because the more information that comes out about concussions, the scarier it gets. I know. I've been to fundraisers and listened to presentations from people such as Chris Nowinski of the Sports Legacy Institute, one of the groups that is doing research to help spearhead the NFL's policies in this area. The long-term effects of concussions have not been completely identified yet, but the results so far are certainly not good.

I know a lot of players who are glad we are learning more about concussions and how to treat them. Because I have relatively short arms, which made it difficult at times to engage with defenders, I would often use my head as a weapon. I can still recall one of the equipment guys offering me the opportunity to wear one of the newer, lighter helmets later in my career. I scoffed.

"No thanks," I told him, "Give me the heaviest one you got."

I had a large and, in NFL parlance, "hard" head and I often used it like a battering ram, especially when I was freed up and able to help out one of my linemates in pass protection or when I was going up to the second level to take on a linebacker. The more I read and the more people I talk to, the more I realize how dumb that was, but I didn't know any better. Frankly, I don't know if I could have survived without using my head like that, and I often think about how I would play now, knowing the things that I do.

After a Sunday like we just saw, there will be an overreaction of sorts as a result of the aforementioned big hits and the one that Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather laid on Ravens tight end Todd Heap. I guess that's a natural reaction, as well, but I don't know that helmet-to-helmet contact can or should ever be completely legislated out of the game.

For one, I think the NFL already has taken significant steps to protect the players in this regard. Helmet-to-helmet hits against defenseless receivers are being penalized more than they ever were just five or six years ago, though admittedly some still go unflagged. Likewise, players are being fined on a much more frequent and significant basis than ever before. Jets safety Eric Smith was fined $50,000 and suspended for one game after his hit on then-Cardinals wide receiver Anquan Boldin in 2008.

There will not be a sea change in this regard overnight. Every week there are players who attempt to follow the new rules and guidelines that prohibit hitting defenseless receivers and roughing the passer. Even so, these players have been brought up through the lower levels playing this way, and it is folly to expect them to be able to just disregard the way they have been engineered to play the game. It will take time, but things can and have been getting better, whether Week 6 in the NFL was indicative of that or not.

Besides, it is not as if these players are consciously trying to deliver a helmet-to-helmet blow. That is very rare. More often, they are just trying to deliver a crushing blow, and since their heads are right in the middle of their shoulders, helmet-to-helmet collisions are going to occur. That doesn't mean they shouldn't try to use their shoulders to strike an opponent, but given the extreme speed at which the game is played, players are still going to take blows to the head.

Pro football is a violent game played by violent men. Blows to the head are an occupational hazard that we can attempt to avoid, knowing full well that we will never completely accomplish that goal. The NFL can increase the suspensions and the amount of the fines, and that may speed up the process of change, but it will never completely eliminate the problem.

Ross Tucker, who played on the offensive line for five teams during his seven-year NFL career, writes regularly for ESPN.com.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/columns/s ... id=5699794 (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/columns/story?columnist=tucker_ross&id=5699794)

Herewegosteelers!
10-18-2010, 10:08 PM
My current facebook status.

Who is signing up for the NFFL? Rumor has it there will be sign ups for the National Flag Football league this Thursday at the Carnegie children's Museum in Pittsburgh after a Barney sing along and a course on how to redirect your sprinting body at the last moment to avoid violent contact. Issac Newton may have a problem with this but have no fear Roger Goodell is teaching the course. *sigh of relief*

I like it! I just may have to borrow it...if that's okay. 8)

Dee Dub
10-18-2010, 10:12 PM
http://media.cleveland.com/plutoblog_impact/photo/8972990-large.jpg



This picture right here shows Harrison is on the side of Massaqoui's helmet with his hands up. This shows positively, absolutely, no intent on Harrison to hit him helmet to helmet. Any helmet to helmet contact was incidental and caused by Massaqoui trying to get under Harrison and he himself lowering his head. And this youtube of the play shows it as well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJvKt1vF4GM

Herewegosteelers!
10-18-2010, 10:26 PM
Mortensen: NFL to suspend players for "devastating hits" and "head shots" starting this week.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
10-18-2010, 10:53 PM
Mortensen: NFL to suspend players for "devastating hits" and "head shots" starting this week.

Two questions:

1. "Starting this week" - that means Harrison is safe for the hits yesterday?

2. Right now "head shots" to running backs are legal. Is the Commish going to change the rules without a Rules Committee meeting/discussion/vote?

3. "Devastating hits" - like the Supreme Court on pornography? ... can't define 'em, but the Commish knows 'em when he sees 'em?

Hmmm ... who died and made him Master of the Universe?

stlrz d
10-18-2010, 11:40 PM
@RyanClark and @LaMarrWoodley have been tweeting all night about the hypocrisy of the NFL going on and on about hard hits yet wanting an 18 game schedule.

Oh yeah, and an official Browns update tweeter stated that Hillis said he doesn't think Harrison should be fined or suspended for either of his hits.

The Man of Steel
10-19-2010, 06:04 AM
It's has to be driving Stains fans nuts that two Akron natives, LeBron James and James Harrison, have completely ruined the Cleveland sportsworld.

Oviedo
10-19-2010, 09:45 AM
Mortensen: NFL to suspend players for "devastating hits" and "head shots" starting this week.

Two questions:

1. "Starting this week" - that means Harrison is safe for the hits yesterday?

2. Right now "head shots" to running backs are legal. Is the Commish going to change the rules without a Rules Committee meeting/discussion/vote?

3. "Devastating hits" - like the Supreme Court on pornography? ... can't define 'em, but the Commish knows 'em when he sees 'em?

Hmmm ... who died and made him Master of the Universe?

Depends on how many times it is talked about on sports shows. That will define "devastating" for Goodell since he is all about PR and image.

He will destroy the game because there will be no consistent standard since we know he doesn't recognize standards. Players and teams with tough guy "reps" will get penalized more, except for Ray lewis who has become the poster child for the NFL and the NFL on ESPN.

proudpittsburgher
10-19-2010, 09:54 AM
I had the same question about the "starting this week" portion of the report.

feltdizz
10-19-2010, 10:00 AM
hot topic for a few weeks.... another travesty will replace this one by mid-season. First it was the Johnson TD overturned... now head to head hits.. in a few weeks it will be Pass INT or hits on the QB.

Wash rinse repeat.

AngryAsian
10-19-2010, 10:01 AM
NFL to announce suspensions for hits
by Chris Mortensen
ESPN Analyst

"The NFL will announce by Wednesday that, effective this weekend, even first-time offenders face suspension for "devastating hits" and "head shots," according to Ray Anderson, the league's executive vice president of football operations.

"We can't and won't tolerate what we saw Sunday," Anderson said Monday. "We've got to get the message to players that these devastating hits and head shots will be met with a very necessary higher standard of accountability. We have to dispel the notion that you get one free pass in these egregious or flagrant shots."

Anderson was alluding to the normal disciplinary measures in which the league has issued fines for first-time offenders and, very often, second-time offenders.

"What we saw Sunday was disturbing," Anderson said. "We're talking about avoiding life-altering impacts."

Sunday's games produced a number of violent hits.

The Eagles' DeSean Jackson and the Falcons' Dunta Robinson were knocked out of their game after a frightening collision in which Robinson launched himself head first into Jackson. Both sustained concussions, and Jackson is not expected to play in Week 7.

Ravens tight end Todd Heap took a vicious hit from Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather that Heap called "one of those hits that shouldn't happen." The team was in contact with the league about the tackle.

Steelers linebacker James Harrison sidelined two Browns players with head injuries after jarring hits. An NFL spokesman said one of the tackles, on Josh Cribbs, was legal. The Browns were more upset about Harrison's hit on Mohamed Massaquoi, which the league is reviewing.

And Jets safety Jim Leonhard was flagged 15 yards for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Brandon Lloyd in a 24-20 win over the Broncos.

Anderson would not speculate earlier Monday on how many players would be punished for hits from the past Sunday's games. Players also can be ejected from games for illegal hits, but that's rare."

I take the above highlighted as "starting this week." Deebo is in jeopardy to possibly not playing this Sunday. This is complete BS!!!

Ghost
10-19-2010, 10:02 AM
@RyanClark and @LaMarrWoodley have been tweeting all night about the hypocrisy of the NFL going on and on about hard hits yet wanting an 18 game schedule.

Oh yeah, and an official Browns update tweeter stated that Hillis said he doesn't think Harrison should be fined or suspended for either of his hits.

Trent Dilfer said he thought only the hit on Heap was cheap. Every other hit being discused was a clean, hard tackle and should be allowed in the NFL.

Steve Young said "They don't want guys to play ferocious".

Goodell, in a knee jerk reaction, has just fundamentally changed the game mid-week after 90 years. WTF? :wft

Shawn
10-19-2010, 10:03 AM
I'm about to get boo'd here but I believe Harrison will get fined for the hit on Cribbs. I don't think Harrison's intent was to debrain Cribbs because this is a fast game played by fast and powerful men. I can't imagine the split second decisions that need to be made. With that said, in slow motion Cribbs head is clearly down. Harrison's head is up, takes two steps then puts the top of his helmet into Cribbs helmet. For me this is a no brainer fine.

As for suspension...well that would be absurd in this case. Suspension should only be for intent to injure. This appears to be a poor split second decision rather than a malicious ill intended hit.

Guys, I hear ya about flag football and all that. But, we are talking about the brains of men with families. If a man is being tackled and you come in to assist in that tackle no one can convince me you must lead with the top of your helmet in order to tackle the man.

Please...men with families. Why don't they go out and get real jobs to support their families then. Every single one of those player would knowingly trade brain damage for the chance to play on that stage. Their families are well taken care of.

My primary concern is entertainment value, and yesterday, that was taken care of. Thanks Jimmy!! :tt2

Players are human beings...and their lives do matter. Just because they make a lot of money doesn't mean anything goes. There is a Rutgers player who is paralyzed as a result of a hit. Does he have it coming because he chose to play football? Harrison should get fined for the Massaquoi hit. He led with the helmet and that is against the rules. All these head injuries are potentially dangerous. The league has to try and curb those hits.

Rodney Harrison said that he put money aside for all his fines for his dirty hits. It didn't bother him to get fined. He admitted it would bother him to get suspended. Suspensions are the only way that helmet to helmet hits will be stopped. The hit on Jackson in the Eagles game was scary. I will be surprised if Jackson can play for a month. Same thing with the hit on Heap in the Pats/Ratbird game. Both defensive players should be suspended. That will begin to stop those launches with the helmet.

Well said Max.

Shawn
10-19-2010, 10:04 AM
@RyanClark and @LaMarrWoodley have been tweeting all night about the hypocrisy of the NFL going on and on about hard hits yet wanting an 18 game schedule.

Oh yeah, and an official Browns update tweeter stated that Hillis said he doesn't think Harrison should be fined or suspended for either of his hits.

I have to agree. There is a certain amount of hypocrisy going on here. A longer season is prone to increase injury.

ikestops85
10-19-2010, 10:25 AM
@RyanClark and @LaMarrWoodley have been tweeting all night about the hypocrisy of the NFL going on and on about hard hits yet wanting an 18 game schedule.

Oh yeah, and an official Browns update tweeter stated that Hillis said he doesn't think Harrison should be fined or suspended for either of his hits.

I have to agree. There is a certain amount of hypocrisy going on here. A longer season is prone to increase injury.

A certain amount of hipocracy? Puleeez ... the hipocracy within the Goodell regime is so deep it's starting to run over the hip waders. I'm sure Robinson wanted to knock HIMSELF out.

This is ridiculous. There have always been headhunters in this game (can you say Jack Tatum) but for the most part players try and stay within the boundary of the rules. Even if Harrison hit MM head to head do you really think that was what he was trying to do?

Did Harrison know the pass was thrown low and the receiver was going to go down low to get it? If the defender is supposed to tackle the offensive player within a certain area of their body then tell the offensive player to stand still. :roll:

I mean that is what they are asking. I agree that we need to do all we can to try and prevent these injuries but instead of attacking the players how about we make them wear the concussion resistant helmets? Why is this a choice? Why not make the helmets more padded but softer? I know the players wouldn't like that because bigger helmets might be heavier and more awkward but who cares?

What is going on now is just a witch hunt generated by bad publicity ... typical of the Goodell regime.

SidSmythe
10-19-2010, 10:45 AM
I'd like to see GOODELL suspend Harrison to his face!!

MeetJoeGreene
10-19-2010, 10:49 AM
Would it really surprise anyone if Goodell took an action that was inconsistent to the detriment of the Pittsburgh Steelers?

Oviedo
10-19-2010, 11:06 AM
Would it really surprise anyone if Goodell took an action that was inconsistent to the detriment of the Pittsburgh Steelers?

I don't think it would be a surprise, if anything it will be expected because the tough reputation of the Steelers is not Hollywood/Broadway enough for Goodell.

feltdizz
10-19-2010, 11:30 AM
@RyanClark and @LaMarrWoodley have been tweeting all night about the hypocrisy of the NFL going on and on about hard hits yet wanting an 18 game schedule.

Oh yeah, and an official Browns update tweeter stated that Hillis said he doesn't think Harrison should be fined or suspended for either of his hits.

I have to agree. There is a certain amount of hypocrisy going on here. A longer season is prone to increase injury.

a 16 game season doesn't decrease the percentages of injuries though... it's week 6 and guys are getting knocked out. Using the 18 game excuse strengthens the suspension argument IMO.

Guys aren't getting knocked out because of the length of the season.. they are getting knocked out because it's a violent game. If these injuries were increasing in the last 2 games of the year it would add merit to the argument.

ikestops85
10-19-2010, 11:52 AM
@RyanClark and @LaMarrWoodley have been tweeting all night about the hypocrisy of the NFL going on and on about hard hits yet wanting an 18 game schedule.

Oh yeah, and an official Browns update tweeter stated that Hillis said he doesn't think Harrison should be fined or suspended for either of his hits.

I have to agree. There is a certain amount of hypocrisy going on here. A longer season is prone to increase injury.

a 16 game season doesn't decrease the percentages of injuries though... it's week 6 and guys are getting knocked out. Using the 18 game excuse strengthens the suspension argument IMO.

Guys aren't getting knocked out because of the length of the season.. they are getting knocked out because it's a violent game. If these injuries were increasing in the last 2 games of the year it would add merit to the argument.

I think the argument is that players will get injured in those 2 additional games so if you are worried about the players health why add to their risk by adding games.

Ghost
10-19-2010, 12:24 PM
@RyanClark and @LaMarrWoodley have been tweeting all night about the hypocrisy of the NFL going on and on about hard hits yet wanting an 18 game schedule.

Oh yeah, and an official Browns update tweeter stated that Hillis said he doesn't think Harrison should be fined or suspended for either of his hits.

I have to agree. There is a certain amount of hypocrisy going on here. A longer season is prone to increase injury.

a 16 game season doesn't decrease the percentages of injuries though... it's week 6 and guys are getting knocked out. Using the 18 game excuse strengthens the suspension argument IMO.


Guys aren't getting knocked out because of the length of the season.. they are getting knocked out because it's a violent game. If these injuries were increasing in the last 2 games of the year it would add merit to the argument.

The point isn't that a 16 game season decreases injury during those 16 weeks. The point is the number of plays you'll have in 2 additional games that do add for an increased possiblity for injury. You can't claim in good faith to have the best interests of the players in mind and then institute 2 more games while saying you don't see that as increasing the risk of injury.

Games are averaging 68 pass plays per game - most ever. That's 2176 additional plays over the last 2 games (not including the running plays) with the potential for a "devasating" hit to occur. It's pure hypocrisy to say that doesn't increase the chance for injury.

hawaiiansteel
10-19-2010, 03:51 PM
Harris: Suspension won't tame Harrison

By John Harris, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Tuesday, October 19, 2010


I agree with Steelers linebacker Lawrence Timmons. This is crazy.

"That was something I've never seen before up close and personal," Timmons said about teammate James Harrison knocking Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Cribbs unconscious and nearly doing the same thing to another receiver, Mohamed Massaquoi, during a seven-minute span in the second quarter of Sunday's 28-10 Steelers' victory.

"That was crazy."

I'm behind Harrison 100 percent. I don't believe he should be suspended for delivering helmet-to-helmet blows that are against the rules but weren't called during the game.

Oh, there was a flag thrown following Harrison's hit on Massaquoi — against the Browns! Center Alex Mack was assessed a 5-yard delay of game penalty for kicking the football after the play.

Why weren't Harrison's hits penalized?

"Legal hits, not fineable hits," said Steelers coach Mike Tomlin, who endorses the way Harrison knocked Cribbs and Massaquoi to the ground. "He played good football."

Played good football. Think about those three words.

Harrison was playing football the way he was taught a long time ago, the way the Steelers want him to play. In Tomlin's opinion, Harrison did nothing wrong. Just doing his job.

Multiply that thought process by 32 teams and coaching staffs with 53 players on each roster. Tomlin isn't the only coach who thinks that way, and Harrison isn't the only player who carries that mindset onto the field. Tomlin and Harrison are the rule, not the exception.

NFL vice president of football operations Ray Anderson said Monday that the league will begin cracking down on helmet-to-helmet hits, perhaps immediately. That means suspensions and/or fines for Harrison and Atlanta cornerback Dunta Robinson, whose jarring collision with Philadelphia wide receiver DeSean Jackson knocked the latter out of Sunday's game with a concussion.

Don't get me started about former NFL safety Rodney Harrison, an analyst for NBC who said during Sunday night's Colts-Redskins broadcast that suspending players is the only way to get their attention.

Harrison — no relation to James — should know. He was fined more than $200,000 during his career and suspended one game in 2002 for a helmet-to-helmet hit.

Of course, James Harrison didn't help his cause when he said his goal is to hurt opposing players (as opposed to injuring them). Politically correct he is not.

Suspending Harrison for a game won't stop him from playing the only way he knows — staying aggressive and tackling hard within the limits of the rules without breaking them.

Here's where the NFL gets itself in trouble. According to the rule book, Harrison's head-to-helmet tackle on Cribbs broke no rules because Cribbs was a ball-carrier.

That tackle knocked Cribbs senseless, yet was legal. Harrison's tackle on Massaquoi didn't knock Massaquoi out, but is considered more serious because the receiver was in a "defenseless" position.

How about the tackles resulting in concussions for Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers and Chicago quarterback Jay Cutler? No penalties were given in either instance.

Were those plays not punishable because the concussions occurred when the back of the quarterbacks' head hit the ground? Are those concussions considered less severe than the ones occurring during the most recent slate of games? Can we even begin to compare the severity of concussions?

The NFL is based on legalized violence, but commissioner Roger Goodell wants to put a dress on a pig. The NFL can't have it both ways, but that's precisely what Goodell is attempting to do.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... 04952.html (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_704952.html)