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fordfixer
10-16-2010, 05:04 AM
Even with Big Ben back, Steelers must retain running identity
By Bucky Brooks NFL.com
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... _spotlight (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d81b540a9/article/even-with-big-ben-back-steelers-must-retain-running-identity?module=HP_spotlight)

The return of Ben Roethlisberger has been touted around the league as the move that pushes the Steelers to the top of the title contenders.

However, the way the Steelers incorporate him into a drastically altered offense could determine how far the team goes this season.

While the two-time Super Bowl winner has developed into one of the top playmakers at the position, his emergence as an elite quarterback prompted the Steelers to build their offense around his skills. After operating like a three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust unit during the early part of Roethlisberger's career, Pittsburgh opened up its offense to feature more three- and four-receiver formations from the shotgun.

Although the formations have always been a part of the Steelers' third-down (nickel) package, the extensive use of the shotgun combined with a no-huddle approach put Roethlisberger in a system that was very similar to the spread style that he directed in college at Miami (Ohio).

Bruce Arians, the Steelers' offensive coordinator since 2007, has long been a proponent of spread football after spending time as quarterbacks coach for the Indianapolis Colts from 1998-2000. He immediately implemented some of those concepts upon taking over in Pittsburgh, and continued to build on those principles as Roethlisberger matured.

Although the team insisted that the running game continued to serve as the foundation of the offense, the numbers suggested that the Steelers were moving away from the grind-it-out approach that has been a trademark of the organization. In a three-year period, the Steelers went from ranking third in rush offense in Arians' first season to finishing in the bottom half of the league the past two seasons.

The pass offense, however, went from averaging 27.6 attempts in 2007 to 33.5 a year ago. Roethlisberger flourished with more opportunities to throw, posting the first 4,000-yard season of his career and finishing with a passer rating over 100 for only the second time.

Though his ascension has been positive in many ways, the increased emphasis on the passing game weakened the rush offense and contributed to squandering several leads late a season ago. The Steelers were unable to close out games with a methodical approach behind a physical running game. As a result, they often gave their opponents additional possessions, which led to a few last-minute defeats.

Given those factors and the sentiment that spread-formation football makes a team soft, the Steelers entered the offseason intent on re-establishing their hard-nosed, physical mentality by showing a stronger commitment to the run.

Roethlisberger's four-game suspension only strengthened the Steelers' desire to get back to running. It helped them mask the deficiencies of their backup quarterbacks while allowing their stifling defense to single-handedly win games. Surprisingly, the approach worked as the Steelers rolled to a 3-1 record despite being forced to start two backup quarterbacks (Dennis Dixon and Charlie Batch) during the ban.

Rashard Mendenhall, who rushed for 1,108 yards in 2009, has thrived under the run-heavy emphasis. He ranks third in rushing yards per game (102.8) and has posted two 100-yard efforts in four games. Most impressive, he has been able to produce when the opponent knew that the Steelers were poised to run and often used eight-man fronts on early downs in an attempt to take away open running lanes between the tackles.
Weekly awards watch
The Steelers are 3-1 even though Ben Roethlisberger missed the first quarter of the season, which has coach Mike Tomlin earning accolades, says Bucky Brooks. More ...

However, the tactics have been ineffective due to the Steelers' ability to control the line of scrimmage. The team's much-maligned offensive line has excelled at blowing defenders off the ball, and the renewed commitment to running has allowed the Steelers to be more aggressive coming off the ball, which has made their play-action passing game more effective.

Though the Steelers rank 32nd in pass attempts per game (20.2), they have three completions over 40 yards (tied for eighth in the league) and average a respectable 7.5 yards per attempt.

Given their success on many levels, it would be a surprise to see the Steelers return to the wide-open approach that seemingly got them into trouble last year. Coach Mike Tomlin will likely ask that Arians plays it close to the vest in most situations, and allow the team to win with its defense and running game leading the way. Though Roethlisberger will still get plenty of chances to throw, the opportunities will likely consist of an assortment of play-action passes from run-heavy formations. WR Mike Wallace and TE Heath Miller will often serve as the primary targets on these plays because they offer a vertical dimension (Wallace) and a safety valve (Miller) over the middle of the field.

Arians might mix in some spread looks on early downs, but expect to see more runs out of those sets to take advantage of the defense loading up to stop Roethlisberger's high-percentage throws to his receivers on the outside.

Tomlin has surprisingly kept his team in contention despite an extended absence from his franchise quarterback. However, Tomlin's chances of guiding the Steelers to another Super Bowl title will undoubtedly hinge on Roethlisberger's ability to assimilate to a conservative offense that might ask him to take a backseat.

papillon
10-16-2010, 07:11 AM
Even with Big Ben back, Steelers must retain running identity
By Bucky Brooks NFL.com
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... _spotlight (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d81b540a9/article/even-with-big-ben-back-steelers-must-retain-running-identity?module=HP_spotlight)

The return of Ben Roethlisberger has been touted around the league as the move that pushes the Steelers to the top of the title contenders.

However, the way the Steelers incorporate him into a drastically altered offense could determine how far the team goes this season.

While the two-time Super Bowl winner has developed into one of the top playmakers at the position, his emergence as an elite quarterback prompted the Steelers to build their offense around his skills. After operating like a three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust unit during the early part of Roethlisberger's career, Pittsburgh opened up its offense to feature more three- and four-receiver formations from the shotgun.

Although the formations have always been a part of the Steelers' third-down (nickel) package, the extensive use of the shotgun combined with a no-huddle approach put Roethlisberger in a system that was very similar to the spread style that he directed in college at Miami (Ohio).

Bruce Arians, the Steelers' offensive coordinator since 2007, has long been a proponent of spread football after spending time as quarterbacks coach for the Indianapolis Colts from 1998-2000. He immediately implemented some of those concepts upon taking over in Pittsburgh, and continued to build on those principles as Roethlisberger matured.

Although the team insisted that the running game continued to serve as the foundation of the offense, the numbers suggested that the Steelers were moving away from the grind-it-out approach that has been a trademark of the organization. In a three-year period, the Steelers went from ranking third in rush offense in Arians' first season to finishing in the bottom half of the league the past two seasons.

The pass offense, however, went from averaging 27.6 attempts in 2007 to 33.5 a year ago. Roethlisberger flourished with more opportunities to throw, posting the first 4,000-yard season of his career and finishing with a passer rating over 100 for only the second time.

Though his ascension has been positive in many ways, the increased emphasis on the passing game weakened the rush offense and contributed to squandering several leads late a season ago. The Steelers were unable to close out games with a methodical approach behind a physical running game. As a result, they often gave their opponents additional possessions, which led to a few last-minute defeats.

Given those factors and the sentiment that spread-formation football makes a team soft, the Steelers entered the offseason intent on re-establishing their hard-nosed, physical mentality by showing a stronger commitment to the run.

Roethlisberger's four-game suspension only strengthened the Steelers' desire to get back to running. It helped them mask the deficiencies of their backup quarterbacks while allowing their stifling defense to single-handedly win games. Surprisingly, the approach worked as the Steelers rolled to a 3-1 record despite being forced to start two backup quarterbacks (Dennis Dixon and Charlie Batch) during the ban.

Rashard Mendenhall, who rushed for 1,108 yards in 2009, has thrived under the run-heavy emphasis. He ranks third in rushing yards per game (102.8) and has posted two 100-yard efforts in four games. Most impressive, he has been able to produce when the opponent knew that the Steelers were poised to run and often used eight-man fronts on early downs in an attempt to take away open running lanes between the tackles.
Weekly awards watch
The Steelers are 3-1 even though Ben Roethlisberger missed the first quarter of the season, which has coach Mike Tomlin earning accolades, says Bucky Brooks. More ...

However, the tactics have been ineffective due to the Steelers' ability to control the line of scrimmage. The team's much-maligned offensive line has excelled at blowing defenders off the ball, and the renewed commitment to running has allowed the Steelers to be more aggressive coming off the ball, which has made their play-action passing game more effective.

Though the Steelers rank 32nd in pass attempts per game (20.2), they have three completions over 40 yards (tied for eighth in the league) and average a respectable 7.5 yards per attempt.

Given their success on many levels, it would be a surprise to see the Steelers return to the wide-open approach that seemingly got them into trouble last year. Coach Mike Tomlin will likely ask that Arians plays it close to the vest in most situations, and allow the team to win with its defense and running game leading the way. Though Roethlisberger will still get plenty of chances to throw, the opportunities will likely consist of an assortment of play-action passes from run-heavy formations. WR Mike Wallace and TE Heath Miller will often serve as the primary targets on these plays because they offer a vertical dimension (Wallace) and a safety valve (Miller) over the middle of the field.

Arians might mix in some spread looks on early downs, but expect to see more runs out of those sets to take advantage of the defense loading up to stop Roethlisberger's high-percentage throws to his receivers on the outside.

Tomlin has surprisingly kept his team in contention despite an extended absence from his franchise quarterback. However, Tomlin's chances of guiding the Steelers to another Super Bowl title will undoubtedly hinge on Roethlisberger's ability to assimilate to a conservative offense that might ask him to take a backseat.

Who thinks this stuff up? Do they write just to see their thoughts put in print? Just like the SB XL the Steelers will pass early to get the lead and run late to burn clock. Ben won't be taking a back seat to the running game. If he does then I'll get on the Arians must go bandwagon, it's not happening. Ben will be the reason the Steelers are successful or not.

Pappy

skyhawk
10-16-2010, 03:29 PM
Just an absurd quote and paragraph Pappy. Didn't these guys watch the Steeler's past SB playoff runs?? :HeadBanger

hawaiiansteel
10-16-2010, 08:22 PM
October 16, 2010, 1:11 PM

Roethlisberger Returns to Offense That May Rely on Him Less

By JUDY BATTISTA

Long before Milledgeville, Ga., became the center of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ off-season universe, the team had begun the move to a more run-based offense. Within days after the Steelers failed to make the playoffs as the defending Super Bowl champions last season, the team president Art Rooney II talked to Coach Mike Tomlin about reverting to a style that looked more like the Steelers teams of the 1970s and less like the pass-happy version that had emerged in recent years.

Last season, the Steelers ran the ball 42 percent of the time and quarterback Ben Roethlisberger attempted 506 passes. Roethlisberger, right, returns from his four-game suspension against Cleveland on Sunday to a decidedly different team from the one he last led. Relying on a run-first attack (the Steelers have run 57.7 percent of the time in their first four games) and a suffocating defense, Pittsburgh was far more successful managing without him than almost anyone expected.

The Steelers are 3-1 despite being last in the league in passing after losing two backup quarterbacks to injury and settling on Charlie Batch. Maybe Roethlisberger, who has seemed intent on repairing his relationship with his teammates and fans since the spring investigation into his conduct toward a woman at a Georgia bar, will view that as a warning. Although the Steelers are surely better with him, they can win without him, too.

But even Rooney would prefer better balance than what Roethlisberger’s suspension forced on the Steelers. So Roethlisberger’s return is the point from which the Steelers’ commitment to the run will truly be tested, when they will hand off by choice, not by necessity.

http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010 ... -him-less/ (http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/roethlisberger-returns-to-offense-that-may-rely-on-him-less/)

Crash
10-16-2010, 09:35 PM
After operating like a three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust unit during the early part of Roethlisberger's career, Pittsburgh opened up its offense to feature more three- and four-receiver formations from the shotgun.

Whoever this guy is it's obvious he doesn't watch our games.

Crash
10-16-2010, 09:44 PM
Maybe Roethlisberger, who has seemed intent on repairing his relationship with his teammates and fans since the spring investigation into his conduct toward a woman at a Georgia bar, will view that as a warning. Although the Steelers are surely better with him, they can win without him, too.

Here's your warning Judy, since 2004 Ben is 7-2 against the Ravens.

Any other Steelers QB since 2004? 0-5

Bye now.

stlrz d
10-16-2010, 11:36 PM
October 16, 2010, 1:11 PM

Roethlisberger Returns to Offense That May Rely on Him Less

By JUDY BATTISTA

Long before Milledgeville, Ga., became the center of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ off-season universe, the team had begun the move to a more run-based offense. Within days after the Steelers failed to make the playoffs as the defending Super Bowl champions last season, the team president Art Rooney II talked to Coach Mike Tomlin about reverting to a style that looked more like the Steelers teams of the 1970s and less like the pass-happy version that had emerged in recent years.

Last season, the Steelers ran the ball 42 percent of the time and quarterback Ben Roethlisberger attempted 506 passes. Roethlisberger, right, returns from his four-game suspension against Cleveland on Sunday to a decidedly different team from the one he last led. Relying on a run-first attack (the Steelers have run 57.7 percent of the time in their first four games) and a suffocating defense, Pittsburgh was far more successful managing without him than almost anyone expected.

The Steelers are 3-1 despite being last in the league in passing after losing two backup quarterbacks to injury and settling on Charlie Batch. Maybe Roethlisberger, who has seemed intent on repairing his relationship with his teammates and fans since the spring investigation into his conduct toward a woman at a Georgia bar, will view that as a warning. Although the Steelers are surely better with him, they can win without him, too.

But even Rooney would prefer better balance than what Roethlisberger’s suspension forced on the Steelers. So Roethlisberger’s return is the point from which the Steelers’ commitment to the run will truly be tested, when they will hand off by choice, not by necessity.

http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010 ... -him-less/ (http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/roethlisberger-returns-to-offense-that-may-rely-on-him-less/)

Hey, I got an idea how to get more women interested in reading about sports in the NY Times...let's give some chick a blog. She can look at box scores and stats, then write a few paragraphs and other chicks will totally dig it.

:roll:

fordfixer
10-17-2010, 09:32 AM
October 16, 2010, 1:11 PM

Roethlisberger Returns to Offense That May Rely on Him Less

By JUDY BATTISTA

Long before Milledgeville, Ga., became the center of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ off-season universe, the team had begun the move to a more run-based offense. Within days after the Steelers failed to make the playoffs as the defending Super Bowl champions last season, the team president Art Rooney II talked to Coach Mike Tomlin about reverting to a style that looked more like the Steelers teams of the 1970s and less like the pass-happy version that had emerged in recent years.

Last season, the Steelers ran the ball 42 percent of the time and quarterback Ben Roethlisberger attempted 506 passes. Roethlisberger, right, returns from his four-game suspension against Cleveland on Sunday to a decidedly different team from the one he last led. Relying on a run-first attack (the Steelers have run 57.7 percent of the time in their first four games) and a suffocating defense, Pittsburgh was far more successful managing without him than almost anyone expected.

The Steelers are 3-1 despite being last in the league in passing after losing two backup quarterbacks to injury and settling on Charlie Batch. Maybe Roethlisberger, who has seemed intent on repairing his relationship with his teammates and fans since the spring investigation into his conduct toward a woman at a Georgia bar, will view that as a warning. Although the Steelers are surely better with him, they can win without him, too.

But even Rooney would prefer better balance than what Roethlisberger’s suspension forced on the Steelers. So Roethlisberger’s return is the point from which the Steelers’ commitment to the run will truly be tested, when they will hand off by choice, not by necessity.

http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010 ... -him-less/ (http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/roethlisberger-returns-to-offense-that-may-rely-on-him-less/)

Hey, I got an idea how to get more women interested in reading about sports in the NY Times...let's give some chick a blog. She can look at box scores and stats, then write a few paragraphs and other chicks will totally dig it.

:roll:
http://chicksinthehuddle.com/ :lol:

stlrz d
10-17-2010, 01:01 PM
October 16, 2010, 1:11 PM

Roethlisberger Returns to Offense That May Rely on Him Less

By JUDY BATTISTA

Long before Milledgeville, Ga., became the center of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ off-season universe, the team had begun the move to a more run-based offense. Within days after the Steelers failed to make the playoffs as the defending Super Bowl champions last season, the team president Art Rooney II talked to Coach Mike Tomlin about reverting to a style that looked more like the Steelers teams of the 1970s and less like the pass-happy version that had emerged in recent years.

Last season, the Steelers ran the ball 42 percent of the time and quarterback Ben Roethlisberger attempted 506 passes. Roethlisberger, right, returns from his four-game suspension against Cleveland on Sunday to a decidedly different team from the one he last led. Relying on a run-first attack (the Steelers have run 57.7 percent of the time in their first four games) and a suffocating defense, Pittsburgh was far more successful managing without him than almost anyone expected.

The Steelers are 3-1 despite being last in the league in passing after losing two backup quarterbacks to injury and settling on Charlie Batch. Maybe Roethlisberger, who has seemed intent on repairing his relationship with his teammates and fans since the spring investigation into his conduct toward a woman at a Georgia bar, will view that as a warning. Although the Steelers are surely better with him, they can win without him, too.

But even Rooney would prefer better balance than what Roethlisberger’s suspension forced on the Steelers. So Roethlisberger’s return is the point from which the Steelers’ commitment to the run will truly be tested, when they will hand off by choice, not by necessity.

http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010 ... -him-less/ (http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/roethlisberger-returns-to-offense-that-may-rely-on-him-less/)

Hey, I got an idea how to get more women interested in reading about sports in the NY Times...let's give some chick a blog. She can look at box scores and stats, then write a few paragraphs and other chicks will totally dig it.

:roll:
http://chicksinthehuddle.com/ :lol:

Links I'll never click on for $500, Alex?

SteelTorch
10-17-2010, 04:07 PM
Must...not...rant!! :HeadBanger

BATMAN
10-17-2010, 07:38 PM
I think it's important to run the ball. I don't mind if we have a higher average of passing or if we pass a lot but, when it comes down to ball/clock control along with a couple of needed muscle yards, we need that.

Doing both well will obviously help our team. I wish they would stop putting Moore in the game because he seems to have lost it. I would have liked to see a little bit of Dwyer today too. Very happy with Mendenhall and Redman. In addition to all the praise that Mendenhall gets for his running he, doesn't get enough or any praise for his blocking. Mendenhall can flatten the defenders if you haven't noticed.

Sugar
10-17-2010, 08:23 PM
I thought that the running game was very solid today even though I thought the Browns did a good job on D for the most part. It was good to see Redman used a little as well to give Mendy a blow. Ben just gives the team an extra dimension and teams just won't be able to key on the run game.