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hawaiiansteel
03-25-2010, 02:37 AM
NFL personnel men concerned by marijuana 'epidemic' in draft class



ORLANDO -- There's a widespread belief within the NFL that the 2010 draft represents one of the deepest and most promising pools of collegiate talent in years. But in addition to the vast potential of this year's draft class, numerous NFL personnel evaluators told SI.com they are concerned about the increased number of prospects who have a history of marijuana use in their background, with players often acknowledging a failed drug test for pot in college in interviews with team executives.

SI.com interviewed four NFL head coaches, four general managers and two other high-level club personnel executives for this story. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, all requested anonymity in order to speak candidly about the issue.

According to one veteran club personnel man, 10 or 11 players who carry first-round draft grades on their board this year have been red-flagged for marijuana use in college, an estimate echoed by two clubs' head coaches. Another NFL head coach estimated that "one-third'' of the players on his club's draft board had some sort of history with marijuana use and would thus require an extra level of evaluation as part of the pre-draft scouting process.

"Marijuana use is almost epidemic, with more guys having tested positive for marijuana at some point in their college background than I can ever remember,'' said a longtime team personnel man. "It's almost as if we are having to figure out a new way to evaluate it as part of the character and background report, because it's so prevalent. There're enough instances of it that it's hard to know how to set your board. You can't throw out that many guys. You have to go case-by-case and do your homework on them.''

It's important to note that NFL club officials in this case are only referencing failed drug tests administered by the prospect's college that wind up on his background report, not the drug tests the league conducts as part of the scouting process at last month's NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis. Players with drug test failures in college are not automatically enrolled in the NFL's drug-testing program upon being drafted, but those players can be added at the league's discretion, depending on the type of drug used, how recent the failed test occurred and if there were multiple failures.

"It's something that's concerning to all coaches and general managers in this league,'' one veteran NFL head coach said at the league's annual meeting in Orlando. "It has been trending the wrong way in recent years. But it's something that has to be dealt with from on high, at the league level, and not just dealt with on a club by club basis. It's partly a societal issue, but it's something we're having to deal with more and more.''
In many cases these days, club officials say, players are much more open to admitting to past marijuana use or experimentation in college as part of their pre-draft interviews with NFL teams.

"The kids are admitting it much more now, and part of that is what they've been coached to do [by their agents or handlers],'' one club general manager said. "They want to get the truth out and give you an explanation for their use. That's seen as better than letting someone else put it out there for you and making you look like you were being evasive.

"But we've had that same conversation internally on our club: 'Wow, there's a lot of kids this year.' It seems much more common now, across the draft.''

One NFL head coach told me this week that in this era of some states decriminalizing marijuana for medicinal purposes, he has interviewed potential draft picks who didn't even seem to recognize their marijuana smoking constituted drug use in the eyes of the NFL.

"It's pretty significant as a trend,'' the head coach said. "But if you knocked everyone off your board who has experimented with weed, you'd lose about 20 percent of your board, not to mention disqualify a few recent presidents. A third sounds a little high to me, but it's not a rare occurrence to have a player with some pot use in his background. You have to make a judgment on each individual guy.''

That same head coach said that earlier in his NFL coaching career, if a player had failed a drug test for pot in college, his name would be quickly removed from the draft boards of most teams. But times have changed. Clubs are doing more work to try and identify whether a prospect's pot use falls under the experimentation heading, or is done with regularity.

"It's a matter of figuring out which ones smoke, and which ones have to smoke, because they really [are addicted],'' another head coach said. "It's like the drinking issue. You want to know if a guy drinks, or if he has a drinking problem. You're trying to find out and make that distinction with some guys.''

The reaction to a prospect's collegiate marijuana use varies from club to club, team executives and coaches said. The mentality of personnel evaluators and coaches making case-by-case decisions on players with marijuana use in their background has grown more prevalent with the league's infusion of younger coaches and general managers in recent years.

"Overall in the league there's a bit of a different generation of decision-makers and people doing the evaluating,'' one team's general manager said. "Even among those of us who didn't [smoke pot], we had some friends who did and we didn't judge them that harshly. So for some, it's a less damaging red flag for a player to have that on his record. Now, maybe [longtime Colts president] Bill Polian's perception of that is different. Maybe those players are still completely off his board. But it can be generational in that sense, yes. Definitely.''

Even among the club officials who expressed the most concern about the prevalence of prospects in this draft who have failed at least one test for marijuana in college, none said they would automatically remove any such player from their draft board.

"There are probably different shades of red to the red flag you give that player these days, different degrees of how it impacts their grade,'' one head coach said. "I know of one guy who told me he smoked with his mom. It was just something they did together. You have to find out something about the specifics and see if it was a habit, and or if it was experimenting in college. For one thing, it could be a case of colleges testing more, and having better tests. It may not be that use is up, but detection is up.''

Some players suspected of marijuana use in college in recent years, Philadelphia receiver DeSean Jackson and Minnesota receiver-return man Percy Harvin most notably, have been two of the top offensive players in the draft the past two years. Their early success in the NFL has possibly led some teams to take a more lenient approach to drafting talented players who are suspected of collegiate marijuana use, one team front office executive said.

"If you passed on Jackson and you passed on Harvin the past two years, maybe you can't afford to just completely write off that kind of prospect every time, or you won't have a job at some point because you won't win any games,'' one team front office executive said. "But you don't want to take guys and see them be in the [league's drug] program the whole time, because they may never get out of it. You want to determine if it's in their environment and if they're bringing that environment with them [to the NFL]?''

One team's head coach said organizations are doing more and more extensive background checks on draft prospects every year to find out as much information as possible about the practices of their potential employees.

"You have to, because some guys aren't telling you the whole truth about their habits and things that have happened while they're in college,'' the head coach said. "It depends on the team's individual approach, but you can get in trouble if you're just overlooking everything when it comes to that kind of history in their background.''

Another NFL general manager interviewed this week said he has a discussion with his team's owner every time the club is even considering a player who has a red flag on their record for marijuana use in college. And you can't have too many of those talks on a year-in, year-out basis, he said.

"That's a topic of conversation for a lot of GMs with their owners,'' the general manager said. "You have a number of prospects who are quality people, but who might have [screwed] up early on in college. As long as it's not a habitual thing, there's more of a discussion about those players, rather than just jettisoning them off your board. Which is what a lot of teams have done in the past. But I think we're all a little more realistic these days.

"I've gone and scouted players at colleges and their coaches really talk them up, but then they add that 'He has this in his background.' It's definitely something we're going to have to get to the bottom of, but what are you going to do? If the kid has one thing in his past, are you going to throw away a third of your board? That's the reality of the situation we face.''


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/w ... index.html (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/writers/don_banks/03/23/nfl.draft.marijuana/index.html)

DHSF
03-25-2010, 04:05 AM
I smoked a little reefer back in the day. Didn't keep me from being successful in my chosen career. That said, my company does do drug checks, and if I was still using, I would lose my job.l

JTP53609
03-25-2010, 07:42 AM
I am glad the nfl is HIGH on the marijuana epidemic...

steelblood
03-25-2010, 07:45 AM
Dude, that is bogus.

BradshawsHairdresser
03-25-2010, 11:43 AM
Make Cheech Marin the Commissioner. Maybe he'd put in a requirement that all the players get high before each game.

Seriously and sadly, though, increasing drug use among draftees is just a reflection of increasing drug use in society. I wish there was some way to turn the tide, but I don't see any signs of it happening anytime soon.

ikestops85
03-25-2010, 11:53 AM
I think amongst society they treat marijuana on a level with alcohol. Many don't consider it illegal. Isn't California voting on whether to make it legal?

JTP53609
03-25-2010, 12:22 PM
I just dont get how marijuana could become legal, thats what we need in addition to the stupidity of our society is more people getting high, that ought to make the world a better place

birtikidis
03-25-2010, 02:04 PM
I just dont get how marijuana could become legal, thats what we need in addition to the stupidity of our society is more people getting high, that ought to make the world a better place
Never underestimate the power of stupid people.

hawaiiansteel
03-25-2010, 02:45 PM
I just dont get how marijuana could become legal, thats what we need in addition to the stupidity of our society is more people getting high, that ought to make the world a better place




I think people act stupider and do stupider things when they are under the influence of alcohol than when they are under the influence of marijuana.

Jigawatts
03-25-2010, 03:10 PM
I'm concerned about a douchebag epidemic in the commissioners office.

D Rock
03-25-2010, 03:18 PM
Marijuana definitely put me in a stranger place than does alcohol, but no doubt the decisions I make when drunk are way worse than anything I've ever done high.

It also needs to be considered that I didn't have a whole lot to lose by sitting in my house a couple times and smoking weed. College football players have scholarships and the potential for extremely lucrative careers they need to protect. If I was in their situation I would want nothing to do with marijuana.

AngryAsian
03-25-2010, 04:34 PM
I'm not a hater on peeps that still rock the ganj, and I share the view with others that people who smoke green buds aren't really going around killing people in cars (because they're too lazy/paranoid to get up and drive... they'd rather order a pie and munch while playing PS3 or watch a Bluray)... But I think its not a huge sacrifice to stop smoking the herb in exchange for becoming a multi-millionaire and insuring your family's security, while playing a game that they love. Unless you run a hemp farm in a foreign country, I don't know of any profession that will advocate marijuana usage... and though some might have an exclusive view of the NFL.... its still a business organization.

birtikidis
03-25-2010, 04:47 PM
If you're too stupid to not smoke pot while you're waiting to see if you can be a professional athlete then i don't want you on my team.

costanza2k1
03-25-2010, 09:59 PM
Human nature is to want something more when you're told you can't have it. That seems to be the case with weed. Where I come from in India weed grows like weed, we have to hire people to get it out of our gardens and orchards. Funny thing is only a small percentage smoke it. I'm not for or against it, I really don't give a rats. It's your body, you should be smart enough to know what you want to do with it.

hawaiiansteel
03-25-2010, 11:37 PM
thought this article offered a couple of interesting perspectives - wonder which side of the argument Santonio is on? :D




Calif. pot vote isn't just hippies versus cops


Associated Press – Thu Mar 25, 7:10 pm ET


SAN FRANCISCO — Now that a proposal to legalize pot is on the ballot in California, well-organized groups are lining up on both sides of the debate. And it's not just tie-dyed hippies versus anti-drug crusaders.

So far, the most outspoken groups on the issue are those affiliated with California's legal medical marijuana industry and law enforcement officials who vehemently oppose any loosening of drug laws.

But the campaign that unfolds before the November election could yield some unusual allies: free-market libertarians joining police officers frustrated by the drug war to support the measure, and pot growers worried about falling prices pairing with Democratic politicians to oppose it.

Others believe legalizing and taxing the drug could improve the state's flagging economy.

"We spend so much time, our police do, chasing around these nonviolent drug offenders, we don't have time anymore to protect our people from murders and child molesters," said Jack Cole, president of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, a group that plans to champion the California proposal between now and the election.

The initiative, also known as the "Tax Cannabis Act," received enough signatures this week to qualify for the November ballot. If it is approved, California would become the first state to legalize marijuana for recreational use by adults. The measure would also give local governments the authority to regulate and tax pot sales.

According to campaign finance records, nearly all of the more than $1.3 million spent on the campaign to qualify the question for the ballot came from businesses controlled by the proposal's main backer, Oakland medical marijuana entrepreneur Richard Lee.
Lee operates a medical marijuana dispensary and cafe in downtown Oakland and is the founder of Oaksterdam University, which trains people to run their own medical marijuana businesses. According to the school, more than 5,000 students have completed their programs.

The largest donations from an individual not connected to the marijuana business came from George Zimmer, founder and chief executive of the men's clothing chain Men's Wearhouse.

Television viewers know Zimmer as the Fremont-based company's longtime pitchman in commercials. But he is also known as a longtime supporter of efforts to liberalize the nation's drug laws.

Opponents contend that the legalization effort will pit a few wealthy individuals against regular Californians who will provide the groundswell needed to defeat the measure.

"You have rich dilettantes who want to legalize drugs and ordinary people who consider the ramifications of legalization on their communities and their families," said John Lovell, a lobbyist representing several law enforcement groups opposed to the initiative.
Lovell pointed to the lopsided defeat of a 2008 ballot issue that would have pushed treatment instead of prison for drug offenders as a sign of voters' leanings. Supporters of the measure heavily outspent opponents, but it was defeated 59 to 41 percent.

The anti-legalization campaign has not reported any contributions yet, but workers are reviewing what they believe are major flaws with the ballot initiative. They say the proposed law would allow pot to be grown in public parks and fail to prevent people with prior drug convictions from selling pot.

Meanwhile, some well-known liberals have come out against it, including the state's presumptive Democratic nominee for governor, Attorney General Jerry Brown.
Brown, who was seen in the 1970s as an icon of California's counterculture, told the San Francisco Chronicle earlier this month that he was "not going to jump on the legalization bandwagon."

"We're going to get a vote of the people soon on that, but I'm not going to support it," he said.

Legalized marijuana in California, the nation's most populous state, would represent a sea change in the nation's drug laws and put the state in direct conflict with the federal government because pot is still illegal in the eyes of federal officials.

On Thursday, a Department of Justice spokeswoman said it was too soon to speculate on whether federal authorities would sue to keep the measure from becoming law.
The administration relaxed its prosecution guidelines for medical marijuana last year, but President Barack Obama's drug czar has said the White House strongly opposes any efforts to legalize pot.

"Marijuana legalization, for any purpose, remains a non-starter in the Obama administration," Gil Kerlikowske, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, said last year. "It is not something that the president and I discuss. It isn't even on the agenda."

California in 1996 became the first of the 14 states that have legalized medicinal marijuana. Many jurisdictions around the country have also decriminalized marijuana to the point that low-level possession offenses are not prosecuted.

States such as California and Colorado have also been struggling to deal with an explosion in the number of medical marijuana dispensaries in recent years, a trend that has made pot readily available to the public.

A decision by California to legalize pot could lend momentum to the entire legalization movement, just like its historic 1996 law did for medical marijuana.

Legislators in Rhode Island are considering a plan to decriminalize pot, and a group in Nevada is pushing an initiative that marks the state's fourth attempt in a decade to legalize the drug.

Lawmakers in Washington state recently killed a plan to legalize the sale and use of marijuana, though lawmakers there did expand the pool of medical professionals who could prescribe the drug for medicinal use.

The ballot measure in California would allow people 21 years and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana, enough for dozens of joints. Residents also could grow their own crop of the plant in gardens measuring up to 25 square feet.

The proposal would ban users from using marijuana in public or smoking it while minors are present. It also would make it illegal to possess the drug on school grounds or drive while under its influence.

Proponents of the measure say legalizing marijuana could save the state $200 million a year by reducing public safety costs. At the same time, it could generate tax revenue for local governments.

Law enforcement officials are promising a vigorous fight to ensure that marijuana never becomes legal in California. They believe legalized marijuana would increase crime and violence, deepen the nation's drug culture and lead teenagers to abuse pot.

The California Police Chiefs Association, Mothers Against Drunk Driving and groups such as the youth-oriented Drug Abuse Resistance Education also plan to oppose the idea.
Not everyone in law enforcement is opposed to the measure, however.

"We believe by voting for that initiative you can actually save lives," Cole said.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100325/ap_ ... galization (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100325/ap_on_re_us/us_marijuana_legalization)

birtikidis
03-25-2010, 11:52 PM
im not gonna argue whether pot should be legal or illegal. my stance is this: if you know you have the potential to be an NFL player but are TOO STUPID to stop smoking pot, especially when you KNOW that the NFL is hard on illegal drugs, then you are TOO STUPID to be in the NFL, or at the very least, I don't want you on my team.

frankthetank1
03-25-2010, 11:59 PM
i dont see why its a big deal. i think the nfl should treat marijuana use like the nba does. dont even test players for it because its not a big deal at all. i will take a pot head like holmes over a player that consistently gets accused of sexual assault any day :wink:

Ghost
03-26-2010, 08:49 AM
My favorite quote:


"I know of one guy who told me he smoked with his mom. It was just something they did together."

Mom, "How was your day, dear?"
Son, "Not too bad"
Mom, "I made you some cookies. And oh yeah, can you get the weed out of the pantry? Let's fire one up."
Son, "I love you mom"

aggiebones
03-26-2010, 10:27 AM
I don't see the problem with keeping it illegal. The fines aren't too heavy unless you are dealing. If you are getting caught all the time, then you are too stupid to smoke pot and should avoid it.
As for the real world, it indeed does make routine users far less motivated. Like others said, I generally don't care if you do it or not, but I don't want you working for me if you are a stoner. Same for football players. Maybe a younger kid with great talent can play at a high level while being a stoner, but it will catch up with him as he ages and it probably lowers his effectiveness in the short term too. Drinking is illegal if you have too much (public intoxicated). If you have 2 beers, you are far less stupid that someone on reefer. I think things are set up properly.
What is the fine these days? Is it on par with speeding? Probably about right if it is. You get caught speeding multiple times, you can really run into heavy fines, insurance problems and even lose your license.

frankthetank1
03-26-2010, 10:54 AM
I don't see the problem with keeping it illegal. The fines aren't too heavy unless you are dealing. If you are getting caught all the time, then you are too stupid to smoke pot and should avoid it.
As for the real world, it indeed does make routine users far less motivated. Like others said, I generally don't care if you do it or not, but I don't want you working for me if you are a stoner. Same for football players. Maybe a younger kid with great talent can play at a high level while being a stoner, but it will catch up with him as he ages and it probably lowers his effectiveness in the short term too. Drinking is illegal if you have too much (public intoxicated). If you have 2 beers, you are far less stupid that someone on reefer. I think things are set up properly.
What is the fine these days? Is it on par with speeding? Probably about right if it is. You get caught speeding multiple times, you can really run into heavy fines, insurance problems and even lose your license.

how do you figure that? it depends on the person. i know a lot of highly intelligent people who use marijuana. by the way what college has the most use of marijuana in the US? It is actually NYU. you dont get into NYU by being lazy and stupid. its a dumb sterotype of marijuana. it also depends what state you are caught with marijuana. a lot of states have de-criminalized it but there are plenty of states that havent

hawaiiansteel
03-26-2010, 02:16 PM
Draft-time marijuana concerns are much ado about nothing
Sporting News

NFL teams generally don't care about players smoking pot, Mike Florio says, unless it affects their performance or gets them suspended


Friday, Mar. 26, 2010


Every year at this time, we're reminded that many college football players have smoked marijuana. Given that many college students smoke marijuana at some point or other during their four (or five ... or eight) years of "higher" education, it's not really a surprise.

Usually, the issue hits the NFL radar screen due to reports of positive marijuana samples generated by players tested at the Scouting Combine. Given that the players know they'll be tested, a positive result constitutes evidence of a problem -- or proof of extreme stupidity. But while those players require more scrutiny, the supposed rash of players who tested positive during college or who admitted to smoking marijuana in pre-draft interviews gets far more focus than it deserves.

Teams generally don't care if players smoke pot. Teams care if smoking pot affects player performance, or if it keeps them from playing due to a suspension. "There's a difference between a guy who smokes pot from time to time," said an agent who requested anonymity, "and Charles Rogers or Onterrio Smith."

Rogers, the second overall pick in the 2003 draft, and Smith, a first-round talent who slid to Round 4 due in part to multiple marijuana issues, couldn't put down the weed, even when their livelihoods depended on it. But for every player who smokes his way out of the league, there are hundreds who can stop cold turkey as soon as they enter the league's substance-abuse program and become subject to up to 10 unannounced tests per month. Indeed, most men prefer playing pro football to smoking pot, and most can quit when they absolutely must.

Still, scouts and coaches claim to be worried about the issue. One unnamed head coach recently told Don Banks of SI.com that "[i]t's something that's concerning to all coaches and general managers in this league."

Apparently, these aging muckety-mucks all have forgotten the things they did when they were 20. As the agent who requested anonymity told me, he recalls in their younger days a current "high-level NFL decision-maker" passing him a joint.

Really, how many of the people who occupy positions of influence and responsibility in the NFL can say they haven't smoked pot at least once in their lives? It's a normal – albeit illegal – activity, and concerns should arise only when the player has become addicted to it or has become entangled with law enforcement because of it.

In the grand scheme of things, few players are suspended for using marijuana. Even fewer see their careers end. Thus, the reward outweighs the risk. Last year, many news outlets reported via anonymous sources that Vikings receiver Percy Harvin tested positive for marijuana at the Scouting Combine, and he only went on to have a dramatic impact on the Minnesota offense and special teams.

So why is it suddenly a big deal? It could be that some teams hope to scare other teams into passing on players with red flags due to green leaves, which could cause highly-talented players to slide into the clutches of teams that are quietly fueling the anti-pot crusade. Or it could be that many of these scouts and coaches are too old to remember what it's like to be a kid in college, and the things that they and their friends did 20, 30, or 40 years ago.

Those who realize that marijuana use now is no more of an epidemic now than it ever has been will be in the best position to do the homework necessary to differentiate those who control their pot smoking from those whose pot smoking controls them. And the teams who take the time to draw those lines instead of simply striking from the board anyone who has a history of doing something that a large percentage of the total college population has done will reap the benefits on draft day.

Heck, maybe even a few of the G.M.'s and coaches will celebrate by firing up a doobie.


http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/article ... ut-nothing (http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/article/2010-03-26/draft-time-marijuana-concerns-are-much-ado-about-nothing)

aggiebones
03-26-2010, 03:32 PM
I was referring to routine users, meaning stoners. Smoking on the weekend doesn't affect much, but I've witnessed way too many very intelligent guys become stoners while in college either flush out completely or have to make drastic measures to curb their lives. The same can be said of drunks. Not the people having a few at parties or even getting drunk 1-2 times a week. The nightly guys have problems. Same with the daily stoners. They are less productive. If you haven't seen this, then you are likely a stoner too. lol
Can you imagine an NFL head coach as a stoner. They work 12 hour days regularly if not alot more. Not much time to smoke pot and be productive there.

rpmpit
03-26-2010, 04:41 PM
If you're too stupid to not smoke pot while you're waiting to see if you can be a professional athlete then i don't want you on my team.

What if you're too stupid to not smoke pot while trying to remain a professional athlete?

http://blog.pennlive.com/patriotnewssports/2009/02/large_sholmes.jpg

RuthlessBurgher
03-26-2010, 04:44 PM
If you're too stupid to not smoke pot while you're waiting to see if you can be a professional athlete then i don't want you on my team.

What if you're too stupid to not smoke pot while trying to remain a professional athlete?

http://blog.pennlive.com/patriotnewssports/2009/02/large_sholmes.jpg

Pot...That's how you be great. :P

hawaiiansteel
03-26-2010, 04:53 PM
If you're too stupid to not smoke pot while you're waiting to see if you can be a professional athlete then i don't want you on my team.

What if you're too stupid to not smoke pot while trying to remain a professional athlete?

http://blog.pennlive.com/patriotnewssports/2009/02/large_sholmes.jpg



hey, works for Santonio...if it's not broken, don't fix it.

http://www.mypokertube.com/files/photos/a546203962b8877L.jpghttp://moretalk.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/holmes-catch.jpg

rpmpit
03-26-2010, 04:53 PM
If you're too stupid to not smoke pot while you're waiting to see if you can be a professional athlete then i don't want you on my team.

What if you're too stupid to not smoke pot while trying to remain a professional athlete?

http://blog.pennlive.com/patriotnewssports/2009/02/large_sholmes.jpg

Pot...That's how you be great. :P

Man, what happened to MY Steelers??

All these rapists, the stoners, the overpaid janitors... :cry: :cry:

(please note sarcasm)

rpmpit
03-26-2010, 04:55 PM
If you're too stupid to not smoke pot while you're waiting to see if you can be a professional athlete then i don't want you on my team.

What if you're too stupid to not smoke pot while trying to remain a professional athlete?

http://blog.pennlive.com/patriotnewssports/2009/02/large_sholmes.jpg



hey, works for Santonio...if it's not broken, don't fix it.

http://www.mypokertube.com/files/photos/a546203962b8877L.jpghttp://moretalk.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/holmes-catch.jpg

Obviously using pot doesn't affect these guys ability to play the game. However, getting caught will adversely affect their ability to stay in the game. Is it worth it???

Jigawatts
03-26-2010, 06:00 PM
Where have you been Armpit? Smoking weed and molesting towel dispensers in your free time?

:lol:

rpmpit
03-26-2010, 08:49 PM
Where have you been Armpit? Smoking weed and molesting towel dispensers in your free time?

:lol:

Wut up, Jig. Yeah, you know me too well!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Been lurking more than posting. Crazy busy at work - but not complaining. I'll be on here sporadically. I can imagine how bad its been around here without me :P

eniparadoxgma
03-26-2010, 09:31 PM
Man, what happened to MY Steelers??

All these rapists, the stoners, the overpaid janitors... :cry: :cry:

<something I didn't read>

Dude, I can't believe you went there. First of all, Ben hasn't even been charged of rape. Last I heard, he hadn't been charged with anything at all! Second, it's obvious that the strawberry cough isn't affecting Stonio adversely. And finally, you need to keep your racist remarks about our head coach to yourself ya damn klansman ya.

Also, I can't believe you find it even remotely humorous to joke about such things as rape, hardcore drug abuse, and members of the sanitation arts. You sir, need to grow up!

No sarcasm or anything here. I'm completely, utterly, and totally serious. :)

rpmpit
03-26-2010, 11:25 PM
Man, what happened to MY Steelers??

All these rapists, the stoners, the overpaid janitors... :cry: :cry:

<something I didn't read>

Dude, I can't believe you went there. First of all, Ben hasn't even been charged of rape. Last I heard, he hadn't been charged with anything at all! Second, it's obvious that the strawberry cough isn't affecting Stonio adversely. And finally, you need to keep your racist remarks about our head coach to yourself ya damn klansman ya.

Also, I can't believe you find it even remotely humorous to joke about such things as rape, hardcore drug abuse, and members of the sanitation arts. You sir, need to grow up!

No sarcasm or anything here. I'm completely, utterly, and totally serious. :)

Strawberry cough?? :lol: Never heard that one. I'm getting old. Which also would explain why I needed to copy and paste your tiny note in Word and make the text bigger so I could effin' read it! Man it stinks getting old. No sarcasm there!! :lol:

Shoe
03-27-2010, 04:02 PM
I just dont get how marijuana could become legal, thats what we need in addition to the stupidity of our society is more people getting high, that ought to make the world a better place

*In my opinion* I think that is one of the biggest fallacies regarding mary jane. I don't use it; never have... but to think that making it legal is all a sudden gonna make everyone wanna walk around high is silly.

First of all, alcohol is legal and WAY more accessible... people ain't walking around drunk 24/7.

Two, MJ costs money. It's not free.

MJ is totally natural (I think). From plant to pot, I think that's it, no?

I could never understand why something from the earth could be deemed illegal by society. I grant that you obviously don't want your bus drivers stoned; but c'mon. Everyone does it.

AngryAsian
03-27-2010, 04:29 PM
Something noteworthy a buddy and I were discussing at breakfast, regarding the differences between people who drink and people who 'smoke'. There are alcoholics and there are people who have a casual drink on the weekends (a couple of beers blah blah blah)... Someone who drinks may even have a cocktail every Friday night at happy hour with his comrades at work.... but more often than not (at least individuals I have known who 'smoke') when you 'smoke' ... you 'smoke' habitually. I have a friend who runs a very successful architectual firm and is quite reputable in the area.... 'smokes', and 'smokes' every day a couple of times a day. Just an observation.

SanAntonioSteelerFan
03-27-2010, 05:24 PM
That article pointed out that "as the age of the average NFL coach get less, they are likely becoming more tolerant of the occasional marijuana smoker as long as they don't come to practice or the games stoned".

I was thinking, as the "age of the average NFL coach gets less", it's probably more and more likely that some of the coaches will light up now and then!

IMO!

hawaiiansteel
03-27-2010, 07:21 PM
That article pointed out that "as the age of the average NFL coach get less, they are likely becoming more tolerant of the occasional marijuana smoker as long as they don't come to practice or the games stoned".

I was thinking, as the "age of the average NFL coach gets less", it's probably more and more likely that some of the coaches will light up now and then!

IMO!


some probably do, but i'm sure they don't inhale!


http://temple3.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/bill_clinton_yeahihitit.jpg

NJ-STEELER
03-27-2010, 07:28 PM
I just dont get how marijuana could become legal, thats what we need in addition to the stupidity of our society is more people getting high, that ought to make the world a better place

*In my opinion* I think that is one of the biggest fallacies regarding mary jane. I don't use it; never have... but to think that making it legal is all a sudden gonna make everyone wanna walk around high is silly.

.

it certainly will be more accessable, which IMO would lead to more people getting stoned

frankthetank1
03-27-2010, 07:35 PM
I just dont get how marijuana could become legal, thats what we need in addition to the stupidity of our society is more people getting high, that ought to make the world a better place

*In my opinion* I think that is one of the biggest fallacies regarding mary jane. I don't use it; never have... but to think that making it legal is all a sudden gonna make everyone wanna walk around high is silly.

First of all, alcohol is legal and WAY more accessible... people ain't walking around drunk 24/7.

Two, MJ costs money. It's not free.

MJ is totally natural (I think). From plant to pot, I think that's it, no?

I could never understand why something from the earth could be deemed illegal by society. I grant that you obviously don't want your bus drivers stoned; but c'mon. Everyone does it.

i agree if it legalized not everyone would smoke it. not everyone drinks. if pot was socially acceptable than people wouldnt think of it so badly. it has been proven that ciggs and booze is worse for the body. by legalizing it you would eliminate the criminal element around pot and the govt would make a ton of money from taxes. pot isnt even addictive. i am currently trying to quit smoking and it is driving me nuts!! its funny how something so harmful and addictive like ciggerettes are legal. they say quiting nicotine is the second hardest substance to stop using next to heroin!!

SanAntonioSteelerFan
03-27-2010, 08:22 PM
I say legalize it, tax it. It will close the budget deficit in 5 weeks, put the Mexican gangs out of business, and rescue the snack food industry from oblivion!

birtikidis
03-27-2010, 09:30 PM
Hey, as long as they tax the hell out of it so it helps get out us out of the mess emperor obama is getting us in...

SanAntonioSteelerFan
03-27-2010, 09:55 PM
Hey, as long as they tax the hell out of it so it helps get out us out of the mess emperor obama is getting us in...

Sorry, pardner, can't let that one stand. Google "national debt 10 years", you'll see that Emperor Bush (no clothes!!), and amazingly his father too, got us into this mess (under Clinton the debt went up just a bit, then levelled out).

What you're doing is like blaming a surgeon for the cancer he's taking out.

http://cedarcomm.com/~stevelm1/USDebt.png

http://zfacts.com/p/318.html

Other than that, I agree - legalize it, and tax the helk out of it (but keep the total cost less than it is now, or the Mexican Mafia will still have incentive to be active)!

birtikidis
03-27-2010, 09:59 PM
Hey, as long as they tax the hell out of it so it helps get out us out of the mess emperor obama is getting us in...

Sorry, pardner, can't let that one stand. Google "national debt 10 years", you'll see that Emperor Bush (no clothes!!), and amazingly his father too, got us into this mess (under Clinton the debt went up just a bit, then levelled out).

What you're doing is like blaming a surgeon for the cancer he's taking out.

http://cedarcomm.com/~stevelm1/USDebt.png

http://zfacts.com/p/318.html

Other than that, I agree - legalize it, and tax the helk out of it (but keep the total cost less than it is now, or the Mexican Mafia will still have incentive to be active)!
only one president in the history of the United States operated without a national debt. John Adams. And only ONE president since has reduced the national debt. teddy roosevelt.

birtikidis
03-27-2010, 10:01 PM
And don't blame Clinton for slowing the national debt down. He had nothing to do with it. that goes to Mr. Carter. but then, you probably didn't know that Mr. Carter is also the reason for our failing stock market.

birtikidis
03-27-2010, 10:04 PM
and only one year in it looks like the Emp sure has us on track!

SanAntonioSteelerFan
03-27-2010, 10:18 PM
and only one year in it looks like the Emp sure has us on track!

Hey man, are you sharing stubbies with Stonio? 'Cause you're typing silly stuff!!

Make you a deal - let's let this topic go back to the draft class epidemic subject, and leave this stuff for another forum.?

Go Steelers!

birtikidis
03-27-2010, 10:58 PM
and only one year in it looks like the Emp sure has us on track!

Hey man, are you sharing stubbies with Stonio? 'Cause you're typing silly stuff!!

Make you a deal - let's let this topic go back to the draft class epidemic subject, and leave this stuff for another forum.?

Go Steelers!
yea, i'd much rather talk steelers than politics. I always feel dirty after talking politics...

hawaiiansteel
03-30-2010, 02:20 PM
Updated: March 30, 2010, 1:00 PM ET
Rooney II issues statement on Holmes


Santonio Holmes Facing Lawsuit

Steelers wide receiver Santonio Holmes, who is facing a civil lawsuit in Florida in which a woman accuses him of throwing a drink at her, says he didn't do anything and expects the matter to be dealt with quickly

PITTSBURGH -- Pittsburgh Steelers president Art Rooney II says the team is "disappointed" wide receiver Santonio Holmes is being accused in a lawsuit of assaulting a woman in an Orlando nightclub.

The lawsuit followed a separate incident involving quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, who became the subject of a police investigation after a college student alleged he assaulted her in a Georgia nightclub.

"We are disappointed to learn about the recent incident involving Santonio Holmes in Florida," Rooney said in a statement.

Rooney said he would have no further comment until the team gathers more information.

Since 2006, Holmes has been charged with marijuana possession in Pittsburgh, domestic violence in Ohio and disorderly conduct in Florida. The marijuana and domestic violence charges were dropped. The disorderly conduct charge was dropped in exchange for a $250 donation to a police officers trust fund.




does anyone know whatever happened after Santonio got busted with pot? did he meet with the Commissioner and get put on super-secret probation or anything?

RuthlessBurgher
03-30-2010, 02:49 PM
Tomlin deactivated him for the Giants game, but nothing else came of it because the charges were dropped by the district attorney.

http://blog.taragana.com/sports/2009/06/10/prosecutors-drop-marijuana-possession-charge-against-steelers-wide-receiver-santonio-holmes-3119/


DA drops marijuana charge against Steelers’ Holmes

PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh prosecutors have dropped a misdemeanor drug charge against Steelers wide receiver and Super Bowl MVP Santonio Holmes.

Allegheny County Assistant District Attorney Rachel Newman announced the decision at a court hearing Wednesday.

Pittsburgh police say they found three marijuana-filled cigars — or blunts — in Holmes’ car when he was pulled over on Oct. 23. They pulled Holmes over because they were looking for a car similar to the one he was driving. Holmes alerted police to the drugs.

Holmes’ attorney argued the traffic stop violated the football star’s rights because the search warrant wasn’t specific enough. Prosecutors agreed.

Asked if he was happy with the outcome, Holmes said: “I’m all right.”

hawaiiansteel
03-30-2010, 05:25 PM
Tomlin deactivated him for the Giants game, but nothing else came of it because the charges were dropped by the district attorney.

http://blog.taragana.com/sports/2009/06/10/prosecutors-drop-marijuana-possession-charge-against-steelers-wide-receiver-santonio-holmes-3119/


DA drops marijuana charge against Steelers’ Holmes

PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh prosecutors have dropped a misdemeanor drug charge against Steelers wide receiver and Super Bowl MVP Santonio Holmes.

Allegheny County Assistant District Attorney Rachel Newman announced the decision at a court hearing Wednesday.

Pittsburgh police say they found three marijuana-filled cigars — or blunts — in Holmes’ car when he was pulled over on Oct. 23. They pulled Holmes over because they were looking for a car similar to the one he was driving. Holmes alerted police to the drugs.

Holmes’ attorney argued the traffic stop violated the football star’s rights because the search warrant wasn’t specific enough. Prosecutors agreed.

Asked if he was happy with the outcome, Holmes said: “I’m all right.”



thanks, my memory isn't what it used to be. too much pot-smoking when i was younger i think... :lol: