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fordfixer
05-25-2010, 12:40 AM
New York likely to land Super Bowl
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tuesday, May 25, 2010
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsbu ... 82737.html (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/steelers/s_682737.html)

IRVING, Texas -- Ready for an outdoor Super Bowl in cold, possibly snowy weather? Thinking that new overtime rule adopted for playoff games should be used in the regular season, too?

NFL owners will discuss those things and more today.

The 2014 Super Bowl site definitely will be picked. It's widely expected to go to the new $1.6 billion Meadowlands stadium that will become home to the Jets and Giants this season, although Miami and Tampa, Fla., also are bidding.

The new stadium for the New York City area would seem like a natural site for the NFL's marquee event, especially with league headquarters in Manhattan. Plus, the league has rewarded cities for building expensive new stadiums by giving them a Super Bowl.

But there's a fundamental problem: the Meadowlands doesn't have a roof, and temperatures are usually in the 20s during early February in East Rutherford, N.J. There's even a league rule aimed at ensuring good weather, either by playing in a warm climate or by having a roof. That the rule was waived for this bid shows what a shoo-in it might be.

Yet there will still be a vote, and teams in other cold-climate cities could support it in hopes of permanently scrapping the weather rule so they, too, can play host to the lucrative event. After all, the success of the NHL's outdoor game in 2008 helped turn that into an annual event.

"I don't see how it's not played here," Jets coach Rex Ryan said. "We've got the best city in the world. I think that's indisputable. We've got arguably one of the top stadiums in the league, a brand-new stadium, and it helps two teams."

As for overtime, when owners last met in March, they voted to change the sudden-death rule so that if a team losing the coin toss immediately gives up a field goal, they still get a chance to score and either tie the game or win -- but only in the playoffs.

There's a sentiment that if the rule is good enough for the postseason, it should be done in the regular season.

"It is on the agenda for a 'possible vote' after consultation with the clubs," said Atlanta Falcons president Rich McKay, co-chairman of the competition committee. "In March, there were a number of clubs who wanted to discuss it at the May meeting, and we will see if this leads to a vote on the issue."

Owners also will talk about the proposed sale of the St. Louis Rams.

Illinois businessman Shahid Khan reached agreement with owners Chip Rosenbloom and his sister, Lucia Rodriguez, on Feb. 11 to buy the team for an estimated $750 million. Last month, Missouri billionaire Stan Kroenke, who already owned 40 percent of the team, exercised his right to match the offer and purchase the remaining 60 percent of the club.

Beyond the financial issues, there's also a problem because Kroenke owns the NBA's Denver Nuggets and the NHL's Colorado Avalanche, and NFL rules prohibit owners from also owning clubs in the NBA, NHL or Major League Baseball.

The league worked around that rule in 1994, when Wayne Huizenga bought the Dolphins in 1994 while already owning the Florida Marlins and Florida Panthers.

StarSpangledSteeler
05-25-2010, 01:09 AM
I'd welcome a bad weather super bowl like i'd welcome megan fox to my b-day party...

The sloppier the better.

fordfixer
05-25-2010, 01:13 AM
I'd welcome a bad weather super bowl like i'd welcome megan fox to my b-day party...

The sloppier the better.
Another disappointing Birthday for you :lol: :lol:

hawaiiansteel
05-25-2010, 01:27 AM
I'd welcome a bad weather super bowl like i'd welcome megan fox to my b-day party...

The sloppier the better.




is Megan Fox beautiful or what?

http://artbikerworld.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/megan-fox-juno-premiere-01-preview.jpghttp://www.gossipcheck.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/megan_fox4.jpg

StarSpangledSteeler
05-25-2010, 05:58 AM
Thank you Hawaiian!!!!!!!

That is exactly the type of thoughtful and dedicated posting we need to get us through the off-season alive and well! Now if someone can just photoshop a Steeler's jersey on her, I can die a happy man!

Mister Pittsburgh
05-25-2010, 12:41 PM
Google 'Megan Fox Thumb'. She is only 99.9% perfect LOL!

JTP53609
05-25-2010, 12:54 PM
oh good, because new york does not get enough exposure as it is...lets give them a super bowl, they already have the draft every single year

flippy
05-25-2010, 01:11 PM
Putting the game in bad weather would mean more real fans would get tickets.

I've never been able to afford SB tickets, so I'm not thinking about myself. But the people that do go to SBs are casual football fans and I expect they wouldn't go to a bad weather game.

As a broke Steelers fan I know my best bet to score cheap tickets to Heinz Field is snowy or rainy weather in Pittsburgh. And the colder the weather, the cheaper the tickets.

Heck, it they have a cold enough SuperBowl, I might be able to go one day :D

RuthlessBurgher
05-25-2010, 01:12 PM
oh good, because new york does not get enough exposure as it is...lets give them a super bowl, they already have the draft every single year

Well, Indy has the combine every year, and now they get SBXLVI in 2012.

The weather for the game in New York will likely suck (windy and cold), but at least there is stuff to do in New York.

Super Bowl week in Indianapolis will make Jacksonville look like Las Vegas.

flippy
05-25-2010, 01:16 PM
Super Bowl week in Indianapolis will make Jacksonville look like Las Vegas.

I thought Indy would suck until I went there for the Indy 500. Indy has loads of character. And some of the best blues in the country. I'd recommend the Slippery Noodle if it's still there. I'd assume it still is since it's been there since the 1800s.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
05-25-2010, 01:25 PM
I think it is completely awesome that they are having the SB in an outdoor Northern city. Bye-Bye dome teams! Heck, it makes it more likely that the Steelers win a SB (when they get to one) - maybe that year as well to give us NINE rings!!).

flippy
05-25-2010, 01:30 PM
I think it is completely awesome that they are having the SB in an outdoor Northern city. Bye-Bye dome teams! Heck, it makes it more likely that the Steelers win a SB (when they get to one) - maybe that year as well to give us NINE rings!!).

No way Eli ever wins a SuperBowl again.

All the limp armed QBs are at a major disadvantage.

RuthlessBurgher
05-25-2010, 01:37 PM
Super Bowl week in Indianapolis will make Jacksonville look like Las Vegas.

I thought Indy would suck until I went there for the Indy 500. Indy has loads of character. And some of the best blues in the country. I'd recommend the Slippery Noodle if it's still there. I'd assume it still is since it's been there since the 1800s.

I don't follow car racing at all (never watched NASCAR for more than 7 continuous seconds), but I think the Indy 500 would be an event to witness. Aren't there like 300,000-400,000 spectators or something like that there?

I suppose Super Bowl organizers can make it successful pretty much anywhere. I went to the games in Detroit and Tampa (you think that would be a no-brainer advantage to Tampa, right?), but actually enjoyed the festivities in Detroit more, where everything was tied into a Winter Festival downtown with ice carvings inside the stadium and out, various themed tents with activites (heated to the point that one of them held beach volleyball and surfing competitions), snow tubing, etc. vs. the standard issue NFL Experience in Tampa. The stadium was much nicer in Detroit. The Motown themed pre-game show ranging from the Temptations to Stevie Wonder in Detroit was better than the generic entertainment in Tampa that I didn't even bother paying attention to. Aretha Franklin, Aaron Neville, and Dr. John for the anthem was better in Detroit than Jennifer Hudson in Tampa. The Stones (with an imaginative stage that had optimal sight lines from anywhere) was better than Springsteen (with a stage that faced in one direction and basically shut out half the crowd). The only thing better about Tampa was the actual game itself with the absurdly exciting endings to both halves of SBXLIII, but I thought that Detroit (shockingly) out-did Tampa in terms of putting on an event.

Snatch98
05-25-2010, 01:38 PM
Megan Fox is definitely smoking hot. However everyone needs to check out her thumbs. Yes her thumbs. Extremely hot but the thumbs can't be ignored.

JTP53609
05-25-2010, 01:47 PM
I like the idea of cold, outdoor super bowls, since over half the league plays in the cold durng the season..I just dont like new york getting everything..i know it is the city never that sleeps, but try denver, or kc, or buffalo too, it is always new york

SanAntonioSteelerFan
05-25-2010, 01:52 PM
Megan Fox is definitely smoking hot. However everyone needs to check out her thumbs. Yes her thumbs. Extremely hot but the thumbs can't be ignored.

Lizard lady.

http://s3.amazonaws.com/pixmac-preview/paw-of-a-lizard.jpg

flippy
05-25-2010, 02:12 PM
Super Bowl week in Indianapolis will make Jacksonville look like Las Vegas.

I thought Indy would suck until I went there for the Indy 500. Indy has loads of character. And some of the best blues in the country. I'd recommend the Slippery Noodle if it's still there. I'd assume it still is since it's been there since the 1800s.

I don't follow car racing at all (never watched NASCAR for more than 7 continuous seconds), but I think the Indy 500 would be an event to witness. Aren't there like 300,000-400,000 spectators or something like that there?

I suppose Super Bowl organizers can make it successful pretty much anywhere. I went to the games in Detroit and Tampa (you think that would be a no-brainer advantage to Tampa, right?), but actually enjoyed the festivities in Detroit more, where everything was tied into a Winter Festival downtown with ice carvings inside the stadium and out, various themed tents with activites (heated to the point that one of them held beach volleyball and surfing competitions), snow tubing, etc. vs. the standard issue NFL Experience in Tampa. The stadium was much nicer in Detroit. The Motown themed pre-game show ranging from the Temptations to Stevie Wonder in Detroit was better than the generic entertainment in Tampa that I didn't even bother paying attention to. Aretha Franklin, Aaron Neville, and Dr. John for the anthem was better in Detroit than Jennifer Hudson in Tampa. The Stones (with an imaginative stage that had optimal sight lines from anywhere) was better than Springsteen (with a stage that faced in one direction and basically shut out half the crowd). The only thing better about Tampa was the actual game itself with the absurdly exciting endings to both halves of SBXLIII, but I thought that Detroit (shockingly) out-did Tampa in terms of putting on an event.

They had 500K the year I went to Indy. My buddy had a group with extra tickets so I went with a busload of people and had a blast. We had seats right at the finish line and Indy was a blast. It was the biggest event I've ever been to outside of Octoberfest or MardiGras. The race was impossible to watch cause you could only see a portion of the track. But it was interesting watching the pitstops. The Colgate car was there almost every lap.

Luckily I'm not into racing at all, but had fun because of the party. I've never watched a race for more than a couple seconds either. At Indy I started drinking Fri morning on the bus ride and didn't stop until the ride back the following Wed.

I did go with another buddy to a CART race back in the late 90s and that was more fun to watch since we could see most of the track and there were loads of twists and turns on the course and it seemed like there was a lot more action. And we left there covered in warm rubber spewing off the cars. It was a heck of an experience even though I'm not a race fan. There we moved around and watched from different spots.

It is surprising that Detroit put together a better SB than Tampa. I remember being in Tampa a few weeks before the SuperBowl and seeing a lot of the signage and prep work happening. It looked like it was going to be a huge production. And I've seen their stadium which seems like it would be a good place to watch a game. Never been to Detroit's stadium.

BURGH86STEEL
05-25-2010, 06:15 PM
I am not sold on the idea as of today. Will have to see how it turns out.

NJ-STEELER
05-25-2010, 06:27 PM
I think it is completely awesome that they are having the SB in an outdoor Northern city. Bye-Bye dome teams! Heck, it makes it more likely that the Steelers win a SB (when they get to one) - maybe that year as well to give us NINE rings!!).

No way Eli ever wins a SuperBowl again.

All the limp armed QBs are at a major disadvantage.

he cant even win in his own stadium when it gets cold and the winds pick up.

some wanted a dome as a new stadium for NY cause it would have assured a SB coming to the area and secretly some giants people didn't want those winds effecting Eli again

hawaiiansteel
05-25-2010, 06:45 PM
NFL takes unacceptable risk with New York Super Bowl

Mike Florio
Tuesday, May. 25, 2010


When I first heard the NFL was seriously considering staging an open-air Super Bowl in a cold-weather city, I was intrigued. This isn't the same stuffy, stodgy NFL that ventures outside the box only with an engraved itinerary and a six-pack of Sherpas. The NFL is willing to take risks and do something different.

But there's a fine line between being edgy and going loco. After further deliberation, the NFL's decision to hold a Super Bowl in a cold-weather climate with a stadium that has no lid makes us wonder whether plenty of people have lost their marbles.

The Super Bowl is the single greatest day on the American sports calendar. It needs to be protected from circumstances that can make the experience something other than super.

Any of you who have ever stood for three-plus hours in single-digit temperatures for an NFL game know exactly what I'm talking about. Folks familiar with going to outdoor games in cold-weather cities understand how to properly prepare for multiple hours in the hostile elements.

But what about the sandal-wearers from California whose idea of a winter coat is a windbreaker with a hood? When it's time for them to pay for tickets that with a face value in the vicinity of $2,000, will they realize that they'll also need to spend roughly that much more on coats, boots, long underwear, gloves, hats, scarves, hand warmers, and foot warmers?

At a time when the NFL has displayed greater sensitivity to the in-stadium fan experience, the league seems to be pandering to the experience of the home viewer, who'd love to see images of a Super Bowl played in gently falling snow emanating from their 3D-HD television screen (made by the NFL's official 3D-HD television sponsor).
The message to the customers who'll be likely paying record-high prices? As the late Peter Boyle playing New York resident Frank Barone would say, "Suck it up, Nancy."
Maybe the NFL is hoping to make it "cool" to go to games in bitterly cold weather. Or maybe the NFL wants to create a spectacle like hockey's annual Winter Classic, already an indispensable New Year's Day tradition.

Either way, the risk of a nightmare scenario outweighs the potential reward of a day in which it's cold but not too cold and the snow is falling but not too heavily, with the wind blowing but not gusting.

But maybe the NFL wants to show it can navigate a nightmare. Imagine the hand-wringing over whether the league can get a concert-quality stage in place for the halftime show, if the snow is falling at a rate of one inch every 10 minutes. If the NFL can make it look easy even when the conditions are difficult, the league will look even better.

On a brighter note, there should be no worries about any wardrobe malfunctions.
The league is selling this as a one-time-only event as protection against the worst-case scenario. If the weather gives us something more like Chargers-Bengals in 1982 than Raiders-Patriots in 2002, the NFL will simply find a way to declare victory and take refuge behind the notion that this will never be done again. If it works — then they'll eventually spin the revolver and try it again at some point in the future.

The Super Bowl isn't an event with which such risks should be taken. And if the folks in New York/New Jersey wanted to host one or more Super Bowls at their new stadium, they should have included a retractable roof.

Why didn't they? Because they want the cold and the wind as part of a January home-field advantage if/when the Jets or the Giants are playing late-season or postseason games there.

That's fine, but they shouldn't be allowed to have it both ways.

Look, I love New York. And I love the Super Bowl. But New York and the Super Bowl don't necessarily mix like peanut butter and chocolate. If the fans have to suffer through the misery of a cold, windy day at Meadowlands Stadium in February 2014, it'll be more like a greasy pork sandwich served in a dirty ashtray.

http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/article ... super-bowl (http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/article/2010-05-25/nfl-takes-unacceptable-risk-new-york-super-bowl)

fordfixer
05-26-2010, 01:19 AM
A snowball’s chance: NJ picked for 2014 Super Bowl
http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=ap-superbowl2014
By JAIME ARON, AP Sports Writer 2 hours, 43 minutes ago


IRVING, Texas (AP)—February. Gray skies. Snowflakes. Brrrrrrrr.

Well, grab your boots and plow the snow. The Super Bowl is coming to the Meadowlands.

In New Jersey? In the dead of winter?

“We’ll all pray that it doesn’t snow that day,” Arizona Cardinals president Michael Bidwill said.

NFL owners voted Tuesday to put the 2014 Super Bowl in the new $1.6 billion Meadowlands Stadium that this season will become home to the New York Jets and Giants. It’s the first time the league has gone to a cold weather site that doesn’t have a dome; until now, those places couldn’t even bid on the big game.

So, why the risk?

“Let’s face it,” Giants co-owner John Mara said, “there’s only one New York City.”

“We promise the greatest game in the greatest venue in the greatest city,” added another co-owner, Steve Tisch. “Now we’ve got to deliver.”

Mother Nature may have a lot to say about that.

The coldest kickoff temperature in Super Bowl history was 39 degrees, and that would be considered a warm February day in East Rutherford, N.J. Average February temperatures there are 24 to 40 degrees, with several inches of rain, according to the bid documents.

Remember, the game kicks off after the sun goes down in the Eastern time zone, so temperatures would be dropping throughout the night.

“Everyone knows it’s risky,” said Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, whose bid was eliminated in the second round.

It might end up being another Ice Bowl, Fog Bowl, Freezer Bowl or something else worthy of a frigid nickname. That’s not what the bidders had in mind when they adopted the slogan, “Make Some History,” but for all the inconvenience to those in the stadium, it might look great on TV.

The extended version of Bart Starr’s game-winning sneak in the Ice Bowl in 1967 opens with Cowboys defenders scraping their cleats into the ice to try getting some traction. Teeth chatter just watching the replay of Tom Brady’s(notes) fumble that was ruled an incompletion in the snow-filled Tuck Rule game. In Brett Favre’s(notes) final game with the Packers, he ends a chilly playoff game by throwing an interception, then runs off with steam coming out of his mouth; it was against the Giants, too.

“People talk about the weather, but, you know, this is football, not beach volleyball,” New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg told the NFL Network.

The NFL has required an average temperature of 50 degrees or a dome for a team to even bid on hosting the Super Bowl, but the league bent the rule to let New York bid.

It’s billed as a one-time exception, but just a few years ago, the NHL experimented with an outdoor game on New Year’s Day, and it came off so perfectly that teams now fight to host what’s become the annual Winter Classic. Maybe this will work out that well, too.

“I think it will turn out to be a great event,” NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said.

The weather worries could even add to the hype. In addition to predicting which teams will make it, fans can guess how nasty it might be.

“We’ve played some (frigid, wet December) games there and I know firsthand that the fans had great experiences even though it was in inclement weather,” Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said.

Players are split on the decision.

In the Pittsburgh Steelers’ locker room, quarterback Byron Leftwich(notes) said the weather doesn’t matter “because it’s the Super Bowl … and you’re not going to let 15 degrees change anything.” But linebacker James Farrior(notes) countered, “I play enough games in the cold.”

Giants and Jets players are thrilled.

“There’s something special about this city, man,” Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis(notes) said following a rally in Times Square.

“We should’ve done this years ago,” said Giants defensive end Justin Tuck(notes), who also was part of that celebration.

The 50-degree rule was created for the comfort and convenience of fans and players. Anyone who has ever planned an outdoor event can appreciate how much of a relief it is to not worry about the weather. Neutral conditions, like those in a dome, also are supposed to help the caliber of play. It also makes it more comfy for all the practices, parties and other events during the week leading up to the game.

It’s been at least 57 degrees for every Super Bowl since 1975, when it was 46. That’s why Florida and California have been such frequent hosts.

“In the back of everybody’s mind, people want to be in South Florida that time of year,” Ross said.

Tuesday’s vote had been widely considered a formality, but it didn’t play out that way. Even after Miami was eliminated, it took two more rounds of voting for New York to get the nod over Tampa.

“New York knows how to put on an event,” Ross said, putting aside his weather warnings. “It’s not like you lost to some small town that doesn’t know how to put on big events.”

Being just outside the Big Apple means lots of glitz and spectacle, Buildup will include everything from a float in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade to parties at internationally renowned destinations. There will be game-day shots of the Manhattan skyline in the distance, and thousands watching on the jumbo-screen TVs in Times Square.

The flip side is that security will become a bigger issue, perhaps among the most expensive pieces of the budget. An expected economic impact of $550 million would help offset some of the cost.

Planners are already making the most of the weather. They’re plotting to give out hand warmers and heated seat cushions—and will be selling plenty more NFL-branded merchandise to help fight off the elements. They’ll also have hundreds of folks ready to shovel away snow, and anything else necessary to make the experience more than bearable.

The team owners were asked where they would sit—indoors or out?

“Probably both,” Jets owner Woody Johnson said.

Mara laughed and said, “I like that.”

Other cities have built big, expensive stadiums and would love to have the weather rule waived for them.

Odds are, the NFL will wait and see how this foray into the great outdoors in winter goes. Then the league might OK another bid—like for Washington, saying the nation’s capital deserves the nation’s most popular event—but it would take a year or two to figure out the logistics. And votes are taken four years out, so it might be until 2019 or 2020 before it happens again.

The upcoming Super Bowl, in February 2011, will be at Cowboys Stadium, followed by Indianapolis’ new stadium in 2012 and a 2013 return to the Superdome for the first time since Hurricane Katrina ripped off part of the roof.

The 2014 game will be held Feb. 2nd, 9th or 16th, depending on how that season’s schedule is set up.

That leads to one more question: Anybody have a 1,300-day forecast?

frankthetank1
05-26-2010, 01:38 PM
i hope they start playing the sb in some cold weather cities. its football for crying out loud not baseball. if nyc gets the sb in a few years does anyone think it could possibly open the door for other northern cities like the burgh? it makes sense imo. you have the steelers, packers, bears, and eagles who are all storied franchises but yet have never hosted a sb.

Sugar
05-26-2010, 05:14 PM
I like the idea of cold, outdoor super bowls, since over half the league plays in the cold durng the season..I just dont like new york getting everything..i know it is the city never that sleeps, but try denver, or kc, or buffalo too, it is always new york

New York is the center of the known universe. Ask anyone there and they'll tell you!

hawaiiansteel
05-28-2010, 09:59 PM
A frozen Super Bowl: Why the outrage?


Thursday, May 27, 2010
By Gene Collier, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


http://i47.tinypic.com/soyf5h.jpg


On the morning of Jan. 9, 1994, I woke up in a Marriott in Syracuse, fully content that this would be among the most relaxing days of an already fairly relaxed life.

Pitt's basketballing Panthers had spent the previous evening getting trimmed by Jim Boeheim's fellas inside the Carrier Dome, which was, like the balance of upstate New York, getting pelted with blinding, wet, lake-effect snow that would be measured in feet. They don't obsess on the inches so much up there.

Surely, I felt, no flights would be departing, including the one that was supposed to take me to Newark for the NFC playoff game between the New York Giants and the Minnesota Vikings that very afternoon.

Surely, I figured, I'd be watching that one from various sectors of the king-size bed, which was to be vacated only upon the rap-rap of room service, a plan that would be strictly enforced for the second game of that Sunday's NFL playoff doubleheader as well.

Surely.

It was 7:30 a.m.

Three-and-a-half hours later, I was walking through the parking lot at Giants Stadium, because a lot of people in this country remain fully functional in the worst of conditions regardless of whether it will ruin my day, including USAir, which on that day, flew me and one other person to New Jersey. Not to complain. In East Rutherford, there were no more than a few inches of snow, and the wind had calmed to maybe 30 mph, gusting to 60. The wind chill on the frozen concrete over Jimmy Hoffa was minus 377 degrees.

On the way to the press gate, I passed a tailgater who was shoving a burger through the mouth hole of his Giants ski mask.

I guess I looked at him a second too long, because he glared at me as if I was crazy.

The point is (at last!), when it comes to football, particularly postseason football, people will go anywhere and endure almost anything. It's 100 percent logic-free, but it's a fact.

Next time you're sitting in your family room on Jan. 9, and there's snow on the ground and the wind chill is minus 377, say this out loud:

"I know, let's light the grill, put on our ski masks, and shove some burgers through the mouth holes while holding some Bloody Marys!"

Then try it with this preface, "I've got playoff tickets!"

See?

So it is, like so many things, completely beyond me that there is so much reactive outrage across the sportscape for this idea of playing the Super Bowl in a cold weather site with no dome. The NFL's plan to put Super Bowl 48 in New York on Feb. 2, 2014, isn't without its downside, but aside from the all-but-certain upstaging of Punxsutawney Phil, I can't see it.

You'd think they were trying to put it in Frostbite Falls for a 2 a.m. kickoff with a halftime show featuring Up With Ice Fishing.

ESPN has been showing a continuous loop of horrible weather as the b-roll for this story, either that or it's the outtakes from "Dr. Zhivago." Wait, wasn't that a scene from "Twister"?

Terrell Suggs, the Baltimore Rats linebacker, said that the Super Bowl should be a reward for players and he doesn't want to get there only to find "it's 20 below zero."

Well that would be just about 60 degrees off the normal February temperature for New York according to NY.com, which claims 40 degrees as the average February high. Could it actually be 20 below that day? One chance in maybe 500, but that's a chance the NFL is willing to take to help pump $550 million into New York's economy while staging its biggest event in the media capital of the world.

Might the conditions be uncomfortable, the footing be less than perfect, even to the extent that it alters in some significant way the individual performances of the noble combatants? Heck yeah, just like it was Jan. 9, 1994; just like it was for the Greatest Game Ever Played right there in the Bronx Dec. 28, 1958; just like it was for the Ice Bowl at Lambeau Field Dec. 31, 1967; just like it was when Jerome Bettis nearly knocked Big Bear Brian Urlacher into the Allegheny on a dark and snowy night at Heinz Field Dec. 11, 2005.

Not one of those games, nor dozens of similarly delicious dramas, would retain a fraction of their iconic qualities were they staged on some swift Southern lawn, much less on the floor of the SuperDome.

Frankly, I'm glad the Sunbelt stranglehold on elemental Super Bowls has been broken this week because it opens the door for my original idea, which was to play the Super Bowl in the home stadium of one of the competing teams.

Why should the only teams with a chance to win the Super Bowl at home be your Giants, Jets, Saints, Buccaneers, Dolphins, Cowboys, Chargers, Colts, Lions, Cardinals, and their ilk?

Put the big game on the home field of one of the conference champions. The host conference will be determined, of course, by which league wins baseball's All-Star Game.

No need to thank me.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10147/1061153-66.stm

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