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Chadman
03-21-2010, 11:36 PM
This will be Chadman's 4th installment in Mock Draft season. Before we start, Chadman is sure there will be much "ooohing" & "aaahing" & gnashing of teeth over the picks he puts forward.

That's ok.

Everyone has opinions, and it's not your fault that yours is wrong. After all, you can't be expected to be right all the time, can you?

:D

Chadman will try to give decent reasons as to the selections as we go along- this will be a 'heady' mix of "what Chadman would do" combined with "what the Steelers might actually do", so you'll see a few familiar faces as we go along.

Now, on with the show..

Chadman
03-22-2010, 12:04 AM
ROUND 1

MIKE IUPATI OG IDAHO
HEIGHT- 6'5"
WEIGHT- 331 LBS
ARMS- 34 3/4"
HANDS- 10 5/8"
40 YARD- 5.24
BENCH- 27

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/47/470195.jpg

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/49/495702.jpg

Pass blocking: Good initial quickness off the snap. Provides a significant jolt to the defender with his punch. Too high in his pass protection but has the strong hands to latch on to the defender and ride him throughout the play. Good balance and lateral agility to slide with the defender and remain square. Can get himself in trouble with leverage by playing too high. Long arms and great lower strength to lock out. Rarely takes a step back even against a powerful bull rush, but this could be an area of concern against NFL defensive linemen, especially when Iupati fails to move his feet. Has developed into a savvy blocker. Looks to help out his teammates when not covered. Wants to hit someone.

Run Blocking: Can dominate as a run blocker due to his mass and rare upper-body strength. Provides an explosive initial pop that often knocks the defender back. Has to do a better job of latching on, as he'll knock his opponent back only to see him regroup and get back into the play. Very good drive blocker when he plays with leverage and keeps his hands inside. Can physically remove the defender from the hole. Looks to eliminate more than one defender on the play and will release to the second level. Good effort downfield.

Pulling/trapping: Surprisingly agile in getting out and blocking at the second level. Good body control and straight-line speed for a player of his size. Can re-adjust in space to hit the linebacker. Fails to lock onto the defender, at times, preferring to violently shove his target to the ground and look for others.

Initial Quickness: Good initial quickness off the snap in pass protection. Even on the rare occasions when beaten off the snap, his long arms and wide-body make it difficult for defenders (including blitzing linebackers) to sneak through his gap. When beaten by quicker defensive tackles in the running game, has the agility and long arms to catch them as they slide by, typically knocking them down and pancaking them.

Downfield: Intimidating presence on the move. Good athleticism and balance for a man his size and can redirect to make the effective block when he gets close. Will misjudge angles at times, and miss his intended target. When he does so, rather than turn to stand helplessly around the pile, he moves on to the next target. Good effort to block downfield.

Intangibles: Made significant progress over the past two seasons and appears to be just scratching the surface of his potential. Size and athleticism combination enough that some will view him as a better offensive tackle or even defensive tackle prospect. Born in American Samoa and moved to the United States at 14. Began learning English (and football) at that time. Has only played football since high school. Signed with Idaho after bigger programs had concerns about his ability to qualify academically. Voted team captain by his peers for 2009.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 12:17 AM
ROUND 2

JEROME MURPHY CB SOUTH FLORIDA
HEIGHT- 6'0"
WEIGHT- 196 LBS
ARMS- 32 1/4"
HANDS- 9"
40 YARD- 4.50
BENCH- 16

http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0ez6eRQ66jd0w/610x.jpg

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/49/494143.jpg

Read & React: When playing off-man coverage, reads plays in front of him effectively. Fast enough to play the run from the outer flanks.

Man Coverage: Tall, wiry corner who can press and play off his man. Hips are a bit tight in transition, but he has the speed to turn and run with any receiver down the sideline. Has a short memory. Inconsistent getting his hands on the receiver in press but is willing to be physical. Loses his footing when planting to drive on out-routes. Overaggressive and will bite on pump fakes and double moves. Late getting his head around on deep balls.

Zone Coverage: Technique needs work when playing off the line. Backpedal is high and slow. Gets too deep in his drop, allowing short throws in front of him. A step slow getting to the ball thrown in his zone but will lay a receiver out on plays directly in front of him.

Closing/Recovery: Very good burst to track the ball in the air. Closes fast and hard on receivers. Makes the big hit and wraps up when necessary. Usually recovers well enough to make the tackle after losing his man in zone coverage. Has the speed and length to effectively blitz off the edge.

Run Support: Extremely willing as a run defender on the outside. After recognizing run, he attacks receivers instead of running around them, and is able to fight free from blocks to make tackles. Often forces plays inside to linebackers. Always gets at least as piece of a back running to his side of the field. Struggles to disengage from solid blocks on the edge.

Tackling: Physical run stopper who really likes to hit. Good focus on the ball around the line of scrimmage, and wraps up backs trying to make plays with second effort. Usually wraps or cuts in the open field effectively, although he will miss tackles when lunging and diving with his head down. Not strong enough to stop receivers with an arm tackle, but is quick enough to at least get into their knees to bring them down.

Intangibles: No major character issues. Team player willing to play cornerback or safety. Played with a broken left hand during his redshirt freshman season. His size and speed are prototypical for special teams (returns and coverage) and he averaged more than 24 yards per kickoff return in 2007.

NFL Comparison: Al Harris, Green Bay Packers

hawaiiansteel
03-22-2010, 12:21 AM
ROUND 1

MIKE IUPATI OG IDAHO
HEIGHT- 6'5"
WEIGHT- 331 LBS
ARMS- 34 3/4"
HANDS- 10 5/8"
40 YARD- 5.24
BENCH- 27

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/47/470195.jpg

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/49/495702.jpg

Pass blocking: Good initial quickness off the snap. Provides a significant jolt to the defender with his punch. Too high in his pass protection but has the strong hands to latch on to the defender and ride him throughout the play. Good balance and lateral agility to slide with the defender and remain square. Can get himself in trouble with leverage by playing too high. Long arms and great lower strength to lock out. Rarely takes a step back even against a powerful bull rush, but this could be an area of concern against NFL defensive linemen, especially when Iupati fails to move his feet. Has developed into a savvy blocker. Looks to help out his teammates when not covered. Wants to hit someone.

Run Blocking: Can dominate as a run blocker due to his mass and rare upper-body strength. Provides an explosive initial pop that often knocks the defender back. Has to do a better job of latching on, as he'll knock his opponent back only to see him regroup and get back into the play. Very good drive blocker when he plays with leverage and keeps his hands inside. Can physically remove the defender from the hole. Looks to eliminate more than one defender on the play and will release to the second level. Good effort downfield.

Pulling/trapping: Surprisingly agile in getting out and blocking at the second level. Good body control and straight-line speed for a player of his size. Can re-adjust in space to hit the linebacker. Fails to lock onto the defender, at times, preferring to violently shove his target to the ground and look for others.

Initial Quickness: Good initial quickness off the snap in pass protection. Even on the rare occasions when beaten off the snap, his long arms and wide-body make it difficult for defenders (including blitzing linebackers) to sneak through his gap. When beaten by quicker defensive tackles in the running game, has the agility and long arms to catch them as they slide by, typically knocking them down and pancaking them.

Downfield: Intimidating presence on the move. Good athleticism and balance for a man his size and can redirect to make the effective block when he gets close. Will misjudge angles at times, and miss his intended target. When he does so, rather than turn to stand helplessly around the pile, he moves on to the next target. Good effort to block downfield.

Intangibles: Made significant progress over the past two seasons and appears to be just scratching the surface of his potential. Size and athleticism combination enough that some will view him as a better offensive tackle or even defensive tackle prospect. Born in American Samoa and moved to the United States at 14. Began learning English (and football) at that time. Has only played football since high school. Signed with Idaho after bigger programs had concerns about his ability to qualify academically. Voted team captain by his peers for 2009.



this should make you happy then... :D



Full Itinerary For Idaho Guard


by Chris Steuber of ScoutNFLNetwork.com, March 21, 2010 at 2:52pm ET

Mike Iupati Profile


The premier interior offensive lineman in the draft, Idaho guard Mike Iupati, continues his ascension up NFL draft boards, and his itinerary over the next month reflects his stature - completely full. Scout.com has learned through a source close to the program that Iupati has worked out and will workout for the Cincinnati Bengals, Cleveland Browns, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, Houston Texans, New York Jets and Philadelphia Eagles this month.

In addition to his workout schedule, Scout.com has also learned from the same source that Iupati is expected to visit the Atlanta Falcons, Dallas Cowboys, Kansas City Chiefs, Miami Dolphins, Minnesota Vikings, Pittsburgh Steelers, San Diego Chargers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers leading up to the draft on April 22nd.

A three-year starter at Idaho, Iupati has improved each year and has developed into the highly touted prospect he is today. Scouts are enthusiastic about his ability and believe he can play OT or OG at the next level. The versatility that he presents, to go along with the strong showing that he’s had this offseason, makes Iupati a valuable commodity and it’s likely that he could hear his name called in the 16 – 23 range.

Iupati is currently the No. 1 rated offensive guard listed on Scout.com’s 2010 NFL Draft Rankings.

http://pit.scout.com/a.z?s=68&p=9&c=2&c ... 5113&fhn=1 (http://pit.scout.com/a.z?s=68&p=9&c=2&cid=955783&nid=4205113&fhn=1)

Chadman
03-22-2010, 12:23 AM
ROUND 3

THADDEUS GIBSON OLB OHIO STATE
HEIGHT- 6'2"
WEIGHT- 243 LBS
ARMS- 33"
HANDS- 8 3/4"
40 YARD- 4.58
BENCH- 32

http://media.scout.com/media/image/60/608828.jpg

http://media.scout.com/media/image/59/592563.jpg

Read & React: Very quick to react and close on plays directly in front of him. Inconsistent facing play-action and misdirection and lacks explosiveness as a playmaker. Does not recognize routes in zone coverage and needs better backfield awareness.

Run defense: Extremely fluid in the open field. Breaks down and changes direction well. Gets skinny to penetrate gaps to attack runs. Stays home to contain, maintains leverage to make a quick get-off on plays run to his side. Finds it difficult to shed tight ends at the nine-technique despite his strength and length, will get walked off the line of scrimmage by tackles. Has the speed to be all over the field, but does not chase plays across the field or downfield to be the second or third guy to the ball.

Pass defense: Usually gets deep in his drop, has excellent knee-bend and fluidity moving back into his zone. Good enough speed and agility to stay with receivers and running backs in the flat when he needs to play man at the next level. Even when he's too shallow in his drop, he can wrap up ballcarriers after the catch using his length. Has not gotten his hands on many passes by either affecting passing lanes during his pass rush or when dropped into coverage.

Tackling: Stacks and sheds linemen, can rip off blocks on the edge when the play is run outside the tackles but struggles to win the battle is the run is in his gap. Very effective as a chase tackler when he puts in the effort because of his strength, arm length and closing speed. Does not always attack the ball when in the area, though, seeming to hesitate instead of instinctually exploding to the play.

Pass Rush/Blitz: Good closing speed to the quarterback. Uses his lateral quickness to set up inside rush against lesser tackles after going around the pocket a few times, although he doesn't turn the corner as quickly as you would think when lined up with his hand on the ground. Sometimes lets up instead of taking the quarterback to the ground after the throw. Defeats cut block with his hands, recovers quickly to chase down ballcarriers or attack the quarterback. Should be much more productive than he is, but he gets lost inside too often instead of using his speed on the edge if quarterback can not find his primary target.

Intangibles: Left school early to help pay for family medical expenses, and is scheduled to graduate in June. Will have to answer coaches' questions about his desire and ability to pick up NFL defenses (and diagnose complex pro offenses).

Shawn
03-22-2010, 12:35 AM
Chadman...no disrespect but I would cry if the draft landed like that. 1-3...especially Gibson. I can live with Iubusti. :D Seriously, I think he will be a very good guard at the next level. But, I hate a guard at 18 especially if Thomas in on the board.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 12:36 AM
ROUND 4

D'ANTHONY SMITH DT/DE LOUISANA TECH
HEIGHT- 6'2"
WEIGHT- 302 LBS
ARMS- 32 3/8"
HANDS- 10"
40 YARD- 4.95
BENCH- 30

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/70/702720.jpg

http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/latc/sports/m-footbl/auto_action/3425916.jpeg

Pass rush: Good initial quickness to pressure the pocket, but lacks a variety of pass-rush moves and relies predominately on his bull rush. Showed an improved swim move as a senior. Cerebral defender who keeps his head on a swivel and reacts well to the screen and draw plays. Keeps his eyes on the quarterback and does a nice job of getting his hands up in the air to deflect passes when he can't get pressure.

Run defense: Short, stumpy defender who plays with good pad level and leg drive to hold up in the running game. Active feet and good lateral agility to slide down the line and make the tackle at or near the line of scrimmage.

Explosion: Good initial quickness off the snap. Flashes the burst to attack gaps and collapse the pocket from the interior. Violent hands to disengage from blocks. Flashes some pop as a tackler. Will leap at the ballcarrier and knock them violently into the ground.

Strength: Good leg drive and use of leverage for the bull rush. Good upper-body strength to violently rip away from blocks.

Tackling: Recognizes the cutback and has the flexibility and balance to protect his knees by sprawling and pushing off his hands to get past the blocker. Good strength to slide off blocks and make the tackle as backs run by. Shows some lateral agility and balance to break down in close quarters.

Intangibles: Remains a work in progress. Has been able to get by with just his size and athletic ability at this level. Doesn't play with the nastiness you'd expect from a defensive tackle. Might lack the intensity and self motivation to maximize his talent. Experienced in the 4-3 (under-tackle) and as the nose in a three-man front when the Bulldogs went to nickel. Durable. Started 44 consecutive games to finish his career. Ascending talent with upside worthy of development.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 12:44 AM
ROUND 5A

MYRON LEWIS CB/FS VANDERBILT
HEIGHT- 6'2"
WEIGHT- 203 LBS
ARMS- 34"
HANDS- 9 5/8"
40 YARD- 4.42
BENCH- 10

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3139/2932556443_7cdc72555e.jpg

http://nashvillecitypaper.com/files/citypaper/imagecache/story_floated/images/full_61503.jpg

Read & React: Good read-and-react skills. Has the potential to play safety or cornerback. Reads and recognizes the motive of the receiver and puts himself in position to make plays. Will read the action in the backfield and can jump routes. Recognizes run quickly and attacks the line of scrimmage.

Man Coverage: Has good size but is high-cut and might lack the balance to remain at cornerback in the NFL. Loses a step in his transition and too often has to gather himself when making lateral cuts. Has the upper-body strength and hand placement to provide an effective jam at the line of scrimmage, but typically played off-man.

Zone Coverage: Rare height and bulk for the cornerback position. Good straight-line speed. Alert defender who reads the quarterback's eyes. Times leaps and competes well for jump balls. Physical, versatile defender. Good open-field tackler.

Closing/Recovery: Lacks the balance and agility to mirror wide receivers into and out of their breaks. Good, but not great straight-line speed to recover if beaten initially. Good hands for the interception. Has a penchant for making the big play in big games.

Run Support: Active in run support. Reads run quickly and fights through receiver blocks. Agile enough to avoid oncoming linemen and is willing to take on blockers. Reliable open-field tackler who flashes big-hitting ability.

Tackling: Secure open-field tackler who will wrap up and hit with authority. Experienced blitzer with closing speed.

Intangibles: Missed the 2009 spring after undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Takes his academics seriously. Graduated in December of 2009 with a degree in Human and Organizational Development. Was a 2008 Academic Honor Roll Recipient. Good bloodlines. Brothers Hamin and Hanik Milligan played in the NFL. Might be an ascending talent whose NFL future is at safety.

NFL Comparison: Julian Battle, Redskins

birtikidis
03-22-2010, 12:47 AM
chadman, why do you want me to cry?
no iupati (or however the hell you spell his name)
and definetly no to Jerome Murphy. I go to USF. Watched every game this year. he's terrible. I'd take Nate Allen there, but not murphy.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 12:51 AM
ROUND 5B

CHARLES SCOTT RB LSU
HEIGHT- 5'11"
WEIGHT- 238 LBS
ARMS- 33"
HANDS- 9 1/2"
40 YARD- 4.68
BENCH- 17

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/08/sports/08bcs_slide3.jpg

http://gate21.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/SEC09-LSU-1.jpg

Inside: Big, strong back with good feet for his size. Will hit a hole at full speed out of the I-formation, but also excels on draw plays. Patient to follow the fullback, get skinny through creases and come out the other side ready to bowl over safeties and linebackers. Uses his hands to direct traffic inside, and has the vision to work his way through. Tough for one defender to bring down when he's past the line driving his legs. Strong goal-line runner. Not particularly elusive behind the line, and doesn't sidestep penetrating defenders.

Outside: Runaway freight train in the open field, but does not have the speed most teams prefer in a bell-cow back. Doesn't always see or take advantage of space outside. Lacks the speed to consistently make the corner. Best as a north-south runner, but will make safeties miss one-on-one with a surprisingly quick cutback or stop-and-start move. Keeps four points of pressure or two hands on the ball when contact comes. Switches the ball to the outside hand once out of traffic.

Breaking tackles: Runs with a good lean and lowers his pads to knock over smaller defenders at the second level. Piles up yards after initial contact by running through arm tackles and keeping his feet moving after bouncing off players in traffic. Almost always leans forward for an additional yard or two before going down. Uses his length to stiff-arm closing defenders.

Blocking: Has the size to be effective in pass protection - and likes to be physical - but needs a lot of work in technique. Throws a shoulder into defenders if coming up to help the line, instead of trying to mirror and sustain. Misses blitzers coming off the edge, letting his quarterback take a big shot.

Receiving: Didn't get many opportunities in LSU's offense, but is a tough matchup for cornerbacks to bring down on swing passes. Best catching the ball going upfield. Will make himself available for the quarterback if he's scrambling. Allows throws over the middle to hit his chest. Can elude most linebackers on inside screens and arrow routes, but must make crisper cuts at the next level.

Intangibles: Team player and a tough competitor whether in the weight room, on the practice field or playing in front of the raucous Saturday night Death Valley crowd. Will have to prove that his fractured clavicle is fully healed at the Combine.

NFL Comparison: LaMont Jordan, Broncos

Chadman
03-22-2010, 01:10 AM
ROUND 5C

JAY ROSS NT EAST CAROLINA
HEIGHT- 6'3"
WEIGHT- 313 LBS
ARMS- 32 5/8"
HANDS- 10 1/4"
40 YARD- 5.10
BENCH- 30

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/69/697171.jpg

http://www.bonesville.net/articles/RonCherubini/2009/08/Jay-Ross_action.jpg

Strengths
Has gotten bigger through the years and carries his weight well. Fairly quick and active for his size. Good stamina.
Weaknesses
Despite his increased bulk, is not a true run-stuffer. Despite above average for his quickness, is not a true pass rusher. Level of competition. Needs to get stronger.
Projection
Has likely gotten himself drafted with his play this past season. Not just another body on the same line with CJ Wilson and Linval Joseph.

Wolfhound45
03-22-2010, 01:21 AM
This pick proves that CHADMAN is THE MAN!


ROUND 5B

CHARLES SCOTT RB LSU
HEIGHT- 5'11"
WEIGHT- 238 LBS
ARMS- 33"
HANDS- 9 1/2"
40 YARD- 4.68
BENCH- 17

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/08/sports/08bcs_slide3.jpg

http://gate21.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/SEC09-LSU-1.jpg

Inside: Big, strong back with good feet for his size. Will hit a hole at full speed out of the I-formation, but also excels on draw plays. Patient to follow the fullback, get skinny through creases and come out the other side ready to bowl over safeties and linebackers. Uses his hands to direct traffic inside, and has the vision to work his way through. Tough for one defender to bring down when he's past the line driving his legs. Strong goal-line runner. Not particularly elusive behind the line, and doesn't sidestep penetrating defenders.

Outside: Runaway freight train in the open field, but does not have the speed most teams prefer in a bell-cow back. Doesn't always see or take advantage of space outside. Lacks the speed to consistently make the corner. Best as a north-south runner, but will make safeties miss one-on-one with a surprisingly quick cutback or stop-and-start move. Keeps four points of pressure or two hands on the ball when contact comes. Switches the ball to the outside hand once out of traffic.

Breaking tackles: Runs with a good lean and lowers his pads to knock over smaller defenders at the second level. Piles up yards after initial contact by running through arm tackles and keeping his feet moving after bouncing off players in traffic. Almost always leans forward for an additional yard or two before going down. Uses his length to stiff-arm closing defenders.

Blocking: Has the size to be effective in pass protection - and likes to be physical - but needs a lot of work in technique. Throws a shoulder into defenders if coming up to help the line, instead of trying to mirror and sustain. Misses blitzers coming off the edge, letting his quarterback take a big shot.

Receiving: Didn't get many opportunities in LSU's offense, but is a tough matchup for cornerbacks to bring down on swing passes. Best catching the ball going upfield. Will make himself available for the quarterback if he's scrambling. Allows throws over the middle to hit his chest. Can elude most linebackers on inside screens and arrow routes, but must make crisper cuts at the next level.

Intangibles: Team player and a tough competitor whether in the weight room, on the practice field or playing in front of the raucous Saturday night Death Valley crowd. Will have to prove that his fractured clavicle is fully healed at the Combine.

NFL Comparison: LaMont Jordan, Broncos

Homer pick.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 01:21 AM
ROUND 6

TYLER SHEEHAN QB BOWLING GREEN
HEIGHT- 6'3"
WEIGHT- 223 LBS
ARMS-
HANDS-
40 YARD- 4.79
BENCH-


http://bgnewssports.com/images/2009/10/ew_Sheehan-thumb-301x200-2313.jpg
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/06/03/sports/bg.jpg

Overview
2-time 3rd Team All-MAC selection who set many BGSU passing records.
Strengths
Accurate passer, completing 64.7% for his career and 66.8% in '08. Excellent height/size to see the field and make good decisions. Takes care of the ball, with just 6 INTs in 575 attempts in '09. Solid team leader (38 straight starts since 2007).
Weaknesses
Ball throwing mechanics could improve. Slow delivery with lack of zip will be of major concern. Will throw off back-foot more than he should. Most passes are of the mid- to short-range variety. Needs to show he has the arm strength to make the tough passes at the next level.
Projection
7th round. Strong pro-day is needed to insure he is drafted.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 01:28 AM
ROUND 7A

ADRIAN TRACY OLB WILLIAM & MARY
HEIGHT- 6'3"
WEIGHT- 248 LBS
ARMS- 33 1/2"
HANDS- 9 1/2"
40 YARD- 4.76
BENCH- 20

http://media.hamptonroads.com/cache/files/images/355821.jpg

http://image.cdnl3.xosnetwork.com/pics12/200/HJ/HJTAPIBEYMGCHUP.20080921161644.jpg

02/23/2010 - William and Mary All-American defensive end Adrian Tracy will showcase his talents in front of coaches, scouts and front office personnel from all 32 NFL teams when he participates at the upcoming 2010 Scouting Combine in Indianapolis, Ind. Beginning on Saturday, Feb. 27 and going through Tuesday, March 2, full coverage of the combine will be televised by the NFL Network. Tracy is scheduled to work out with the defensive linemen on Monday, March 1. Tracy becomes the second Tribe player invited to the combine, as offensive lineman Archie Harris participated in the 1987 combine. Honored by five organizations as an All-American in 2009, Tracy established himself as one of the nation's top defensive players and recently competed in the Texas vs. the Nation All-Star Game. A Buchanan Award candidate and a two-time first-team All-Colonial Athletic Association honoree, the Sterling, Va., native ranked seventh nationally with 1.57 tackles for a loss per game and 15th with 0.79 sacks per game last season. With 12 sacks, he equaled the single-season school record established by Luke Cullinane in 1996. Additionally, Tracy ranked sixth in the conference in tackles among defensive linemen with 5.6 per game. In addition to registering an outstanding senior season, the two-time ECAC All-Star was one of the country's top defensive players throughout his career. His 62.5 tackles for a loss led the nation among all active players, while he ranked third with 31 career sacks - a W&M record. He also started every game of his career (47) en route to establishing a school record. - William and Mary football
02/08/2010 - Texas vs. Nation Game Review: William & Mary's Adrian Tracy looked very good in space as a linebacker after playing defensive end in college. He tackled running backs and receivers adeptly and even took on a fullback to blow up a goal line play. - Chad Reuter, The Sports Xchange, NFLDraftScout.com

Overview
Adrian is a 2005 graduate of Potomac Falls H.S. in Sterling, VA. He earned three varsity letters at a variety of positions, including running back, tight end, linebacker and defensive end for coach Casey Childs. Tracy was also named first team all-district as a senior and was team’s defensive MVP for three consecutive years. He also was a two-year letter winner in basketball and was named district player of the year in basketball as a senior and holds school’s career records for points (723) and rebounds (507). He served as senior class vice president and a SCA representative.

At W&M, he spent the fall of 2005 on the scout team, and as a RS freshman in 2006 he finished second among all league rookies with 70 total tackles and was a two-time rookie of the week selection. That year, Adrian ranked in the league’s top-10 in both tackle for loss (Seventh, 15.5) and sacks (Sixth, 6.0). In 2007, he earned starts in all 11 games and tallied 63 tackles, and led the squad with three sacks. He also led the team in tackles for losses with 9.5. In 2008, he really made a splash while totalling 72 tackles, 15.5 tackles for a loss, 10.0 sacks and one blocked kick.
Strengths
Nice size and wingspan. Similar to last years' CAA DE phenom Lawrence Sidbury of Richmond, but is flying further under the radar. Gets our nod as the CAA's top DE prospect narrowly over JMU's Adrian Tracy because of his size and improved play against the run. Makes tackles from the back side. Shows enough quickness and lateral agility to be looked at as a LB, while he has room to get bigger if left as a 4-3 pass rushing end. Comes hard off the edge, and fights down the LOS and ruins the stretch play. Scrapes well. Protects his legs, and plays with energy. Solid citizen.
Weaknesses
Over runs plays at times, and overpursues. May lack the bulk and speed to beat elite NFL OT's if left as an edge rusher. Needs better technique and is still not an elite run defender. Good, not great overall skill set. Slight LOC issues. Can be crushed by bigger run blockers if he gets turned. Still emerging, and may have a ways to go developmentally.
Projection
6-7th.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 01:34 AM
ROUND 7B

SEAN LISSEMORE DT/DE WILLIAM & MARY
HEIGHT- 6'3"
WEIGHT- 297 LBS
ARMS-
HANDS-
40 YARD- 4.82
BENCH-

http://media.timesdispatch.com/timesdispatch/img-story/images/uploads/Lissemore.jpg

http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0chP2BJeVsaaj/x610.jpg

Overview
Sean is a 2005 graduate of Dumont (NJ) H.S. where he saw action at both guard and tackle on offense and defensive end and linebacker on defense. Lissemore was named a 1st-team all-league selection as a linebacker in 2004-05 and All-North Jersey Group 2. He was invited to Governor’s Bowl and The Bergen All-Star game. Sean was part of his team's best record in 20 years and a berth in state playoffs, and he also earned honorable mention all-county honors. He tallied 120 total tackles (74 solo), nine sacks and one interception during his senior season and also handled the kickoff duties. Sean was also a 4-year letterman and All-League performer in track and field in the 100 and 200 meter. He also competed in the shot put and was a 3-year letter winner in wrestling, where he was also an all-league performer and state medalist at the 215-pound weight class. He was awarded the Dwight D. Eisenhower Leadership award in 2004 and was an Honor Roll student in school.

As a RS freshman in 2006, Sean tallied 33 total tackles, 2.5 tackles for loss and a sack. In '07, he improved to 43-4-2. In 2008, those numbers went to 51-7.5-4.
Strengths
Thick, raw-boned street brawler who is naturally strong and a bit nasty. Does not look all that athletic but can move. Plays better than his athletic numbers and has some room to grow. Penetrates unless double-teamed, and is a good bull rusher. Stalemates OGs his size. Good motor. Pile maker.
Weaknesses
Not all that big for an interior D-line candidate. Can be cut blocked. Has a little upside but will never be more than a journeyman. Doesn't bat balls. Lacks moves.
Projection
Priority UDFA. Work ethic and speed gives him a chance.

hawaiiansteel
03-22-2010, 02:07 AM
ROUND 6

TYLER SHEEHAN QB BOWLING GREEN
HEIGHT- 6'3"
WEIGHT- 223 LBS
ARMS-
HANDS-
40 YARD- 4.79
BENCH-


http://bgnewssports.com/images/2009/10/ew_Sheehan-thumb-301x200-2313.jpg
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/06/03/sports/bg.jpg

Overview
2-time 3rd Team All-MAC selection who set many BGSU passing records.
Strengths
Accurate passer, completing 64.7% for his career and 66.8% in '08. Excellent height/size to see the field and make good decisions. Takes care of the ball, with just 6 INTs in 575 attempts in '09. Solid team leader (38 straight starts since 2007).
Weaknesses
Ball throwing mechanics could improve. Slow delivery with lack of zip will be of major concern. Will throw off back-foot more than he should. Most passes are of the mid- to short-range variety. Needs to show he has the arm strength to make the tough passes at the next level.
Projection
7th round. Strong pro-day is needed to insure he is drafted.



if we draft him, i sure hope he turns out better than Omar Jacobs, the last Bowling Green QB we drafted!

http://www.bqb-site.com/ojacobs.jpg

Chadman
03-22-2010, 02:11 AM
Ok, so now a bit of the 'reasoning' behind this selection of players..

1. Mike Iupati- Obviously not everyone's favourite choice. But, leading up to the Senior Bowl, he was being spoken of as possibly the best OL in the draft. Then he has a bad game & boom- he's over rated. Chadman doesn't agree. He keeps thinking back to the similar situation happening to our own LaMarr Woodley. You can't base your judgement on one game. Iupati's career record says he's going to be good. Before the Kraig Urbik argument starts up- just think about this- he was passed over for the RG spot by the back-up OT, he was passed over by the LG spot by the undrafted Center Doug Legursky, and then by undrafted rookie Ramon Foster. This is not a good sign, and concerns Chadman greatly. Remember- Foster was a rookie as well as Urbik, yet beat him to the starting LG role- not good. Iupati also makes sense when you consider the Steelers have already stated they want to upgrade the running game- Iupati's specialty. You can throw as many 1st round RB's at the position to help fix the running game as you like, but if the OL can't open holes, and Arians won't insert a FB, it won't work. Iupati is the most immediate, cheapest fix to the running game woes. And if you don't think the Steelers have a problem with the running game- just remember the Steelers theory behind that 'now famous 3rd & short empty backfield play' that had half of Pittsburgh choking on it's beer. You might not like Iupati, but he makes sense.

2. Jerome Murphy- Steelers got abused at Cb last year. They could wait & see if both Lewis & Burnett, along with Willie Gay, can step in & be 'the man' at CB, but do you really think they'll take that chance when they could have a legit shot at a SB? The Steelers will add a CB, it's just a matter of when & who. Murphy hasn't recieved a bunch of praise on this board, but he's the prototype Steeler CB- big, physical, good run support, zone coverage CB. It's highly unlikely the Steelers will add a CB that is suspect against the run, so you have to look for the willing run defenders. There are few better than Murphy in this draft.

3. Thaddeus Gibson- Chadman knew this one would cause some debate. The reasoning here is- the Steelers put him through a rigorous workout at Ohio's pro day, he's very athletic, he fits Tomlin's 'fast defense' style that he's building, and he won't be asked to do more than ST & spot duty for at least 2 years, maybe more. He has time to develop into a real option at OLB for the Steelers. The other option at OLB here was Worilds, but given the poor history of V Tech OLB's moving to the NFL of late (remember Xavier Adibi?), Chadman would look to the school that has a better record of producing NFL players.


4. D'Anthony Smith- The Steelers will still be looking to get younger on the DL. They have been seen in talks with Smith at Lousinana Tech's Pro Day. He has a good stature for a 3-4 DL, and depending on his development could be asked to bulk up to be a NT, or stay as he is & work out as a 3-4 DE.

5a. Myron Lewis- Chadman thinks Lewis is great. He had to find a way to get him in the draft despite picking a CB earlier. Having Lewis drafted here adds a future FS for the Steelers- big, smart & physical. Oh, and has a habit of picking off passes too.

5b. Charles Scott- added to the selection of Iupati, this gives the Steelers some grunt on those 3rd & short situations. With Scott on the roster, you can rest Mendenhall, give Scott the pounding duty 5-10 times a game, and not overwork him. Hard runner. This could spell the end of "Empty backfield 3rd & shorts".

5c. Jay Ross- Here's your future NT. Stout, round body that is hard to move. Plays on a good DL, and isn't overshadowed. Good build for the NT position & has time to learn behind Casey.

6. Tyler Sheehan- Chadman wasn't going to add a QB, but with the ongoing issues with Ben, it can't hurt to add one. And if he's viewed simply as a spot duty, mop up type QB, that COULD surprise, then he would be a pleasant addition.

7a. Adrian Tracy- Steelers need depth at OLB, they really have none. Tracy is big & athletic, and could be a late round sleeper. Also- Tomlin might like adding a few William & Mary boys...

7b. Sean Lissemore- which leads us to Lissemore. Has come up a few draft boards after showing his athletic ability at his pro day. Big body that could be a useful rotation type guy- could be your future Nick Eason type DE.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 02:13 AM
if we draft him, i sure hope he turns out better than Omar Jacobs, the last Bowling Green QB we drafted!

Could just be Chadman, but really think Jacobs was never given the right kind of chance. He should have been stowed away, Brian St Pierre style, and left to learn from the more experienced QB's in front of him.

Oh well, past is past..

Chadman
03-22-2010, 02:15 AM
ROUND 1

MIKE IUPATI OG IDAHO
HEIGHT- 6'5"
WEIGHT- 331 LBS
ARMS- 34 3/4"
HANDS- 10 5/8"
40 YARD- 5.24
BENCH- 27

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/47/470195.jpg

http://media.scout.com/Media/Image/49/495702.jpg

Pass blocking: Good initial quickness off the snap. Provides a significant jolt to the defender with his punch. Too high in his pass protection but has the strong hands to latch on to the defender and ride him throughout the play. Good balance and lateral agility to slide with the defender and remain square. Can get himself in trouble with leverage by playing too high. Long arms and great lower strength to lock out. Rarely takes a step back even against a powerful bull rush, but this could be an area of concern against NFL defensive linemen, especially when Iupati fails to move his feet. Has developed into a savvy blocker. Looks to help out his teammates when not covered. Wants to hit someone.

Run Blocking: Can dominate as a run blocker due to his mass and rare upper-body strength. Provides an explosive initial pop that often knocks the defender back. Has to do a better job of latching on, as he'll knock his opponent back only to see him regroup and get back into the play. Very good drive blocker when he plays with leverage and keeps his hands inside. Can physically remove the defender from the hole. Looks to eliminate more than one defender on the play and will release to the second level. Good effort downfield.

Pulling/trapping: Surprisingly agile in getting out and blocking at the second level. Good body control and straight-line speed for a player of his size. Can re-adjust in space to hit the linebacker. Fails to lock onto the defender, at times, preferring to violently shove his target to the ground and look for others.

Initial Quickness: Good initial quickness off the snap in pass protection. Even on the rare occasions when beaten off the snap, his long arms and wide-body make it difficult for defenders (including blitzing linebackers) to sneak through his gap. When beaten by quicker defensive tackles in the running game, has the agility and long arms to catch them as they slide by, typically knocking them down and pancaking them.

Downfield: Intimidating presence on the move. Good athleticism and balance for a man his size and can redirect to make the effective block when he gets close. Will misjudge angles at times, and miss his intended target. When he does so, rather than turn to stand helplessly around the pile, he moves on to the next target. Good effort to block downfield.

Intangibles: Made significant progress over the past two seasons and appears to be just scratching the surface of his potential. Size and athleticism combination enough that some will view him as a better offensive tackle or even defensive tackle prospect. Born in American Samoa and moved to the United States at 14. Began learning English (and football) at that time. Has only played football since high school. Signed with Idaho after bigger programs had concerns about his ability to qualify academically. Voted team captain by his peers for 2009.



this should make you happy then... :D



Full Itinerary For Idaho Guard


by Chris Steuber of ScoutNFLNetwork.com, March 21, 2010 at 2:52pm ET

Mike Iupati Profile


The premier interior offensive lineman in the draft, Idaho guard Mike Iupati, continues his ascension up NFL draft boards, and his itinerary over the next month reflects his stature - completely full. Scout.com has learned through a source close to the program that Iupati has worked out and will workout for the Cincinnati Bengals, Cleveland Browns, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, Houston Texans, New York Jets and Philadelphia Eagles this month.

In addition to his workout schedule, Scout.com has also learned from the same source that Iupati is expected to visit the Atlanta Falcons, Dallas Cowboys, Kansas City Chiefs, Miami Dolphins, Minnesota Vikings, Pittsburgh Steelers, San Diego Chargers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers leading up to the draft on April 22nd.

A three-year starter at Idaho, Iupati has improved each year and has developed into the highly touted prospect he is today. Scouts are enthusiastic about his ability and believe he can play OT or OG at the next level. The versatility that he presents, to go along with the strong showing that he’s had this offseason, makes Iupati a valuable commodity and it’s likely that he could hear his name called in the 16 – 23 range.

Iupati is currently the No. 1 rated offensive guard listed on Scout.com’s 2010 NFL Draft Rankings.

http://pit.scout.com/a.z?s=68&p=9&c=2&c ... 5113&fhn=1 (http://pit.scout.com/a.z?s=68&p=9&c=2&cid=955783&nid=4205113&fhn=1)

To be honest- Iupati is kind of a boring pick, but he does make sense.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 02:18 AM
Chadman...no disrespect but I would cry if the draft landed like that. 1-3...especially Gibson. I can live with Iubusti. :D Seriously, I think he will be a very good guard at the next level. But, I hate a guard at 18 especially if Thomas in on the board.

It's ok Shawn- you can't always be right. :D

To be honest- Chadman would be ok with Thomas (as a FS only), but Iupati fits a certain amount of need & the OL really has been poor for too long.

Chadman
03-22-2010, 02:20 AM
chadman, why do you want me to cry?
no iupati (or however the hell you spell his name)
and definetly no to Jerome Murphy. I go to USF. Watched every game this year. he's terrible. I'd take Nate Allen there, but not murphy.

Aww...it's fun to have so much power over your emotions! :stirpot

Interested to know why Iupati & Murphy cause you so much pain though- what are the experts missing?

hawaiiansteel
03-22-2010, 02:20 AM
Ok, so now a bit of the 'reasoning' behind this selection of players..

1. Mike Iupati- Obviously not everyone's favourite choice. But, leading up to the Senior Bowl, he was being spoken of as possibly the best OL in the draft. Then he has a bad game & boom- he's over rated. Chadman doesn't agree. He keeps thinking back to the similar situation happening to our own LaMarr Woodley. You can't base your judgement on one game. Iupati's career record says he's going to be good. Before the Kraig Urbik argument starts up- just think about this- he was passed over for the RG spot by the back-up OT, he was passed over by the LG spot by the undrafted Center Doug Legursky, and then by undrafted rookie Ramon Foster. This is not a good sign, and concerns Chadman greatly. Remember- Foster was a rookie as well as Urbik, yet beat him to the starting LG role- not good. Iupati also makes sense when you consider the Steelers have already stated they want to upgrade the running game- Iupati's specialty. You can throw as many 1st round RB's at the position to help fix the running game as you like, but if the OL can't open holes, and Arians won't insert a FB, it won't work. Iupati is the most immediate, cheapest fix to the running game woes. And if you don't think the Steelers have a problem with the running game- just remember the Steelers theory behind that 'now famous 3rd & short empty backfield play' that had half of Pittsburgh choking on it's beer. You might not like Iupati, but he makes sense.

2. Jerome Murphy- Steelers got abused at Cb last year. They could wait & see if both Lewis & Burnett, along with Willie Gay, can step in & be 'the man' at CB, but do you really think they'll take that chance when they could have a legit shot at a SB? The Steelers will add a CB, it's just a matter of when & who. Murphy hasn't recieved a bunch of praise on this board, but he's the prototype Steeler CB- big, physical, good run support, zone coverage CB. It's highly unlikely the Steelers will add a CB that is suspect against the run, so you have to look for the willing run defenders. There are few better than Murphy in this draft.

3. Thaddeus Gibson- Chadman knew this one would cause some debate. The reasoning here is- the Steelers put him through a rigorous workout at Ohio's pro day, he's very athletic, he fits Tomlin's 'fast defense' style that he's building, and he won't be asked to do more than ST & spot duty for at least 2 years, maybe more. He has time to develop into a real option at OLB for the Steelers. The other option at OLB here was Worilds, but given the poor history of V Tech OLB's moving to the NFL of late (remember Xavier Adibi?), Chadman would look to the school that has a better record of producing NFL players.


4. D'Anthony Smith- The Steelers will still be looking to get younger on the DL. They have been seen in talks with Smith at Lousinana Tech's Pro Day. He has a good stature for a 3-4 DL, and depending on his development could be asked to bulk up to be a NT, or stay as he is & work out as a 3-4 DE.

5a. Myron Lewis- Chadman thinks Lewis is great. He had to find a way to get him in the draft despite picking a CB earlier. Having Lewis drafted here adds a future FS for the Steelers- big, smart & physical. Oh, and has a habit of picking off passes too.

5b. Charles Scott- added to the selection of Iupati, this gives the Steelers some grunt on those 3rd & short situations. With Scott on the roster, you can rest Mendenhall, give Scott the pounding duty 5-10 times a game, and not overwork him. Hard runner. This could spell the end of "Empty backfield 3rd & shorts".

5c. Jay Ross- Here's your future NT. Stout, round body that is hard to move. Plays on a good DL, and isn't overshadowed. Good build for the NT position & has time to learn behind Casey.

6. Tyler Sheehan- Chadman wasn't going to add a QB, but with the ongoing issues with Ben, it can't hurt to add one. And if he's viewed simply as a spot duty, mop up type QB, that COULD surprise, then he would be a pleasant addition.

7a. Adrian Tracy- Steelers need depth at OLB, they really have none. Tracy is big & athletic, and could be a late round sleeper. Also- Tomlin might like adding a few William & Mary boys...

7b. Sean Lissemore- which leads us to Lissemore. Has come up a few draft boards after showing his athletic ability at his pro day. Big body that could be a useful rotation type guy- could be your future Nick Eason type DE.




Mike Tomlin ('95): William & Mary alumnus Mike Tomlin ('95) became the youngest head coach in history to lead a team to a Super Bowl win Sunday when his Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Arizona Cardinals 27-23.

by Brian Whitson | February 1, 2009


Tomlin, 36, is in just his second year as head coach of one of the National Football League’s most storied franchise. The Steelers took the lead for good Sunday when quarterback Ben Roethlisberger found Santonio Holmes in the back of the endzone for a touchdown pass with 35 second to play in the game. A short time later, Tomlin, who played football for the Tribe in the 1990s, was celebrating a victory.

Since the conference championship games two weeks ago, Super Bowl fever – and the national exposure for the two teams and their head coaches that comes with it – has taken hold. And the world has learned what many at William & Mary already knew -- Mike Tomlin, and his quick rise to national prominence, represents a special story in American sports.

Numerous articles and broadcasts, including recent stories in the New York Times and on ESPN, have featured Tomlin and his connection to William & Mary. NBC announcer Al Michaels even made reference to Tomlin's undergraduates days at William & Mary during Sunday's broadcast. Tribe Football Head Coach Jimmye Laycock ('70) has been a favorite source for the media in the days leading up to the game. Laycock appeared for nearly five minutes last week on ESPN2's "First Take" program to discuss Tomlin and his connection to the nation's second oldest college.

“When he became a coordinator in the National Football League, I told people it's just a matter of time now before he becomes a head coach,” Laycock said in a story leading up to the big game on ESPN.com. "His presence, his personality, his intelligence and the way he gets along with people are terrific. And with his leadership, he has a great way of being confident but without being cocky in the way he does things.”

The William & Mary family knows Tomlin well – both from his playing days on the Tribe football team and his continued involvement in his alma mater as an alumnus. Tomlin has returned to the Williamsburg campus many times in recent years, including serving as keynote speaker at last year’s Commencement Exercises. A sociology major as an undergraduate, William & Mary presented Tomlin with an honorary doctorate of humane letters at the 2008 graduation.

During his commencement address, Tomlin reminded graduates that they were prepared for the “game of life.”

“Whatever it is your heart’s desire to do, you can do,” Tomlin told the William & Mary Class of 2008 said. “Your experience here has sharpened your sword for battle. I encourage you to trust that preparation.” Tomlin went on to tell the graduates that first five minutes of action never determines the outcome of the game.

“Life is more than the scoreboard, it’s how you play,” he said. “We have to exhibit the honor, the integrity, the class that’s indicative of a William & Mary alum.”

In June, Tomlin returned to campus to help dedicate the Jimmye Laycock Football Center, named for the Tribe’s longtime football coach.

“This is an awesome place,” Tomlin said in an Alumni Association article on the football center dedication. “I couldn't measure the impact (Coach Laycock) has had on me personally and professionally. He's still the coach.”

A three-time starter at wide receiver for William & Mary between 1990-94, Tomlin finished his Tribe football career with 101 receptions for 2,046 yards and a school-record 20 touchdown receptions. A first-team All-Yankee Conference selection in 1994, Tomlin established a school record that year with a 20.2 yards-per-catch average.

Laycock said the William & Mary football program has the same goals as that of the College.

“We strive to be a first-class operation in all facets – on the field, in the classroom and around the community,” Laycock said last week. “Mike makes an outstanding ambassador for the program, as his successes, I believe, mirror those of many other alumni we have produced that have also achieved a great deal in a wide variety of professions. We’re thrilled to be able to watch him on the national stage this Sunday.”

http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2009/tom ... wl-001.php (http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2009/tomlin-95-youngest-coach-to-lead-team-to-superbowl-001.php)

Chadman
03-22-2010, 02:22 AM
This pick proves that CHADMAN is THE MAN!


ROUND 5B

CHARLES SCOTT RB LSU
HEIGHT- 5'11"
WEIGHT- 238 LBS
ARMS- 33"
HANDS- 9 1/2"
40 YARD- 4.68
BENCH- 17

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/08/sports/08bcs_slide3.jpg

http://gate21.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/SEC09-LSU-1.jpg

Inside: Big, strong back with good feet for his size. Will hit a hole at full speed out of the I-formation, but also excels on draw plays. Patient to follow the fullback, get skinny through creases and come out the other side ready to bowl over safeties and linebackers. Uses his hands to direct traffic inside, and has the vision to work his way through. Tough for one defender to bring down when he's past the line driving his legs. Strong goal-line runner. Not particularly elusive behind the line, and doesn't sidestep penetrating defenders.

Outside: Runaway freight train in the open field, but does not have the speed most teams prefer in a bell-cow back. Doesn't always see or take advantage of space outside. Lacks the speed to consistently make the corner. Best as a north-south runner, but will make safeties miss one-on-one with a surprisingly quick cutback or stop-and-start move. Keeps four points of pressure or two hands on the ball when contact comes. Switches the ball to the outside hand once out of traffic.

Breaking tackles: Runs with a good lean and lowers his pads to knock over smaller defenders at the second level. Piles up yards after initial contact by running through arm tackles and keeping his feet moving after bouncing off players in traffic. Almost always leans forward for an additional yard or two before going down. Uses his length to stiff-arm closing defenders.

Blocking: Has the size to be effective in pass protection - and likes to be physical - but needs a lot of work in technique. Throws a shoulder into defenders if coming up to help the line, instead of trying to mirror and sustain. Misses blitzers coming off the edge, letting his quarterback take a big shot.

Receiving: Didn't get many opportunities in LSU's offense, but is a tough matchup for cornerbacks to bring down on swing passes. Best catching the ball going upfield. Will make himself available for the quarterback if he's scrambling. Allows throws over the middle to hit his chest. Can elude most linebackers on inside screens and arrow routes, but must make crisper cuts at the next level.

Intangibles: Team player and a tough competitor whether in the weight room, on the practice field or playing in front of the raucous Saturday night Death Valley crowd. Will have to prove that his fractured clavicle is fully healed at the Combine.

NFL Comparison: LaMont Jordan, Broncos

Homer pick.

Who's the man? :D

ANPSTEEL
03-22-2010, 05:16 AM
This pick proves that CHADMAN is THE MAN!


Who's the man? :D


http://i1019.photobucket.com/albums/af314/anpmtg/chico-783067.jpg

That is you, on the right.

MeetJoeGreene
03-22-2010, 08:20 AM
That is truly a well thought out mock draft that merits praise and compliments!!

MeetJoeGreene
03-22-2010, 08:24 AM
ROUND 5B

CHARLES SCOTT RB LSU
HEIGHT- 5'11"
WEIGHT- 238 LBS
ARMS- 33"
HANDS- 9 1/2"
40 YARD- 4.68
BENCH- 17

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/08/sports/08bcs_slide3.jpg

http://gate21.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/SEC09-LSU-1.jpg

Inside: Big, strong back with good feet for his size. Will hit a hole at full speed out of the I-formation, but also excels on draw plays. Patient to follow the fullback

what is this thing that they refer to called a ??fullback??