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fordfixer
09-16-2010, 12:14 AM
Emotional week for Steelers tackle Scott
By Scott Brown, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, September 16, 2010
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... 99747.html (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_699747.html)

This is the fifth-year anniversary of when Vince Young led Texas to a 13-0 record and a stirring win over Southern Cal in the BCS title game. One memory of that season still stands out to the player that protected Young's blind side.

"Everyone just had that 'We will win' type mentality, and I think that's in Vince's DNA," Jonathan Scott said.

Scott was one of the more sought-after players in the Steelers' locker room Wednesday for good reason. The 6-6, 318-pounder, who in the last year has changed teams and coped with the loss of his father, may start at left tackle against the Titans in place of the injured Max Starks.

But his history with Young, who will try to deal the Steelers yet another loss in Tennessee, and the Texas connections in the 1 p.m. game are also why reporters gravitated to Scott's locker.

Five players from the national championship team that scored an NCAA-record 652 points are expected to suit up Sunday at LP Field. Seven University of Texas products could play in the game if Casey Hampton's hamstring cooperates.

That won't make the hitting between the former AFC Central rivals any less fierce. But a handful of the players may linger afterward a little longer than usual, particularly if Tony Hills dresses for the Steelers.

While Scott started at left tackle on Texas' 2005 team, Hills served as the Longhorns' third tackle that season, and you could almost hear Young smile as he talked about "my guys" during a conference call.

"All of those kids are very close," Texas coach Mack Brown said of his 2005 team. "They all talk. They stay in touch."

The one person who Scott wishes he could talk to is his late father.

Ray Scott died last November at the age of 66 after suffering complications following back surgery. Scott, a ninth-round pick of the Jets in 1967, was one of his son's biggest supporters.

"I can't really talk about football any more to anybody like we did," said Scott, who has his father's obituary hanging in his locker. "It's something I think about every day."

Added Young: "(Scott's) been through a whole lot. I hope and pray that he has a home now in Pittsburgh and gets back to finishing his career like his Pops and everyone wanted him to do."

Scott signed with the Steelers amid little fanfare last March as his addition coincided with the return of wide receiver Antwaan Randle El and linebacker Larry Foote.

But his experience and ability to play both tackle spots have already been put to use.

Scott replaced Starks in the fourth quarter of last Sunday's game, and the fourth-year veteran said he is preparing as if he is going to start against the Titans.

Starks, who has a sprained left ankle, did not practice yesterday. If he is unable to play, the Steelers will turn to a player who made six starts at left tackle last season for the Bills.

And one who is driven by the memory of his father.

"From the outside looking in, they had a great relationship," said Hills, who had Scott in his wedding in June. "There's no doubt that every time he's out there on the field, he's looking up at his father."

His best friend, too.

"Only time can help, so I've just got to take it day by day," Scott said. "I can say that life has gotten progressively better from the day he died until today."

steelblood
09-16-2010, 07:44 AM
J. Scott sounds like a thoughtful guy. I really hope he plays well on Sunday.

Pahn711
09-16-2010, 10:13 AM
I couldn't even tell a difference when he replaced Starks last Sunday, was there any dropoff at all?

calmkiller
09-16-2010, 01:18 PM
I couldn't even tell a difference when he replaced Starks last Sunday, was there any dropoff at all?


Nope People got around him just as easily.

I wish him well. Losing a family member is one of the hardest things to deal with.