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fordfixer
06-29-2010, 10:19 PM
Time for Goodell to strengthen conduct policy
Les Carpenter
http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=A ... licy062910 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=Ap3VjYf.QTN77n7oVaIyrV9DubYF?slug=lc-conductpolicy062910)
By Les Carpenter


Three springs ago, back when Pacman Jones roamed the strip clubs and Tank Johnson(notes) carried enough small arms to supply a militia, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell decided his league had an image problem. This has been part of Goodell’s genius: realizing when the public relations are going bad and reacting quickly to squelch the disaster.

So in response to the troubling behavior, he produced a two-page document the NFL called its “Personal Conduct Policy,” a vague but nonetheless strong statement essentially explaining that any player, coach, team official or league executive caught doing something wrong could face dire consequences. It never spelled out what those consequences actually were. Everything was left to “the discretion of the Commissioner.”

Instantly, Goodell ruled hard. Jones, arrested several times during his first two seasons with the Tennessee Titans, was suspended for the 2007 season. Johnson, who served 60 days in jail early in ’07, was suspended for the first half. And another player, then-Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chris Henry, was also given an eight-game suspension. Goodell’s policy was praised. The league had salvaged its image.

Problem is: players didn’t stop misbehaving. Even more, the NFL’s policy doesn’t provide answers. While Goodell was wise to create the document and attack a looming image problem, it still stands today as a public relations ploy – two pages of words that mean different things depending on the profile of the offender.

Over the weekend, Detroit Lions president Tom Lewand was arrested for a DUI. As DUI arrests go this was especially untidy. In the video, released by police, Lewand’s car appears to weave back and forth. He is supposedly so drunk that one of the arresting officers shouts “whew, you’ve been drinking man” as Lewand wobbles from the car. Yet even when faced with a mountain of evidence to his intoxication, he insists that he is sober. He tries to talk his way out of taking a breathalyzer. When he finally does breathe into one, he is arrested immediately.

In many ways this is as bad or worse than Jones’ $100 bill blizzard that led to a strip club fracas in Las Vegas, or Johnson hiding his weapons cache. A player driving around with a .21 blood alcohol level, denying he had done anything wrong, looking ridiculous as the handcuffs were snapped on his wrists would be certain to face the wrath of Goodell’s policy.

It’s not too hard to imagine Goodell at his desk trying to calculate the reaction to his punishment, waiting for the perfect moment to drop his ruling; all to maximize airtime and further the notion that he is ridding the league of its hoodlums.

In a reverse of most sports leagues where big stars often get the benefit of the doubt, the NFL’s punishment of quarterbacks Michael Vick(notes) and Ben Roethlisberger(notes) proves that the more publicized the behavior, the worse the penalty.

Will the same happen to Lewand? Should it be worse?

Ultimately, as the league’s conduct policy heads into its fourth year it needs to advance. It can not continue to rely upon a quickly-written document dashed off in the heat of a bad PR week to define the future of its behavioral policy. A good policy can be an excellent deterrent. Nothing motivates a player like the loss of a paycheck. Yet the punishments must be handed out evenly, the consequences laid out long in advance before the TV cameras have even descended on the scene.

Maybe DUIs are automatic two-game suspensions for players and three months for executives. Whatever they are, let them be defined. Let everyone know what they face. Let them understand there is little room for appeal. For years this has worked when the crime is steroids. The time has come to simplify conduct as well.

Ten years ago this wouldn’t have mattered. Ten years ago no one much cared if players got in trouble. Ten years ago a team executive’s DUI might not have even made the news. But we are an image-conscious culture now. We bristle when our heroes don’t behave. We care when a team’s president is wobbling on the side of the road, his breath sending the breathalyzer’s numbers soaring.

Ten years ago there wasn’t a need for a behavioral policy. Now there is.

The time has come to make it the same for everybody.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
06-29-2010, 11:08 PM
Time for Goodell to strengthen conduct policy
Les Carpenter
http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=A ... licy062910 (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=Ap3VjYf.QTN77n7oVaIyrV9DubYF?slug=lc-conductpolicy062910)
By Les Carpenter


Three springs ago, back when Pacman Jones roamed the strip clubs and Tank Johnson(notes) carried enough small arms to supply a militia, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell decided his league had an image problem. This has been part of Goodell’s genius: realizing when the public relations are going bad and reacting quickly to squelch the disaster.

So in response to the troubling behavior, he produced a two-page document the NFL called its “Personal Conduct Policy,” a vague but nonetheless strong statement essentially explaining that any player, coach, team official or league executive caught doing something wrong could face dire consequences. It never spelled out what those consequences actually were. Everything was left to “the discretion of the Commissioner.”

Instantly, Goodell ruled hard. Jones, arrested several times during his first two seasons with the Tennessee Titans, was suspended for the 2007 season. Johnson, who served 60 days in jail early in ’07, was suspended for the first half. And another player, then-Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chris Henry, was also given an eight-game suspension. Goodell’s policy was praised. The league had salvaged its image.

Problem is: players didn’t stop misbehaving. Even more, the NFL’s policy doesn’t provide answers. While Goodell was wise to create the document and attack a looming image problem, it still stands today as a public relations ploy – two pages of words that mean different things depending on the profile of the offender.

Over the weekend, Detroit Lions president Tom Lewand was arrested for a DUI. As DUI arrests go this was especially untidy. In the video, released by police, Lewand’s car appears to weave back and forth. He is supposedly so drunk that one of the arresting officers shouts “whew, you’ve been drinking man” as Lewand wobbles from the car. Yet even when faced with a mountain of evidence to his intoxication, he insists that he is sober. He tries to talk his way out of taking a breathalyzer. When he finally does breathe into one, he is arrested immediately.

In many ways this is as bad or worse than Jones’ $100 bill blizzard that led to a strip club fracas in Las Vegas, or Johnson hiding his weapons cache. A player driving around with a .21 blood alcohol level, denying he had done anything wrong, looking ridiculous as the handcuffs were snapped on his wrists would be certain to face the wrath of Goodell’s policy.

It’s not too hard to imagine Goodell at his desk trying to calculate the reaction to his punishment, waiting for the perfect moment to drop his ruling; all to maximize airtime and further the notion that he is ridding the league of its hoodlums.

In a reverse of most sports leagues where big stars often get the benefit of the doubt, the NFL’s punishment of quarterbacks Michael Vick(notes) and Ben Roethlisberger(notes) proves that the more publicized the behavior, the worse the penalty.

Will the same happen to Lewand? Should it be worse?

Ultimately, as the league’s conduct policy heads into its fourth year it needs to advance. It can not continue to rely upon a quickly-written document dashed off in the heat of a bad PR week to define the future of its behavioral policy. A good policy can be an excellent deterrent. Nothing motivates a player like the loss of a paycheck. Yet the punishments must be handed out evenly, the consequences laid out long in advance before the TV cameras have even descended on the scene.

Maybe DUIs are automatic two-game suspensions for players and three months for executives. Whatever they are, let them be defined. Let everyone know what they face. Let them understand there is little room for appeal. For years this has worked when the crime is steroids. The time has come to simplify conduct as well.

Ten years ago this wouldn’t have mattered. Ten years ago no one much cared if players got in trouble. Ten years ago a team executive’s DUI might not have even made the news. But we are an image-conscious culture now. We bristle when our heroes don’t behave. We care when a team’s president is wobbling on the side of the road, his breath sending the breathalyzer’s numbers soaring.

Ten years ago there wasn’t a need for a behavioral policy. Now there is.

The time has come to make it the same for everybody.

Didn't one of the Raiders coaches commit grand assault on another Raiders coach a couple of years ago (cold cocked him and broke his jaw)? That guy wasn't punished by the NFL, IIRC. If I were a player's union rep, I would demand the book be thrown at this guy - suspended from all team activities for, oh, 6 games, maybe reduced to 4 for good behavior.

birtikidis
06-29-2010, 11:18 PM
yea it was tom cable. and i think it was just last year.

stlrz d
06-30-2010, 12:08 AM
Roger Goodell faces three new personal conduct policy challenges

Recent incidents involving Vince Young, Michael Vick and Lions president Tom Lewand present very different scenarios for NFL commissioner as he considers how to discipline each of them.

Mike Florio

Tuesday, Jun. 29, 2010 - 9:27 a.m. ET

In most years, June is one of the rare months in which the NFL commissioner can relax a bit before another season ramps up. This year, Roger Goodell has a trio of thorny problems.
NFL commissioner implied Titans quarterback Vince Young won't receive a suspension for the misdemeanor assault.
NFL commissioner implied Titans quarterback Vince Young won't receive a suspension for the misdemeanor assault.

Trouble has found Titans quarterback Vince Young, Eagles quarterback Michael Vick and Lions president Tom Lewand, and in time Goodell must resolve each matter in accordance with the precedent he has set under the personal conduct policy.

Vince Young

On the surface, Young's situation is simple: He was cited for misdemeanor assault after an incident at a Dallas strip club, and the availability of video suggests that Young will plead guilty or no contest to the charges.

Based on the precedents involving Cardinals linebacker Joey Porter, a first-time offender who was fined in the amount of a single game check after pleading no contest to misdemeanor assault in 2008, and another first-time offender, Jets receiver Braylon Edwards, who reportedly won't be suspended after pleading no contest to misdemeanor assault arising from an October 2009 incident, Young likely will get a fine but no suspension.

Perhaps there's a catch, though. When FoxSports.com reported that Goodell was unlikely to suspend Young, the league quickly clarified the remarks, explaining that Goodell said nothing about Young's likely or unlikely fate. It's possible the league chimed in because Goodell plans to use trouble-making quarterbacks for sending messages to the other players, just as many think Goodell did with Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger.

Michael Vick

Vick apparently did nothing wrong in connection with the shooting at his 30th birthday party. Whether he had left the party before the shot rang out (the reports in this regard are conflicting), no one claims Vick had a role in the incident.

The problem arises from the fact the bullet hit Quanis Phillips, one of the co-defendants in the dogfighting case that landed Vick in federal prison. Vick's probation requires him to steer clear of convicted felons, and Phillips' presence at the party calls into question whether Vick ran afoul of his probation and/or his NFL reinstatement.

If the feds persuade a judge that Vick violated the terms of his probation, Goodell's decision will be simple. Vick necessarily would be suspended because he'd be back in jail.

What if the feds do nothing? Under the precedent Goodell set in the Roethlisberger case, the league itself may investigate whether Vick ran afoul of the terms of his probation and, in turn, his reinstatement.

At this point, it's too early to know how this will play out. But Steelers fans who continue to believe that Goodell unfairly made an example out of a starting quarterback who never was arrested will be paying close attention.

Tom Lewand

Over the past year, the league has dealt with a couple of situations involving non-players who have faced allegations of wrongdoing. Former Raiders defensive assistant Randy Hanson met with coach Tom Cable in August 2009 and left with a broken jaw. In May, Saints head coach Sean Payton was accused of abusing Vicodin, and assistant head coach Joe Vitt was accused of stealing it.

To date, the league has not punished any of them.

Lions president Tom Lewand's drunk-driving arrest, on the other hand, compels swift and decisive action. Given that his blood-alcohol concentration was more than twice the legal limit and that he holds a lofty position within the organization, Lewand's alleged misbehavior can't be ignored.

But Lions owner William Clay Ford apparently plans to do so. If Goodell follows suit, he'll face intense criticism from the players' union.

In the end, each situation presents a different challenge for Goodell. And none of these cases would have arisen if Young, Vick and Lewand had learned from the examples provided by others.

Read more: http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/article/2010-06-29/roger-goodell-faces-three-new-personal-conduct-policy-challenges#ixzz0sIxhdT3R


An interesting take from Florio for a change.

hawaiiansteel
06-30-2010, 03:28 PM
Personal Conduct Policy applies to all, but does it?

Posted by Mike Florio on June 30, 2010


As if there was any doubt, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell made clear on Monday that the league's Personal Conduct Policy applies to every employee of every team -- and every employee of the league office.

"As I've said before, this isn't a player policy, it's a personal conduct policy," Goodell said. "It goes for everybody in the NFL."

That said, players primarily become the focus of its consequences, with non-players who apparently have engaged in misbehavior perceived by some to be getting a pass. Raiders coach Tom Cable, for example, seemingly endured no real punishment or scrutiny after he emerged from a meeting and a member of his staff had a both a to-do list and a broken jaw. (In most other industries, the guy running the meeting at least would have some extensive and serious explaining to do.) More recently, former Saints director of security Geoffrey Santini has alleged that Saints coach Sean Payton was abusing Vicodin, that assistant head coach Joe Vitt had stolen Vicodin, and that G.M. Mickey Loomis tried to cover it all up. To date, the league apparently has done nothing, either to gather facts or to mete out discipline.

Now, the league faces a much more cut-and-dried situation regarding Lions president Tom Lewand. Widely known within league circles (we're told) as someone who liked to a have a cocktail or two (or more) after business hours at league functions, his arrest for DUI gives the NFL an opportunity to prove that a double standard doesn't exist.

"Our policies apply to everyone -- yours truly, club presidents, players, coaches -- everybody involved with the NFL," Goodell told NFL Network. "I think Tom recognizes that. Of course I will speak to him at some point in the near future and we'll be gathering the facts. But everybody is accountable and responsible."

And who can be more accountable and responsible than the president of a team?

The NFL wants its players to take full advantage of the "Safe Ride" program in order to prevent an outcome like the one Ravens receiver Donte' Stallworth endured in March 2009, when a man was killed after colliding with a car that Stallworth drove in a drunken state. The task of getting players to take advantage of the service, which provides rides home on a no-questions-asked basis, becomes a lot more challenging if the guy running the team won't use it, either.

Some league insiders think that Lewand will use the same charm and connections that allowed him to obtain and maintain his current position to avoid a serious consequence now. Already, the Lions have made clear their intention to stand behind him. The league's handling of the situation will go a long way toward dispelling -- or validating -- concerns that, in reality, the Personal Conduct Policy holds the players to a higher standard than everyone else.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... t-does-it/ (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/06/30/personal-conduct-policy-applies-to-all-but-does-it/)

ter1230_4
06-30-2010, 06:48 PM
The Policy under Goodell the POS is simple. He simply licks his finger and holds it up to see which way the wind is blowing, then he rules accordingly.

stlrz d
07-01-2010, 12:09 AM
Saints assistant coach pleads guilty in alleged real estate scam

Associated Press
Published: June 30, 2010 at 09:10 p.m.
Updated: June 30, 2010 at 10:26 p.m.

METAIRIE, La. -- New Orleans Saints assistant defensive line coach Travis Jones has pleaded guilty to federal conspiracy charges in an alleged real estate scam involving more than 40 people in northeastern Texas.

A spokeswoman with the U.S. Attorney's office in Texas' Eastern District confirmed Wednesday that Jones entered a plea of conspiracy to commit mail fraud last week. Court records show Jones also signed a factual statement admitting his role in the alleged scam, which netted him about $86,000.

Jones, who hasn't yet been sentenced, remains employed by the Saints. Team spokesman Greg Bensel said the Saints are aware of the charges but have no further comment.

Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press


http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... state-scam (http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d818eb876/article/saints-assistant-coach-pleads-guilty-in-alleged-real-estate-scam)

Hmmmmm...wonder what Goodell will do to him?

fordfixer
07-01-2010, 12:17 AM
Fine him about $86,000 dollars

Crash
07-01-2010, 01:56 AM
"Our policies apply to everyone: yours truly, club presidents, players, coaches, everybody involved in the NFL”

-Roger GOD-dell

Pleading guilty to federal charges should be a year off IMO.

feltdizz
07-01-2010, 03:14 PM
I'm going to try to stop making fun of people for questioning every offense and asking for a suspension. Maybe other fans do the same when they have a player get suspended. Maybe they combed over NFL.com and every article about conduct looking for others to villify.

I just can't understand how a team exec getting a DUI should result in a suspension. The only punishment that would work is draft picks. Were we really concerned with Cables fight when it happened? Is this just red meat for the fans of players who are suspended? Are Packer, Pats and Cardinal fans sitting around debating Goodells intentions with player suspensions? I doubt it.

Its going to be a long year for Steeler fans who want justice. A very long year.

cruzer8
07-01-2010, 05:15 PM
I'm going to try to stop making fun of people for questioning every offense and asking for a suspension. Maybe other fans do the same when they have a player get suspended. Maybe they combed over NFL.com and every article about conduct looking for others to villify.

I just can't understand how a team exec getting a DUI should result in a suspension. The only punishment that would work is draft picks. Were we really concerned with Cables fight when it happened? Is this just red meat for the fans of players who are suspended? Are Packer, Pats and Cardinal fans sitting around debating Goodells intentions with player suspensions? I doubt it.

Its going to be a long year for Steeler fans who want justice. A very long year.

Do a search of other team's message boards and you WILL see other fans stating that what Goodell did with Ben sets a bad precedent.

A team exec getting suspended can't do his job just like a player who is suspended, right? Sheesh.

feltdizz
07-01-2010, 10:12 PM
Draft picks... that is the only punishment that will work.

You can't stop an exec from working... even if he is barred from the facility he will go paperless and use assistants to run messages for him.

No one really cares about execs off the clock unless it involves cheating for his team.

hawaiiansteel
07-01-2010, 11:06 PM
Roger Goodell faces three new personal conduct policy challenges

Mike Florio
Tuesday, Jun. 29, 2010


In most years, June is one of the rare months in which the NFL commissioner can relax a bit before another season ramps up. This year, Roger Goodell has a trio of thorny problems.

NFL commissioner implied Titans quarterback Vince Young won't receive a suspension for the misdemeanor assault.

Trouble has found Titans quarterback Vince Young, Eagles quarterback Michael Vick and Lions president Tom Lewand, and in time Goodell must resolve each matter in accordance with the precedent he has set under the personal conduct policy.

Vince Young

On the surface, Young's situation is simple: He was cited for misdemeanor assault after an incident at a Dallas strip club, and the availability of video suggests that Young will plead guilty or no contest to the charges.

Based on the precedents involving Cardinals linebacker Joey Porter, a first-time offender who was fined in the amount of a single game check after pleading no contest to misdemeanor assault in 2008, and another first-time offender, Jets receiver Braylon Edwards, who reportedly won't be suspended after pleading no contest to misdemeanor assault arising from an October 2009 incident, Young likely will get a fine but no suspension.

Perhaps there's a catch, though. When FoxSports.com reported that Goodell was unlikely to suspend Young, the league quickly clarified the remarks, explaining that Goodell said nothing about Young's likely or unlikely fate. It's possible the league chimed in because Goodell plans to use trouble-making quarterbacks for sending messages to the other players, just as many think Goodell did with Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger.

Michael Vick

Vick apparently did nothing wrong in connection with the shooting at his 30th birthday party. Whether he had left the party before the shot rang out (the reports in this regard are conflicting), no one claims Vick had a role in the incident.

The problem arises from the fact the bullet hit Quanis Phillips, one of the co-defendants in the dogfighting case that landed Vick in federal prison. Vick's probation requires him to steer clear of convicted felons, and Phillips' presence at the party calls into question whether Vick ran afoul of his probation and/or his NFL reinstatement.

If the feds persuade a judge that Vick violated the terms of his probation, Goodell's decision will be simple. Vick necessarily would be suspended because he'd be back in jail.

What if the feds do nothing? Under the precedent Goodell set in the Roethlisberger case, the league itself may investigate whether Vick ran afoul of the terms of his probation and, in turn, his reinstatement.

At this point, it's too early to know how this will play out. But Steelers fans who continue to believe that Goodell unfairly made an example out of a starting quarterback who never was arrested will be paying close attention.

Tom Lewand

Over the past year, the league has dealt with a couple of situations involving non-players who have faced allegations of wrongdoing. Former Raiders defensive assistant Randy Hanson met with coach Tom Cable in August 2009 and left with a broken jaw. In May, Saints head coach Sean Payton was accused of abusing Vicodin, and assistant head coach Joe Vitt was accused of stealing it.

To date, the league has not punished any of them.

Lions president Tom Lewand's drunk-driving arrest, on the other hand, compels swift and decisive action. Given that his blood-alcohol concentration was more than twice the legal limit and that he holds a lofty position within the organization, Lewand's alleged misbehavior can't be ignored.

But Lions owner William Clay Ford apparently plans to do so. If Goodell follows suit, he'll face intense criticism from the players' union.

In the end, each situation presents a different challenge for Goodell. And none of these cases would have arisen if Young, Vick and Lewand had learned from the examples provided by others.


Read more: http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/article ... z0sUTDCLsA (http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/article/2010-06-29/roger-goodell-faces-three-new-personal-conduct-policy-challenges#ixzz0sUTDCLsA)

feltdizz
07-02-2010, 01:00 PM
is there a reason the same story is posted twice?

fordfixer
07-02-2010, 10:59 PM
is there a reason the same story is posted twice?


Just wanted to make sure you saw it?

feltdizz
07-04-2010, 01:18 PM
I guess.... :wink: